• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Center's website refreshed
 APIRS
 Florida's invasive plant education...
 Florida's invasive plant management...
 At the center in 2008
 Books/reports, etc.
 Meetings
 Back Cover














Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00020
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00020
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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This item has the following downloads:

AQ-28-10-02 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Center's website refreshed
        Page 1
    APIRS
        Page 2
    Florida's invasive plant education initiative
        Page 3
    Florida's invasive plant management program under new leadership
        Page 4
    At the center in 2008
        Page 5
    Books/reports, etc.
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Meetings
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
Full Text




A Q U A P H Y T E


A NEWSLETTER ABOUT AQUATIC, WETLAND AND INVASIVE PLANTS


Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants I UNIVERSITY of
with support from Ur TFLORIflA
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission,
Invasive Plant Management Section
The St. Johns River Water Management District IFAS Extension


Volume 28 Number 1 Fall 2008 Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702


Center's Website

Refreshed!
Websites are an extremely popular and efficient form of
information dissemination. The technology for delivering
websites changes rapidly and the public expects a fresh and
interesting layout, newly available video formats, easy navigation,
and current content. The University of Florida/IFAS Center for
Aquatic and Invasive Plants (CAIP) Information Office, under
the direction of Victor Ramey, created the original website
and placed it online in 1995. It included plant information and
images, the Aquatic Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS)
bibliographic database, the Aquaphyte newsletter, and more.
Over the last dozen years, three portals or gateways have been
added to direct viewers to even more information on aquatic and
wetland plants around the world, and invasive non-native plants
in Florida's natural areas.
Primary CAIP/APIRS Website
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/
In 2005, a major overhaul and update of the primary website
was initiated. After being online for ten years, the underlying
framework and organization of the original website was outdated.
New technology was quickly becoming available to enhance nav-
igation, delivery and appearance. The newly refurbished website
finally went online this summer and definitely deserves a revisit
by those who have not been to this site recently. The overhaul and
update were accomplished by website designer Elizabeth Hatha-
way.
A major enhancement has been the addition of 102 aquatic plant
identification video segments to each respective Plant Information
page. These segments were completed as a video series in the
late 1990s. They were subsequently converted to digital formats,
enabling them to be viewed on the CAIP website as individual
2-3 minute identification video segments. Look for the
video icon in the Plant Information and Images section of
the website.
A new series of identification videos on Florida upland inva-
sive plant species was initiated in 2007-2008. Six segments were
produced and have been uploaded to the Plant Information and
Images pages for viewing.
The aquatic plant photographic image collection is being


refreshed using technology that was not available when the
initial website was developed. The CAIP receives requests
for 450 700 images annually, including our botanically accurate
line drawings. Sample uses include brochures, agency reports,
textbooks, educational websites, gardening and other magazines,
PowerPointTM and other multi-media presentations, student
papers, poster presentations, and more. A good example is the
recent publication in Hydrobiologia (2008) 595:9-26, Global
diversity of aquatic macrophytes in freshwater by P.A. Chambers,
P. Lacoul, K.J. Murphy, and S.M. Thomaz, in which line draw-
ings produced by the CAIP were used. Image requests continue
to come from all over the world, including Canada, Belgium,
France, Poland, and Nigeria, to name just a few.

Plant Management in Florida Waters
http ://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/guide
This portal was created in cooperation with the Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management (now under the direction of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (see article, p. 4)). Topics
within this encyclopedia-style portal have been researched in the
APIRS and other libraries,
written for the non-scien-
tific public, and reviewed by
content experts. More than
400 major and minor topics
are addressed and indexed.
Aside from the tremendous
reception from the general
public, the Plant Management in Florida Waters portal also is prov-
ing to be especially helpful to professionals in the field. Aquatic
herbicide applicators are encouraged to carry a supply of "web
cards" for citizens who have questions about plant management
activities. This web card refers interested people to the website,
which is a reliable source of accurate information about aquatic
plant management. Thus, a useful tool is put into the hands of
pesticide applicators for their interactions with the public, and a
trusted University of Florida website is made readily available
to those with questions and concerns about aquatic plant man-
agement. Web cards also are distributed at various environmental
education events throughout the year to publicize this Internet
resource and to make the public aware of invasive plants as an
important environmental topic.
Continued on page 2







Page 2 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008


Continued from page 1
Portals to Education
Since 2005, the CAIP Information Office and the Bureau have
collaborated on the Florida Invasive Plant Education Initia-
tive and Curricula portal at http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/education,
and the Florida Invasive Plant Education Initiative In the
Parks portal at http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/parks/ under the direction
of Amy Richard. The primary goal of both programs is to raise
public awareness of invasive plant problems in Florida.
The first portal is for particular use by science teachers and sup-
ports extensive programs developed to provide in-service training
to Florida science teachers. Training topics include plant identi-
fication of native, non-native and invasive plants; the ecological
and economic impacts of non-native invasive plants in Florida;
the numerous management issues regarding invasive plants; and
invasive plant prevention strategies.
The latter portal is for particular use by Florida State Park
rangers, biologists, environmental volunteers and other staff. It
provides management and identification information for native,
non-native and invasive plants, including comprehensive invasive
plant management plans for 42 species; a glossary of plant terms;
and an invasive plant brochure template that can be customized
for individual parks; 90 individual PDF files on invasive and non-
native plant species (from the Invasive and Non-native Plants You
Should Know -F ..... ,,iii,. ,,i Cards publication); and a Find Plants
in Your Region section with links to native and non-native plant
information for all of the five Florida State Park Districts.

Additional Website Projects
The IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida '
Natural Areas website was developed by the UF/IFAS Invasive
Plants Working Group so that University of Florida-IFAS
Extension faculty from all departments could provide consistent
recommendations concerning the use of non-native plants. The
IFAS Assessment is available on the CAIP primary website
(http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/assessment/), and new results are posted
periodically.
The Osceola County Hydrilla and Hygrophila Demonstration
Project website (http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/osceola/) describes a US
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funded project examin-
ing the biology of Hydrilla verticillata and Hygrophila polysper-
ma, invasive species management strategies, and new research
and technologies under development. The site is used to com-
municate with residents of Osceola County and other interested
groups about aquatic plant management activities that are occur-
ring throughout the county. This is a cooperative project with the
UF-IFAS Osceola County Extension Office, Osceola County, and
the EPA.


APIRS

n order for researchers and natural area managers to conduct
research and apply invasive plant management techniques
in the most efficient and informed manner, it is essential that
they be apprised of the total body of scientific literature sur-
rounding each species of concern. This literature is widely
scattered in international, national, and regional journals, in
proceedings from professional symposia, in books, and in
agency reports. Much of this literature, especially the "gray
literature" (proceedings, state and federal agency reports,
etc.) often is not available using common Internet searches
(although this is rapidly changing), and it is not collected
under one database "umbrella." This complicates literature
searching by individuals and necessitates multiple, individual
site visits, author contacts, and/or academic library access to
multiple databases for locating published research.
Since the early 1980s, the Aquatic Plant Information
Retrieval System (APIRS) has been developed as a source
of bibliographic information for both aquatic and upland in-
vasive plant researchers, managers, graduate students and oth-
ers around the world. This information includes the scientific
literature (research articles, books, and reports) about aquatic
and wetland plants worldwide, and upland invasive plant spe-
cies listed by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
APIRS staff continues to identify and catalog the scientific
literature in these areas. Annotated citations (not full-text) are
uploaded to the APIRS online database and made freely avail-
able to environmental managers, scientists, graduate students
and others via the website:
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/APIRS
During the past year, approximately 2,600 new records were
added to the APIRS database, and there are more than 71,000
annotated citations in the APIRS Online database in total.
Citations include plant lists and keywords provided by reader/
cataloger Mary Langeland.
According to Google AnalyticsTM, the APIRS database
has received almost 20,000 queries in the past year. Visitors
range from 121 different countries/territories, with the major-
ity (65%) from the U.S. By continent, visits to APIRS were as
follows: Americas, 5,272; Europe, 1,032; Asia, 651; Oceania,
173; Africa, 99; Others, 7.
APIRS welcomes contributions of publications for the
citation database, either as reprints or as PDF files. Only an-
notated citations are entered into the database.
See sample citations in the From the Database section on
pages 10-13, and Mary 's Picks on page 8.


CAIP Website Program Staff:
Karen Brown, Content Manager
Amy Richard, Education Coordinator
Elizabeth Hathaway, Website Designer


APIRS Staff:
Karen Brown, Database Manager
Mary Langeland, Reader/Cataloger
Lynda Dillon, Program Assistant







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 3


Florida's Invasive Plant Education Initiative
by Amy Richard, Coordinator

In 2005, the Florida Invasive Plant Education Initiative was launched as a collabora-
tive effort between the CAIP Information Office and the Florida DEP's Bureau of
Invasive Plant Management (see Aquaphyte Volume 25, Number 2 Winter 2005). Staff
at the CAIP Information Office began to work with teachers to find ways to meld the
wealth of preexisting CAIP educational materials and resources into science lessons
and activities that could be used in classrooms around the state in a concerted way. This
initiative, which focuses largely on aquatic plants, also includes upland invasive plants,
and is among the first of its kind in the United States.
Teaching Modules
For the past three years, we not only have been assembling and distributing resources
for teachers to use in the classroom, but have also developed content and delivery strat- .
egies for a number of core lessons or teaching modules. The modules are designed to
cover science topics and activities that teachers are required to teach to meet state stan-
dards and benchmarks, and are delivered on the web via QuickTime and FLASH in an Teachers examine the leaves of water
effort to make the presentations available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, in keep- hyacinth plants at the CAIP 2008
PLANT CAMP
ing with current nc" media" trends and technology. During the development process,
groups of teachers throughout Florida were asked to review and provide feedback on the content and presentation of these core lessons
and activities. This inclusive approach was appreciated and contributes to the enthusiasm many educators have for the materials.
The intention of these lessons is to provide the tools for students to become responsible environmental stewards as adults. In addition,
they deliver a message that hopefully will help ease some of the conflicts and negative attitudes often directed at the plant manage-
ment arena by citizens unaware of the problems and expense created by invasive plants in Florida and elsewhere.

PLANT CAMP!
The Education Initiative is the first program to provide such intensive in-service training for Florida science teachers (i.e., upper
elementary, middle and high school levels) on the subject of aquatic and upland invasive plants. These annual "PLANT CAMPs," held
for 4.5 days in mid-June, include field trips and rigorous hands-on plant identification activities as a way of generating excitement and
interest in the curriculum. Teachers also earn as many as forty hours of professional development continuing education units (CEUs).
Ultimately, the camps provide teachers with greater background knowledge on Florida's native, non-native and invasive plants before
they begin to teach the topic to their students. So far, the Initiative has trained 94 teachers. At least 250 teachers have been introduced to the
materials/lessons on a more limited
basis as a result of outreach mini-
workshops and events.
For the past two years, we have
added information and training
about invasive animal species to
our PLANT CAMPs by collabo-
rating with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion (FWC) Project WILD program,
a wildlife-focused conservation
and environmental education pro-
gram for educators and their stu-
dents (kindergarten through high
school). This year, PLANT CAMP
participants graduated from the 4-
day workshop with both Invasive
Plant and Project WILD certifica-
tion. It is hoped that as a result of
this collaboration, Florida's future
taxpayers will have a better under-
standing of the challenges we all
face from invasive species both
Center Director Dr William Haller gives teachers a hands-on learning experience about aquatic plants and animals.
plants and their management in Florida waters.






Page 4 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008


Florida's Invasive Plant Management Program

Under New Leadership

By Bill Caton, Section Leader, Invasive Plant Management
Division of Habitat and Species Conservation, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission


During the 2008 Session of the Florida Legislature, Senate
Bill 1294 was passed and became law on July 1, 2008. This
law transferred the authority to direct and operate the State's
invasive plant management program from the Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP) to the Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC) and the Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Services (DACS). The FWC is now the
lead agency for:
Aquatic Plant Management in Public Water Bodies
directing the control, eradication, and regulation of nox-
ious aquatic weeds;
guiding and coordinating the activities of all public
bodies, authorities, agencies, and special districts charged
with the management of aquatic plants;
disbursing funds to districts, special districts, or other
local authorities for the purpose of operating a program for
managing aquatic plants in the waters of state responsibility;
directing the research and planning related to these activi-
ties; and
Upland Invasive Exotic Plant Management on Public
Conservation Lands
achieving eradication or maintenance control of upland in-
vasive exotic plants on public lands;
assisting state and local government agencies in the
development and implementation of coordinated management
plans for the eradication or maintenance control of upland
invasive exotic plant species on public lands;
contracting, or entering into agreements, with entities in
the State University System or other governmental or private
sector entities for research concerning control agents; and the
production and growth of biological control agents.
Any person or public agency wanting to control, eradicate,
remove, or otherwise alter any aquatic weeds or plants in wa-
ters of the state must obtain a permit for such activity from the
FWC unless the activity or waters are expressly exempted by
FWC rule. DEP's rule chapters 62C-20 and 62C-54, Florida
Administrative Code (F.A.C.) have been transferred to the
FWC under rule chapters 68F-20 and 68F-54, F.A.C., respec-
tively. The only changes to these rules were technical in nature
primarily to change all references of DEP to FWC.
All personnel and equipment of the DEP Bureau of Invasive
Plant Management have been transferred to the FWC Invasive
Plant Management Section (FWC's equivalent of a Bureau).
The FWC Executive Director, Ken Haddad, has clearly stated
that initially there will be no change in how the program
operates. There are a lot of administrative issues involved with
moving a program from one agency to another. After these is-


sues are worked out and the transition is complete, the agency
will look for ways to integrate operations with other internal
programs to create improvements and enhance efficiency.
In addition, the portion of the DEP Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management responsibility related to the importation, trans-
portation, cultivation and collection of aquatic plants for busi-
ness purposes and the possession of prohibited aquatic plants
was transferred to the DACS by Senate Bill 1294. The DACS
now maintains the list that regulates the possession of prohib-
ited aquatic plants. As a result of this change, DACS now has
authority over the State's noxious weed list and the prohibited
aquatic plant list. Any person wanting to import, transport, cul-
tivate or collect plants for business purposes or possess prohib-
ited plants must obtain a permit from the DACS, Division of
Plant Industry.
Additional legislation will be needed in the 2009 session of
the Florida Legislature to address unresolved issues regarding
the Invasive Plant Control Trust Fund (base funding for aquatic
plant control activities that was established by the Legislature
in 1971; currently funding comes from fuel taxes, boat regis-
tration fees, and documentary stamps), authority for allowing
activities on sovereign submerged lands, and regulatory en-
forcement. FWC is committed to working with the Legislature
and stakeholders to get these issues resolved and to ensure that
Florida's Invasive Plant Management program continues to be
the best of its kind in the nation.
The original Bureau of Aquatic Plant Research and Control
was established in 1969 and funded in 1970 under the Florida
Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Dr. Alva Burkhal-
ter was appointed Bureau Chief beginning in 1971. The DNR
later became the Department of Environmental Protection and
the Bureau underwent internal name changes to the Bureau of
Aquatic Plant Management, and later, when the Florida Leg-
islature directed the Bureau to begin an upland invasive ex-
otic plant management program, the Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management. It is now the Inva-
sive Plant Management Section
of the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission.
For additional information re-
garding these changes, contact
Bill Caton, Invasive Plant Man-
agement Section Leader at 850-
245-2809.
Visit the Section website at:
http://myfwc.com/nonnatives/
InvasivePlants/index.htm






Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 5


At the Center in 2008
by William T. Haller, Acting Director

The Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants (CAIP) has been very much involved with invasive plant management for the past
thirty years. The CAIP is under the auspices of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) at the University of Florida
and is responsible for coordinating, facilitating and assisting faculty in
pursuing research, extension and teaching issues in invasive plant biol-
ogy, ecology and control. UNIVERSITY 9f
Thirty years ago, CAIP-affiliated faculty were evaluating and develop- U FLO R IDA
ing fluridone use for hydrilla control in cooperation with Elanco Products
Inc. They were also conducting mechanical harvesting operations/evalu- IFAS Ex tension
ation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Orange Lake, Florida and C Aquatic
evaluating diploid and hybrid (big head x grass carp) carp for hydrilla Center for Aquatic
control. The Aquatic Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) cita- and Invasive Plants
tions were being collected and put onto one of the earliest computers so
that Vic Ramey could search the database and mail bibliographic lists to
requesting scientists.
The CAIP grew under the leadership of former Center directors Arnette Mace, Joe Joyce and Randall Stocker, and its respon-
sibilities expanded into research, education and control of upland invasives in natural areas. The number of faculty, staff and
students increased and many federal (Department of Agriculture, Army Corps of Engineers, Department of Interior, Environmental
Protection Agency) and state agencies (Department of Environmental Protection, Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWCC), Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), water management districts, county and private agencies
and foundations continue to support research and education programs at the CAIP
Drs. Alison Fox, Randall Stocker, Vernon Vandiver, David Sutton and Curtis Rainbolt have all retired within the last several
years, and budget problems have not allowed for their replacement. Nevertheless, the IFAS Assessment of Non-native Plants in
Florida Natural Areas (http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/assessment/), extension training programs such as the UF/IFAS CAIP Aquatic
Weed Control Short Course, and the many research efforts conducted by these former staff members continues.
Newer faces around the Center include Jeremy Slade, a new biologist focusing on monitoring of large-scale hydrilla control
projects for the Florida FWCC, and post-doctoral associate Lyn Gettys working on ecotypic differentiation of Vallisneria americana.
Dr. Chris Mudge completed his PhD degree in December 2007 and is now at Vicksburg, Mississippi with the US Army Corps
of Engineers, Waterways Experiment Station. Dr. Tomas Chiconela completed his PhD degree in May 2008 and has assumed
teaching responsibilities in plant protection at Eduardo Mondlane University in Maputo, Mozambique. Dr. Mercedes Roquela
recently completed a one year sabbatical working on ALS enzymes, herbicide metabolism, and resistance with Dr. Greg
MacDonald and Dr. Atul Puri. Dr. Roquela has returned to her weed scientist position at Universidad Pfiblica de Navarra,
Pamplona, Spain. Exciting research projects on Lygodium control, evaluating new herbicides for aquatic use, searching for insect
biocontrols for hydrilla in East Africa, and many other projects keep the scientific staff across Florida at the cutting edge of devel-
oping new and improved technologies for invasive plant management.
The annual Aquatic Weed Control Short Course held in South Florida at Coral Springs attracted 450 attendees once again in
May 2008. Plans are currently underway for the 2009 Short Course to be held at the same location May 4-7, 2009 (http://confer-
ence.ifas.ufl.edu/aw/) In addition, the second Northwest Florida Right-of-Way and Aquatic Pesticide Applicator Training
Course will be held in Panama City in late September 2009 (http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/applicator/index.htm).
The CAIP Information Office has redesigned its award winning website (see cover article), and the educational efforts with
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation staff and CAIP continue at an accelerated pace with the Education Initiative (see pg. 3).
As we move into this initial year of collaboration with the Invasive Plant Management Section of the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (formerly the Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, we
look back and reflect on the breadth of information and materials that have been developed over the past 25+ years with their
support. This productive partnership has built a strong foundation of information services thanks to individuals like (the late) Vic
Ramey at the CAIP, and Jeff Schardt and Don Schmitz of the new FFWC Invasive Plant Management Section, who recognized
the importance of educating Florida's citizens about invasive species. Together, they produced a wide variety of materials that
continue to be used on a regular basis by agency personnel, biologists, field technicians, researchers, students and teachers for
the purpose of identifying, managing, and learning more about Florida's non-native and invasive plants. Veteran Aquaphyte read-
ers will recognize the numerous items which have been introduced in this newsletter over the years and are also viewable on the
newly renovated CAIP website: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/596 Please take a moment to visit.






Page 6 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008

BOOKS/REPORTS, ETC.

INVASION ECOLOGY Ia i
By Julie Lockwood, Martha Hoopes, and Michael Marchetti. 2007. 312 pp. ISBN 978-1-4051-
1418-9. Blackwell Publishing. www.blackwellpublishing.com/n ecologv
Highlighting important research findings associated with each stage of non-native invasion, this book
provides an overview of the invasion process from transportation patterns and causes of establishment suc-
cess to ecological impacts, invader management, and post-invasion evolution.

ECOLOGICAL STUDIES 190 AND 191:
WETLANDS AND NATURAL RESOURCE I \ \I. I. 11. NT
by J.T.A. Verhoeven, B. Beltman, R. Bobbink, and D.E Whigham, Eds., 2006, and ,.,,
WETLANDS: FUNCTIONING, BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION, AND RESTORATION
by R. Bobbink, B. Beltman, J.T.A. Verhoeven, and D.E Whigham, Eds., 2006. Springer-Verlag.
www.springer. corn
These books are based on the highlights of the 7th INTECOL International Wetland Conference in Utrecht in 2004, which brought
together approximately 900 participants from 61 countries who discussed a broad range of science, policy, and management related
issues regarding wetland ecology and hydrology, conservation and creation, and the impact of global climate change.

THE RIVERSCAPE AND THE RIVER.
By S. M. Haslam. 2008. ISBN 9780521839785. Cambridge University Press. htt: //www.cambridge.or/
Dr. Haslam examines how the quantity, function and ecology of water changes as it moves from watershed to river. The develop-
ment of river and riverscape, their ecology, the effect of human activities (such as water abstractions, flood control and management
for recreational use) and water resources are described both in principle and using case histories. Contrasting examples are given
from across the world, including Iceland, Hungary, Malta, Britain and the USA, which enables an understanding of how water and
riverscape interact with each other, and with human impact.

PLANT INVASIONS. HUMAN PERCEPTION, ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS AND MANAGEMENT
by B. Tokarska-Guzik, J.H. Brock, G. Brundu, L. Child, C.C. Daehler & RP. Pysek (Eds). 2008, 428 pp. ISBN 978-90-5782-188-2.
Backhuys Publishers, www.backhuvs.corn
Sections include Human perception androle in biological invasions; Biology, ecology and distribution of invasive species; Invasi-
bility of habitats and impacts of invasive species; and Control and management. This volume continues the tradition of publishing
key presentations from a series of biennial International Conferences on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions
(EMAPi) beginning in 1992 (see de Waal et al. 1994, Pysek et al. 1995, Brock et al. 1997, Starfinger et al. 1998, Brundu et al. 2001,
Child et al. 2003). This volume aims to contribute to this growing field, exploring human perceptions of plant invasions and the role
of humans in the invasion process from different perspectives and geographical areas. It also covers case studies of the biology and
ecology of invasive species, mechanisms of invasion and ecological impacts, while offering solutions through a variety of control
and management techniques.

FRESHWATER REVIEWS
A JOURNAL OF THE FRESHWATER BIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION.
Editor: Colin S. Reynolds. ISSN: 1755-084X. www. ba. org. uk/journals ~
Freshwater Reviews is a new peer reviewed scientific journal dedicated to pro-
viding comprehensive, modem reviews of topics in the freshwater sciences. It is
aimed at a wide, international audience including academics, practitioners, admin- Freshwater Reews
istrators, teachers and students.The content of review papers is primarily biological ** **. -
but papers covering limnology, policy and socio-economic aspects of fresh waters
are acceptable if they are relevant to our understanding or management of fresh-
water biology. Freshwater is interpreted widely, embracing all inland waters includ-
ing lakes, ponds and reservoirs, rivers and streams, as well as saline and caustic lakes,
brackish waters, interstitial and groundwater environments.
Freshwater Reviews is an "online first" journal, publishing articles online as they
are accepted, and then in two, full colour, high quality print issues (bi-annually). -
Published by the Freshwater Biological Association.







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 7


PHYCOLOGY, 4TH EDITION
By Robert Edward Lee. 2008. 560 pp. ISBN-13:9780521682770. Cambridge University Press, New York. Available in paperback,
hardback, or eBook. http://www.cambridge.org/us/
Detailed life-history drawings of algae are presented alongside information on the cytology, ecology, biochemistry, and economic
importance of selected genera. Suitable for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students following courses in phycology, limnology
or biological oceanography. Emphasis is placed on those algae that are commonly covered in phycology courses, and encountered by
students in marine and freshwater habitats.

MAINE FIELD GUIDE TO INVASIVE AQUATIC PLANTS AND THEIR COMMON NATIVE LOOKALIKES*
ByR. Hill and S. Williams, Maine Center for Invasive Aquatic Plants and the Maine Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program. 2007. 146 pp.
www. mainevolunteerlakemonitors. org
Spiral-bound and printed on waterproof paper, this handy field guide is dedicated to Maine's volunteer lake monitors. The Maine
Volunteer Lake Monitoring Program is the longest standing citizen lake monitoring program in the U.S., and the largest provider of
scientific lake data in the State of Maine. This book includes a simplified dichotomous key, detailed plant descriptions, a section on
Maine's eleven most unwanted invasive aquatic plants, range maps, line drawings, and color photographs of each of the fifty-plus spe-
cies covered. Also included is a section on how to conduct an invasive aquatic plant screening survey, and descriptions of other invaders
in Maine, both flora and fauna.

GUIDE DE RECONNAISSANCE DES HABITATS FORESTIERS DES PLANTS MENACEES OU VULNERABLES. CAPITALE-NATIONALE,
CENTRE-DU-QUEBEC, CHAUDIERE-APPALACHES ET MAURICIE. *
By N. Dignard, L. Couillard, J. Labrecque, P. Petitclerc and B. Tardif. 2008. 234 pp. ISBN 978-2-550-52574-5. Ministere des
Ressources naturelles et de la Faune et minister du Developpement durable, de l 'Environnement et des Parcs, Quebec.
www. mrnfgouv. qc. ca
A handy guide to the recognition of threatened or vulnerable plants in forest habitats. The authors present forest habitats likely to
shelter these plants as well as multiple color photographs, descriptive text, and maps of both recent and historical occurrence, allowing
their identification for the areas of the Capital-Main Road, Center-of-Quebec of the Boiler-Appalachian Mountains and Mauricie. The
guide also contains information on other threatened or vulnerable species present in these areas.

IDENTIFICATION AND BIOLOGY OF NONNATIVE PLANTS IN FLORIDA'S
NATURAL AREAS*
by K.A. Langeland, H.M. Cherry, C.M. McCormick, and K.A. Craddock Burks. 2008. 210 pp.
University of Florida, IFAS Publication SP 257. http://www.ifasbooks.ufl.edu/ 800-226-1764.
Second Edition This field guide, designed to assist natural area managers in recognizing
nonnative and invasive plant species on lands that they manage, will be of use to naturalists,
horticulturists, landscapers, and gardeners. The authors identify 117 nonnative plant species that
occur in natural areas and provide an extensive literature review of each species. Complemented
by over 300 photographs, the descriptions provide plant identification characteristics, plus de-
tails on their ecological significance, distribution, and life history. The second edition of Identi-
fication and Biology of Nonnative Plants in Florida's Natural Areas combines information from
the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) List of Invasive Species, and the University of
Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Invasive Plants Working Group's Assess-
ment of Nonnative Plants in Florida's Natural Areas.

FIELD GUIDE TO AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES IDENTIFICATION, COLLECTION
AND REPORTING OF AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES IN ONTARIO WATERS*
byK. Jui, M. Butler, M Allen, J. da Silva, and B. Brownson. 2008. ISBN978-1-4249-4380-7. I i' 52089. Ministry ofNatural Resources
Biodiversity Section, Aquatic Invasive Species Program, Ontario, Canada.
This field guide is printed on waterproof paper and is held together with rust-proof rings truly an aquatic field guide. It identifies
over 50 aquatic invasive species of plants, fish and invertebrates and aims to aid professionals in the identification and collection of
specimens and the reporting of occurrences of aquatic invasive species in Ontario waters. A reporting procedure is provided together
with a hotline number (1-800-563-7711) and a website (www.invadingspecies.com). A database across the province is provided through
a partnership with the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.



"Note The Field Guides section of the CAIP \\ebsIte has been updated and uieatl\ expanded
To look for a field ui'de in \ our area. Uo to http plants ifts ufl edu node 4-10







Page 8 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008

MARY'S PICKS


Items of special interest from our reader/cataloger, Mary Langeland


Short-term effects of benzalkonium chloride and atrazine
on Elodea canadensis using a miniaturised microbioreactor
system for an online monitoring of physiologic parameters.
By Vervliet-Scheebaum, M., Ritzenthaler, R., Normann, J.,
Wagner, E. 2008. Ecotoxicol. Environ. Safety 69(2):254-262.
"The study evaluated the effects of benzalkonium chloride
(BAC) and atrazine on the macrophyte Elodea canadensis (Mi-
chaux) using a miniaturised monitoring test system consisting of
a microbioreactor of reduced volume and integrated sensors for
the online measurement of physiologic parameters, like oxygen
production and different parameters of fluorescence. Different
concentrations of both chemicals were applied to leaves of E. ca-
nadensis and the physiologic endpoints evaluated after 1 h... The
mini-PAM technique implemented in the presented system al-
lowed for a clear monitoring of the kinetic of BAC and atrazine,
showing their distinct mode of action..."
There are indications "that the microbioreactor test system might
be suitable, on the one hand, for the laboratory screening of poten-
tial short-term toxicity of contaminants on aquatic plants, and on
the other hand, serve as an in situ field biomonitoring system for
the rapid detection of pollutants in water."

Hydrothermal processing of biomass from invasive aquatic
plants. By Catallo, W.J., Shupe, T.F., Eberhardt, T.L. 2008.
Biomass Bioenergy 32(2):140-145.
"The purpose of this study was to examine the hydrothermal
(HT) treatment of three invasive aquatic plants (i.e., Lemna sp.,
Hydrilla sp., and Eichhornia sp.) with respect to the generation of
semi-volatile hydrocarbon product mixtures and biomass volume
reduction. Identical HT treatments yielded similar semi-volatile
product mixtures for Hydrilla sp. and Eichhornia sp. versus a sig-
nificantly different mixture for Lemna sp...
Currently, there are no data in the public domain on products re-
sulting from HT treatment of vascular aquatic plants, particularly
those which pose ecological problems (i.e., invasive or noxious
nature)... Therefore, the objective of this research was to evaluate
the HT treatment of three major pest aquatic plants with respect
to hydrocarbon yields, chemical composition of semi-volatile mix-
tures, and volume reduction."

Botany new home for tiny aquatics. By Friis, E.M., Crane, P.
2007. Nature 446(7133):269-270.
"Many new constellations in the angiosperm evolutionary tree
have come to light as relationships within the flowering plants
have been explored using molecular analyses. Some of these
changes were not unexpected. But others have resulted in fun-
damental reinterpretations of angiosperm evolution. It will take
some time to digest all the implications of suddenly introducing a
new plant family into discussions of early angiosperm evolution...
Hydatella and Trithuria have not been on the radar screen of most
specialists working on the subject, and there are many pieces of
this puzzle still to work out. Certainly, repositioning the Hydatel-
laceae as the closest living relatives to the Nymphaeales will dra-
matically influence ideas about the early evolution of water-lilies
and their allies, and it will modify important details of character


evolution at the base of the angiosperm tree. Hydatella and Tri-
thuria will inevitably be the subject of detailed investigation in
the coming years. But whatever the outcomes of these studies, the
radical realignment discovered by Saarela et al. should remind us
not to become too comfortable with the current picture of early an-
giosperm relationships, and especially with the details of character
evolution that they imply."

Programmed cell death and tissue remodelling in plants. By
Gunawardena, A.H.LA.N. 2008. J. Experim. Bot. 59(3):445-451.
"PCD is a genetically encoded active process, whereby cells or-
ganize their own destruction. The main objective of this paper is
to review a few select examples of PCD-enabled remodelling in
plants at the cellular, tissue, and organ levels, with an emphasis on
research involving the lace plant-a model system for the study of
developmentally induced PCD."
"The formation of complex leaf shape through the use of PCD is
a rare event across vascular plants and occurs only in a few species
of Monstera and related genera, and in the lace plant (Aponoge-
ton madagascariensis). During early development, the lace plant
leaf forms a pattern of equidistantly positioned perforations across
the surface of the leaf, giving it a lattice-like appearance. Due to
the accessibility and predictability of this process, the lace plant
provides highly suitable material for the study of developmentally
regulated PCD in plants."

The kingdom of the shore: achievement of good ecological
potential in reservoirs. By Moss, B. 2008. Freshwater Reviews
1(1):29-42.
Moss says, in the conclusion of this article, "In the past few hun-
dred years we have assumed that we can alter our environment at
will, without consequence." Reservoirs are an example of this al-
teration. They "...are disabled lakes, usually lacking the diversity
and function provided by a littoral zone." In the "kingdom of the
shore" (a title from William Shakespeare's Sonnet LXIV), where
the land and water interface, Moss suggests that "...the least dam-
aging solutions are mechanisms that promote parsimony of use
rather than response always to continued demand."

Ethnobotany of folk medicinal aquatic plants in Jordan.
By Al-Qura'n, S. 2007. Bot. Review 73(1):51-65.
Most of the area of Jordan is desert with few water resources.
It is considered to be one of the world's ten most poorly watered
countries. It is in or around the "... Jordan and Yarmouk rivers,
marshes, swamps, ditches, geothermal springs... in addition to
small ponds and water resources where the aquatic species with
therapeutic effects are found."
"This study aimed to verify the phytomedicinal wealth present
in the investigated area and to determine the levels of popularity
of different plants, since the investigated area has a uniquely high
level of species diversity." The authors expressed the hope that the
Bedouin and rural peoples would feel an increased "sense of re-
sponsibility for protecting these species from factors that threaten
and endanger them. Consequently, this cultural heritage may be
reinforced because it is aligned with scientific measures."







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 9


BOOK REVIEW

by Mary Langeland

FLORA IBERICA.
ALGAS CONTINENTALES.
CAROFITOS (CHARACEAE).
by S. Cirujano, J. Cambra, P.M. Sanchez-Castillo, A. Meco, and
N. Flor-Arnau. 2008. 132 pp. Real Jardin Bothnico de Madrid.
(in Spanish)

This 2008 Monograph of the Flora Ib6rica series on the mainland
algae is devoted to the characterization, identification and distribu-
tion of the Iberian charophytes, including Spain, Portugal and the
Baleares Isles. The slender book (only 132 pages) by Santos Ciru-
jano, et. al was published in Spanish by the Real Jardin Botnico de
Madrid. The usefulness of the book lies in the orderly arrangement
and careful, detailed infor-
mation and keys, based on
sampling field trips, reviews
of herbarium specimens and
bibliographic literature.
Cirujano states that the
purpose of the work is to fa-
cilitate the identification of
the charophytes of the Iberi-
an Peninsula. This has been o
accomplished in the book
with detailed, crisply drawn
illustrations, the clear pho-
tographs of specimens, and
the simple, but useful keys
for identification. The book Dr. Eduardo Reyes Pr6sper
opens with several short, but to-the-point chapters on the history of
the study of charophytes of the Iberian
Peninsula, on the ecology of the cha-
rophytes, on methods of management
and conservation, on their value, and
the phylogeny and general morphol-
ogy of charophytes.
The authors take great delight in
their field of study and their enjoy-
Sment is obvious in the treatment of
the historical figures of the disci-
pline of Iberian charophytes. Honor
is paid to the early experts of the field,
but with some lighthearted over-
tones. The first general study of the
Iberian charophytes was published in
1910 by Dr. Eduardo Reyes Pr6sper,
entitled "Las Carofitas de Espafia.
Singularmente las que crecen en sus
estepas." Other notable experts in-
Seluded in the short historical sketch
are Adriano Gongalves da Cunha and
/ / Eduardo Mendes.


Eduardo Mendes


BOTANICAL SPELLING SOFTWARE SPELLEX
BOTANICAL 2008 EDITION
Billed as the most comprehensive, up-to-date, and accurate
botany spell checker ever developed, this new software release
includes more than 100,000 specialty words in the botanical
field, including tens of thousands of vascular plants, mosses,
liverworts, homworts, and lichens from around the world.
Spellex Botanical provides accurate spelling of both common
and uncommon terms from botanical taxonomy and nomen-
clature (including meiosis, prokaryotes, and protista as well as
hundreds of dinoflagellates, haptophytes, heterokonts, bryo-
phytes, angiosperms, fungi, euglenoids, and cryptomonads). It
includes the spelling of thousands of common and scientific
botanical names as well as plant families, genera, species, and
symbols, including a wide variety of edible and medicinal
plants and plants used for habitat creation and landscape res-
toration. Also includes the common and scientific names of
hundreds of plant diseases including bacterial, fungal, nema-
todal and parasitic diseases, virus and viroid diseases, genetic
diseases, and phytoplasmal diseases; includes extensive cover-
age of marine botany including macroalgae and microalgae,
salt marshes, mangrove forests, seagrass beds, and coral reefs.
Correctly spells abbreviations, acronyms, eponyms, alternative
and variant spellings, and plural word forms from the botanical
field.
Software works inside your favorite Microsoft, WordPerfect,
or Lotus spell checker. Spellex Botanical is available in US and
UK English. www.spellex.com/products/botany.htm.







Page 10 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008


ANONYMOUS
A landowner's guide to Phragmites control.
OFFICE OF GREAT LAKES, MICHIGAN DEPT.
ENVIRON. QUAL., LANSING, MI., 8 PP. 2007.

ANONYMOUS
Noxious weed identification and control
handbook.
INLAND EMPIRE COOPER. WEED MANAGER.
AREA, ID., 68 PP. 2007.

ASAEDA, T., SIONG, K.
Dynamics of growth, carbon and nutrient
translocation in Zizania latifolia.
ECOL. ENG. 32(2):156-165. 2008.

BARRIENTOS, C.A., ALLEN, M.S.
Fish abundance and community composi-
tion in native and non-native plants follow-
ing hydrilla colonisation at Lake Izabal,
Guatemala.
FISH. MANAG. ECOL. 15(2):99-106. 2008.

BELAL, I.E.H.
Controlling aquatic weeds in a Saudi drain-
age canal using grass carp (Ctenopharyn-
godon idella Val.)
J. FOOD AGR. ENVIRON. 5(1):332-336. 2007.

BELTRAMI, M.E.
Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye) M.
Schmidt (Bacillariophyta) in the Danube
basin: new data from the Drava River
(northern Italy).
PLANT BIOSYSTEMS 142(1):126-129. 2008.

BENSON, E.R., O'NEIL, J.M.,
DENNISON, W.C.
Using the aquatic macrophyte Vallisneria
americana (wild celery) as a nutrient bio-
indicator.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 596(1):187-196. 2008.

BEST, E.P.H., BOYD, W.A.
A carbon flow-based modelling approach
to ecophysiological processes and biomass
dynamics of Vallisneria americana, with


applications to temperate and tropical wa-
ter bodies.
ECOL. MODELLING 217(1-2):117-131. 2008.

BICKEL, T.O., CLOSS, G.P.
Fish distribution and diet in relation to the
invasive macrophyte Lagarosiphon major
in the littoral zone of Lake Dunstan, New
Zealand.
ECOL. FRESHWATER FISH 17(1):10-19. 2008.

BOLL, E.S., CHRISTENSEN, J.H.,
HOLM, P.E.
Quantification and source identification of
polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sedi-
ment, soil, and water spinach from Hanoi,
Vietnam.
J. ENVIRON. MONIT. 10(2):261-269. 2008.

BULTEMEIER, B.W., HALLER, W.T.
Occurrence of diquat resistant Landoltia in
Lake Octahatchee, FL.
UNPUBLISHED REPT, UNIV. FL., IFAS, CENTER
FOR AQUATIC & INVASIVE PLANTS, 5 PP. 2008.

BUTLER, J.L., ELLISON, A.M.
Nitrogen cycling dynamics in the carnivo-
rous northern pitcher plant, Sarracenia
purpurea.
FUNC. ECOL. 21(5):835-943. 2007.

CAPERS, R.S., SELSKY, R., BUGBEE,
G.J., WHITE, J.C.
Aquatic plant community invasibility and
scale-dependent patterns in native and in-
vasive species richness.
ECOLOGY 88(12):3135-3143. 2007.

CARRANZA-ALVAREZ, C., ALONSO-
CASTRO, A.J., ALFARO-DE LA
TORRE, M.C., GARCIA-DE LA
CRUZ, R.F.
Accumulation and distribution of heavy
metals in Scirpus americanus and Typha
latifolia from an artificial lagoon in San
Luis Potosi, Mexico.
WATER AIR SOIL POLLUT. 188(1-4):297-309. 2008.


FROM THE DATABASE

This is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been
entered into the aquatic, wetland and invasive plant database since Fall 2007. T h e
APIRS database contains more than 71,000 citations. To use the free database online,
go to http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ and click on APIRS Online Database.
To obtain articles, contact your nearest academic library, or a document delivery
service. Full text of records cited in APIRS is not stored electronically, however, we
can assist in directing you to online resources.


CHADWELL, T.B., ENGELHARDT,
A.M.
Effects of pre-existing submersed vegeta-
tion and propagule pressure on the invasion
success of Hydrilla verticillata.
J. APPL. ECOL. 45(2):515-523. 2008.

CHEN,Y.-Y., LI,X.-L., YIN,L.-Y., LI,W.
Genetic diversity of the threatened aquatic
plant Ottelia alismoides in the Yangtze River.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(1):10-16. 2008.

CHERUVELIL, K.S., SORANNO, P.A.
Relationships between lake macrophyte
cover and lake and landscape features.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(3):219-227. 2008.

COETZEE, J.A., HILL, M.P.,
SCHLANGE, D.
Potential spread of the invasive plant Hydrilla
verticillata in South Africa based on anthro-
pogenic spread and climate suitability.
BIOL. INVASIONS ONLINE FIRST. 2008.

CORREA, S.B., CRAMPTON, W.G.R.,
CHAPMAN, L.J., ALBERT, J.S.
A comparison of flooded forest and float-
ing meadow fish assemblages in an upper
Amazon floodplain.
J. FISH BIOL. 72(3):629-644. 2008.

CROFT, M.V., CHOW-FRASER, P.
Use and development of the wetland
macrophyte index to detect water quality
impairment in fish habitat of great lakes
coastal marshes.
J. GREAT LAKES RES. 33(SI3):172-197. 2007.

CUNHA-SANTINO, M,, BIANCHINI, I.
Cellulase activities during decomposition
of a submerged aquatic macrophyte (Utric-
ularia breviscapa): a microcosm assay.
BRAZ. J. MICROBIOL. 38(2):230-236. 2007.

DAS NEVES, J.P.C., FERREIRA,
L.F.P., VAZ, M.M., GAZARINI, L.C.
Gas exchange in the salt marsh species
Atriplex portulacoides L. and Limonias-
trum monopetalum L. in southern Portugal.
ACTA PHYSIOL. PLANT 30(1):91-97. 2008.

DAVIES, R.J.-P., CRAIGIE, A.I.,
MACKAY, D.A., WHALEN, M.A., ET AL
Resolution of the taxonomy of Eriocaulon
(Eriocaulaceae) taxa endemic to Australian
mound springs, using morphometrics and
AFLP markers.
AUST. SYSTEM. BOT. 20(50:428-447. 2007.







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 11


DIANAT, M., SHAHNEJAT-
BOOSHEHRI, A., ALIZADEH, H.-M.,
NAGHAVI, M.-R., ET AL
Of genetic diversity among populations of
common reed (Phragmites australis) in Iran.
IN: 5TH INTERN. WEED SCI. CONGRESS, JUN.
23-27, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA, ABSTRACT
730, P. 321. 2008.

ENGER, S., HANSON, S.
A summary of permitted control work for
aquatic vegetation, algae, leeches, swim-
mer's itch, 2006.
MN. DEPT. NATL. RES., DIV. ECOL. SERV., AMP
ANNUAL RPT. 42, 31 PP. 2007.

ENGLE, D.L., MELACK, J.M.,
DOYLE, R.D., FISHERS, T.R.
High rates of net primary production and
turnover of floating grasses on the Amazon
floodplain: implications for aquatic respira-
tion and regional CO2 flux.
GLOB. CHANGE BIOL. 14(2):369-381. 2008.

GARNER, A.B., KWAK, T.J.,
MANUEL, K.L., BARWICK, D.H.
Intensive grass carp stocking effects on res-
ervoir invasive plants and native fish popu-
lations (student presentation).
AQUAT. PLANT MANAG. SOC., 47TH ANNUAL
MEETING PROGRAM, NASHVILLE, TN, PP. 34-
35 (ABSTRACT). 2007.

GHERARDI, F., BARBARESI, S.
Feeding preferences of the invasive cray-
fish, Procambarus clarkii.
BFPP-BULL. FR. PECHE PISCIS. 385:7-20. 2007.

GOTHBERG, A.
Metal fate and sensitivity in the aquatic
tropical vegetable Ipomoea aquatica.
PH.D. THESIS, APPL. ENVIRONM. SCI., STOCK-
HOLM UNIV., SWEDEN, 39 PP. 2008.

GREENFIELD, B.K, SIEMERING, G.S.,
ANDREWS, J.C., RAJAN, M., ETAL
Mechanical shredding of water hyacinth
(Eichhornia crassipes): effects on water
quality in the Sacramento-San Joaquin
River Delta, California.
ESTUARIES COASTS 30(4):627-640. 2007.

GROB, V., PFEIFER, E.,
RUTISHAUSER, R.
Morphology, development and regenera-
tion of Thelethylax minutifora, a Madagas-
can river-weed (Podostemaceae).
PHYTON 47(1-2):205-229 (ABSTRACT). 2007.


GUIRAL, D., ROUGIER, C.
Trap size and prey selection of two coex-
isting bladderwort (Utricularia) species in
a pristine tropical pond (French Guiana) at
different trophic levels.
ANN. LIMNOL. INT. J. LIM. 43(3):147-159. 2007.

HAYNIE, R.S.
J. Strom Thurmond Reservoir avian vacu-
olar myelinopathy (AVM) epizootic: field
assessment and management plan (student
presentation).
AQUAT. PLANT MANAG. SOC., 47TH ANNUAL
MEETING PROGRAM, NASHVILLE, TN, PP. 38
(ABSTRACT). 2007.

HOAGLAND, R.E., BOYETTE, C.D.,
ABBAS, H.K.
Myrothecium verrucaria isolates and formu-
lations as bioherbicide agents for kudzu.
BIOCONTROL SCI. TECH. 17(7):721-731. 2007.

HOWARD, R.J., TRAVIS, S.E., SIKES,
B.A.
Rapid growth of a Eurasian haplotype of
Phragmites australis in a restored brackish
marsh in Louisiana, USA.
BIOL. INVASIONS 10(3):369-379. 2008.

HUTHOFF, F., AUGUSTIJN, D.C.M.,
HULSCHER, S.J.M.H.
Analytical solution of the depth-averaged
flow velocity in case of submerged rigid
cylindrical vegetation.
WATER RESOURCES RES. 43:1-10. 2007.

HUTOROWICZ, A., DZIEDZIC, J.
Long-term changes in macrophyte veg-
etation after reduction of fish stock in a
shallow lake.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(3):265-272. 2008.

JACKSON, M.B.
Ethylene-promoted elongation: an adaption
to submergence stress.
ANN. BOT. 101(2):229-248. 2008.

JAMES, W.F.
Effects of lime-induced inorganic carbon
reduction on the growth of three aquatic
macrophyte species.
AQUAT. BOT 88(2):99-104. 2008.

JAN(ULA, D., MiKOVCOVA, M.,
ADAMEK, Z., MARSALEK, B.
Changes in the photosynthetic activity ofMi-
crocystis colonies after gut passage through
Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and sil-
ver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix).
AQUACULTURE RES. 39:311-314. 2008.


KIRKWOOD, A.E., SHEA, T., JACK-
SON, L.J., MCCAULEY, E.
Didymosphenia geminata in two Alberta
headwater rivers: an emerging invasive
species that challenges conventional views
on algal bloom development.
CAN. J. FISH. AQUAT. SCI. 64(12):1703-1709. 2007.

KNIGHT, T.J., MASSER, M.P.
Effects of aquatic vegetation management
on the ecology of small impoundments
(student presentation).
AQUAT. PLANT MANAG. SOC., 47TH ANNUAL
MEETING PROGRAM, NASHVILLE, TN, PP. 40-
41 (ABSTRACT). 2007.

KOCIC, A., HENGL, T., HORVATIC, J.
Water nutrient concentrations in channels
in relation to occurrence of aquatic plants:
a case study of eastern Croatia.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 603(1):253-266. 2008.

LABRADA, R.
Water hyacinth is dispersing to other non-
tropical areas.
IN: 5TH INTERN. WEED SCI. CONGRESS, JUN.
23-27, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA, ABSTRACT
622, P. 259-260. 2008.

LARSON, J.S., SEARCY, K.B.
Lemna minute (Lemnaceae) discovered in
Massachusetts.
RHODORA 109(940):456-458. 2007.

LAUGHTON, R., COSGROVE, P.J.,
HASTIE, L.C., SIME, I.
Effects of aquatic weed removal on fresh-
water pearl mussels and juvenile salmonids
in the River Spey, Scotland.
AQUAT. CONSERV.: MAR. FRESH. ECOSYST.
18(1):44-54. 2008.

LAWLER, S.P., REIMER, L.,
THIEMANN, T., FRITZ, J., ET AL
Effects of vegetation control on mosquitoes
in seasonal freshwater wetlands.
J. AMER. MOSQUITO CONTR. ASSN. 23(1):66-70
(ABSTRACT). 2007.


LEAVITT, R., AKERS, P.,
KOSCHNICK, T., SHULER, S.
Progress of hydrilla eradication
Lake, CA.
AQUATICS 30(1):4, 6, 8-9. 2008.


Clear


LEHTONEN, S., MYLLYS, L.
Cladistic analysis of Echinodorus (Alisma-
taceae): simultaneous analysis of molecular
and morphological data.
CLADISTICS 24(2):218-239. 2008.







Page 12 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008


LES, D.H., JACOBS, S.W.L., TIPPERY,
N.P., CHEN, L., ETAL
Systematics of Vallisneria (Hydrocharitaceae).
SYST. BOT. 33(1):49-65. 2008.

LI, J., CAO, T., NI, L.
Effects of ammonium on growth, nitrogen
and carbohydrate metabolism of Potamo-
geton maackianus A. Benn.
FUNDAM. APPL. LIMNOL. 170(2):141-148. 2007.

LIANG, F., SHEN, L.-Z., CHEN, M.,
YANG, Q.
Formation of intercellular gas space in the
diaphragm during the development of aer-
enchyma in the leaf petiole of Sagittaria
trifolia.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(3):185-195. 2008.

LOPETEGUI, E.J., VOLLMANN, R.S.,
CIFUENTES, H.C., VALENZUELA,
C.D., ET AL
Emigration and mortality of black-necked
swans (Cygnus melancoryphus) and disap-
pearance of the macrophyte Egeria densa in
a RAMSAR wetland site of southern Chile.
AMBIO 36(7): 607-609. 2007.

LU, J., FU, Z., YIN, Z.
Performance of a water hyacinth (Eichhornia
crassipes) system in the treatment of waste-
water from a duck farm and the effects
of using water hyacinth as duck feed.
J. ENVIRON. SCI. 20(5):513-519. 2008.

MACDONALD, G.E., PURI, A.,
SHILLING, D.G.
Interactive effect of photoperiod and
fluridone on growth, reproduction, and
biochemistry of dioecious hydrilla (Hydrilla
verticillata).
WEED SCI. 56(2):189-195. 2008.

MADSEN, J.D., WERSAL, R.M.
Growth regulation of Salvinia molesta by
pH and available water column nutrients.
J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 23(2):305-313. 2008.

MAKI, K.C., GALATOWITSCH, S.M.
Cold tolerance of the axillary turions of
two biotypes of hydrilla and northern
watermilfoil.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 46:42-50. 2008.

MARKO, M.D., GROSS, E.M.,
NEWMAN, R.M., GLEASON, F.K.
Chemical profile of the North American
native Myriophyllum sibiricum compared


to the invasive M. spicatum.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(1):57-65. 2008.

MASTRANTUONO, L., SOLIMINI,
A.G., NOGES, P., BAZZANTI, M.
Plant-associated invertebrates and hydro-
logical balance in the large volcanic Lake
Bracciano (central Italy) during two years
with different water levels.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 599(1):143-152. 2008.

MEYERSON, L.A.
Saving native phragmites, native versus
introduced Phragmites australis what are
the differences and why should we care?
WILDFLORARI 21(2):1-3. 2008.

MI, W.J., ZHU, D.W., ZHOU, Y.Y.,
ZHOU, H.D., ET AL
Influence of Potamogeton crispus growth
on nutrients in the sediment and water of
Lake Tangxunhu.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 602(1):139-146. 2008.

MNAYA, B., ASAEDA, T., KIWANGO,
Y., AYUBU, E.
Primary production in papyrus (Cyperus
papyrus L.) of Rubondo Island, Lake Vic-
toria, Tanzania.
WETLANDS ECOL. MANAG.15:269-275. 2007.

MISHIMA, D., KUNIKI, M., SEI, K.,
SODA, S., ET AL
Ethanol production from candidate en-
ergy crops: water hyacinth (Eichhornia
crassipes) and water lettuce (Pistia stra-
tiotes L.)
BIORESOUR. TECHNOL. 99(7):2495-2500. 2008.

MUKHERJEE, A., CUDA, J.P.,
OVERHOLT, W.A., ELLISON, C.
Biological control of Hygrophila polysper-
ma: searching for natural enemies in India
- first trip report.
AQUATICS 30(1):20-22. 2008.

NAGASAKI, 0.
Pollination of the yellow water lily Nuphar
subintegerrima (Nymphaeaceae) by the
shore fly Notiphila (Notiphila) maritima
(Diptera: Ephydridae).
PLANT SPEC. BIOL. 22(3):227-230. 2007.

NAGASAKI, 0.
Impact of the flower stalk-boring moth
Neoschoenobia testacealis (Lepidoptera:
Crambidae) and water-level fluctuations
on the flower and fruit production of the


yellow water lily Nuphar subintegerrima
(Nymphaeaceae) in irrigation ponds of
western Japan.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(1):27-31. 2008.

OLETTE, R., COUDERCHET, M.,
BIAGIANTI, S., EULLAFFROY, P.
Toxicity and removal of pesticides by
selected aquatic plants.
CHEMOSPHERE 70(8):1414-1421. 2008.

OLIVARES-RIEUMONT, S., LIMA, L.,
DE LA ROSA, D., GRAHAM, D.W.
Water hyacinths (Eichhornia crassipes)
as indicators of heavy metal impact of
a large landfill on the Almendares River
near Havana, Cuba.
BULL. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 79(6):583-
587. 2007.

PAN, L., QUAN, Z., LI, S., LIU, H., ETAL
Isolation and characterization of microsat-
ellite markers in the sacred lotus (Nelumbo
nucifera Gaertn.)
MOL. ECOL. NOTES 7(6):1054-1056. 2007.

PAROCHETTI, J., ARSENOVIC, M.,
GETSINGER, K., STUBBS, D., ET AL
Herbicides for aquatic weeds addressing
the need for herbicides for aquatic weeds in
irrigation water in the US.
OUTLOOKS PEST MANAG. JUNE 112-116. 2008.

PENG, K, LUO, C., LOU, L., LI, X., ETAL
Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by the
aquatic plants Potamogeton pectinatus L.
and Potamogeton malaianus Miq. and their
potential use for contamination indicators
and in wastewater treatment.
SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 392(1):22-29. 2008.

PEREZ, G.L., TORREMORELL, A.,
MUGNI, H., RODRIGUEZ, P., ET AL
Effects of the herbicide Roundup on
freshwater microbial communities: a me-
socosm study.
ECOL. APPL. 17(8):2310-2322. 2007.

PITELLI, R.L.D.C.M., FIORILLO,
C.M.T., VELINI, E.D., FERRAUDO,
A.S., ETAL
Multivariate studies in a macrophyte com-
munity colonizing the Santana Reservoir,
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
AQUAT. PLANT MANAG. SOC., 47TH ANNUAL
MEETING PROGRAM, NASHVILLE, TN, PP. 49
(ABSTRACT). 2007.







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 13


PLEW, D.R., COOPER, G.G.,
CALLAGHAN, EM.
Turbulence-induced forces in a freshwater
macrophyte canopy.
WATER RESOUR. RES. 44:W02414, 11 PP. 2008.

QUINN, L.D., HOLT, J.S.
Ecological correlates of invasion by Arundo
donax in three southern California riparian
habitats.
BIOL. INVASIONS 10(5):591-601. 2008.

RODRIGUEZ-PEREZ, H., GREEN,
A.J., FIGUEROLA, J.
Effects of greater flamingo Phoenicopterus
rubber on macrophytes, chironomids and
turbidity in natural marshes in Dofiana, SW
Spain.
FUND. APPL. LIMNOL. 170(2):167-175. 2007.

ROLON, A.S., LACERDA, T.,
MALTCHIK, L., GUADAGNIN, D.L.
Influence of area, habitat and water chem-
istry on richness and composition of mac-
rophyte assemblages in southern Brazilian
wetlands.
J. VEG. SCI. 1(2):221-228. 2008.

ROSEN, D.J., HATCH, S.L.
A new species of Eleocharis subgen. Lim-
nochloa (Cyperaceae) from Bolivia.
BRITTONIA 59(4):377-379. 2007.

SHARMA, P., ASAEDA, T., FUJINO, T.
Effect of water depth on the rhizome
dynamics of Typha angustifolia.
WETLANDS ECOL. MANAG. 16:43-49. 2008.

SHIGA, T., KADONO, Y.
Genetic relationships of Nuphar in central
to western Japan as revealed by allozyme
analysis.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(2):105-112. 2008.

SIKOYO, G.M., GOLDMAN, L.
Assessing the assessments: case study of
an emergency action plan for the control of
water hyacinth in Lake Victoria.
INT. J. WATER RESOUR. DEV. 23(3):443-456. 2007.

SLADE, J.G., POOVEY, A.G.,
GETSINGER, K.D.
Concentration-exposure time relationships
for controlling sago pondweed (Stuckenia
pectinata) with endothall.
WEED TECHNOL. 22(1): 146-150. 2008.


SOWINSKI, M.
Triploid grass carp and aquatic plant
management.
IN: AQUATIC WEED CONTROL SHORT COURSE,
SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS AND COURSE MA-
TERIALS, CORAL SPRINGS, UNIV. FL., IFAS: 173-
178 (POWERPOINT). 2007.

SPENCER, D.E, STOCKER, R.K.,
LIOW, P.-S., WHITEHAND, L.C., ET AL
Comparative growth of giant reed (Arundo
donax L.) from Florida, Texas, and California.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 46:89-96. 2008.

STEFANIDIS, K,
PAPASTERGIADOU, E.S.
Aquatic vegetation and related abiotic
environment in a shallow urban lake of
Greece.
BELGIAN J. BOT. 140(1):25-28 (ABSTRACT
ONLY). 2007.

TAYLOR, D.W., BRENNER, G.J.,
BASHA, S.H.
Scutifolium jordanicum gen. et sp. nov.
(Cabombaceae), an aquatic fossil plant
from the Lower Cretaceous of Jordan, and
the relationships of related leaf fossils to
living genera.
AMER. J. BOT. 95(3):340-352. 2008.

TAYLOR, M.L., GUTMAN, B.L.,
MELROSE, N.A., INGRAHAM, A.M.,
ETAL
Pollen and anther ontogeny in Cabomba
caroliniana (Cabombaceae, Nymphaeales).
AMER. J. BOT. 95(4):399-413. 2008.

THOMAZ, S.
Aquatic macrophytes in Brazilian reser-
voirs: a synthesis with emphasis on long
term trends at the Itaipu Reservoir.
IN: 5TH INTERN. WEED SCI. CONGRESS, JUN.
23-27, VANCOUVER, BC, CANADA, ABSTRACT
731, P. 321-322. 2008.

TSUI, M.T.K., CHU, L.M.
Environmental fate and non-target impact
of glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup)
in a subtropical wetland.
CHEMOSPHERE 71(3):439-446. 2008.

TYLOVA, E., STEINBACHOVA, L.,
VOTRUBOVA, 0., LORENZEN, B., ETAL
Different sensitivity of Phragmites austra-
lis and Glyceria maxima to high availabil-
ity of ammonium-N.
AQUAT. BOT. 88(2):93-98. 2008.


VALKAMA, E., LYYTINEN, S.,
KORICHEVA, J.
The impact of reed management on wild-
life: a meta-analytical review of European
studies.
BIOL. CONSERV. 141(2):364-374. 2008.

VAN BODEGOM, P.M., SORRELL, B.K,
OOSTHOEK, A., BAKKER, C., ET AL
Separating the effects of partial submer-
gence and soil oxygen demand on plant
physiology.
ECOLOGY 89(1):193-204. 2008.

WAGNER, KL, HAUXWELL, J.,
RASMUSSEN,P.W., KOSHEREF., ETAL
Whole-lake herbicide treatments for Eur-
asian watermilfoil in four Wisconsin lakes:
effects on vegetation and water clarity.
LAKE RESERV. MANAGE. 23(1):83-94. 2007.

WANG, X., SHI, G., XU, Q., HU, J.
Exogenous polyamines enhance copper
tolerance of Nymphoides peltatum.
J. PLANT PHYSIOL. 164(8): 1062-1070. 2007.

WARD, D.B.
Native or not: studies of problematic species
- primrose willow Ludwigia peruviana
(Onagraceae).
PALMETTO 25(2):14-15. 2008.

WILLBY, N.J.
Managing invasive aquatic plants: prob-
lems and prospects.
AQUATIC CONSERVE : MAR. FRESH. ECOSYST.
17(7):659-665. 2007.

WILSON, C.E., DARBYSHIRE, S.L.,
JONES, R.
The biology of invasive alien plants in
Canada. 7. Cabomba caroliniana A. Gray.
CAN. J. PLANT SCI. 87(3):615-637. 2007.

YANG, IL, SHEN, Z., ZHU, S., WANG, W.
Heavy metals in wetland plants and soil of
Lake Taihu, China.
ENVIRON. TOXICOL. CHEM. 27(1):38-42. 2008.

ZHANG, X.-H., TAPIA, M., WEBB,
J.B., HUANG, Y.-H., ET AL
Molecular signatures of two cattail species,
Typha domingensis and Typha latifolia
(Typhaceae), in south Florida.
MOL. PHYLGENET. EVOL. 9 PP. (VOLUME, IS-
SUE, AND PAGE NUMBER NOT YET AVAIL-
ABLE) 2008.






Page 14 AQUAPHYTE Fall 2008

MEETINGS

Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society (FAPMS) 32nd Annual Training Conference, October 13-16, 2008.
Daytona Beach, Florida. http://www.fapms.org/meeting.html
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists. University of Florida, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences. October 21-23, 2008. Gainesville, Florida. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu click on Short Courses.
State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC 2008). October 22-23, 2008. Niagara Falls, Ontario. www.epa.gov/solec
1st Asian Wetland Convention and Workshop. Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Asia Chapter. October 23- 26, 2008.
National Taiwan University Hospital International Convention Center. Conference theme: Asian Wetlands: Global Position.
http://www.swsasia.org/callforpapers.html
Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board Biennial Conference. Nov 5-7, 2008. Eugene, Oregon. http://www.oregon.
gov/OWEB/biennialconference 08.shtml
North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) Symposium. Theme: Lake Management in a Changing Environ-
ment. NALMS and the Alberta Lake Management Society, November 11-14, 2008. Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada.
http://www.nalms.org/Conferences/2008LakeLouise/Program.aspx
35th Annual Conference on Ecosystems Restoration and Creation Assessment of Wetland Mitigation and Mitiga-
tion Banks. Theme: Assessment of Wetland Mitigation and Mitn ad litigation Banks. November 6-8, 2008. Institute of Florida
Studies, Hillsborough Community College, and Patel Center for Global Solutions, University of South Florida, Plant City,
Florida. http://www.hccfl.edu/ifs/conference
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton. November 12-14, 2008. Centre of Excellence for Invasion
Biology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa. http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB_symposium.htm
2008 AGA Aquatic Gardeners Convention. November 14-16, 2008. Atlanta, Georgia. Aquatic Gardeners Association an
international nonprofit organization of aquatic plant enthusiasts that appeals to both beginners and experienced hobbyists
alike. http ://www.aquatic-gardeners.org/convention.html
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists. University of Florida, Institute of Food and Ag-
ricultural Sciences, Soil and Water Science Department. November 18-20, 2008. Gainesville, Florida. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
International Symposium on "Perspectives in Pteridophytes." November 27-29, 2008. National Botanical Research
Institute, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Lucknow, India, and the Indian Fern Society. http://www.nbri-lko.
org/NBRI EVENT08/Perspectives%20in%20Pteridophytes.pdf
Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society meeting. January 19th -21st, 2009. Saratoga Springs, New York.
www.neapms.net/
24th Annual Conference Illinois Lake Management Association. February 19th 21st, 2009 Peoria, Illinois.
Email: ilma@ilma-lakes.org WWW: http://www.ilma-lakes.org/conference.html
29th Annual Midwest Aquatic Plant Management Society (MAPMS) Conference. March 1-4, 2009. Chicago area, Illinois.
http://www.mapms.org/MAPMSConf2009.html
16th International Conference on Aquatic Invasive Species. April 19-23, 2009. Montreal, Quebec, Canada. www.icais.org/
2009 Aquatic Weed Control Short Course. May 4-7, 2009. Coral Springs, Florida. http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/aw
52nd Annual Conference International Association for Great Lakes Research. Theme: Bridging Ecosystems & Envi-
ronmental Health across our Great Lakes. May 18 22, 2009. Toledo, Ohio. http://iaglr.org/conference/locations.php
Society for Wetland Scientists. Theme: Wetland Connections. June 22-26,2009. Madison, Wisconsin. www.sws.org/2009 meeting/
llth International Paleolimnology Symposium. International Paleolimnology Association. June 23-26, 2009. Guadala-
jara, Jalisco, Mexico. http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant Invasions (EMAPI). August 23-27,
2009. Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South
Africa. www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@sun.ac.za







Fall 2008 AQUAPHYTE Page 15

12th EWRS International Symposium on Aquatic Weeds
Jyvaskyla, Finland August 2009

The European Weed Research Society will present the 12th EWRS International Symposium on Aquatic Weeds on August 24 28,
2009 in Jyviskyli, Finland. The symposium will bring together professionals involved in research, management, extension and prac-
tical uses of aquatic plants in order to exchange results, experiences, and information. The main theme of the symposium will be
"Aquatic invasions and their relation to environmental changes." Main topics are: Biology of Aquatic Plants Indicator value of
Aquatic Plants Management of Aquatic Vegetation Practical Uses of Aquatic Plants Aquatic Plants as Elements of the EU Water
Framework Directive
Download the first announcement at: http://www.ewrs.org/pdf/EWRS Aquatic weeds 12th symposium.pdf or
E-mail: invasive-plants@ewrs.org or URL: hmp \\ "\ \\ c" isi o'/ewrs-iw.htm

ORGANIZERS
This symposium will be organised by the EWRS through its Working Group on Invasive Plants, in collaboration with the Working Group
on Macrophytes of the International Society on Limnology (SIL), and the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE).

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
Christian Bohren, Joe Caffrey, Frauke Ecke, Teresa Ferreira, Jacques Haury, Kaisa Heikkinen, Seppo Hellsten, Georg Janauer, Timo
Kairesalo, Antti Kanninen, Kevin Murphy, Arnold Pieterse, Jukka Salonen, Jouko Sarvala, Krzysztof Szoszkiewicz, Heikki Toivonen,
Ludwig Triest, and Pertti Uotila.

Previous EWRS symposia on aquatic weeds have been held in La Rochelle (1964), Oldenburg (1967), Oxford (1971), Vienna (1974),
Amsterdam (1978), Novi Sad (1982), Loughborough (1986), Uppsala (1990), Dublin (1994), Lisbon (1998) and Moliets et Maa (2002).
For details on the EWRS Invasive Plants Working Group, go to: hup n n" c" i's oit IW/default.asp


5th International Weed Science Congress Aquatic Weed Control Session


The 5th International Weed Science Congress took place
during the week of June 22nd, 2008 in Vancouver, Canada, and
was co-hosted by the International Weed Science Society, the
Canadian Weed Science Society, and the Weed Science Society
of America.
This meeting is held every four years and over 500 meeting
delegates from 46 countries represented academia, government,
non-governmental organizations, and private industry research. A
main topic session on aquatic weed control was co-organized by
Dr. Michael Netherland, US Army ERDC, USA, and Dr. Kevin
Murphy, University of Glasgow, Scotland. Invited talks were giv-
en by Dr. Sidnei Thomaz (Brazil) on the spread of invasive plants
in Brazilian reservoirs and Dr. Mic Julien (France) on water hya-
cinth dynamics and biocontrol in Lake Victoria, Africa. Papers se-
lected for oral presentation included: 1) Dr. Pat Chambers (Cana-
da) on worldwide distribution of aquatic macrophytes; 2) Dr. Joe
Caffrey (Ireland) on lagarosiphon invasion in Irish lochs; 3) Mr.
Jeff Schardt (USA) on the linkage between operational aquatic
plant control and research in Florida; 4) Dr. John Madsen (USA)
on Eurasian watermilfoil eradication efforts in Idaho; 5) Dr. Rob
Richardson (USA) on the use ofALS inhibitors for aquatic plant
control in the United States; 6) Dr. Matthew O'Hare (UK) on
issues with aquatic plants and water conveyance in rivers; 7)
Dr. Michael Smart (USA) on integrating ecological principles in
aquatic plant control efforts; 8) Ms. Pauline Lang (UK) on dis-
tribution of native and invasive plants in Zambia, Africa; 9) Dr.
Robinson Pitelli (Brazil) on control of invasive aquatic grasses in
Brazil; and 10) Dr. Cody Gray (USA) on control of aquatic mac-
rophytes in irrigation canals. There were also numerous posters
presented as part of this session. Other papers on aquatic weeds


were presented in different sessions throughout the conference.
The program is available at http://iws.ucdavis.edu/
The International Weed Science Society (IWSS) is a worldwide
scientific organization that was formed in 1975 by individuals
from Europe, North America, South America, and the Asian-
Pacific area to deal with global weed science issues. The forma-
tion of IWSS was promoted actively by the six existing regional
weed science societies (Asian-Pacific, European, Latin American,
American, East and West African). The Society has held highly
successful International Weed Control Congresses in Australia
(1992), Denmark (1996), Brazil (2000), South Africa (2. '14), and
Vancouver, Canada (2008).


PODOSTEMACEAE Website

Podostemaceae range worldwide on all continents with tropical
climates. Most of the members occur in tropical and subtropical
rivers and waterfalls. Many of the c. 48 genera and c. 280 spe-
cies are endemic to small geographical areas or even a single
river or waterfall. This website contains drawings of all African
species, photographs of African podos, keys, and a literature list,
together with much more information: Rutishauser R., Pfeifer
E., Grob V & Bernhard A. (2007): Podostemaceae ofAfrica and
Madagascar: Keys to Genera and Species, Including Genera
Descriptions, Illustrations to All Species Known, Synonyms,
and Literature List. Version 20-07-2007.
hlip v\ \\ systbot.uzh.ch/podostemaceae
Dr. Rutishauser and colleagues at the Institute of Systematic
Botany in Zurich focus on "morphological misfits," conserva-
tion biology, and other aspects of aquatic vascular plants.







University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants (CAIP)
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653-3071 USA
CAIP-website@ufl.edu
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu


AQUAPHYTE

AQUAPHYTE is the newsletter of the
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
(CAIP) and the Aquatic, Wetland and
Invasive Plant Information Retrieval
System (APIRS) of the University of
Florida / Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences (UF/IFAS). Support for AQUA-
PHYTE and the information system is
provided by the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission, Invasive
Plant Management Section; the St. Johns
River Water Management District; and
UF/IFAS.

EDITOR: Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers,
researchers and agencies in 71 countries
around the world. Comments, announce-
ments, news items and other information
relevant to aquatic and invasive plant
research are solicited.
Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not
constitute endorsement, nor does exclu-
sion represent criticism, of any item,
organization, individual, or institution by
the University of Florida.

jJfN UNIVERSITY of

IF FLORIDA
IFAS Extension
Center for A]i1nDtic
and Invasive Plants


NONPROFIT ORG.
U.S. POSTAGE PAID
GAINESVILLE FL
PERMIT NO. 94


Mare's-tail in Colorado Waters
Hippuris vulgaris (Hippuridaceae) occurs in the southwestern and northern
USA, including Alaska. This population was found at high elevation (around
8,800') in San Miguel County in western Colorado. Currently residing with
a native milfoil, it is becoming a problem in this pond. Mare's-tail is consid-
ered endangered or threatened in some states.
Photo by Sheila Grother, San Miguel County Weed Program Manager




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