• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Table of Contents
 Online book - nonindigenous species...
 Accessing the aquatic plant...
 Army corps aquatic plant program...
 Recycling pesticide containers
 Our last word on balls...
 Tropical aquatic plants from...
 A small Mediterranean island needs...
 These knotty spikerushes
 Fox pounces on new aquatic...
 Stocker targets Melaleuca
 Meetings
 Books/reports
 From the database






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00019
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00019
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Online book - nonindigenous species of Florida
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Accessing the aquatic plant database
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Army corps aquatic plant program under new leadership
        Page 7
    Recycling pesticide containers
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Our last word on balls...
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Tropical aquatic plants from Denmark
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    A small Mediterranean island needs help
        Page 15
        Page 16
    These knotty spikerushes
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Fox pounces on new aquatic weed
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Stocker targets Melaleuca
        Page 22
    Meetings
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Books/reports
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    From the database
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online

Volume 16 Number 1 Spring 1996


Center for Aquatic Plants
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Aquatic Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program


Contents

APIRS Web Site A Hit!
Online Book Nonindigenous Species of Florida
Accessing the Aquatic Plant Database

Army Corps Aquatic Plant Program Under New Leadership
Recycling Pesticide Containers
Our Last Word on Balls...
"The Lotus beds of Monroe marshes..."

Tropical Aquatic Plants from ... Denmark?! by Claus Christensen
A Small Mediterranean Island Needs Help! an appeal from Sylvia Haslam

GETTING TO KNOW THE NATIVES

o Those Knotty Spikerushes
by Kathy Craddock Burks, Botanist


AT THE CENTER




o Fox Pounces on New Aquatic Weed
o Stocker Targets Melaleuca

MEETINGS

BOOKS/REPORTS

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRS database

Aquaphyte page I Home

CAIP-WEBSITE(aufl.edu
copyright (C) 1995 University of Florida
Revised: January 1996





APIRS Web Site A Hit!



When planning computer systems and usage, cyber wisemen say to "push the
envelope": plan to use the newest technology, anticipate its maximum usage, then
double your requirements before buying. This way, your computer system will be
state-of-the-art and may possibly operate at maximum efficiency for at least 6
months.

We at APIRS attempted to follow this advice last year when designing our new
computer system and Internet Web site. Our anticipated usage of this site was
relatively low: after all, how many people would want to gaze at aquatic plant
photos and line drawings in a day? Maybe as many as 50 Web browsers a day?

Well, the results are in for the first four full months of usage of the APIRS site,
December 1995 through March 1996. The answer is that in December, our site was
visited an average of 25 times per day; by March, the average number of visits had
increased to 80 times per day, not including University of Florida visitors. This is
almost 2,500 times per month and climbing.

We appreciate your interest in our Web site and thank you for your comments and
suggestions.



AQUAPHYTE ONLINE
Spring 1996

Online Book -
Nonindigenous Species of Florida




A timely and useful new book about nonindigenous species in Florida, three years in
the making, is now available for viewing and downloading ONLY at the APIRS
Web site. This 300+ page review of the scientific literature was initiated by the
Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force authorized under the federal Nonindigenous
Species Prevention and Control Act of 1990.

The book, Nonindigenous Aquatic and Selected Terrestrial Species of Florida, by
J.A. McCann, L.N. Arkin and J.D. Williams (National Biological Service,
Gainesville, Florida), presents the status, pathway and time of introduction, present
distribution, and significant ecological and economic effects of 154 introduced
species of plants, mollusks, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and
crabs.

How did this worthy work, produced by a federal agency, come to be first
"published" on a state agency Internet site? It's the economy, stupid! As a cost-
saving measure, the NBS shut down its national publication and information unit in
Colorado. Luckily, the University of Florida Aquatic Plant Information Office is
still in business, and we were happy to suggest this most hi-tech way of paperless
publishing. Our guess is that the book will gain wider distribution via the Internet
than if 20 photocopies were produced and "made available" through traditional
channels.

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May 1996





Accessing the
Aquatic Plant Database



During March, 1996, almost 200 individuals from 23 countries gained access to and
used the APIRS aquatic plant database through our Web site. The database now
includes more than 42,000 citations. Use of the database, whether through our Web
site or by contacting the APIRS office, is free of charge to anyone.

We have received many compliments and suggestions from successful Web users,
and are grateful for them. Now we are certain that remote use of our database is a
valuable service to those who are able to access and use it.

From our e-mail and telephone calls, though, we know also that many of you
have tried but failed to get into the database, or to make it work properly, through
our Web site. Here are a few answers:

>- You Get to the Database Through Telnet

To use the database, your computer must have a "telnet application" (such as
QVTNET), in addition to your Web browsing software (such as Netscape). When
properly configured, your browser will automatically start the telnet application
when you click on "Telnet" on our Web site database page. Your computer will then
present a text only window with the word (or prompt) loginn:". Now you type
"guest" as the password and follow the log on instructions as provided on our Web
site database page.

Many users have no difficulty accessing the Web site, but when they go to the
database page, and click on "Telnet" to get to the aquatic plant database, the
message "unable to find application" appears. In short, Web users who get such a
message have a problem at their end, and need to contact their local computer guru
for help in further setting up their Web browsing and telnet capabilities.




> The Database Interface Can Be Confusing


Because of financial considerations, the APIRS Web/Database interface is plain, old-
fashioned, and user-noncomplaisant. The database "search" and "display" screens
are obviously unlike the rest of the Web site, and are somewhat confusing as a
consequence. About twenty thousand dollars, the cost of interface software
compatible with our system, should fix the problem nicely.

> "Sorry"

Sometimes users get to the database search screen but when they attempt to go
further they get a message that only says, "Sorry". Because of software user
licensing limitations and the unwillingness or confusion of users who do not "quit"
their search sessions properly, the number of user channels can be reduced to zero.
At this point the "Sorry" message appears, and no one else can get into the database
until our office "unlocks" the channels. About ten thousand dollars, the cost of
enlarging our user license, would reduce the "Sorry" messages by about three-
quarters. When you are finished searching the database, please quit according to
instructions.

> The Database Is Not Easy to Use

Because of the aforementioned financial considerations, use of the APIRS database
requires a reasonably knowledgeable user; one who has used other scientific
databases such as those in DIALOG, for example. Users who want to search our
database by themselves are expected to know, or to read and learn about, the
standard Boolean search strategies and specific database commands. Instructions are
provided on the Search Survival Pages that are accessible from the Web site
database page.

For very limited telephone assistance to help solve your telnet problems, you are
welcome to call the APIRS office (352-392-1799) and ask for Vic Ramey or
Kimberly Meyer.

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Army Corps Aquatic Plant
Program Under New Leadership



Mr. Lewis Decell, Program Manager of the US Army Corps Aquatic Plant Control
Research Program (APCRP) retired at the end of 1995 after many years with the
program he helped create. Under his leadership, APCRP established research work
units for biological control, chemical control, and ecology of aquatic plants. He also
created the Corps' new Center for Aquatic Plant Research and Technology in 1993
to provide a single facility to coordinate aquatic plant research and technology
transfer.

Dr. John W. Barko is the new Program Manager of APCRP, taking over from
Decell on January 1, 1996. Barko for years has been an aquatic plant ecology
researcher, and previously served as the technology area leader for ecology under
APCRP.

Among the first decisions Barko will make is how to re-focus the programs of
APCRP, necessary after last year's federal budget cuts resulted in a 50% reduction
in research money for the aquatic plant program this fiscal year. One silver lining to
Barko's budget dilemma is that as of this writing, the President's budget proposal for
1997 does not further cut the APCRP budget.

Another silver lining is that Mr. Robert Gunkel continues to serve as the assistant
manager of the program: Gunkel was instrumental in educating Congress as to the
need for aquatic plant research and the need for funding at the federal level, thus
saving APCRP from an otherwise certain demise.

Barko and Gunkel may be contacted at US Army Corps of Engineers, Waterways Experiment
Station EP, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, (800) 522-6937, ext. 3654, or
(601) 634-3654.





Recycling Pesticide Containers



Each year in the United States, more than 35 million "agricultural" pesticide
containers (which includes aquatic herbicide containers) are manufactured and
distributed. This is more than sixty million pounds of High Density Polyethylene
(HDPE) plastic which must be disposed of one way or another.

Rather than take the trouble to burn the empty containers (and pollute the air), or to
bury them in a landfill (and pollute the ground), why not recycle them into usable
products, such as roofing shingles or faux wooden benches? After all, since 1992
pesticide manufacturers have supported the costs of collecting, grinding up, and
recycling used pesticide containers. All that is needed to become part of the
manufacturer's container recycling system is people to take responsibility for setting
up and maintaining collection sites.

In Florida, more and more counties are setting up "pesticide container recycling
collection centers" for the use of farmers, pest control companies, plant nurseries,
golf courses, government agencies, and others who typically use pesticides that
come in HDPE plastic containers. (This generally excludes homeowners, whose
pesticides do not usually come in large bulk containers made of HDPE.)

The effort to set up collection sites in Florida is being coordinated by G. Tim Hurner
of the Cooperative Extension Service, under a program being funded by the Florida
Department of Environmental Protection. He will provide interested parties with
motivational brochures, or will provide complete instructions on how to set up a
local pesticide container recycling collection center.

To learn more, contact G. Tim Hurner at UF/IFAS, Florida Pesticide Container Recycling
Program, 4509 W. George Blvd., Sebring, FL 33872-5803, (941) 382-2509.












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May 1996





Our Last Word on Balls ...



"In the Hokkaido district of Japan, there is a lake with especially fine Cladophora
balls which form part of a summer festival connected with the folklore of the local
Ainic people. Judging by the issue of a special stamp and a picture postcard [both
depicting Cladophora balls], "Cladophora worship" seems to have become a tourist
attraction. Moreover, there is (or was) a bar in Tokyo called Marimba, the Japanese
name for these balls, where plastic Cladophora balls are on sale. It seems that the
mythology surrounding these balls involves a young man and girl who drowned in
the lake, their hearts turning into Cladophora balls. So popular have Cladophora
balls become in Japan that they are now protected plants. It is said that plants of
other non-ball forming species are rolled by hand into balls and sold as true
Marimba."

Excerpt from Freshwater Algae: their microscopic world explored, by Hilda Canter-Lund and
John W.G. Lund. (Review of book)

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May 1996





"The Lotus beds of the Monroe marshes
[Lake Erie] were for a great many years an advertising feature of Monroe
to attract tourists and visitors to that city. These have practically
S disappeared since Michigan put the muskrat under game protection. The
rats devoured the rhizomes for food and thus destroyed one of Monroe's
flourishing activities. The plants flowered by the thousands every year and visitors were
taken out to the beds and allowed to cut the flowers at will and carry them
away. I am putting it rather mildly when I say that in the forty years I was at
Detroit I probably saw a million such flowers." 9

Excerpt from O.A. Farwell, The Color of the Flowers of Nelumbo pentapetala,
Rhodora 38:272. 1934. (Now recognized as Nelumbo lutea.) Note: Dr. Edward Voss at the University
of Michigan Herbarium reports that Nelumbo lutea still occurs in the area described by Farwell.

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May 1996





Tropical Aquatic Plants from ... Denmark?!


by Claus Christensen, Tropica Aquarium Plants, PO Box 3, DK-8530 Hjortshoej,
Denmark, http://www.tropica.dk

During the past fifty years in Europe, a tradition has evolved of well-equipped
aquaria with numerous plants. This has resulted in a suite of producers of aquarium
plants. Tropica Aquarium Plants, an aquatic plant nursery in Denmark, is now
twenty-five years old and has grown to be among the largest aquatic plant producers
of the world. Thirty-two employees produce 1.5 million pots a year, 90% of which
are exported all over the world, including Japan, Hong Kong, Germany, The
Netherlands, and Canada. 160 different species of aquatic plants are produced,
including many species of Cryptocoryne, Echinodorus, and Anubias.

Tropica's total
indoor production
area consists of 11 _
plant houses
covering about
10,000 m2, but less
than 20% is in
common tank. ----
production. A
computer controls
light, temperature,
nutrition, and
humidity so that
growth conditions
are optimal. During the dark winter season, automated high-pressure sodium vapour
lights travel across the greenhouses to supply missing sunlight. Due to the salinity of
the local water supply, an on-sight reverse osmosis plant is used to produce 20,000
litres of clean, basic water each day.




In the beginning, all plants were grown in indoor ponds. However, our first
gathering tours to tropical areas revealed that many submerged plants are actually
amphibious during the dry season, they grow above the water level on lake and
river banks. A fraction of our plants are grown submerged to allow the development
of submerged leaves and true colors. But accommodation of submerged plants to
new environments is often harder because they are more closely adapted to the
water and light quality. Today, most of Tropica's plants are grown hydroponically
in a substrate of "stonewool." This procedure allows us to control the nutrients to
the plants and to apply well-tested production methods such as carbon enrichment of
the air. In addition, the plants can be exported to most of the world because soil is
avoided in our products. This method produces healthier plants due to the enhanced
growth conditions, and they are much easier to handle. Therefore, they are better
able to face the acclimatisation period when moved from one environment to
another.

TISSUE CULTURE

In addition to vegetative and seed propagation of aquarium plants, Tropica produces
some 75 species from tissue culture. Tissue culture propagation is an
environmentally compatible mass production method. By starting with plant
material free from bacteria, fungi and insects, we reduce the need for pest control.
As well as generating disease-free plants, this technique significantly reduces
propagation time. Tissue cultured plants are much more uniform in size and form,
and many species show a more bushy growth with more adventitious shoots,
qualities that many aquarists appreciate.

The first step in tissue culture is to take the plant from the greenhouse and disinfect
it for further propagation. This is where we encounter the first hurdle because
obtaining a clean plant in the sterilisation process can be very difficult. Often we
sterilize 100 plants, but only one will be free from bacteria and fungus. Now we can
propagate the sterile plant in the laboratory. After some weeks of growth in sterile
glasses, the plants are divided. In this growth phase, the plants have an optimal
supply of sugars and vitamins, but we illuminate the plants part of the day to
develop the hormonal regulating system. The plants are divided in special laminar
airflow benches where work in clean air is possible. In this way, no re-
contamination takes place. When enough plants have been pro-duced, some are
planted in the nursery to "harden off". New roots for further growth develop and the




plants adapt to the natural env-ironment. After a few weeks, the strong and healthy
plants are sold.

IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

The USA is one of the few countries of the world to which Tropica can not export
aquatic plants, because the US Department of Agriculture requires that imported
plants be free of growth medium to avoid soil pests. Because Tropica's plants are
grown in stonewool and part of the roots are hidden in this material, they can not be
imported. Ironically, this leads to the import of plants collected in nature or from
tropical open air nurseries. We know from our gathering tours that such specimens
introduce numerous pests and pathogens. In addition, importing collected plants
increases the risk of introducing plants with well-known potential damage to the
native flora. These plants may enter as weeds or by incorrect use of scientific
names. Even countries such as Japan, Australia, and New Zealand which have very
strict import rules accept our plants for import, occasionally with some kind of
quarantine.

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May 1996





A Small Mediterranean


Island Needs Help!


- an appeal from Sylvia Haslam

I work partly in Malta, an island of less than 300km2, with 330,000 people
(excluding tourists). What population density! What human impact! Estimates of
built-up area now range anything up to a third, and most of the rest is farmed,
mainly in small fields (down to c. 20x5m) on often-terraced slopes. What remains?
There are karst lands (semi-bare limestones) with garigue (very short woody plants
with herbs), there are stream beds, now mostly dried by groundwater extraction.
There are odd bits on building sites and by roads, the occasional small copse of
maquis (Mediterranean sclerophyll) and little more.

All is now falling apart. Up to the 1960s, most people lived in towns and hardly ever
left them. They have since colonised the countryside in a big way, acquiring cars
and other attributes of affluence, and, naturally enough, they want country leisure
activities. They have no tradition or experience of rural affairs or sustainability. The
rural folk, almost a different nation, knew sustainable farming, but many emigrated,
and the minority remaining have become too affluent to bother about keeping soil
stable, repairing terrace walls, etc., activities once necessary for their survival.

The result poses huge problems. There are still gems of natural and historic heritage
in the river valleys and elsewhere, but more of the river valleys is dry, disturbed or
both.

Is anyone interested in studying the effect of excessive human impact, as a warning
for other places? Including the effects of habitat fragmentation and loss on
community, species and gene pools?

There is no money available, so researchers would have to bring their own grants. If
coming for long enough, the University Departments of Agriculture and Biology
and the (Government) Department of Afforestation and Horticulture welcome




visitors. (Afforestation is mostly planting trees in towns.)

There is more here than I can do, and it is a worthwhile cause. Would anyone like to
investigate while there is still something left to investigate? If so, please contact,
for further information: Dr. Sylvia Haslam, Department of Plant Sciences,
University of Cambridge, England. Dr. S. Haslam

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May 1996




Getting to Know the Natives


THOSE KNOTTY SPIKERUSHES


by Kathy Craddock Burks, Botanist, Technical Services, Bureau of Aquatic Plant
Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, 3917 Commonwealth
Blvd., MS 710, Tallahassee, FL 32399, 904/487-2600.

Most of Florida's 28 or 29 species of the sedge genus Eleocharis (spikerushes) are
diminutive plants, their often-tufted aerial stems reaching no more than 0.5 m in
height. A few of our species, however, may soar to 1 m in height. Among these
"large" Eleocharis are three species whose stems are nodose-septate, i.e., knobby or
knotted with conspicuous joints where complete crosswalls (septae) occur.

Probably the most common of these knotted spikerushes is E. equisetoides, which
grows in west, north, and central Florida, and ranges northward to Massachusetts,
Michigan, and Wisconsin, and westward to Texas and Missouri. Like all
spikerushes, this species has no leaf blades (only a bladeless sheath at the base of
each unbranched stem); it produces a single flower spike (of spiralled scales) at the
stem tips; and its fruits acheness) have persistent style bases tubercless). Unlike most
Eleocharis, this one has a flower spike that is not much wider than the stem below
it. You can distinguish this species from the other knotted spikerushes by the regular
spacing of the septae, or joints, along the stem, all the way to the tip; by the usually
bumpy nodulosee) stem surface between the joints; and by the thin achene bristles
shorter than the achene.
















Eleocharis equisetoides, achene and stem tips


The other two knotty species found in Florida, E. interstincta and E. montana, have
tropical affinities. More common in central and south Florida (occurring rarely in
north and west Florida), E. interstincta also ranges west to Texas and south to
Bolivia and Brazil. Its stem joints become crowded (closer together) near the stem
tip; the internode stem surface is smooth rather than bumpy; and the robust achene
bristles are longer than the achene.











Eleocharis interstincta, achene and stem tips

Least common of the knotted spikerushes in Florida, E. montana ranges north to
south Georgia, west across the Sun Belt to Arizona and New Mexico and south
through the Carribean and Central America to tropical South America. Its stem
joints are spaced regularly but closely together all along the stem (2-5 mm apart);
the internode stem surface is smooth; the flower spike is distinctly wider than its
stem (about twice as wide); and the achene bristles are of unequal length, some as
long as the achene. Another obvious difference is in the tubercles: while the other
two species have a narrow conical tubercle topping the achene, this species has a


Is rJ




short broad tubercle hugging the achene body.


Eleocharis montana, achene and stem tips

All three species, as well as other spikerushes, provide a food source relished by
waterfowl. For more information, contact the Bureau at the address above.

Illustrations from Aquatic and Wetland Plants of Southeastern United States, by R.K. Godfrey
and J.W. Wooten. 1981. The University of Georgia Press, Athens. Used with permission.

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May 1996




AT THE CENTER


Fox Pounces on New Aquatic Weed





Click to see 26,037K image

Dr. Alison Fox, Research Assistant Professor, is researching the invasive potential
of a relatively new weed in Florida, the aquatic soda apple (Solanum tampicense).
Aquatic soda apple has been found proliferating in regularly flooded wetland
habitats such as along rivers and in cypress domes. It does not appear to tolerate
continuous flooding. The plant is believed to have come from Mexico, the West
Indies, and Belize. It has been reported only in a fairly limited area of southwest
Florida with the largest and densest single population approaching 150 acres. Dr.
Fox is researching the weed potential and management of Solanum tampicense in
hopes of heading off a potentially massive problem.

Aquatic soda apple has elongate leaves with indented edges and prickles on the
veins of both leaf surfaces. Sprawling stems are up to /2 inch wide, 6 to 15 feet long,
and covered in curved prickles. The leaf and stem prickles snag and interlock to
form an impenetrable thicket. The stems can climb small trees and bushes to a
height of 15 feet. White and yellow tomato-like flowers develop into clusters of up
to 11 pea-size berries. The berries turn from green to orange to deep red as they
ripen. The presence of the plant amongst a variety of wetland species indicates that
it can invade and survive within existing vegetation. Aquatic soda apple grows in
both full sunlight and in shade, and reproduces readily from seed. Although the
plants do not tolerate frost, the seeds can survive freezing temperatures, indicating
that the species could survive as an annual plant in north Florida. The plant also
regenerates from stem sections in soil, water, or from cut stumps. It does not
regenerate from root sections, nor does it appear to have rhizomes.




Dr. Fox hopes to learn more about the basic biology and ecological impacts of
aquatic soda apple as well as methods for controlling the prickly species. She also is
requesting confirmed sightings of the plant to more firmly delineate its distribution
in Florida. If aquatic soda apple does not turn out to be a threat, another species will
have been described. If it is a disaster waiting to happen, Fox hopes to get a jump on
aquatic soda apple.

CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
(352) 392-9613

Dr. Randall K. Stocker, Director

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AT THE CENTER


Stocker Targets Melaleuca



Having recently been transplanted to Florida as
the new director of the Center for Aquatic
Plants, Dr. Randall Stocker plans to study
another transplant to Florida, Melaleuca
quinquenervia. Stocker will target the
reproductive ecology of the invasive tree to /I 0
determine when Melaleuca begins producing '
seeds, and what other factors affect seed .
production, release and germination. He also I1 l'
will study the germination of seeds in seed !
banks and how it is affected by disturbance.
Stocker also plans to explore the prediction of .. ... -. _
impacts of potential biological control agents -
of Melaleuca by clipping the leaves to mimic
insect herbivory.

CENTER FOR AQUATIC PLANTS
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
(352) 392-9613

Dr. Randall K. Stocker, Director

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May 1996





Meetings


23RD ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON ECOSYSTEMS
RESTORATION & CREATION. May 16-17, 1996. Tampa, Florida.

Sponsored by the Hillsborough Community College Institute of Florida Studies, this
annual conference provides a forum for the nationwide exchange of scientific
research results in the restoration, creation and management of freshwater and
coastal wetlands, uplands and transitional areas.
Contact: F.J. Webb, Dean of Environmental Programs, Hillsborough Community College, Plant
City Campus, 1206 N. Park Road, Plant City, Florida 33566; 813/757-2104.

2ND NATIONAL WORKSHOP ON CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS
FOR ANIMAL WASTE MANAGEMENT. May 15-18, 1996. Fort
Worth, Texas.

Sponsored by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, and Texas A&M University, this workshop will
provide training sessions and field tours of constructed wetlands for many uses
including treatment of swine waste, aquaculture, agriculture, dairy waste and private
homes.
Contact: Paul DuBowy, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, Texas A&M University,
College Station, TX 77843-2258; 409/845-5765; fax: 409/845-3786; p-dubowyvtamu.edu

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PLANTS AND
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION. November 26-30, 1996. Lucknow,
India.

Organized by the International Society of Environmental Botanists and the National
Botanical Research Institute, the conference will discuss the role and potential of
terrestrial and aquatic plants in bio-indication and -remediation of environmental
pollution. Invited lectures and presented papers will be published in the form of a




book.
Contact: K.J. Ahmad, Organizing Secretary ICPEP, National Botanical Research Institute,
Lucknow 226 001, India; (0522) 271031-35, Ext. 209; fax: (0522)282849; anager@nbri.sirneted.
ernet.in

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON EUROPEAN LOWLAND
WET GRASSLANDS MANAGEMENT AND RESTORATION FOR
BIODIVERSITY. September 17-20, 1996. University of South
Bohemia, eske Bud jovice, Czech Republic.

Organized by the International Centre of Landscape Ecology, Deparatment of
Geography, Loughborough University, UK in association with the Darwin Initiative.
The aim of the conference is to bring together those concerned with the biodiversity,
management and restoration of European floodplain and coastal wet grasslands.
Contact: Gill Giles, ICOLE, Department of Geography, Loughborough University,
Loughborough, Leicestershire, LEl1 3TU, United Kingdom; 44 1509 223030; fax: 44 1509
260753; G.Gilesg,@lut.ac.uk

VTH INTECOL INTERNATIONAL WETLANDS CONFERENCE.
September 22-28, 1996. Perth, Australia. University of Western
Australia.

Co-sponsored by the Society of Wetland Scientists, Wetlands for the Future is the
theme for the 1996 conference. The conference will emphasize our understanding of
wetlands now, the importance of conservation and management, and the role of
technology in maintaining wetlands in the future.
Contact: J. Davis, School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Murdoch University,
Murdoch, Western Australia 6150; 61 9 360 2939; fax: 61 9 310 4997; davis@essunl.murdoch.
edu.au

SECOND INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON THE BIOLOGY OF
SPHAGNUM. July 11-13, 1996. Quebec City, Canada. Laval
University.

Held by the International Association of Bryologists, the symposium will include
topics on population biology, community ecology, taxonomy, productivity and




peatland ecology. The symposium will be followed by the Fourth Annual Canadian
Peatland Restoration Workshop on July 13-14, also at Laval University.
Contact: L. Rochefort, Phytologie, FSAA, Laval University, Quebec, Canada GIK 7P4; fax:
418/656-7856; LROC@vmlrn.ulaval.ca

THE AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY. July 14-17,
1996. Burlington, Vermont.

The latest developments in aquatic plant science and aquatic plant management
using biological, mechanical, and chemical control techniques will be discussed. For
the first time, the APMS meeting is being held in the northeastern U.S. Current
information on biology and control of weedy species in this area, such as Eurasian
watermilfoil, water chestnut, and purple loosestrife, will be presented.
Contact: 904/429-4119

SOCIETY OF WETLAND SCIENTISTS 17TH ANNUAL MEETING.
JUNE 9-14, 1996. KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI.

The theme for the 1996 meeting is From Small Streams to Big Rivers, and will
include technical sessions and workshops, field trips and field workshops.
Contact: Society of Wetland Scientists, Allen Marketing & Management, PO Box 368,
Lawrence, KS 66044; fax: 913/843-1274.

3RD INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON RESERVOIR
LIMNOLOGY AND WATER QUALITY. August 31 September 5,
1997. eske Bud jovice, Czech Republic.

The aim of the conference is to bring together limnologists and water quality
engineers dealing specifically with reservoir limnology or topics relevant to
understanding, predicting and managing reservoir water quality.
Contact: Jaroslav Vrba, Conference Secretary, Hydrobiological Institute, Academy of Sciences of
the Czech Republic, Na sadkach 7, CZ-370 05 esk6 Bud jovice, Czech Republic, 42-38-45484;
fax: 42-38-45718; hbu@dale.entu.cas.cz

39TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON GREAT LAKES RESEARCH.
May 26-30, 1996. Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. University of




Toronto, Erindale College.


Special sessions will cover a variety of current large lakes issues such as the
effectiveness of international management agreements, non-native species, effects
of UV radiation, human health, sea lamprey controls, satellite imagery, food web
interactions, and wetland restoration.
Contact: W. Gary Sprules, Department of Zoology, Erindale College, University of Toronto,
Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6, Canada; 905/828-3987; fax: 905/828-3792; gsprules@cyclops.
erin.utoronto.ca

THE AQUATIC WEED CONTROL, AQUATIC PLANT CULTURE
& REVEGETATION SHORT COURSE. May 14-16, 1996. Fort
Lauderdale, Florida. University of Florida.

Topics include plant identification, plant propagation and revegetation, biological
control of weeds and herbicide technology.
Contact: University of Florida, IFAS Office of Conferences, PO Box 110750, Gainesville, FL
32611-0750; 352/392-5930; fax: 352/392-9734; CONF@GNV.IFAS.UFL.EDU

16TH ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM OF THE NORTH
AMERICAN LAKE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY. November 13-16,
1996. Minneapolis, Minnesota.

The conference program title is People, Lakes, and Land: Puzzling Relationships.
The symposium will address important developments in lake and watershed
management for both professionals and lay people.
Contact: NALMS, PO Box 101294, Denver, CO, USA 80250; 303/781-8287; fax: 303/781-6538

FLORIDA LAKE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY ANNUAL
CONFERENCE. May 22-24, 1996. Ocala, Florida.

The theme of this seventh annual conference is Decision Making in Lake
Management.
Contact: M. Hoyer, University of Florida, Department of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 7922
NW 71st St., Gainesville, FL, 32653; 352/392-9617 X 227.




FLORIDA AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY. October
8-10, 1996. Fort Myers, Florida.

This will be the 20th annual meeting of the FAPMS. An equipment demonstration is
planned in addition to presentations on aquatic plant management in Florida.
Contact: S. Redovan, 941/694-2174.

SIXTEENTH ASIAN PACIFIC WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY
CONFERENCE. September 1997. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

Contact: Baki Hj. Bakar, Organizing Secretary, The 16th APWSS Conference, c/o Botany
Department, University of Malaya, 59100 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 603-7594351; fax: 603-
7594178; baki(@bbotany.um.edu.my

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Books/Reports



FRESHWATER ALGAE, THEIR MICROSCOPIC WORLD EXPLORED, by H.
Canter-Lund and J.W.G. Lund. 1995. 360 pp. ISBN 0-948737-25-5
(Order from Biopress Ltd., The Orchard, Clanage Road, Bristol BS3 2JX, England, UNITED
KINGDOM. 49.50 plus S/H.)

Here is a science book that might also sell as a "coffee table" art book; the subject so
fascinating, the photographs so captivating. Written by fellows of England's
Freshwater Biological Association, this large-format volume is an introduction to all
the major freshwater algal groups, together with parasitic fungi, protozoan and other
invertebrate predators.

The very high quality alga portraits (387 in color, 640 altogether) are a delightful
sampler of the many colors and shapes to be found among algae. They are
complemented by a very readable text, written for laymen, which answers the
basics: what are algae? where are they found? how do they live? This book will find
its way into many libraries, from home to university.



RESTORATION OF STREAM ECOSYSTEMS--AN INTEGRATED
CATCHMENT APPROACH, edited by M. Eiseltova and J. Biggs. 1995. 170 pp.
(Order from the Natural History Book Service, 2-3 Wills Road, Totnes, TQ9 5XN, Devon, UNITED
KINGDOM. IWRB Publ. 37. 20.00 plus S/H.)

Around the world, "restoration ecologists" are attempting to repair the damage to
rivers and floodplains altered or destroyed by the construction of dams and by
channelization for flood control and boat traffic.

This volume, the second in the series of IWRB's wetland management training
handbooks, is aimed at ecologists, engineers and planners who are responsible for
restoration projects, and also to agriculture, forestry and development planners and




managers.


The book includes a dozen case studies about the "remeandering" (unchannelizing?)
of rivers, structuring stream beds, and other essential acts for re-making rivers. The
case studies are focused on Central and Eastern Europe.



TROPICAL FRESHWATER WETLANDS, A GUIDE TO CURRENT
KNOWLEDGE AND SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT, by H. Roggeri. 1995. 364
pp. ISBN 07923-3785-9
(Order from Kluwer Academic Publishers, Order Dept., POB 358, Accord Station, Hingham, MA 02018-
0358. US$134.00.)

The author of this wetlands management "guide" for professionals notes that even
though wetlands have "an importance which is comparable to that of the tropical
forest", many people in developing countries as well as many development and
nature conservation planners and managers fail to appreciate the "highly valuable
services and products" provided by wetlands, and some have yet "to become
acquainted with wetlands".

The main purpose of the book is "to help provincial planners choose, develop and
carry out" a "new" kind of wetland management, a kind that seeks "to make the best
of the benefits offered by nature, rather than transform or eradicate nature." After
sections in which freshwater wetlands are defined, wetland functions and values are
reviewed, and "interventions" are examined, the author presents guiding principles
and practical approaches to the sustainable management of wetlands.

Thirteen case studies of wetlands management in various developing countries are
presented, including 7 in Africa. Several appendices, including a bibliography of
some 900 citations, complete the volume.



VIZINOVENYEK, by Z. Tuba, illustrated by K. Biro, 1987, reprinted 1995, 64 pp. ISBN
96311-7263-5 (In Hungarian.)
(For ordering information, contact Dr. Zoltan Tuba, Dept. Bot. & Plant Physiol., Agricultural University
of Godollo, Pater K U 1, H-2103 Godollo, HUNGARY; tuba(@,fa.gau.hu)




This is a colorful guide to 122 species of aquatic plants of Hungary, complete with
basic morphological and ecological information about each plant. Each plant is
depicted in a nicely done water color. The small format book includes an index of
common names; nyilfu is the common Hungarian name for Sagittaria sagittifolia,
sarga vizitok vagy tavirozsa is Nuphar lutea.



DEVELOPMENT OF AN AUTOMATED SYSTEM FOR DETECTION AND
MAPPING OF SUBMERSED AQUATIC VEGETATION WITH
HYDROACOUSTIC AND GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM TECHNOLOGIES,
Report 1 The Submersed Aquatic Vegetation Early Warning System (SAVEWS) -
System Description and User's Guide (Version 1.0), by B.M. Sabol and R.E. Melton.
1995. 37 pp.
(For information, contact Bruce Sabol, USACE, Waterways Experiment Station, EL-EN-C, 3909 Halls
Ferry Rd., Vicksburg, MS 39180, sabol(@exl .wes.army.mil)

This report describes a portable system that can be managed by two people and is
operable from a small boat, that is able to detect and map submersed (not topped
out) plants from the surface in real time in areas of up to several thousand acres at
one time. It was made using commercially available, off-the-shelf components. The
system's total cost was less than $50,000, in 1993-94 US dollars.



COMMON PLANTS OF FLORIDA'S AQUATIC PLANT INDUSTRY, SECTION 3
OF AQUATIC PLANT INSPECTION MANUAL, by N.C. Coile. 1995. 131 pp.
(Order from Office of Technical Assistance, Division of Plant Industry, Florida Department of
Agriculture & Consumer Services, POB 147100, 1911 SW 34 ST., Gainesville, FL 32614-7100, (352)
372-3505. $15.00 plus postage.)

This looseleaf manual offers identification information about 87 species that are
commonly sold by Florida's aquatic plant industry. While the publication was
originally intended for the use of Florida Bureau of Plant Inspection workers, it also
might be of interest to nurserymen and others. We suppose that such a manual as
this would be useful in Florida insofar as many of the species treated here are not
included in other references which cover native Florida plants. Unfortunately, most
of the images selected to represent the various plants leave something to be desired,




and closeups or detailed drawings that might enable more accurate identification are
lacking.



PLANT SURVIVAL: ADAPTING TO A HOSTILE WORLD, by B. Capon. 1994. 140
pp.
(Order from Timber Press, Inc., 133 SW 2 Ave., Suite 450, Portland, OR 97204-3527, (503) 227-2878.
Hardback: $24.95 plus S/H; Paper: $15.95 plus S/H.)

This introduction to plant ecology was "written especially for young readers" by a
university botany professor. It tells how plants have adapted to live almost
anywhere, from the arctic tundra to tropical jungles, from the deserts to lakes and
oceans. Many interesting questions are simply answered: why do water lily leaves
feel waxy? what is the purpose of bald cypress knees? how do high mountain plants
protect themselves from ultraviolet rays? The answers are illustrated by colorful
pencil drawings. Though written for middle school audiences, there is enough here
to engage the interest of almost any science reader.



PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF PLANT CONSERVATION, by D.R. Given.
1994. 292 pp. ISBN 0-88192-249-8
(Order from Timber Press, Inc., 133 SW 2 AVE, Suite 450, Portland, OR 97204-3527, (503) 227-2878.
Hardback: $39.95 plus S/H.)

According to the author, "Strict preservationism is not the same as conservation.
Conservation may advocate preservation of species and ecosystems but may also
advocate use of them, providing this is not wasteful...A challenge for conservation is
to seek a middle stance, sometimes promoting preservation, but at other times
supporting controlled exploitation."

This comprehensive handbook for practicing conservationists is "the first detailed
overview ever to be published of this vitally important subject"; it explains the
concepts and principles underlying successful plant conservation. It was
commissioned by the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the World
Conservation Union (IUCN).




Included are chapters on how plants become threatened or extinct; plant population
management; managing protected natural areas; "off-site" conservation in botanic
gardens and gene banks; as well as chapters devoted to ethics; education;
conservation legislation; and the economics of plant conservation.



MANUAL DE IDENTIFICATION DE PLANTS ACUATICAS DEL PARQUE
NATIONAL LAGUNAS DE ZEMPOALA, MEXICO, by J.R. Bonilla-Barbosa and A.
Novelo Retana. 1995. 169 pp. ISBN 968-36-4335-3 (In Spanish)
(For information, contact Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Biologia, Apartado
postal 70-233, 04510 Mexico, DF, MEXICO.)

This volume contains descriptions of the morphology and vegetation of seven
Mexican lakes. Included are descriptions of 66 aquatic plant species which include
information about flowering, fruiting, habitat, and distribution.



CACHE RIVER BASIN, ARKANSAS: ENVIRONMENTAL DATABASE,
COMPACT DISK DATA ARCHIVE, AND META-DATA DOCUMENTATION, by
R. Kress and S. Bourne. 1995. 46 pp. and 1 CD.
(For information, contact Public Affairs Office, U.S. Army Engineer, Waterways Experiment Station,
3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199, (601) 634-2502. Technical Report WRP-SM-13)

This investigation designed a digital database for numerical and spatial analysis of a
wetlands system. The prototype was developed for the Cache River watershed. It is
one of the first environmental databases to conform to new federal regulations and
standards for geographic data, acquisition, storage and access, as ordered by
President Clinton in Executive Order 12906, April 11, 1994.

The databases on the CD include those on topography, hydrology, soils, vegetation,
wildlife, meteorology, wetland maps, cultural boundaries, satellite images and field
measurement locations.


AQUACULTURE IN THE UNITED STATES, A Historical Survey, by R.R. Stickney.




1996. 372 pp. ISBN 0-4711-3154-7
(Order from John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 605 Third Ave., New York, NY 10158, (800) 225-5945. $49.95.)

The author defines aquaculture as "the rearing of aquatic organisms under controlled
or semicontrolled conditions", a definition that includes plants as well as animals.

This history goes into detail about early U.S. fish culturists, Spencer Baird and the
establishment of the U.S. Fish and Fisheries Commission (in 1871), the
development of fish culture first as an industry and then as a science, species lists
and shipping tonnage, the beginnings of the American Fisheries Society, on up to
the establishment of the World Mariculture Society (1969) and finally to current day
issues: "hatchery bashing", high land costs, protecting species vs. protecting stocks,
etc.



WETLAND PLANTS FROM TEST TUBES, by C.B. Burgess. 1995. 36 pp.
(Order from North Carolina Sea Grant, Box 8605, N.C. State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8605.
Publication No. UNC-SG-95-08.)

"No Wetlands, No Seafood." But, when wetlands are destroyed or are otherwise in
need of restoration or "mitigation", where do we find the plants to plant in them?

Rather than raiding existing wetlands for plant material, we can now employ
biotechnology and the methods of tissue culture, or "micropropagation", to produce
as many plants as needed for wetland restoration.

This book, though not exactly a how-to manual, does answer the most often asked
questions by resource managers, developers and others about tissue culture: What
are the basics? What are the five steps of tissue culture? What about genetic
variation (or lack thereof)? What laws apply and how is the industry coming along?

Chapters deal with seagrasses, as well as dune and wetland plants.

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FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic plant database since December 1995.
The database has more than 42,000 citations. To receive free bibliographies on specific
plants and/or subjects, contact APIRS at 352-392-1799 or use the database online.
To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library.


Adamec, L.
Oxygen budget in the traps of Utricularia australis.
CARNIV. PLANT NEWSL. 24:42-45. 1995.

Ahern, J.; Lyons, J.; McClelland, J.; Valiela, I.
Invertebrate response to nutrient-induced changes in macrophyte assemblages in Waquoit
Bay.
BIOL. BULL. 189(2):241-242. 1995.

Allison, S.K.
Recovery from small-scale anthropogenic disturbances by northern California salt marsh
plant assemblages.
ECOL. APPLICATIONS 5(3):693-702. 1995.

Amat, J.A.
Effects of wintering greylag geese Anser anser on their Scirpus food plants.
ECOGRAPHY 18(2):155-163. 1995.

Amritphale, D.; Gutch, A.; Hsiao, A.I.
Phytochrome-mediated germination control of Hygrophila auriculata seeds following dry
storage augmented by temperature pulse, hormones, anaerobiosis or osmoticum imbibition.
ENVIRON. EXPER. BOT. 35(2):187-192. 1995.

Anderson, N.O.; Ascher, P.D.
Style morph frequencies in Minnesota populations of Lythrum (Lythraceae) II. Tristylous




L. salicaria L.
SEXUAL PLANT REPRODUCTION 8(92):105-112. 1995.

Appenroth, K.J.; Oelmuller, R.
Regulation of transcript level and nitrite reductase activity by phytochrome and nitrate in
turions of Spirodela polyrhiza.
PHYSIOLOGIA PLANTARUM 93:272-278. 1995.

Bailey, F.C.; Knight, A.W.; Ogle, R.S.; Klaine, S.J.
Effect of sulfate level on selenium uptake by Ruppia maritima.
CHEMOSPHERE 30(3):579-591. 1995.

Barber, J.T.; Sharma, H.A.; Ensley, H.E.; et al
Detoxification of phenol by the aquatic angiosperm, Lemna gibba.
CHEMOSPHERE 31(6):3567-3574. 1995.

Bartodziej, W.; Weymouth, G.
Waterbird abundance and activity on waterhyacinth and egeria in the St. Marks River,
Florida.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 33:19-22. 1995.

Beffagna, V.; Romani, G.; Gatti, L.
Changes in chloride fluxes and cytosolic pH induced by abscisic acid in Elodea densa
leaves.
BOT. ACTA 108(2):74-79. 1995.

Belanger, L.; Bedard, J.
Foraging ecology of greater snow geese, Chen caerulescens atlantica, in different Scirpus
marsh plant communities.
CANADIAN FIELD-NATURALIST 108(3):271-281. 1994.

Beyers, D.W.
Acute toxicity of rodeo herbicide to Rio Grande silvery minnow as estimated by surrogate
species: plains minnow and fathead minnow.
ARCH. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 29(1):24-26. 1995.

Biernacki, M.; Lovett Doust, J.; Lovett Doust, L.
Effects of trichloroethylene, plant sex and site of origin on modular demography in
Vallisneria americana.




J. APPL. ECOL. 32:761-777. 1995.


Bishop, J.H.
Evaluation of the removal of treated municipal effluent on water chemistry and the
abundance of submersed vegetation in Kings Bay Crystal River, Florida.
MASTER'S THESIS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE, 65 PP. 1995.

Blossey, B.; Schroeder, D.
Host specificity of three potential biological weed control agents attacking flowers and
seeds of Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife).
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 5(1):47-53. 1995.

Boeye, C.; van Straaten, D.; Verheyn, R.F.
A recent transformation from poor to rich fen caused by artificial groundwater recharge.
J. HYDROLOGY 169(1-4):111-129. 1995.

Bowmer, K.H.; Jacobs, S.W.L.; Sainty, G.R.
Identification, biology and management of Elodea canadensis, Hydrocharitaceae.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 33:13-19. 1995.

Brewer, C.A.; Smith, W.K.
Leaf surface wetness and gas exchange in the pond lily Nuphar polysepalum
(Nymphaeaceae).
AM. J. BOT. 82(10):1271-1277. 1995.

Brock, T.C.M.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Rollon, R.; et al
Effects of nutrient loading and insecticide application on the ecology of Elodea-dominated
freshwater microcosms II. Responses of macrophytes, periphyton and macroinvertebrate
grazers.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 134(1):53-74. 1995.

Bruhl, J.J.; Perry, S.
Photosynthetic pathway-related ultrastructure of C3, C4, and C3-like C3-C4 intermediate
sedges (Cyperaceae), with special reference to Eleocharis.
AUST. J. PLANT PHYSIOL. 22(4):521-530. 1995.

Bubier, J.L.
The relationship of vegetation to methane emission and hydrochemical gradients in
northern peatlands.




J. ECOL. 83(3):403-420. 1995.


Budd, J.; Lillie, R.A.; Rasmussen, P.
Morphological characteristics of the aquatic macrophyte, Myriophyllum spicatum L., in
Fish Lake, Wisconsin.
J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 10(1): 19-31. 1995.

Catling, P.M.; Porebski, Z.S.
The spread and current distribution of European frogbit, Hydrocharis morsus-ranae L., in
North America.
CAN. FIELD-NATURALIST 109(2):236-241. 1995.

Chapin, C.T.; Pastor, J.
Nutrient limitations in the northern pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea.
CAN. J. BOT. 73(5):728-734. 1995.

Chapman, L.J.; Liem, K.F.
Papyrus swamps and the respiratory ecology of Barbus neumayeri.
ENVIRON. BIOL. FISHES 44(1-3): 183-197. 1995.

Cherrill, A.
Infestation of improved grasslands by Juncus effusus L. in the catchment of the River
Tyne, Northern England: a field survey.
GRASS FORAGE SCI. 50(1):85-91. 1995.

Chick, J.H.; Mclvor, C.C.
Patterns in the abundance and composition of fishes among beds of different macrophytes:
viewing a littoral zone as a landscape.
CAN. J. FISH. AQUAT. SCI. 51(12):2873-2882. 1994.

Claveri, B.; Mouvet, C.
Temperature effects on copper uptake and C02 assimilation by the aquatic moss
Rhynchostegium riparioides.
ARCH. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 28(3);314-320. 1995.

Clayton, J.S.; Tanner, C.C.
Environmental persistence and fate of arsenic applied for aquatic weed control.
IN: ARSENIC IN THE ENVIRONMENT, PART I: CYCLING AND CHARACTERIZATION, J.O. NRIAGU,
ED., JOHN WILEY & SONS, PP. 345-363. 1994.





Clevering, O.A.; van der Putten, W.H.
Effects of detritus accumulation on the growth of Scirpus maritimus under greenhouse
conditions.
CAN. J. BOT. 73(6):852-861. 1995.

Cole, C.A.; Bratton, S.
Freshwater wetlands of Cape Hatteras National Seashore: water quality in a resort setting.
NATURAL AREAS J. 15(2):136-147. 1995.

Coops, H.; van der Velde, G.
Seed dispersal, germination and seedling growth of six helophyte species in relation to
water-level zonation.
FRESHWATER BIOLOGY 34:13-20. 1995.

Coquery, M.; Welbourn, P.M.
The relationship between metal concentration and organic matter in sediments and metal
concentration in the aquatic macrophyte Eriocaulon septangulare.
WAT. RES. 29(9):2094-2102. 1995.

Craft, C.B.; Vymazal, J.; Richardson, C.J.
Response of Everglades plant communities to nitrogen and phosphorus additions.
WETLANDS 15(3):258-271. 1995.

Crawford, D.J.; Landolt, E.
Allozyme divergence among species of Wolffia (Lemnaceae).
PLANT SYST. EVOL. 197(1-4):59-69. 1995.

Creed, R.P.; Sheldon, S.P.
Weevils and watermilfoil: did a North American herbivore cause the decline of an exotic
plant?
ECOL. APPL. 5(4):1113-1121. 1995.

Cuda, J.P.
Utilization of pennyworts (Hydrocotyle spp.) as food plants by the southern armyworm,
Spodoptera eridania (Cramer) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).
AQUATICS 17(4):4,6,8,10.


Daehler, C.C.; Strong, D.R.




Impact of high herbivore densities on introduced smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora,
invading San Francisco Bay, California.
ESTUARIES 18(2):409-417. 1995.

Daldorph, P.W.G.; Thomas, J.D.
Factors influencing the stability of nutrient-enriched freshwater macrophyte communities:
the role of sticklebacks Pungitiuspungitius and freshwater snails.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 33:271-289. 1995.

DePrado, R.; Romera, E.; Menendez, J.
Atrazine detoxification in Panicum dichotomiflorum and target site Polygonum
lapathifolium.
PESTICIDE BOCHEM. PHYSIOL. 52(1):1-11. 1995.

Doyle, R.D.; Smart, R.M.
Potential use of native aquatic plants for long-term control of problem aquatic plants in
Guntersville Reservoir, Alabama: Report 2. Competitive interactions between beneficial
and nuisance species.
TECH. REPT. A-93-6, US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STN.,
AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM, VICKSBURG, MS, 52 PP. 1995.

Elster, J.; Kvet, J.; Hauser, V.
Root length of duckweeds (Lemnaceae) as an indicator of water trophic status.
EKOLOGIA (BRATISLAVA) 14(1):43-59. 1995.

Ervik, F.; Renner, S.S.; Johanson, K.A.
Breeding system and pollination of Nuphar luteum (L.) Smith (Nymphaeaceae) in Norway.
FLORA 190(2):109-113. 1995.

Fahey, L.L.; Crow, G.E.
The vegetation of Pequawket Bog, Ossipee, New Hampshire.
RHODORA 97(889):39-92. 1995.

Fennessy, M.S.; Cronk, J.K.; Mitsch, W.J.
Macrophyte productivity and community development in created freshwater wetlands
under experimental hydrological conditions.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 3(4):469-484. 1994.


Flaig, E.G.; Havens, K.E.




Historical trends in the Lake Okeechobee ecosystem I. Land use and nutrient loading.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. SUPPL. 107(1):1-24. 1995.

Flint, N.A.; Madsen, J.D.
The effect of temperature and daylength on the germination of Potamogeton nodosus
tubers. J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 10(2):125-128. 1995.

Grasmuck, N.; Haury, J.; Leglize, L.; Muller, S.
Assessment of the bio-indicator capacity of aquatic macrophytes using multivariate
analysis.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 300/301:115-122. 1995.

Greger, M.; Kautsky, L.; Sandberg, T.
A tentative model of Cd uptake in Potamogeton pectinatus in relation to salinity.
ENVIRON. EXP. BOT. 35(2):215-225. 1995.

Groenveld, D.P.; French, R.H.
Hydrodynamic control of an emergent aquatic plant (Scirpus acutus) in open channels.
WATER RESOURCES BULL. 31(3):505-514. 1995.

Gupta, M.; Rai, U.N.; Tripathi, R.D.; Chandra, P.
Lead induced changes in glutathione and phytochelatin in Hydrilla verticillata (L.f.) Royle.
CHEMOSPHERE 30(10):2011-2020. 1995.

Harris, T.T.; Williges, K.A.; Zimba, P.V.
Primary productivity and decomposition of five emergent macrophyte communities in the
Lake Okeechobee marsh ecosystem.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. SPEC. ISSUES ADVANCES IN LIMNOL. 45:63-78. 1995.

Haslam, S.M.
A discussion of the strength (durability) of thatching reed (Phragmites australis) in
relation to habitat.
REED RESEARCH REPORT X, DEPT. PLANT SCIENCES, UNIV. CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND, 56 PP. 1995.

Hatcher, P.E.; Ayres, P.G.; Paul, N.D.
The effect of natural and simulated insect herbivory, and leaf age, on the process of
infection of Rumex crispus L. and R. obtusifolius L. by Uromyces rumicis (Schum.) Wint.
NEW PHYTOL. 130(2):239-249. 1995.





Henderson, P.A.; Hamilton, H.F.
Standing crop and distribution of fish in drifting and attached floating meadows within an
upper Amazonian varzea lake.
J. FISH. BIOL. 47(2):266-276. 1995.

Hickman, S.
Improvement of habitat quality nesting and migrating birds at the Des Plaines River
Wetlands Demonstration Project.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 3(4):485-494. 1994.

Hight, S.D.; Blossey, B.; Laing, J.; Declerck-Floate, R.
Establishment of insect biological control agents from Europe against Lythrum salicaria in
North America.
ENVIRON. ENTOMOL. 24(4):967-977. 1995.

Hroudova, Z.; Zakravsky, P.
Butomus umbellatus-community in the Czech and Slovak Republics.
PRESLIA, PRAHA 66:97-114. 1994.

Hruby, T.; Cesanek, W.E.; Miller, K.E.
Estimating relative wetland values for regional planning.
WETLANDS 15(2):93-107. 1995.

Jacob, J.; Greitner, C.; Drake, B.G.
Acclimation of photosynthesis in relation to Rubisco and nonstructural carbohydrate
contents and in situ carboxylase activity in Scirpus olneyi grown at elevated C02 in the
field.
PLANT CELL ENVIRON. 18(8):875-884. 1995.

Jacobsen, D.; Sand-Jensen, K.
Variability of invertebrate herbivory on the submerged macrophyte Potamogeton
perfoliatus.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 34(2):357-365. 1995.

Jasser, I.
The influence of macrophytes on a phytoplankton community in experimental conditions.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 306(1):21-32. 1995.





Johnson, J.R.; Bird, K.T.
The effects of the herbicide atrazine on Ruppia maritima L. growing in autotrophic versus
heterotrophic cultures.
BOTANICA MARINA 38:307-312.

Johnson, S.R.
Spider communities in the canopies of annually burned and long-term unburned,
em>Spartina pectinata wetlands.
ENVIRON. ENTOMOL. 24(4):832-834. 1995.

Kammerer, M.
Intoxication by glyphosate based herbicides.
RECUEIL DE MEDICINE VETERINAIRE 171(2-3): 149-152 (IN FRENCH; ENGLISH SUMMARY)

Khalfaoui, B.; Meniai, A.H.; Borja, R.
Removal of copper from industrial wastewater by raw charcoal obtained from reeds.
J. CHEM. TECH. BIOTECHNOL. 64(2):153-156. 1995.

Kohlmeyer, J.; Volkmann-Kohlmeyer, B.; Eriksson, O.E.
Fungi on Juncus roemerianus 2. New dictyosporous ascomycetes.
BOTANICA MARINA 38:165-174. 1995.

Kornijow, R.; Kairesalo, T.
A simple apparatus for sampling epiphytic communities associated with emergent
macrophytes.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 294(2): 141-143. 1994.

Leonard, L.A.; Hine, A.C.; Luther, M.E.
Surficial sediment transport and deposition processes in a Juncus roemerianus marsh,
west-central Florida.
J. COASTAL RESEARCH 11(2):322-336. 1995.

Lowe-McConnell, R.H.
The changing ecosystem of Lake Victoria, East Africa.
FBA FRESHWATER FORUM 4(2):76-89. 1994.


Ludlow, J.




Management of aquatic plant communities in Rodman Reservoir from 1969-1994.
AQUATICS 73(3):11, 13-15. 1995.

Lytle, C.M.; Smith, B.N.
Seasonal nutrient cycling in Potamogeton pectinatus of the Lower Provo River.
GREAT BASIN NATURALIST 55(2): 164-168. 1995.

Madsen, T.V.; Breinholt, M.
Effects of air contact on growth, inorganic carbon sources, and nitrogen uptake by an
amphibious freshwater macrophyte.
PLANT PHYSIOL. 107:149-154. 1995.

Mallison, C.T.; Hestand, R.S.; Thompson, B.Z.
Removal of triploid grass carp with an oral rotenone bait in two central Florida lakes.
LAKE AND RESERVOIR MANAGE. 11(4):337-342. 1995.

Mazzeo, N.
Revision of family Lemnaceae in Chile.
GAYANA BOT. 50(1):29-40. 1993. (IN SPANISH; ENGLISH SUMMARY)

Mazzeo, N.; Gorga, J.; Crosa, D.; Ferrando, J.; Pintos, W.
Spatial and temporal variation of physicochemical parameters in a shallow reservoir
seasonally covered by Pistia stratiotes L. in Uruguay.
J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 10(2):141-149. 1995.

McKnight, S.K.; Hepp, G.R.
Potential effects of grass carp herbivory on waterfowl foods.
J. WILDL. MANAGE. 59(4):720-727. 1995.

Mendelssohn, I.A.; Kleis, B.A.; Wakeley, J.S.
Factors controlling the formation of oxidized root channels: a review.
WETLANDS 15(1):37-46. 1995.

Merchant, M.
The effect of pattern and severity of cutting on the vigour of the soft rush (Juncus effusus
L.).
GRASS FORAGE SCI. 50(1):81-84. 1995.




Mesleard, F.; Grillas, P.; Ham, L.T.
Restoration of seasonally-flooded marshes in abandoned ricefields in the Camargue
(southern France) Preliminary results on vegetation and use by ducks.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 5(1):95-106. 1995.

Mitchell, G.J.; Carter, R.J.; Chinner, S.R.
Studies on the control of water-dropwort (Oenanthe pimpinelloides) in South Australia.
AUST. J. EXPER. AGRIC. 35(4):483-488. 1995.

Mossier, M.A.; Shilling, D.G.; Milgram, K.E.; Querns, R.
A quality control standard for fluridone analysis.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 33:23-24. 1995.

Narasimhalu, P.; McRae, K.B.; Kunelius, H.T.
Hay composition, and intake and digestibility in sheep of newly introduced cultivars of
timothy, tall fescue, and reed canarygrass.
ANIMAL FEED SCI. TECHNOL. 55(1-2):77-85.

Nelson, L.S.; Getsinger, K.D.; Freedman, J.E.
Selective control of purple loosestrife with triclopyr.
TECH. REPT. WRP-SM-R, US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, WATERWAYS EXPT. STATION,
WETLANDS RESEARCH PROGRAM, VICKSBURG, MS, 31 PP. 1995.

Niswander, S.F.; Mitsch, W.J.
Functional analysis of a two-year-old created in-stream wetland: hydrology, phosphorus
retention, and vegetation survival and growth.
WETLANDS 15(3):212-225. 1995.

Ostendorp, W.; Iseli, C.; Krauss, M.; Krumscheid-Plankert, P.; et al
Lake shore deterioration, reed management and bank restoration in some central European
lakes.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 5(1):51-75. 1995.

Otte, M.L.; Kearns, C.C.; Doyle, M.O.
Accumulation of arsenic and zinc in the rhizosphere of wetland plants.
BULL. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 55(1):154-161. 1995.


Owen, C.R.




Water budget and flow patterns in an urban wetland.
J. HYDROLOGY 169(1-4):171-187. 1995.

Patil, R.S.; Rao, M.R.; Ramanujam, C.G.K.
Azolla sp. from the Early Cretaceous of Cauvery Basin, South India.
CURRENT SCI. 69(2):97-99. 1995.

Patt, J.M.; French, J.C.; Schal, C.; Lech, J.; Hartman, T.G.
The pollination biology of tuckahoe, Peltandra virginica (Araceae).
AM. J. BOT. 82(10):1230-1240. 1995.

Pedersen, M.F.
Nitrogen limitation of photosynthesis and growth: comparison across aquatic plant
communities in a Danish estuary (Roskilde Fjord).
OPHELIA 41:261-272. 1995.

Pemberton, R.W.
The search for natural enemies of Trapa.
PROC., 29TH ANNUAL MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM, MISC.
PAPER A-95-3, US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, WATERWAYS EXPER. STATION, VICKSBURG,
MS, PP. 154-157. 1995.

Poiani, K.A.; Johnson, W.C.; Kittel, T.G.F.
Sensitivity of a prairie wetland to increased temperature and seasonal precipitation
changes.
WATER RES. 31(2):283-293. 1995.

Rattray, M.R.
The relationship between P, Fe, and Mn uptakes by submersed rooted angiosperms.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 308(2): 117-120. 1995.

Reichhardt, T.
Academy under fire on 'wetlands' definition.
NATURE 375(6528):171.

Rejmankova, E.; Pope, K.O.; Pohl, M.D.; Rey-Benayasa, J.M.
Freshwater wetland plant communities of northern Belize: implications for
paleoecological studies of Maya wetland agriculture.




BIOTROPICA 27(1):28-36. 1995.


Rowley, J.R.; Flynn, J.J.; Takahashi, M.
Atomic force microscope information on pollen exine substructure in Nuphar.
BOT. ACTA 108(4):300-308. 1995.

Sajwan, K.S.; Ornes, W.H.
Phytoavailability and bioaccumulation of cadmium in duckweed plants (Spirodela
polyrhiza L. Schleid).
J. ENVIRON. SCI. HEALTH A29(5): 1035-1044. 1994.

Sasser, C.E.; Visser, J.M.; Evers, D.E.; Gosselink, J.G.
The role of environmental variables on interannual variation in species composition and
biomass in a subtropical minerotrophic floating marsh.
CAN. J. BOT. 73(3):413-424. 1995.

Sayers, A.; Hamilton, R.G.
The effect of neighbors on gametophyte development in Ceratopteris richardii.
AM. FERN J. 85(2):47-53. 1995.

Scherer, N.M.; Gibbons, H.L.; Stoops, K.B.; Muller, M.
Phosphorus loading of an urban lake by bird droppings.
LAKE AND RESERVOIR MANAGE. 11(4):337-342. 1995.

Schuette, J.L.; Klug, M.J.
Evidence for mass flow in flowering individuals of the submersed vascular plant
Myriophyllum heterophyllum.
PLANT PHYSIOL. 108(3):1251-1258. 1995.

Schwartz, M.F.; Boyd, C.E.
Constructed wetlands for treatment of channel catfish pond effluents.
PROGRESSIVE FISH-CULTURIST 57(4):255-266. 1995.

Segal, D.S.
Relationships between hydric soil indicators and wetland hydrology for sandy soils in
Florida.
TECH. REPT. WRP-DE-7, WETLANDS RESEARCH PROGRAM, US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS,
WATERWAYS EXPT. STATION, VICKSBURG, MS, 121 PP. 1995.





Shaltout, K.H.; El-Kady, H.F.; Al-Sodany, Y.M.
Vegetation analysis of the Mediterranean region of Nile delta.
VEGETATIO 116:73-83. 1995.

Shamsudin, L.; Sleigh, M.A.
Seasonal changes in composition and biomass of epiphytic algae on the macrophyte
Ranunculus penicillatus in a chalk stream, with estimates of production, and observations
on the epiphytes of Cladophora glomerata.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 306(2):85-95. 1995.

Smith, C.S.; Wilson, C.G.
Close to the edge: microhabitat selection by Neurostrota gunniella (Busck) (Lepidoptera:
Gracillariidae), a biological control agent for Mimosa pigra L. in Australia.
J. AUST. ENT. SOC. 34(3):177-180. 1995.

Smits, A.J.M.; Schmitz, G.H.W.; van der Velde, G.; Voesenek, L.A.C.J.
Influence of ethanol and ethylene on the seed germination of three Nymphaeid water
plants.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 34:39-46. 1995.

Sorrell, B.K.; Brix, H.; Boone, P.I.
Modelling of in situ oxygen transport and aerobic metabolism in the hydrophyte
Eleocharis sphacelata R. Br.
PROC. ROYAL SOC. EDINBURGH 102B:367-372. 1994.

Spencer, D.F.; Ksander, G.G.
Influence of propagule size, soil fertility, and photoperiod on growth and propagule
production by three species of submersed macrophytes.
WETLANDS 15(2):134-140. 1995.

Sprecher, S.L.; Netherland, M.D.
Methods for monitoring herbicide-induced stress in submersed aquatic plants: a review.
MISC. PAPER A-95-1, AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM, US ARMY CORPS OF
ENGINEERS, WATERWAYS EXPT. STATION, VICKSBURG, MS, 41 PP. 1995.

Stevens, L.E.; Schmidt, J.C.; Ayers, T.J.; Brown, B.T.
Flow regulation, geomorphology, and Colorado River marsh development in the Grand




Canyon, Arizona.
ECOL. APPLICATIONS 5(4): 1025-1039. 1995.

Stross, R.G.; Sokol, R.C.; Schwarz, A.M.; Howard-Williams, C.
Lake optics and depth limits for photogenesis and photosynthesis in charophyte meadows.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 302(1):11-19. 1995.

Stuckey, R.L.; Moore, D.L.
Return and increase in abundance of aquatic flowering plants in Put-In-Bay Harbor, Lake
Erie, Ohio.
OHIO J. SCI. 95(3):261-266. 1995.

Tabacchi, E.
Structural variability and invasions of pioneer plant communities in riparian habitats of the
Middle Adour River (SW France).
CAN. J. BOT. 73(1):33-44. 1994.

Takahashi, M.
Development of structure-less pollen wall in Ceratophyllum demersum L.
(Ceratophyllaceae).
J. PLANT RES. 108(1090):205-208. 1995.

Takimoto, A.; Kaihara, S.; Yokoyama, M.
Stress-induced factors involved in flower formation in Lemna.
PHYSIOL. PLANT. 92(4):624-628. 1994.

Tekle-Haimanot, A.; Doku, E.V.
Comparison of Azolla mexicana and N and P fertilization on paddy taro (Colocasia
esculenta) yield.
TROP. AGRIC. 72(1):70-72. 1995.

Thebtaranonth, C.; Thebtaranonth, Y.; Wanauppathamkul, S.; Yuthavong, Y.
Antimalarial sesquiterpenes from tubers of Cyperus rotundus: structure of 10,12-
peroxycalamenene, a sesquiterpene endoperoxide.
PHYTOCHEM. 40(1):125-128. 1995.

Thomas, J.D.; Daldorph, P.W.G.
The influence of nutrient and organic enrichment on a community dominated by




macrophytes and gastropod molluscs in a eutrophic drainage channel: relevance to snail
control and conservation.
J. APPLIED ECOLOGY 31:571-588. 1994.

Thulen, J.S.; Eberts, D.R.
Effects of temperature, stratification, scarification, and seed origin on the germination of
Scirpus acutus Muhl. seeds for use in constructed wetlands.
WETLANDS 15(3):298-304. 1995.

Valiela, I.; Rietsma, C.S.
Disturbance of salt marsh vegetation by wrack mats in Great Sippewissett Marsh.
OECOLOGIA 102(1):106-112. 1995.

Volkmann-Kohlmeyer, B.; Kohlmeyer, J.
A new Aniptodera (Ascomycotina) from saltmarsh Juncus.
BOTANICA MARINA 37:109-114. 1994.

Wangberg, S.A.
Effects of arsenate and copper on the algal communities in polluted lakes in the northern
parts of Sweden assayed by PICT (pollution-induced community tolerance).
HYDROBIOLOGIA 306(2): 109-124. 1995.

Wicker, A.M.; Endres, K.M.
Relationship between waterfowl and American coot abundance with submersed
macrophytic vegetation in Currituck Sound, North Carolina.
ESTUARIES 18(2):428-431. 1995.

Wilcox, D.A.
Wetland and aquatic macrophytes as indicators of anthropogenic hydrologic disturbance.
NATURAL AREAS J. 15(3):240-248. 1995.

Williamson, P.S.; Schneider, E.L.
Floral aspects of Barclaya (Nymphaeaceae): pollination, ontogeny and structure.
PL. SYST. EVOL. (SUPPL.) 8:159-173. 1994.

Williges, K.A.; Harris, T.T.
Seed bank dynamics in the Lake Okeechobee marsh ecosystem.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. SPEC. ISSUES ADVANCES IN LIMNOLOGY 45:79-94. 1995.





Willis, C.; Mitsch, W.J.
Effects of hydrology and nutrients on seedling emergence and biomass of aquatic
macrophytes from natural and artificial seed banks.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 4(2):65-76. 1995

Wunderlin, R.P.; Hansen, B.F.; Delaney, K.R.; Nee, M.; Mullahey, J.J.
Solanum viarum and S. tampicense (Solanaceae): two weedy species new to Florida and
the United States.
SIDA 15(4):605-611. 1993.

Zakravsky, P.; Hroudova, Z.
The effect of submergence on tuber production and dormancy in two subspecies of
Bolboschoenus maritimus.
FOLIA GEOBOT. PHYTOTAX., PRAHA 29:217-226. 1994.

Zaranyika, M.F.; Ndapwadza, T.
Uptake of Ni, Zn, Fe, Co, Cr, Pb, Cu and Cd by water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) in
Mukuvisi and Manyame Rivers, Zimbabwe.
J. ENVIRON. SCI. HEALTH PART A: ENVIRON. SCI. ENGR. 30(1):157-169. 1995.

Zimba, P.V.; Hopson, M.S.; Smith, J.P.; Colle, D.E.; Shireman, J.V.
Chemical composition and distribution of submersed aquatic vegetation in Lake
Okeechobee, Florida (1989-1991).
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. SPECIAL ISSUES ADVANCES IN LIMNOLOGY 45:241-246. 1995.

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