• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 The baker
 The farmer - The pharmacist
 The fireman
 The butcher - The cook
 The ship builder
 The gardener - The storekeeper
 The saddler
 The shoemaker - The tailor
 The hunter - The fisherman
 The carpenter
 The mason - The painter
 The watchmaker - The blacksmith...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Slovenly Peter series
Title: Child's book of trades
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083192/00001
 Material Information
Title: Child's book of trades
Series Title: Slovenly Peter series
Physical Description: 16 p. : ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Donohue, Henneberry & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Donohue, Henneberry & Co.
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: c1896
 Subjects
Subject: Occupations -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1896   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1896
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
General Note: Stiff paper covers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083192
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001576500
oclc - 23076671
notis - AHK0360

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    The baker
        Page 2
        Page 3
    The farmer - The pharmacist
        Page 4
        Page 5
    The fireman
        Page 6
    The butcher - The cook
        Page 7
    The ship builder
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The gardener - The storekeeper
        Page 10
    The saddler
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The shoemaker - The tailor
        Page 13
    The hunter - The fisherman
        Page 14
    The carpenter
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The mason - The painter
        Page 17
    The watchmaker - The blacksmith - The horseshoer
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Cover
        Page 20
Full Text








































































































*1,E


4


OilF


7-







. ........


ETER SERT-ES.


... -.. _. : *- -


uoi'o hue .Henneoeert (:k

-IA
~* *1


.. #..-







Tle Q1ilds Book of Trades.


THE B

HE Bake
,, .. H e kr
To make
And
Into his oven hot
He pokes the loaves to bake.
But think of what is done,
Before they're bread and cake!

The farmer first must sow his
seed
Upon his well-ploughed farm
The mowers, too, must swing
their scythes
So strong and stout of
I arm.
Then, binding up the
yellow grain
SThey load it on the cart,
i-, Off to the mill it goes
S and there,
-' The miller does his part.
At last the baker gets
the meal


AKER.

r mixes meal


leads the flour too
white bread and brown,
also cake, for you.


He buys the flour too
And stirs and kneads and
rolls it out
For boys and girls like you.
Perhaps you think it fine
To be a busy baker
And what nice things you'd
taste
Were you a cookie-maker!
But tasting this and that
Would spoil your teeth so
white
The baker, too, :2
works hard 7 _i


-;P~"^'~I'; -I -- -- -------.-.....~














A X-


Aj

-. \ fl t


- 7:


PIE s'-~
(Jhm. o


,v



. .t.~~fl ttr.. ;k


S7 .


~-/:


iL A


i --


b Qe


- ,w.wc~
* I


-ro e.
1Fc4' % >,
~' -r~ :< Cl o~r


A


a


/~~


-r
A


*. .- it-


\.k


-- -- -----~


.i~~q~t~i.'~h.
1R-iJr; ~


.k.'. AW,






For you, the livelong night
For they must mix and bake
So that you may be able
To have your rolls and bread
Upon your breakfast table,


For children who eat
baked bread
Have sturdy ,
frames and ,


cheeks so


THE FARMER.


EFORE the sun is
high
Upon the summer
sky
The busy farmer
goes
With spades and
ploughs and hoes
To make the loamy


Its store of good


Or up the hillside steep '+1
Ploughs out his 7 .
furrows deep, 1* ,,
He scatters -
every seed
To raise the
things we need
And watches well


field


things yield,


each crop


That it may never stop
But grow and grow and yield


His sheep and lambs and cows


The fruits


of farm and field,


a-field


browse


THE PHARMACIST


SIN


Then praise the farmer good
Who helps us all to food.


(DRUGGIST).


many a herb and many a plant
Lie juices full of health;


They


bring to sick and weary


folks
A better gift than wealth.


well-


He drives


i~Lr t









t


~k~
FI~ 'CI'
.t Ir(. L
~~"~"' ;FT.~. -~L


4i


, IA


V ;_;~~q


poei


!4~ ii


C


qe


II~

,


i LI


,4. ..


- o


%Juto~Zer.


4L1
'>


:: .F


t
.i ;

;






For strength and healing,
balm and cure
And life to weakened blood,
Came from the juice the
druggist's skill
Can press-from leaf and bud,


Mortar and pestle, powder.
paste,
And liquids strong in smell,
All these in pharmacies are
used
To make the sick ones well.


THE FIREMAN.


FIRE! fire! hear the cry
See the red flame in
the sky
Hear the skrieks of
frightened folk-
For a fire is no joke.
Hark, what is it, dong,
dong, dong!
Tis the fire engines gong.


"Clear the track," the firemen
shout,
"We will put the fire out!
Quick, against the burning
wall,
Now they place the ladder tall
Round and round the fireman
goes
With his line of well-knit


hose,


Up and down the engines
play,
Out bursts water, stream
and spray
Down the fire falls, now
its out
Hurrah! all the people shout,
Who else could our houses
save
Like the fireman so brave.


I -


\ '







THE BUTCHER.


SEE


the jolly butcher-man


sausage

Meat for
savory
stew


he has


for sale
That give strength
to you.


THE


his kitchen, hard


at work,


See the white-robed cook.


COOK.


So that he may mix them
fine


See what nice things


there he


For the


dish on


which you'll


makes;
It will pay to look!
Soups and stews and roasts and
cakes,


All of these the


big cook makes,


dine.


While the maid, near by, is seen,
With the vegetables green,


Scraping, cutting,


slicing,


paring,


All the things for which he's


caring,


In his well-filled shop


Beef and lamb and pork are
there,
Fowl, and roast, and chop;


Tongues so red and
round,


All the things


/


IN


,A


I
iF







THE SHIP BUILDER.


forest trees grow
i


straight


high
With tops that seem to reach the sky,
S The straightest, tallest trunks are sought,
STo river-bank and sea-shore brought,
And there, in ship yards, fashioned fast
In hull and stanchion, rail and mast,


Until from keel to
neat


top-mast


And day by day,
zeal


with patient


The graceful ship is all com-
plete.
But O! the work there is to
do,
Before the ship-builder is
through,
For he must cut and shave
and saw,
And fit and trim and smooth
and draw,
With caution great must lay
the keel,
And set the ribs like bars of
steel,


Must make the
water-tight


seams all


And finish off, all trim and
light.


The builder works, straight
from the keel,
Until the ship, all trim and taut


Down slippery
is brought,


Where


floating


and sheet,
She spurns
the waves
beneath
her feet,
And with,-
her colors7
high un-
furled
She leads
the race
around
the world.


ways, to sea


free, with


-* -*N'-Z 4=


WHERE


and


sail


~ch~












1eiP d


r3J


iir


Ii.

c c,
1;&
K +


Ii~



/


.1.*
I'

-4(
~cb~lLi

3 /l r

*~.4E3i

&k


6he .

6a OdeP


L -1*


L'*-. *" ice
" -" PP


r


~'ii" B.'t
'9
..~~ ~nrr-s


f~ir~'.t~YBj


~'L~PNU~F7li-I--.:
!I
i /


$)-__ y


:I ,(
'
III!i\
:!b \i
:"
1B
~tlr 1






GARDENER.


AMONG the flowers the gardener works
Nor over weeds his labor shirks.
Roses and tulips, fine and rare
Lilies and pinks and pansies fair,


Fruit, rich and
Plants brought
sea,


ripe, on vine and tree


from countries


He tends and rears with wondrous
care
To make boquets and garlands fair,
SOr serve at feasts and banquets where
Both fruits and flowers the tables bear.


THE


STOREKEEPER.


COME, dear children, let's go down
To the Merchant's in the town,
See the things' he has to sell


For I know they'll please you


Here are sugar, coffee,


well.


spice,


Oil and salt and raisins, nice;
Nuts and lemons, butter, too,
Oranges so liked by you.


P Dishes, pitchers, cups and
Knives and forks and
slates;


plates,
Books and


s o'er the


THE







Dollies, drums, and jumping jacks,
Wheelbarrows and carpet-tacks;
Garden rakes and jumping ropes;
Essences and scents and soaps.

Cloth and silk and dainty laces,
Things to set off pretty faces,
Hats and shoes, umbrellas, too,


Useful things for me and you.
Medicines for those who're sick,
Soda water, candy-stick;
All things needful, all things rar


e,


Will the merchant sell
you there,


If you have the


cash to


buy
And the price is not
too high.


I I'


You would poorly fare, I fear,


THE


THERE'S nothing like leather!
For, no matter whether
Its in saddles or satchels or
shoes,
If they're well made and strong
They will last a man long,
And he'll find them delightful
to use.


If no storekeepers were here.


SADDLER.


On his saddle he'll ride over
valleys and hills,
In his shoes he can travel
all day,
In his satchel he brings
To the children rare things
That he bought for them far,
far away.


II
~' -"" B-. -5~.
i.,.
P )1
P~~5~ ,~u ~k.- ~.
..
QI~"
:~dP~














/


U3


#, ilor


I*


R

~


P`'\\
~II)la
'';'; '\


---L


6ll~nJdlar.


I,~~- I-;aaPB
~--~.. .. .I--.


maker.


e't
;


I~
r,
1,, r;

B''' f






Then ho! for the saddler's needle and
And ho! for his stitches so strong.


thread;


He makes us good things for the home and the stall,
That to children or horses belong.

THE SHOEMAKER.


FROM stones so sharp, and snow so cold
And rainy roads so wet


The busy


shoemaker,


I'm told


Makes things that you can get.
With awl and hammer, wax and thread


He works with


zeal for you


And soon from leather, black or red
Turns out a dainty shoe.


THE TAILOR.


OUT of wool and flax and silk
Soft as down and smooth
as milk
Does the busy weaver make
Cloth of all sorts for our sake,
To the tailor all this goes
Who with flashing needle sews,
Into clothes he cuts and fits
As he at his table sits.
Trousers, vests and jackets too
Coats he makes for me and you
That we all may look so neat
Dressed in style from head to feet.


Clothes, however fine are they
Do not make the man, I say.
Worth and truth make
people good,
But 'tis always understood
That the poorest may be neat


Clean and bright
to feet,


from head


If he watchful is and takes
Care for what the tailor makes.

(= I'M







THE HUNTER.


.-- A -W ITH dog and gun the hunter hastes,
STo seek the forest shades,
f ,j Where stag and hare and slyboots fox,
SRoam through the verdant glades.
I:'. But fast they flee when through the trees,
S-- The gleaming gun they spy,
.----~ For well they know the
1. 1*' ^ ~= 'j *11


hunters


skill,


They know how true his eye.
We praise his quick, unerring aim,
And hail him as of old they cheered,


Nimrod's


name.


A res
:.- S t .%- ; N?
, _ -_:- _




And rivers sma


-THE FISHERMAN.

lW fiTH hook and line,


In sa
11:


With
It sea


In boat and punt,
From shore and ship,
The fishers hunt,


From trip


to trip,


For what you call
A tempting dish;
But hard they toil
To catch your fish.


J'-;.n a


_ ---=
e
"i
'---






THE CARPENTER.
l How many things the carpenter makes!
| What should we do without him?
See where he whistles and works at his bench,
While the shavings tumble about him.
First from the forests, thick and high,
Comes the fragrant wood,
Which for timber first is cut,
Dragged from where it stood.
Then 'tis sawn for joists and planks,
And as lumber goes,
Fitted for most useful things,
As the Carpenter shows.
How he measures, planes and saws,
Smoothes and fits and glues
Into windows, sashes, doors,
All the things we use,
For our houses snug and warm
Where we live secure from storm.


















-A
'*


ttoi


T-
^W


1-


Olhe arP
L


i'* '
/ I
~.I
/


I


p *rter,
(91)


~


I


^-


!r






MASON.


brick and stone the mason
works


Piers that uphold the
so wide,


To build walls stout and strong,
And towers high
That toward the sky
Are lifted straight and long.
With patient toil he lays each
stone
And fastens them together,
With honest mortar
Mixed in water,
That outlasts wear and weather.

THE PA
When the carpenter has made
All his building right,
Then, with colors rich and fast
Comes the painter man at last
Just to make things bright.


And forts where soldiers live,
The mason makes.
Much pains he takes,


Both form and


strength to


give.
He lays the bricks on, one by
one,
And thus great buildings are
begun,
And noble edifices done.

INTER.
Outside, inside, roof and door,
Blinds and stairways, wall
and floor
Into brilliance rush.


But be


he lays the colors on
his skilful brush;


To his work go not so near
Or you'll hear his voice, not


faint,
Calling, "Hey!
look out for
paint!"

: ^dl


IN


bridge


How
With


careful children dear


THE








FImaker!
I
1,


j 'r.


A. .*'.Y


y"r~.1~S


NP'


jYj"


'4


3 Ih.
^l0c "
get


,.:
-

~...._


bE! r :i
! ~~~~I


-a ---~'
"P


~;h
iaii1,S


rl%
El
F '~~' '


--yd
'J~1:
..u





THE WATCHMAKER.


THE Watchmaker sits at his
bench,
And mends all our watches
and clocks,
He looks with his powerful


glass,
At the


delicate


case,


works


in the


He mends broken springs,
wheels and hands,


Or puts a new glass
face,


And when all
through,


in the


his labors


are


Then our timepieces seem
good as new.


THE BLACKSMITH.


-Iis hammer clinks, his
rings,


anvil


The sparks fly round about,
The iron shapes to useful
things,
The fire glows, and climbs and
springs,
As fast the bellows pout..


What does
horse's shoe


he make?


A sword so sharp, a bolt
complete,
A wagon tire, a standard true,
Things stout and strong he
makes for you,
In forge and anvil heat.


THE HORSESHOER.
W? HILE the blacksmith fashions neat,
Iron shoes for horse's feet.
On the hoof he works to fit,


In the form


he fashions it,


Well-curved shoes which pound
and pound,
As the swift horse skims the
ground.
And, at last,when Dobbin's shod,
Off we gallop o'er the sod.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs