• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Table of Contents
 About Aquaphyte
 Invasives information retrieval...
 Invasive plants
 Florida ag adds 11, nurserymen...
 No aquatic weeds on Jackson...
 Odds n' ends
 Chaise Hyacinth
 Plea for a plant introduction
 Meetings
 Books, manuals, and online...
 From the database






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00014
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00014
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    About Aquaphyte
        Page 3
    Invasives information retrieval system
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Invasive plants
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Florida ag adds 11, nurserymen give up 11
        Page 10
        Page 11
    No aquatic weeds on Jackson Prairie
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Odds n' ends
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Chaise Hyacinth
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Plea for a plant introduction
        Page 20
    Meetings
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Books, manuals, and online resources
        Page 24
    From the database
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online


A Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants

Volume 19 Number 2 Fall 1999
Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702


Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

The St. Johns River Water Management District


Contents

About AQUAPHYTE

Invasives Information Retrieval System

Invasive Plants Lantana, shrub verbena (Lantana camera L.)

Florida Ag Adds 11 -- Nurserymen Give Up 11

No Aquatic Weeds on Jackson Prairie

Odds n' Ends


. Chaise Hyacinth





The Back Page Plea for a Plant Introduction

BE THERE, DO THAT

BOOKS/REPORTS

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRSdatabase



Aquaphyte page Home

CAIP-WEBSITEaufl.edu
Copyright 1999 University of Florida





About Aquaphyte



This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic,
Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS:
Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries.
Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic
plant research are solicited.

Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion
represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the
University of Florida.



Aquaphyte Contents I Aguaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 1999 University of Florida





Invasives Information Retrieval System


The APIRS office, long known for its information gathering and dissemination
relating to aquatic plants, native and non-native, has widened its focus to include
invasive plants of uplands as well. In fact, the research center of which APIRS is a
part has changed its name to the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants. Many of
the researchers associated with the Center are already well known for their work on
invasive plants.

As a first step, APIRS database manager,
Karen Brown, and reader, Mary Langeland,
have begun collecting the literature of the
invasive plants on the two lists of the Florida
Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC), as well as
the Noxious Weed List of the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services
(FDOACS). The FLEPPC lists are Category I
plants (that are invading and disrupting native
habitats, 65 species) and Category II plants (that
have shown a potential to disrupt native habitats,
60 species). FLEPPC: http://www.fleppc.org
The FDOACS lists 63 species, some of which are
in common with the FLEPPC lists. (FDOACS:
http://doacs.state.fl.us/~pi/noxioustbl.htm)

Support is being sought to expand our
information gathering and dissemination
capabilities more quickly, so that the literature on
additional plants on "invasives and noxious lists"
of other states and countries can be collected, cataloged, disseminated and used.

Already, several hundred researchers routinely contribute their articles and
reports for inclusion in the APIRS system and database. Other researchers and




authors who work on invasive plants, and who may not be aware of our established
system, are encouraged to join our modest partnership. Works will be entered into
our science library and central source for aquatics and invasives literature. In
exchange, our information and referral services will remain free of charge to our
contributors, as they have been for the past 18 years. For more information, contact
Karen Brown at kpb@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu

As was the case for aquatic plants, projects manager Victor Ramey is building a
thorough collection of photographs and line drawings of invasive plants. These
and other resources are being used to develop all kinds of information and education
products, from museum backdrops to ID decks, from invasives posters to coloring
books, from magazine articles to homeowner slide shows.

And, of course, our web site is expanding its content as well. So far, fairly extensive
information about 16 invasive plants is online at our site. There also are pictures and
drawings of a number of other invasive plants. See it all at: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu

APIRS has a new color catalog with full descriptions of our free and for-sale
products and services. Included are database instructions, lists of plants featured in
various publications, full lists of available slides and drawings, and ordering
information. Contact the APIRS office for a copy of the new catalog: CAIP-
WEBSITE(ufl.edu


Aquaphyte Contents Aquaphyte page Home


Copyright 1999 University of Florida





Invasive Plants


Lantana, shrub verbena
Lantana camera L.

by Victor Ramey, U.F. Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants


"There grow on this island many curious shrubs, particularly a beautiful species of
lantana. It grows in coppices in old fields, about five or six feet high, the branches adorned
with rough serrated leaves, which sit opposite, and the twigs terminated with
umbelliferous tufts of orange-colored blossoms, which are succeeded by a cluster of small
blue berries; the flowers are of various colors, on the same plant, and even in the same
cluster, as crimson, scarlet, orange and golden yellow; the whole plant is of a most
agreeable scent."

from The Travels of William Bartram, his observations of lantana in 1773 while exploring
the islands of Lake George in northern Florida.




L antana camera, lantana, and its many
cultivated varieties, has a mixed reputation.
On one hand, lantana is listed by Holm et al. as
one of the worst weeds in all the world: a thicket-
forming menace in 47 countries that has "infested
millions of hectares of natural grazing
lands" (especially in Asia and Africa) and that is
a weed in 14 major crops including coffee, oil
palms, coconuts, cotton, bananas, pineapples,
sugarcane, sandalwood, tea, rubber and rice. In
Indonesia, lantana is the most dominant species among 54 species found on the east
slope of the Candikuning pine plantation. Reportedly, in India the lantana invasion
in some places has been so complete as to require the moving of several entire




villages. In Hawaii, several hundred thousand acres are infested with lantana;
lantana infests four million acres in Australia. What's more, Lantana camera leaves
and fruit (green and mature) are very toxic, having been blamed in the deaths of
animals as diverse as livestock, parrots, rabbits and snakes, as well as humans.

On the other hand, Lantana camera and its varieties frequently are planted in the U.
S. to attract butterflies, is planted to herald the arrival of spring at Boston Garden,
and is still considered one of the "10 favorite plants of Malaysians." In the US, some
nurseries tout lantana as a native plant; it is sold over the internet from companies in
Ohio, Texas and New Mexico. According to Indian research, there is evidence that
lantana extracts could be used for weed control in rice.

Notwithstanding Bartram's observations of lantana in Florida more than 200 years
ago, Lantana camera is listed as a Category I non-native, invasive plant by the
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC). (However, lantana is not listed on the
Noxious Weed List of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Affairs
(FDACS).) FLEPPC believes lantana to be a native of the West Indies, not of
Florida. Others believe it to be from Argentina.


Lantana camaraL. deciduous shrubto 6 ft. tall; stemssquare, covered with bristly hairs,
often with thorns and/or small prickles; leavesopposite, simple, with petioles (leaf stems),
strongly aromatic; leaf bladesoval, rough, hairy to 6 in. long, to 2.5 in. wide, veins
conspicuous; leaf marginscoarsely serrate; inflorescensea stalked dense cluster of
flowers; flowerssmall, multicolored, in a single cluster, may be white to pink or lavender,
yellow to orange or red, color changing over time; fruitsmall, round, fleshy, 2-seeded
drupe, green turning purple to blue-black.


Lantana camera grows well in full-sun disturbed places, but also grows well
under shade. It is a long-lived plant, and can form dense thickets in pastures,
forests and along fence lines. It prefers well-drained soils, and, once established,
requires only infrequent watering. It is spread by birds as well as humans. Lantana
leaves are damaged at 27 degrees F. Lantana is allelopathic; it releases chemicals
into the soil to prevent other plants from germinating. Lantana is not easy to control.
Experience shows that burning, cutting and digging lantana often results in
increased germination and more shoot growth. As for biological control
possibilities, various arthropods and fungal pathogens have been or are being tested.





Florida's
case is
complicated
by the fact
that this state
has at least
two species of
lantana
believed to be
native:
Lantana depressa, Florida lantana, and Lantana involucrata, wild sage. Florida
lantana, an endangered plant, has yellow flowers and tapered leaves. It is believed
that Lantana camera hybridizes with Florida lantana, thus contaminating the Florida
lantana gene pool. It is not easy to tell just by looking whether a plant is a 100%
Lantana camera or a 50% Lantana depressa. Sales and plantings of lantana hybrids
of many colors further complicate the scenario. The other lantana native to Florida,
wild sage (L. involucrata), is decidedly less showy, having small whitish yellow-
centered flowers and smaller, rounder leaves. Finally, another non-native lantana,
Lantana montevidensis, trailing lantana, is sold to homeowners throughout the state.
Its all-mauve lantana flowers are becoming more familiar, although L.
montevidensis does not seem to be invasive.


Some Lantana species references from the APIRS invasive plant database:

Gentle, C.B. and J.A. Duggin. 1997. Allelopathy as a competitive strategy in
persistent thickets of Lantana camera L. in three Australian forest communities.
Plant Ecology 132: 84-95.
Greathead, D.J. 1973. Progress in the biological control of Lantana camera in East
Africa and discussion of problems raised by the unexpected reaction of some of the
more promising insects of Sesamum indicum. pp. 89-92 in Dunn, P.H. (ed.), Proc.
2nd Int. Symp. Biol. Control Weeds. Comm. Inst. Biol. Control Misc. Publ. 6. 225
pp.
Holm, L.G., Plucknett, D.L., et al. 1977. The world's worst weeds distribution
and biology. University Press of Hawaii. 609 pp.
Langeland, K.A. and Craddock Burks, K. (eds.) 1998. Identification & biology of




non-native plants in Florida's natural areas. University of Florida, Gainesville. 165
pp.
Wolfson, S.L. and T.W. Solomons. 1964. Poisoning by fruit of Lantana camera.
Am J. Dis. Child, 107: 109-112.


Aquaphyte Contents Aquaphyte page Home

Copyright 1999 University of Florida




Florida Ag Adds 11
Nurserymen Give Up 11



Eleven terrestrial weeds were recently added to the official "Noxious Weed List"
of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDOACS). The
Noxious Weed List prohibits introducing, possessing, moving, growing and selling
these species. The full list can be seen at http://doacs.state.fl.us/~pi/noxioustbl.htm

The 11 new terrestrial weeds added to the official noxious weeds list are:

Air potato (Dioscorea bulbifera)
Burma reed (Neyraudia reynaudiana)
Carrotwood (Cupaniopsis anacardioides)
Downy rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus
tomentosa)
Japanese climbing fern (Lygodium
japonicum)
Kudzu (Pueraria montana)
Small-leaved climbing fern (Lygodium .
microphyllum)
Sewer-vine (Paederia cruddasiana)
Skunk-vine (Paederiafoetida) *"_g. ..
Wetland nightshade (Solanum
tampicense)
White yam (Dioscorea alata)




The Florida Nurserymen and Growers Association (FNGA) has decided to
encourage its members to voluntarily phase out the growing and selling of 11




species of plants identified as being invasive in Florida. The 11 came from a list of
especially invasive plants as determined by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
(FLEPPC). The full list can be seen at http://www.fleppc.org

Ten of these plants are not officially banned by the state of Florida, carrotwood
being the exception. The 11 plants the nurserymen have agreed to phase out are:

Woman's tongue (Albizia lebbeck)
Orchid tree (Bauhinia variegata)
Bischofia (Bischofiajavanica)
Carrotwood (Cupaniopsis anacardioides)
Cat's claw vine (Macfadyena unguis-cati)
Chinaberry (Melia azedarach)
Sword fern (Nephrolepis cordifolia)
Guava (Psidium guajava)
Oyster plant (Rhoeo spathacea)
Java plum (Syzygium cumini)
Seaside mahoe (Thespesiapopulnea)

Other non-native plants sold by nurseries, such as lantana, ardisia and nandina,
also have been declared to be invasive by the FLEPPC. The nurserymen have not
decided to cease selling these plants. But that's another story...


Aquaphyte Contents Aquaphyte page Home


Copyright 1999 University of Florida






No Aquatic Weeds
On Jackson Prairie



Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant
University of Florida form
Information Retrieval System





S.Jackson Prairie [Lake Jackson], Florida

Outstanding Florida Water Body, Lake Jackson (Tallahassee), is known
nationally as a premiere bass fishing lake. And over the years, aquatic weed and water quality concerns
in the lake have been the subject of countless homeowners' meetings and of primary interest to lake
management personnel. However, its bass reputation and aquatic weed problems became much less
consequential on September 16, 1999 when a sink hole suddenly drained more than half the lake of
every last gallon of water, not to mention every last fish and alligator. It is now possible to walk from
shore to shore--but steer clear of the sink hole.

Jess Van Dyke, long-time regional biologist with the Bureau of Invasive Plant Management (Florida
Department of Environmental Protection) was there when it happened. "It was spectacular: animals
trying to scramble out; a whirlpool of gators, birds and bass went down the hole," said Van Dyke. Lake
Jackson is one of Florida's disappearing lakes, lakes with sinkholes that are known to drain periodically.
Lake Jackson, for example, has drained 4 times previously in the 20th century, in 1907, 1933, 1957,
1982 and now in 1999.

"Our records show that in 1982 the lake refilled from rainfall within about 6 months. In 1957 there was a
drought, so it took much longer to refill. It's all about long term rainfall patterns," says Van Dyke. It is
expected that the lake will eventually collect water and again become a top-notch fishing lake.

For more information, contact Jess Van Dyke, the regional biologist for the northwest Florida region
(which includes Lake Jackson), at Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd,
Tallahassee, FL 32399; (850) 245-2809.




Here are pics of ex-Lake Jackson in no particular order; pics include some taken on that fateful day in
September 1999 (even though they're mis-dated as 2002), and some taken 3 years later, in September
2002. The pics below include some that feature some employees of the Tallahassee offices of the
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management.


I E I


k 1000' aerial of sinkhole


tseer with telephone


ISightseers without telephones


IN Stranded lotus (Nelumbo lutea) on
Jackson Prairie)



EBess Van Dvke perilously close to the


SWaterfall into the sinkhole


1200' aerial of sinkhole


Vil that's left is mud



Pedestriaiins, including Drew Leslie


Greg Jubinsky joins Jess Van Dyke
in the mud


ess Van Dyke also works inside


ir1-i






JFlorida Photo Sets


4Single Florida Scenes


4Animal Scenes


- Plant Scenes


Home


CAIP-WEBSITE(A&ufl.edu
Copyright 1999 University of Florida





Odds n' Ends


Giant salvinia (Salvinia molesta) is invading the United States, and has now been
identified in Texas, Louisiana, Florida and Arizona. A biological agent, the beetle,
Cyrtobagous salviniae, now is being evaluated for use against the dreaded aquatic
weed to see if the beetle might be as successful against U.S. infestations as it has
been elsewhere. Dr. Philip Tipping (USDA-ARS, Ft. Lauderdale) has begun
distributing the beetle at sites in Louisiana and eastern Texas. Besides wanting to
know about new infestations of giant salvinia, he also wants to find new sites of
Salvinia minima where he finds natural populations of the salvinia beetle for
collection and distribution. Dr. Tipping can be contacted at (954) 475-0541 X 104,
or by E-mail: ptipping2 eemail.com

The Weedo Grande River. Unhappy river users in Texas have complained to
Texas Governor George W. Bush about the aquatic weed problems that occur on the
Rio Grande River near Brownsville. Mr. Benny Berger has sent us pictures of the
hydrilla and water hyacinth infestation, saying that citizens are disgusted and that
the Border Patrol got their boat stuck in the plants. He states that the plants grow
about 6" per day. Mr. Berger can be contacted at 36 River Bend Drive, Brownsville,
TX 78520; E-mail: benber(pixelplace.com

The Invasive Woody Plants in the Tropics Research Group, based at the
University of Wales (Bangor, UK), has produced a global review of invasions, and
has prepared a number of recommendations for management and control Their web
site includes papers on invading trees and case histories, as well as
recommendations and contacts. http://www.safs.bangor.ac.uk/iwpt

The Hillsborough County (Florida) Lake Atlas is available online. This very
well done, logically arranged web site presents an interactive map, a tour of Tampa-
area lakes, lake management "volunteer opportunities", and Lakewatch data. Go to
it: http://www.lakeatlas.usf.edu

The Estuarine Research Foundation is an "international organization whose




purpose is to promote research in estuaries and coastal waters" and "be available as
a source of advice in matters concerning estuaries and the coastal zone." Their web
site is: http://erf.org

Other new interesting photo and information features can be found at the Center
for Aquatic and Invasive Plant web site. Particulars and photos of more than 150
plant species: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/photos.html plus Fakahatchee Strand and
wild ghost orchid pictures: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/fakahat.html plus 16
particularly invasive plants: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/invasive.html plus Pics of 22
north Florida springs: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/springs.html

Plant Talk is an interesting quarterly magazine with "news and views on plant
conservation worldwide". The beautifully designed and illustrated magazine
features articles and editorials about the conservation of plants around the world and
includes notices and reviews of books and meetings. The subscription price is US
$28 for individuals and US$68 for institutions. Orders from the Americas: Plant
Talk, POB 354841, Palm Coast, FL 32135-4841. Orders from the rest of the world:
Plant Talk, POB 500, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, KT2 5XB, United Kingdom.
For more information, contact Plant Talk at E-mail: plant-talk(dial.pipex.com

High quality scans of images of the flora of Spain and Portugal are available on
CD from Professor Francisco Perez Raya of the University of Granada in Spain. To
see examples of the images of more than 1,000 plant taxa, visit their web site: http://
www.arrakis.es/~jahita or contact them by E-mail: frperez@platon.ugr.es

You've got to know about FICMNEW. The Federal Interagency Committee for
the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds is the committee of federal agency
employees most interested in noxious, exotic, non-native, non-indigenous (etc.)
weeds. View their web site, read the President's Executive Order on Invasive
Species, learn about the national invasive species strategy: http://refuges.fws.gov/
FICMNEWFiles/FICMNEWHomePage.html

More lists, noxious weeds and rare and endangered plants from the Florida
Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), along with their
associated rules for possession and propagation can be read and downloaded from
the FDACS web site: http://doacs.state.fl.us/~pi/rules.html






Aquaphyte Contents Aquaphyte page Home

Copyright 1999 University of Florida





Chaise Hyacinth


U unless you've been on Lake Victoria lately, or here in Florida thirty years ago,
it may be difficult to imagine a water hyacinth infestation: floating plants, growing
to three feet high, bunched tightly by the wind, upwards of 200 tons of plant mass
per acre, covering an entire lake or river shore to shore--even large boats can
become immobilized. Certainly, fishing and other commerce comes to a halt. On
Lake Victoria, more than once water hyacinth has clogged the intake pipes to the
power station that supplies Kampala, the capital city of Uganda. No electricity to
Kampala. In fact, much of the world's second-largest freshwater lake, which
provides fish and accommodates commerce for Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda, is
socked in by miles and miles of extra-large "bull" hyacinths.

In the war against water hyacinths, officials have introduced Neochetina weevils as
biological controls, and have hired a huge grinding machine to break up the gigantic
mats. Depending on whom you ask, herbicides may or may not have been employed
as well.







Then there's the Water Hyacinth Utilization Project (WHUP), a "sustainable use"
project devised to exploit the silver lining of the infestation by using water hyacinths
to create jobs. According to Ms. Carolyne Odhiambo, WHUP Coordinator, 60
workers, mostly disadvantaged women, are using the plentiful menace to produce
chairs, tables, baskets and shades, paper, books, cards and gift items. WHUP is
under the auspices of KICK, a non-governmental organization that aims to develop
small enterprises, and is supported by the Department for International Development
of Great Britain. Ms. Odhiambo provided us with these photographs of artisans and
items made from water hyacinth.




For more information, contact WHUP and KICK, POB 284, Kisumu, KENYA.
kick(knet2000ke.com

See the latest big story on water hyacinth in the Washington Post, Wednesday,
September 22, 1999, page A25.

For a new book on practical uses of water hyacinth, see Use Water Hyacinth!
under Books/Reports


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Copyright 1999 University of Florida





Plea for a Plant Introduction


In 1882, an appeal was made for the introduction of Typha latifolia to Tasmania for
the purpose of constructing buoyant life-saving mattresses for use onboard ships.
Such devices were being used on Italian vessels at the time. The Victorian Humane
Society of Melbourne tested the mattress and found that it could easily support two
persons on the water, so they decided to promote the introduction into the colony of
the plant those mattresses were stuffed with. Doubt was expressed on the
profitability of this introduction since Typha latifolia already occurred in Tasmania.
It was remarked that "attention should be first directed to the species to be found
naturally on the island." However it was argued that, "The many lamentable
disasters at sea and deplorable shipwrecks, which from time to time cause a thrill of
horror like an electric shock to pervade the community, demand the adoption of
every possible precaution against such dire calamities; and simple as this remedy
appears, it may yet be the means of snatching many a valuable human life from
otherwise inevitable destruction. If successful, there can be little doubt that but few
vessels would be unprovided with them; and thus a possible means of escape from a
water grave would be afforded in many cases of shipwreck on a coast and within a
moderate distance of land."

Who could resist such an impassioned plea?!

from the Papers and Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania for 1882,
"Economic Value of the Aquatic Plant Typha latifolia," by James Barnard


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Copyright 1999 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Meetings


May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org
28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference
Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage



May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org
10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference



June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis.
edu/5intlweedcong.htm
International Weed Science Society

Aquatic Weed Management

Contacts:

Mike Netherland, USA I mdnether(@ufl .edu

Kevin Murphy, UK |I k.murphy@vbio.qla.ac.uk



June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/
wetland082/site.htm
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course



August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www.
sce.Isu.edu/conference
Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice






September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri 2008.
htm
2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute



September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



October 21-23, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB symposium.
htm
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton
Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University



November 18-20 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
11th International Paleolimnology Symposium



August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@(sun.ac.za
The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant
Invasions (EMAPI)
Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University







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Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Books, Manuals, and Online Resources


New Books and Reports
8 Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks
Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book
8 Online Articles and Extension Publications
Extension Publications & Articles
8 Online Books


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FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic plant database since January 1999. The database has more than 49,000
citations. To receive free bibliographies on specific plants and/or subjects, contact APIRS
at 352-392-1799 or use the database online at http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/database.html

To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library.



Behnke, H-D.
Proliferating sieve elements present in bud phloem anastomoses connect sieve tubes
of axillary bud traces to stelar vascular bundles in the aquatic monocotyledon
Potamogeton natans L. (Potamogetonaceae).
PROTOPLASMA 201:17-29. 1998.

Bekker, R.M., Knevel, I.C., Tallowin, J.B.R., Troost, E.M.L., et al
Soil nutrient input effects on seed longevity: a burial experiment with fen-meadow
species.
FUNCTIONAL ECOL. 12(4):673-682. 1998.

Berghage, R.D., MacNeal, E.P., Wheeler, E.F., Zachritz, W.H.
"Green" water treatment for the green industries: opportunities for biofiltration of
greenhouse and nursery irrigation water and runoff with constructed wetlands.
WETLANDS AND HORTICULTURE: PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS, HORTSCIENCE 34(1):50-
54. 1999.

Biehle, G., Speck, T., Spatz, H-CH.
Hydrodynamics and biomechanics of the submerged water moss Fontinalis
antipyretica a comparison of specimens from habitats with different flow
velocities.
BOT. ACTA 111:42-50. 1998.


Bjork, M., Weil, A., Semesi, S., Beer, S.




Photosynthetic utilization of inorganic carbon by seagrasses from Zanzibar, East
Africa.
MAR. BIOL. 129(2):363-366. 1997.

Bonar, S.A., Bolding, B., Divens, M.
Management of aquatic plants in Washington State using grass carp: effects on
aquatic plants, water quality and public satisfaction 1990-1995.
INLAND FISH DIV. RES., WASHINGTON DEPT. FISH & WILDL., OLYMPIA, WA, 28 PP. 1996.

Boniardi, N., Rota, R., Nano, G.
Effect of dissolved metals on the organic load removal efficiency of Lemna gibba.
WAT. RES. 33(2):530-538. 1999.

Bolser, R.C., Hay, M.E., Lindquist, N., Fenical, W., et al
Chemical defenses of freshwater macrophytes against crayfish herbivory.
J. CHEM. ECOL. 24(10):1639-1658. 1998.

Bunn, S.E., Davies, P.M., Kellaway, D.M., Prosser, I.P.
Influence of invasive macrophytes on channel morphology and hydrology in an
open tropical lowland stream, and potential control by riparian shading.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 39:171-178. 1998.

Burdick, D.M., Short, F.T.
The effects of boat docks on eelgrass beds in coastal waters of Massachusetts.
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT 23(2):231-240. 1999.

Cavan, G., Biss, P., Moss, S.R.
Localized origins of herbicide resistance in Alopecurus myosuroides.
WEED RES. 38:239-245. 1998.

Chendorain, M., Yates, M., Villegas, F.
The fate and transport of viruses through surface water constructed wetlands.
J. ENVIRON. QUAL. 27(6):1451-1458. 1998.

Chung, Y.R., Koo, S.J., Kim, H.T., Cho, K.Y.
Potential of an indigenous fungus, Plectosporium tabacinum, as a myco-herbicide
for control of arrowhead (Sagittaria trifolia).
PLANT DISEASE 82(6):657-660. 1998.




Colton, T.F., Alpert, P.
Lack of public awareness of biological invasions by plants.
NATURAL AREAS J. 18(3):262-266. 1998.

Costa-Pierce, B.A.
Preliminary investigation of an integrated aquaculture-wetland ecosystem using
tertiary-treated municipal wastewater in Los Angeles County, California.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 10:341-354. 1998.

Cronin, G., Wissing, K.D., Lodge, D.M.
Comparative feeding selectivity of herbivorous insects on water lilies: aquatic vs.
semi-terrestrial insects and submersed vs. floating leaves.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 39:243-257. 1998.

Daehler, C.C., Anttila, C.K., Ayres, D.R., Strong, D.R., et al
Evolution of a new ecotype of Spartina alterniflora (Poaceae) in San Francisco Bay,
California, USA.
AMER. J. BOT. 86(4):543-546. 1999.

Dickinson, M.B., Miller, T.E.
Competition among small, free-floating, aquatic plants.
AMER. MIDL. NATURALIST 140(1):55-67. 1998.

Douglas, G.W., Illingworth, J.M.
Status of the water-plantain buttercup, Ranunculus alismifolius var. alismifolius
(Ranunculaceae) in Canada.
CANADIAN FIELD-NATURALIST 112(2):280-283. 1998.

Duffy, K.C., Baltz, D.M.
Comparison of fish assemblages associated with native and exotic submerged
macrophytes in the Lake Pontchartrain estuary, USA.
J. EXP. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 223(2):199-221. 1998.

Edwards, E.S., Roux, S.J.
Gravity and light control of the developmental polarity of regenerating protoplasts
isolated from prothallial cells of the fern Ceratopteris richardii.
PLANT CELL REPORTS 17:711-716. 1998.


Ennabili, A., Ater, M., Radoux, M.




Biomass production and NPK retention in macrophytes from wetlands of the
Tingitan peninsula.
AQUATIC BOTANY 62:45-56. 1998.

Evers, D.E., Sasser, C.E., Gosselink, J.G., Fuller, D.A., et al
The impact of vertebrate herbivores on wetland vegetation in Atchafalaya Bay,
Louisiana.
ESTUARIES 21(1):1-13. 1998.

Fairchild, J.F., Ruessler, D.S., Carlson, A.R.
Comparative sensitivity of five species of macrophytes and six species of algae to
atrazine, metribuzin, alachlor, and metolachlor.
ENVIR. TOXICOL. CHEM. 17(9):1830-1834. 1998.

Fraga, J.M.P., Quesada, E.M.
Structure of Eleocharetum interstinctae in Santa Cruz Reservoir, Cuba.
ACTA BOT. HUNGARICA 39(3-4):217-226. 1995.

Frenzel, P., Rudolph, J.
Methane emission from a wetland plant: the role of CH4 oxidation in Eriophorum.
PLANT AND SOIL 202:27-32. 1998.

Furtado, A.L.D.S., Esteves, F.D.A.
Organic compounds, nutrients and energy of two tropical aquatic macrophytes.
ARQ. BIOL. TECNOL. 39(4):923-931. 1996.

Gann, G., Gordon, D.R.
Paederiafoetida (Skunk vine) and P. cruddasiana (Sewer vine): threats and
management strategies.
NAT. AREAS J. 18(2):169-173. 1998.

Gawlik, D.E., Rocque, D.A.
Avian communities in bayheads, willowheads, and sawgrass marshes of the central
Everglades.
WILSON BULL. 110(1):45-55. 1998.

German, E.R.
Evapotranspiration measurement and modeling in the Everglades.
IN: U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PROG., SO. FLORIDA ECOSYSTEM PROC. SO. FLORIDA




RESTORATION SCIENCE FORUM, 17-19 MAY 1999, BOCA RATON, FL, USGS OPEN-FILE
REPT. 99-181, PP. 24-25 (ABSTRACT) 1999.

Gornall, R.J., Hollingsworth, P.M., Preston, C.D.
Evidence for spatial structure and directional gene flow in a population of an aquatic
plant, Potamogeton coloratus.
HEREDITY 80:414-421. 1998.

Gupta, M., Chandra, P.
Bioaccumulation and toxicity of mercury in rooted-submerged macrophyte
Vallisneria spiralis.
ENVIRON. POLLUTION 103(2-3):327-332. 1998.

Hansen, D., Duda, P.J., Zayed, A., Terry, N.
Selenium removal by constructed wetlands: role of biological volatilization.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 32:591-597. 1998.

Hester, M.W., Mendelssohn, I.A., McKee, K.L.
Intraspecific variation in salt tolerance and morphology in Panicum hemitomon and
Spartina alterniflora (Poaceae).
INT. J. PLANT SCI. 159(1):127-138. 1998.

Hill, N.M., Keddy, P.A., Wisheu, I.C.
A hydrological model for predicting the effects of dams on the shoreline vegetation
of lakes and reservoirs.
ENVIRON. MANAGE. 22(5):723-736. 1998.

Horvitz, C.C., Pascarella, J.B., McMann, S., Freedman, A., et al
Functional roles of invasive non-indigenous plants in hurricane-affected subtropical
hardwood forests.
ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS 8(4):947-974. 1998.

Husak, S., Adamec, L.
Conservation cultivations of endangered aquatic and wetland plant species in the
Institute of Botany in Trebon.
PRIRODA, PRAHA 12:7-26. 1998. (IN CZECH; ENGLISH SUMMARY)

Jackson, B., Summers, J.E., Voesenek, L.A.C.J.
Potamogeton pectinatus: a vascular plant that makes no ethylene.




IN: BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY OF THE PLANT HORMONE ETHYLENE, ED. BY A.K.
KANELLIS, ET AL, KLUWER ACAD. PUBL., PP. 229-237. 1997.

Jackson, S.T.
Documenting natural and human-caused plant invasions using paleoecological
methods.
IN: ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF PLANT INVASIONS, ED. BY J.O. LUKEN AND J.W.
THIERET, SPRINGER-VERLAG, NEW YORK, PP. 37-55. 1997.

Jacobsen, L., Perrow, M.R.
Predation risk from piscivorous fish influencing the diel use of macrophytes by
planktivorous fish in experimental ponds.
ECOL. FRESHWATER FISH 7:78-86. 1998.

Janse, J.H., Van Donk, E., Aldenberg, T.
A model study on the stability of the macrophyte-dominated state as affected by
biological factors.
WATER RES. 32(9):2696-2706. 1998.

Jenman, B., Kitchin, C.
A comparison of the management and rehabilitation of two wet grassland nature
reserves: the Nene Washes and Pevensey Levels, England.
IN: EUROPEAN WET GRASSLANDS: BIODIVERSITY, MANAGEMENT AND RESTORATION,
ED. BY C.B. JOYCE AND P.M. WADE, JOHN WILEY & SONS, NEW YORK, PP. 229-245. 1998.

Jiminez, M.M., Charudattan, R.
Survey and evaluation of Mexican native fungi for potential biocontrol of
waterhyacinth.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 36:148-150. 1998.

Kadono, Y.
Present status of wetland flora in Japan, with special reference to aquatic
macrophytes.
IN: RARE, THREATENED, AND ENDANGERED FLORAS OF ASIA AND THE PACIFIC RIM, ED.
BY C.-I. PENG, P.P. LOWRY, INST. BOT., ACADEMIA SINICA MONOGRAPH, TAIPEI, SERIES
NO. 16, PP. 27-36. 1998.

Kaenel, B.R., Matthaei, C.D., Uehlinger, U.
Disturbance by aquatic plant management in streams: effects on benthic
invertebrates.




REGUL. RIVERS: RES. MGMT. 14(4):341-356. 1998.


Kanazawa, A., Watanabe, S., Nakamoto, T., Tsutsumi, N., et al
Phylogenetic relationships in the genus Nelumbo based on polymorphism and
quantitative variations in mitochondrial DNA.
GENES GENET. SYST. 73:39-44. 1998.

Kane, M.E., Philman, N.L.
In vitro propagation and selection of superior wetland plants for habitat restoration.
IN: COMBINED PROC. INTERNAL. PLANT PROPAGATORS' SOC. 47:556-560. 1997.

Kaplan, D., Peters, G.A.
The Azolla-Anabaena azollae relationship. XIV. Chemical composition of the
association and soluble carbohydrates of the association, endophyte-free Azolla, and
the freshly isolated endophyte.
SYMBIOSIS 24:35-50. 1998.

Karen, D.J., Joab, B.M., Wallin, J.M., Johnson, K.A.
Partitioning of chlorpyrifos between water and an aquatic macrophyte (Elodea
densa).
CHEMOSPHERE 37(8): 1579-1586. 1998.

Kasumi, M., Sakuma, F.
Flowering, pollination, fertilization, and seed formation in lotus rhizome plant.
J. JAPAN. SOC. HORT. SCI. 67(4):595-599 (IN JAPANESE; ENGLISH SUMMARY). 1998.

Kitajima, K.
Coral ardisia (Ardisia crenata) differences in ecological behavior between
populations in Florida and its native range in Japan.
IN: FOURTEENTH ANNUAL CONF., FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL,
GAINESVILLE, P. 10. (ABSTRACT) 1999.

Leeflang, L., During, H.J., Werger, M.J.A.
The role of petioles in light acquisition by Hydrocotyle vulgaris L. in a vertical light
gradient.
OECOLOGIA 117(1-2):235-238. 1998.

Lesica, P., Kannowski, P.B.
Ants create hummocks and alter structure and vegetation of a Montana fen.




AMER. MIDL. NAT. 139:58-68. 1998.


Liu, Q., Oelke, E.A., Porter, R.A., Reuter, R.
Formation of panicles and hermaphroditic florets in wild-rice.
INT. J. PLANT SCI. 159(4):550-558. 1998.

Lonsdale, W.M., Farrell, G.S.
Testing the effects on Mimosa pigra of a biological control agent Neurostrota
gunniella (Lepidoptera: Gracillaridae), plant competition and fungi under field
conditions.
BIOCONTROL SCI. TECHNOL. 8(4):485-500. 1998.

Lytle, C.M., Lytle, F.W., Yang, N., Quian, J., et al
Reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by wetland plants: potential for in situ heavy metal
detoxification.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 32(20):3087-3093. 1998.

Maberly, S.C., Madsen, T.V.
Affinity for C02 in relation to the ability of freshwater macrophytes to use HCO3.
FUNCTIONAL ECOL. 12:99-106. 1998.

Madsen, J.D.
Predicting the invasion of Eurasian watermilfoil into northern lakes.
AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM, U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS,
WATERWAYS EXPT. STN., TECH. REPT. A-99-2, 36 PP. 1999.

Matsuki, T., Negishi, H., Fujimori, T.
Mycelial preparation of Nimbya scirpicola for biological control of Eleocharis
kuroguwai Ohwi.
J. PESTICIDE SCI. 23(3):312-315. 1998.

Miller, S.J., Ponzio, K.J., Lee, M.A., Keenan, L.W., et al
The use of fire in wetland preservation and restoration: are there risks?
IN: FIRE IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT: SHIFTING THE PARADIGM FROM SUPPRESSION
TO PRESCRIPTION, ED. BY T.L. PRUDEN, L.A. BRENNAN, TALL TIMBERS FIRE ECOL. CONF.
PROC. NO. 20, TALL TIMBERS RESEARCH STATION, TALLAHASSEE, FL, PP. 127-139. 1998.

Mitsch, W.J., Wise, K.M.
Water quality, fate of metals, and predictive model validation of a constructed
wetland treating acid mine drainage.




WAT. RES. 32(6):1888-1900. 1998.


Miyazawa, M., Yoshio, K., Ishikawa, Y., Kameoka, H.
Insecticidal alkaloids against Drosophila melanogaster from Nupharjaponicum DC.
J. AGRIC. FOOD CHEM. 46(3):1059-1063. 1998.

Murugesan, A.G., Sukumuran, N.
Potential utilization of aquatic weeds for treating industrial effluents.
IN: LIMNOLOGICAL RESEARCH IN INDIA, S.R. MISHA, ED., DAYA PUBL. HOUSE, DELHI, PP.
247-259. 1999.

Obataya, E., Umezawa, T., Nakatsubo, F., Norimoto, M.
The effects of water soluble extractives on the acoustic properties of reed (Arundo
donax L.)
HOLZFORSCHUNG 53(1):63-67. 1999.

Olson, M.H., Carpenter, S.R., Cunningham, P., Gafny, S., et al
Managing macrophytes to improve fish growth: a multi-lake experiment.
FISHERIES 23(2):6-11. 1998.

Oostermeijer, J.G.B., Luijten, S.H., Krenova, Z.V., Den Nijs, H.C.M.
Relationships between population and habitat characteristics and reproduction of the
rare Gentiana pneumonanthe L.
CONSERV. BIOL. 12(5):1042-1053. 1998.

Pennings, S.C., Richards, C.L.
Effects of wrack burial in salt-stressed habitats: Batis maritima in a southwest
Atlantic salt marsh.
ECOGRAPHY 21(6):630-638. 1998.

Pezeshki, S.R., Jugsujinda, A., DeLaune, R.D.
Responses of selected U.S. gulf coast marsh macrophyte species to oiling and
commercial cleaners.
WATER, AIR, SOIL POLL. 107(1-4):185-195. 1998.

Phogat, B.S., Pandey, J.
Effect of water regime and weed control on weed flora and yield of transplanted rice
(Oryza sativa).
INDIAN J. AGRONOMY 43(1):77-81. 1998.




Poovey, A.G., Kay, S.H.
The potential of a summer drawdown to manage monoecious hydrilla.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 36:127-130. 1998.

Quayyum, H.A., Mallik, A.U., Lee, P.F.
Allelopathic potential of aquatic plants associated with wild rice (Zizania palustris):
I. Bioassay with plant and lake sediment samples.
J. CHEM. ECOL. 25(1):209-220. 1999.

Ramage, D.L., Schiel, D.R.
Reproduction in the seagrass Zostera novazelandica on intertidal platforms in
southern New Zealand.
MARINE BIOL. 130:479-489. 1998.

Randall, K.
Creating a lush lawn in your aquarium.
THE AQUATIC GARDENER 11(5):130-134. 1998.

Rayachhetry, M.B., Van, T.K., Center, T.D.
Regeneration potential of the canopy-held seeds of Melaleuca quinquenervia in
south Florida.
INT. J. PLANT SCI. 159(4):648-654. 1998.

Reusch, T.B.H.
Differing effects of eelgrass Zostera marina on recruitment and growth of
associated blue mussels Mytilus edulis.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 167:149-153. 1998.

Ritter, N.P., Crow, G.E.
Myriophyllum quitense Kunth (Haloragaceae) in Bolivia: a terrestrial growth-form
with bisexual flowers.
AQUATIC BOTANY 60:389-395. 1998.

Rodriguez, J.C.
Nutritive value of water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms in relation to
utilization as forage.
ZOOT. TROP. 15(1):51-65. 1997.


Rolletschek, H., Bumiller, A., Henze, R., Kohl, J.G.




Implications of missing efflux sites on convective ventilation and amino acid
metabolism in Phragmites australis.
NEW PHYTOL. 140(2):211-217. 1998.

Russell, R.C.
Constructed wetlands and mosquitoes: health hazards and management options an
Australian perspective.
ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 12:107-124. 1999.

Ruzycki, E.M., Axler, R.P., Owen, C.J., Martin, T.B.
Response of phytoplankton photosynthesis and growth to the aquatic herbicide
Hydrothol 191.
ENVIRON. TOXICOL. CHEM. 17(8):1530-1537. 1998.

Saarinen, T.
Internal C:N balance and biomass partitioning of Carex rostrata grown at three
levels of nitrogen supply.
CAN. J. BOT. 76(5):762-768. 1998.

Sabbatini, M.R., Murphy, K.J., Irigoyen, J.H.
Vegetation-environment relationships in irrigation channel systems of southern
Argentina.
AQUATIC BOTANY 60:119-133. 1998.

Sekiranda, S.B.K., Kiwanuka, S.
A study of nutrient removal efficiency of Phragmites mauritianus in experimental
reactors in Uganda.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 364(1):83-91. 1998.

Seymour, R.S., Schultze-Motel, P.
Physiological temperature regulation by flowers of the sacred lotus.
PHIL. TRANS. ROYAL SOC. LONDON, SER. B-BIOL. SCI. 353(1371):935-943. 1998.

Shrestha, P.
Diversity of aquatic macrophytes in the Koshi Tappu Wildlife Reserve and
surrounding areas, eastern Nepal.
IN: ENVIRONMENT AND BIODIVERSITY: IN THE CONTEXT OF SOUTH ASIA, ED. BY P.K.
JHA, G.P.S. GHIMIRE, S.B. KARMACHARYA, ET AL, ECOL. SOC. (ECOS), NEPAL, PP. 203-211.
1996.




Singh, D.P.
Performance of rice (Oryza sativa) as affected by intercropping with phosphorus-
enriched Azolla caroliniana under varying levels of urea-nitrogen.
INDIAN J. AGRON. 43(1):13-17. 1998.

Spahn, P., Hoffmann, L.
Spatio-temporal development of the aquatic vegetation of the Alzette River (G.-D.
of Luxembourg).
BELGIAN J. BOT. 131(1):3-12. 1998.

Spanglet, H.J., Ustin, S.L., Rejmankova, E.
Spectral reflectance characteristics of California subalpine marsh plant communities.
WETLANDS 18(3):307-319. 1998.

Stary, P., Tkalcu, B.
Bumble-bees (Hym., Bombidae) associated with the expansive touch-me-not,
Impatiens glandulifera in wetland biocorridors.
ANZ. SCHADLINGSKDE., PFLANZENSCHUTZ, UMWELT-SCHUTZ 71:85-87. 1998.

Tilley, D.R., Brown, M.T.
Wetland networks for stormwater management in subtropical urban watersheds.
ECOL. ENGINEERING 10:131-158. 1998.

Tyler, G.A., Smith, K.W., Burges, D.J.
Reedbed management and breeding bitterns Botaurus stellaris in the UK.
BIOL. CONSERV. 86(2):257-266. 1998.

Unmuth, J.M.L., Sloey, D.J., Lillie, R.A.
An evaluation of close-cut mechanical harvesting of Eurasian watermilfoil.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 36:93-100. 1998.

Van, T.K., Wheeler, G.S., Center, T.D.
Competitive interactions between Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and Vallisneria
(Vallisneria americana) as influenced by insect herbivory.
BIOL. CONTROL 11(3): 185-192. 1998.

Vanderpoorten, A.
Correlative and experimental investigations on the segregation of aquatic
bryophytes as a function of water chemistry in the Walloon Hydrographic Network.




LEJEUNIA 159:1-17. 1999.


Vance, H.D., Francko, D.A.
Allelopathic potential of Nelumbo lutea (Willd.) Pers. to alter growth of
Myriophyllum spicatum L. and Potamogeton pectinatus L.
J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 12(3):405-409. 1997.

Vermaat, J.E., Hanif, M.K.
Performance of common duckweed species (Lemnaceae) and the waterfern Azolla
filiculoides on different types of waste water.
WAT. RES. 32(9):2569-2576. 1998.

Webb, C.J., Sykes, W.R.
The reinstatement of Utricularia protrusa for New Zealand and an assessment of
the status of the other New Zealand bladderworts based on seed characters.
NEW ZEALAND J. BOT. 35(2):139-143. 1997.

White, S.L., Wise, R.R.
Anatomy and ultrastructure of Wolffia columbiana and Wolffia borealis, two
nonvascular aquatic angiosperms.
INT. J. PLANT SCI. 159(2):297-304. 1998.

Whitt, M.B., Prince, H.H., Cox, R.R.
Avian use of purple loosestrife dominated habitat relative to other vegetation types
in a Lake Huron wetland complex.
WILSON BULL. 111(1): 105-114. 1999.

Williams, S.L., Orth, R.J.
Genetic diversity and structure of natural and transplanted eelgrass populations in
the Chesapeake and Chincoteague Bays.
ESTUARIES 21(1):118-128. 1998.

Wojcicki, J.J., Bajzath, J.
Trapa praehungarica, a new fossil species from the Upper Pannonian of Hungary.
ACTA PALAEOBOT. 37(1):51-54. 1997.

Woodhead, J.L., Bird, K.T.
Efficient rooting and acclimation of micropropagated Ruppia maritima Loisel.
J. MAR. BIOTECHNOL. 6:152-156. 1998.




Yang, S.L.
The role of Scirpus marsh in attenuation of hydrodynamics and retention of fine
sediment in the Yangtze estuary.
ESTUARINE, COASTAL AND SHELF SCI. 47(2):227-233. 1998.

Citations from 100 Years Ago...

Caldwell, O.W.
On the life history of Lemna minor.
BOT. GAZ. 27:37-66. 1899.

Ito, T.
Floating-apparatus of the leaves of Pistia stratiotes L.
ANN. BOT. 13:466. 1899.

Ladd, E.F.
Some chemical problems investigated. I. A case of poisoning--water hemlock.
NORTH DAKOTA AGRIC. EXP. STN. BULL. 35:307-310. 1899.

Rendle, A.B.
A systematic revision of the genus Najas.
TRANS. LINN. SOC. BOT. 2(5):379-436. 1899.



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