• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Table of Contents
 About Aquaphyte
 Macrophyte communities within the...
 Center director named to federal...
 New line drawings available
 Coloring book
 Odds n' ends
 New journals
 Meetings
 Books, manuals, and online...
 From the database






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00013
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00013
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    About Aquaphyte
        Page 3
    Macrophyte communities within the channelized Kissimmee River
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Center director named to federal invasives committee
        Page 9
    New line drawings available
        Page 10
    Coloring book
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Odds n' ends
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    New journals
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Meetings
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Books, manuals, and online resources
        Page 23
    From the database
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online


A Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants

Volume 20 Number 1 Summer 2000
Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702


Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants
Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from
The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

The St. Johns River Water Management District


Contents

About AQUAPHYTE

Macrophyte Communities Within the Channelized Kissimmee River:
Expectations for Restoration

Center Director Named to Federal Invasives Committee

NEW! Salvinia molesta Line Drawing Available

NEW! A Coloring Book Wetland and Invasive Plants of the Southeast


. Odds n' Ends




New Journal: BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS

New Journal: PLANTED AQUARIA

BE THERE, DO THAT

BOOKS/REPORTS

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRSdatabase



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About Aquaphyte



This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic,
Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS:
Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries.
Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic
plant research are solicited.

Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion
represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the
University of Florida.



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Macrophyte Communities Within the Channelized

Kissimmee River: Expectations for Restoration

by Caroline Hovey, South Florida Water Management District, 3301 Gun Club Rd., Div. 7180, West
Palm Beach, FL 33406 E-mail: chovey(asfwmd.gov

The


River,
located in
Central Florida,
flows from Lake
Kissimmee to
Lake
Okeechobee.
Historically, the
Kissimmee
meandered 166 .i R -Ks R
km, exhibiting
continuous in-channel flow and frequent over-bank flow. The 1.5 to 3 km wide floodplain surrounding
the river was typically inundated for prolonged periods throughout the year (Toth, 1993).

Between 1962 and 1971, the US Army Corps of Engineers constructed a regional flood control project,
for which a straight canal (C-38) was dredged through the river and floodplain. Dredging of C-38 cut off
sections of the old river channel and confined flow within a 90-km long, 100-m wide, and 9-m deep
waterway. This canal was divided by water control structures into 5 impoundments with stabilized water
levels (Goodrick et al, 1974). Although channelization and the hydrologic manipulations provided flood
protection for the region, the ecological integrity of the river/floodplain ecosystem was degraded,
altering vegetative communities and associated fauna.

Prior to channelization, continuous flows confined aquatic vegetation to littoral edges of the river
channel. Although there is little information available on specific vegetation characteristics of the river
prior to 1962, some features can be derived from aerial photographs and historical flow regimes. The
morphology of the river dictated variations in flow along and across the channel. Highest flow velocities
occurred along outside bends of channel meanders, leading to a deeper channel in these areas. Plant
species growing along the outer bends were well adapted to deep water with high flows and included
Nuphar lutea spatterdockk), Sacciolepis striata (American cupscale), and Polygonum densiflorum




(smartweed). Conversely, inner margins of channel meanders had lower velocities; these depositional
zones exhibited prominent sand bar formations. Species colonizing inside bends had to tolerate varying
water levels, and included Sagittaria lancifolia (arrowhead) and Pontederia cordata pickerelweedd).
Other common species distributed throughout the river channel included Scirpus cubensis (Cuban
bulrush), Panicum hemitomon (maidencane), and Hydrocotyle umbellata (pennywort). During periods of
low flow, floating species, such as Pistia stratiotes (water lettuce) and Eichhornia crassipes (water
hyacinth) likely accumulated along the edge of littoral beds (Toth et al, 1995). Additionally, floating
mats of vegetation would often accumulate in cut-off oxbows and backwater areas that received little or
no flow. Species common to these mats included Scirpus cubensis, Lemna spp. (duckweed), Eichhornia
crassipes, Pistia stratiotes, and Luziola fluitans (watergrass) (Pierce et al, 1982).

After channelization, aquatic vegetation communities changed significantly due to stagnant water
conditions within remnant river channels. One of the most striking effects was increased coverage of the
exotic species Pistia stratiotes and Eichhornia crassipes. Although these species were present prior to
channelization, continuous flows likely restricted their growth, particularly during moderate to high flow
regimes. After flow to remnant channels was eliminated, these species proliferated and now often cover
the entire width of remnant river channels. Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes are treated with
herbicides several times a year to maintain navigation through these channels.

Lack of flow to remnant river channels has allowed the distribution and coverage of Scirpus cubensis to
increase, and it is now one of the most abundant species within remnant channels. Scirpus cubensis
forms mats that may host a variety of other forbs and small shrubs, including aquatic species as well as
species typical of drier conditions. Secondary colonization by Ludwigia spp. (primrose willow),
Eupatorium capillifolium (dog-fennel), Pontederia cordata, Sagittaria lancifolia, Typha domingensis
(cat-tail), and many other species is common on the floating mats.

In addition to Scirpus cubensis, other common aquatic species include Salvinia minima (water spangles),
Lemna spp., Hydrocotyle umbellata, Polygonum densiflorum, and Nuphar lutea. Of these, the floating
and mat-forming species are the most abundant within remnant channels. Because there is no flow,
species distribution is independent of channel morphology, often covering the entire width of the river
channel. This is particularly common during summer months, at the peak of the growing season. The
overabundance of aquatic vegetation in remnant river channels, particularly Scirpus cubensis, not only
prevents light from reaching the water column below, but also contributes large deposits of organic
matter to the remnant channels. In some areas, the organic layer may reach one meter thick, covering the
sandy substrate and increasing the biological oxygen demand in the surrounding waters (Koebel, 1995).

Over the past two decades, demonstration projects have been conducted to determine the feasibility of
restoring the Kissimmee River to pre-channelization conditions. These projects provide some insight
into expected responses of the vegetation community to restoration. During 1984 and 1985, three weirs
were placed across the C-38 canal to force water through adjacent remnant channels. The
reestablishment of flow in the river channel decreased the width of vegetation mats in mid-channel
areas; however, when flow subsided Eichhornia crassipes and Pistia stratiotes often rapidly expanded
(Miller, 1990).





In 1994, a 300-m section of C-38 was backfilled, diverting the majority of flow through the channel
adjacent to one of the demonstration project weirs. Based on aerial photographs of this channel six
months after flow was restored, several changes in the macrophyte community were documented. Mats
of Scirpus cubensis were flushed out by high flows and replaced by narrower littoral beds composed
primarily of Nuphar lutea and Polygonumrn densiflorum. While the overall width of macrophyte beds
decreased, this effect was more prominent on outer bends, which had narrower littoral zones compared
to the inner bends of channel meanders. Inner bends had a higher occurrence of Pontederia cordata and
Sagittaria lancifolia, while outer bends supported more Panicum hemitomon. Although these projects
likely do not show the full effects of restoration on the macrophyte community within river channels,
they indicate the potential for restoring these communities to historic conditions.

Restoration of the Kissimmee River began in June 1999. During the 11-year construction period the C-
38 canal will be backfilled to reconnect remnant river channels and restore continuous flow. Overall, 35
km of C-38 will be backfilled, restoring 70 km of continuous river channel. Two water control structures
will be removed and water levels will be managed to reestablish historic hydrologic conditions.

Several expectations for changes due to restoration can be formulated based on the effects of the weirs
and backfill projects, along with knowledge of the historic Kissimmee River. Once flow is reestablished,
vegetation coverage is expected to decrease and be limited to the littoral fringes of the river channel.
Along inside bends of channel meanders, vegetation beds likely will remain within 5 meters of the bank;
along outside bends of channel meanders, where flows will be higher, vegetation beds will remain
within 3 meters of the bank.

In addition to changes in macrophyte bed width, dominant plant species also are expected to change.
Floating and mat-forming species that currently dominate will be replaced by emergent species,
particularly those that are adapted to flowing conditions and varying water levels. These beds will likely
include Nuphar lutea, Polygonum densiflorum, Sacciolepis striata, and Panicum hemitomon. The
distribution of these species will depend on channel morphology. Emergent species tolerant of varying
hydroperiods will dominate along inner bends, where sand bar formation is likely, while deep-water
emergent species will be more common along outer margins of channel meanders.

Changes in the macrophyte communities of the Kissimmee River are expected to occur within one to
three years following backfilling of the C-38 canal (Dahm et al, 1995). Currently, flow has been
reestablished in two channels that were stagnant for nearly 30 years. As construction continues, the
remnant channels will be reconnected into a single continuous river channel. Although it is not possible
to restore the entire length of the Kissimmee River, this restoration effort will reconnect 70 km of river
channel and reestablish over 14,000 ha of floodplain wetlands. The benefits of this project extend
beyond the vegetation communities by providing habitat for birds, fish, and other wildlife.

SUMMARY OF MACROPHYTE COMMUNITY CHANGES WITHIN THE KISSIMMEE
RIVER





Historic Conditions


1. Vegetation within river channels was confined to narrow littoral zones.
2. Littoral zones were composed of emersed, submersed, and floating species. Dominant plants included
Nuphar lutea, Polygonum densiflorum, Sacciolepis striata, and Panicum hemitomon.
3. The deepest areas occurred along outer bends where flows were highest; these areas hosted species
better suited to such conditions (e.g. Nuphar lutea and Polygonum densiflorum). Inner bends were
shallower with characteristic sandbars.

Current Conditions

1. Vegetation extends well into mid-channel areas and often covers the entire channel width. There is no
variation in vegetation width due to channel morphology.
2. Floating and sprawling species dominate. Although 55 species have been identified in the channels,
only 7 of these account for over half of the total coverage. The most abundant species are Scirpus
cubensis, Salvinia minima, Lemna spp., Pistia stratiotes, and Hydrocotyle umbellata.
3. Distribution of vegetation within the channels is independent of channel morphology.

After Backfilling & Restoration of Hydrology:

Initial High Flows/Short-term Expectations

1. High flows will flush thick mats of Scirpus cubensis out of the channel, clearing mid-channel areas.
2. Floating species, such as Pistia stratiotes, also will be removed.

Continuous Flows Over Time/Long-term Expectations

1. Vegetation will be confined to a narrow littoral zone. Along inner bends of channel meanders,
vegetation will be within 5 meters of the bank. Along outer bends of channel meanders, vegetation will
be within 3 meters of the bank. Vegetation along straight runs will be within 3 to 5 meters of the bank.
2. Emersed species, such as Nuphar lutea, Polygonum densiflorum, and Sacciolepis striata will become
dominant. Floating and sprawling species will remain, but will diminish and be confined to backwater
areas.
3. The composition of macrophyte beds will vary depending on morphology of the channel. Outer bends
will support deep-water emersed species, such as Nuphar lutea, Polygonum densiflorum, and Sacciolepis
striata. Inner bends will have marsh vegetation, such as Pontederia cordata and Sagittaria lancifolia.

References:
Dahm, C.N., K.W. Cummins, H.M. Valett, and R.L. Coleman. 1995. An ecosystem view of the
restoration of the Kissimmee River. Restoration Ecology 3(3): 225 238.
Goodrick, R.L, and J.F. Milleson. 1974. Studies of floodplain vegetation and water level fluctuation in




the Kissimmee River Valley. South Florida Water Management District Technical Publication 74-2.
Koebel, J.W. 1995. An historical perspective on the Kissimmee River restoration project. Restoration
Ecology 3(3): 149 159.
Miller, S.J., J. Wood, and L. Perrin. 1990. Vegetation community responses to restoration. South
Florida Water Management District. Kissimmee River Restoration Symposium. 97 110.
Milleson, J.F., R.L. Goodrick, and J.A. VanArman. 1980. Plant communities of the Kissimmee River
Valley. South Florida Water Management District Technical Publication 80-7.
Pierce, G.J., A.B. Amerson, and L.R. Becker. 1982. Final report: Pre-1960 floodplain vegetation of
the Lower Kissimmee River Valley, Florida. United States Army Corps of Engineers, Biological
Services Report 82-3.
Toth, L.A. 1993. The ecological basis of the Kissimmee River restoration plan. Biological Sciences 56
(1): 25 51.
Toth, L.A., D.A. Arrington, M.A. Brady, and D.A. Muszick. 1995. Conceptual evaluation of factors
potentially affecting restoration of habitat structure within the channelized Kissimmee River ecosystem.
Restoration Ecology 3(3): 160 180.



D



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Center Director Named to Federal Invasives Committee




The Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC) advises the Federal Invasive
Species Council as it pursues the implementation of a National Invasive Species
Management Plan, as ordered by the President in Executive Order 13112. The
Secretary of the US Department of the Interior, Bruce Babbitt, appointed thirty-two
people from government, academia, environmental groups and private companies to
serve on ISAC. Among them is Randall K. Stocker, Ph.D., Director of the Center
for Aquatic and Invasive Plants of the University of Florida.

More information about ISAC and its membership, the President's Executive Order,
the National Management Plan and minutes of ISAC meetings may be read on this
web site.



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NEW LINE DRAWINGS AVAILABLE!



Salvinia molesta and Salvinia minima are two non-native floating ferns in the
United States. S. minima has been here for quite some time; some believe it to be a
native plant. However, S. molesta, giant salvinia, is known to be a major pest plant
elsewhere--and it's newly arrived in the U.S.

But what do they look like?

APIRS has produced two new line drawings of these two plants, both by artist/
biologist Laura Line.

Here are the line drawings for online viewing.

Salvinia molesta

Salvinia minima

If you wish to purchase the line drawings for use in signs, manuals, brochures,
reports, web sites, etc., they are available in the newly expanded collection of 36
drawings, Supplement--Aquatic Plants in Pen-and-Ink. This collection is for sale
for $15 plus S/H from IFAS Publications, 1-800-226-1764. Please refer to
Publication Number SP243.



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S- ,A COLORING BOOK -
Wetland and Invasive Plants of the
Southeast
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
-- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida

S -- ;Here is the coloring book we've gotten so
lantd and many requests for: Wetland and Invasive
e Plants Plants of the Southeast A Coloring
Book -. This coloring book can be colored (use of
color pencils is especially pleasing), but it is also a
S Coloring Book fine collection of line drawings including your favorite
S. native wetland plants, beautiful and useful as they
S are, and non-native invasive plants, the ones we love
to hate.

This coloring book of drawings by A. Murray and
Laura Line was compiled by Vic Ramey. It includes
84 plant drawings: 59 native wetland plants and 25
non-native wetland and terrestrial plants. It costs
$4.95, plus S/H.

The Coloring Book will appeal to science, nature
and botany students, young and old, middle school to college; nature lovers and outdoorspeople; waterfront
homeowners; and may be especially appreciated by management and regulatory agency personnel, from field
workers to desk jockies.














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Wetland and Invasive Plants of the Southeast A Coloring Book (ISBN 0-9700046-0-5)









may be purchased for $4.95 plus tax and shipping and handling from IFAS Publications, PO Box 110011,
Gainesville, FL 32611-0011, 352-392-1764; or, visit the IFASBOOKS web site. The IFAS Publication
Number is SP 276.
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Number^ is SP 276


Visa and MasterCard orders only, call 1-800-226-1764




Shipping and Handling
$0-9.99 ............. $3
$10-49.99............$4
$50-99.99............$5
$100-129.99........$6
$130 and up........ 5% of sale


Plant drawings included in this coloring book:


Native Wetland Plants
Aletris obovata Southern colic-root
Allium canadense Canada garlic
Asclepias lanceolata Fewflower milkweed
Bidens laevis Bur-marigold
Brasenia schreberi- Water shield
Cabomba caroliniana Fanwort
Carex stipata Owlfruit sedge
Cephalanthus occidentalis Buttonbush
Ceratophyllum demersum Coontail
Cicuta mexicana Water hemlock
Cladium jamaicense Saw-grass
Cyperus distinctus Flat sedge
Decodon verticillatus Swamp loosestrife
Eleocharis equisetoides Jointed spikerush
Equisetum hyemale Scouring rush horsetail
Eriocaulon decangulare Ten-angled pipewort
Fuirena scirpoidea Rush fuirena
Helianthus angustifolius Narrow-leaf sunflower
Iris virginica Southern blue flag
Juncus effusus Soft rush
Juncus elliottii- Bog rush
Juncus megacephalus- Bighead rush
Liatris spicata Blazing star
Lilium catesbaei- Pine lily
Limnobium spongia Frog's-bit
Lobelia cardinalis Cardinal-flower
Mayaca fluviatilis Bog moss
Muhlenbergia capillaris Gulf muhly grass
Myriophyllum heterophyllum Variable-leaf
milfoil
Najas guadalupensis Southern naiad
Nelumbo lutea American lotus
Nuphar luteum Spatterdock
Nymphaea odorata American white water lily
Nympoides aquatica Banana lily


Rhynchospora cephalantha Bunched beak
rush
Rhynchospora colorata Star-rush
Rhynchospora inundata Narrowfruit beak rush
Sagittaria graminea Slender arrowhead
Sambucus canadensis Elderberry
Saururus cernuus Lizard's-tail
Scirpus californicus Giant bulrush
Sparganium americanum American bur-reed
Spartina alterniflora Smooth cordgrass
Thalia geniculata Fire flag
Typha domingensis Cat-tail
Utricularia radiata Little floating bladderwort
Vallisneria americana Tapegrass
Viola sororia Common blue violet
Xyris brevifolia Shortleaf yellow-eyed grass
Zizaniopsis miliaceae Giant cutgrass

Non-Native Wetland and Upland Plants
Alternanthera philoxeroides Alligator weed
Arundo donax Giant reed
Cinnamomum camphora Camphor tree
Colocasia esculenta Wild taro
Dioscorea bulbifera Air potato
Eichhornia crassipes Water hyacinth
Hydrilla verticillata Hydrilla

Compare: Hydrilla-Elodea-Egeria
Hygrophila polysperma- Indian hygro
Ipomoea aquatica- Water spinach
Limnophila sessiliflora- Ambulia
Ludwigia peruviana- Peruvian primrose-willow
Lygodium microphyllum- Old World climbing
fern
Melaleuca quinquenervia- Punktree




Oxypolis filiformis Water dropwort
Panicum hemitomon Maidencane
Phragmites australis Common reed
Platanthera blephariglottis White fringed
orchid
Polygonum densiflorum Denseflower
knotweed
Pontederia cordata Pickerelweed
Potamogeton diversifolius Waterthread
pondweed
Potamogeton pusillus Small pondweed
Proserpinaca pectinata Combleaf mermaid
weed


Myriophyllum aquaticum- Parrot feather
Myriophyllum spicatum- Eurasian watermilfoil
Paederia foetida- Skunk vine
Panicum repens- Torpedograss
Pennisetum purpureum- Elephant grass
Pistia stratiotes- Water lettuce
Rhodomyrtus tomentosus- Downy rose myrtle
Salvinia molesta- Giant salvinia
Sapium sebiferum- Chinese tallow
Schinus terebinthifolius- Brazilian pepper-tree
Solanum tampicense- Aquatic soda apple
Urochloa mutica- Paragrass


W UNIVERSITY of
U FLORIDA
IFAS Extension


r~ nri 1 *


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Odds n' Ends


The Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC)advises the Federal Invasive
Species Council as it pursues the implementation of a National Invasive Species
Management Plan, as ordered by the President in an Executive Order issued
February 3, 1999. Here is a web page that presents the full text of President
Clinton's Executive Order regarding invasive species, the "Stakeholder Review" of
APHIS, and the minutes of the ISAC meetings. http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu click on
"Federal Invasive Species Advisory Commitee."

Re-plant tape grass! Vallisneria americana is known as tape grass, eel grass and
American wild celery. It is a very important submersed plant that provides food for
ducks and other birds and stabilizes lake and river bottoms; it is native, primarily of
eastern North America, from Nova Scotia to the Gulf of Mexico. Hydrilla
infestations and other unfortunate events destroy tape grass meadows. During
restoration, eco-managers often want to re-plant the favored tape grass. Here is a
web page which provides comprehensive information about the plant's taxonomy,
reproduction, phenology, ecology, productivity and propagation: http://www.
npwrc.usgs.gov/resource/literatr/wildcel/wildcel.htm

"A Weed of National Significance." Cabomba, Cabomba caroliniana, has been
named as a "Weed of National Significance" in Australia, and a "national strategy is
being developed for cabomba, as part of the Australian National Weed Strategy."
Native to America, cabomba has recently infested several water storage dams, and
"is a concern with regard to blocking water flow, reducing water quality and
reducing access for boating and swimming. It has also been observed to outcompete
native aquatic plants, with subsequent effects on native fish and invertebrates." For
more information, contact Mr. Rodney Edwards, Queensland Department of Natural
Resources, E-mail: rodney.edwards(ikdnr.gld.gov.au

Report Non-Native Pest Plants in Florida. The Exotic Pest Plant Database is an
online database which may be queried to obtain lists of field occurrences of pest
plants in Florida public lands and waters. Or you may report a field occurrence




yourself. The database is a collaborative effort of the Florida Exotic Pest Plant
Council and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection's Bureau of
Invasive Plant Management. http://www.fleppc.org/database/data intro.htm

Bay Grasses in Classes. Or is it Classes in Bay Grasses? In Maryland, the state
Department of Natural Resources involves students from 70 elementary, middle and
high schools in growing plants for and transplanting them into Chesapeake Bay. The
web site for the project includes project data, bay grass information (including an
online key), maps of restoration sites, as well as science teacher questions and
answers about the requirements for growing plants. http://www.dnr.state.md.us/
bay/sav/grass clas.html

I'm not a plant, but will aquatic herbicides harm me? Regarding the use of
aquatic herbicides in our waters and wetlands, Dr. Carole Lembi says it's reasonable
to wonder "whether the use of chemicals in your body of water will be safe to you
and safe to the environment? That is a legitimate concern that all of us should have
before we apply any chemical to control some pest. How toxic is the chemical...
How persistent is the chemical... Will it cause cancer?" Dr. Lembi, of Purdue
University, attempts to answer these questions in a web-based tutorial and narrated
slide show. http://www.btny.purdue.edu/aguatic/aguaticherb.html

Aquatic plants in Utah?! Although Utah is the 2nd driest U.S. state, receiving only
13 inches of precipitation annually, the state does have aquatic and wetland
resources that it wants to protect. Thus, the Utah Aquatic Nuisance Species Action
Team, members of which represent about a dozen public and private organizations
in that state. The "primary threats" they list include purple loosestrife (Lythrum
salicaria), Eurasian water milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum) and zebra mussel
(Dreissenapolymorpha). One place you can get information about Utah's ANS
program is at: http://www.nr.state.ut.us/dwr/ans.htm

Hyacinth-induced paralysis. Africa's Lake Victoria, covering 27,000 square miles,
is the second largest freshwater lake in the world. Unfortunately, it now has the
exotic floating aquatic weed, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes), massive mats
of which paralyze port and fishing cities in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. Aquarius
Systems, manufacturers of aquatic plant harvesting equipment, has won a grant from
the World Bank to clear away and dispose of some of the worst mats. For pictures of
the problem, and for more information, go to: http://www.water-hyacinth.com





Current topographic maps for free. Interactive topo maps for the entire United
States are now on-line. The user can pinpoint very exact coordinates at resolution
scales from 1:25,000 to 1:200,000. Maps are in color and may be printed. (You need
the latest browser version, and, obviously, the fastest possible connection.) http://
www.topozone.com


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New Journal: BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS




Kluwer Academic Publishers has begun publication of a new quarterly journal,
Biological Invasions, with the first volume for 1999 just released. According to
editor-in-chief James T. Carlton, "Our hope is to seek the threads that bind for an
evolutionary and ecological understanding of invasions across terrestrial, fresh
water, and salt water environments. Specifically, we offer a portal for research on
the patterns and processes of invasions across the broadest menu: the ecological
consequences of invasions as they are deduced by experimentation, the factors that
influence transport, inoculation, establishment, and persistence of non-native
species, the mechanisms that control the abundance and distribution of invasives,
and the genetic consequences of invasions."

Other topics welcomed include invasion biodiversity and biogeography, the
theoretical basis of the release and use of biocontrol species and genetically
modified organisms, and management and policy issues.

Subscription prices: Institutions NLG 505.00/USD 252.50; Individuals NLG 200.00/
USD 100.00 (postage included).

For more information, contact Kluwer Academic Publishers, PO Box 17, 3300 AA
Dordrecht, The Netherlands, or PO Box 358, Accord Station, Hingham, MA 02018-
0358. E-mail: kluwer(wkap.com WWW: http://www.wkap.nl



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New Journal: PLANTED AQUARIA




Planted Aquaria, a quarterly magazine devoted to the hobby of keeping planted
tanks, made its debut with the Spring 2000 inaugural issue.

The editors plan to present information about planted tank management, aquatic
plant nutrition and physiology, plant types and their relationships to other plants and
animals, aquascaping, lighting, substrate, and more. The small format journal uses
striking color photographs to show a multitude of planted aquaria from around the
world. The first issue includes an article on "Style in the Planted Aquarium" which
points out that the Dutch have been seriously keeping planted tanks for much longer
than many other nations. They have "hotly competitive 'Aquarium Beautiful'
contests" with "very specific rules and highly trained, very demanding judges."

Order from PAM, 7 Gateview Ct., San Francisco, CA 94116; E-mail: pam(wcf.
com $20 one year; $38 two years; add $8 per year outside the U.S.



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Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Meetings


May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org
28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference
Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage



May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org
10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference



June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis.
edu/5intlweedcong.htm
International Weed Science Society

Aquatic Weed Management

Contacts:

Mike Netherland, USA I mdnether(@ufl .edu

Kevin Murphy, UK |I k.murphy@vbio.qla.ac.uk



June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/
wetland082/site.htm
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course



August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www.
sce.Isu.edu/conference
Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice






September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri 2008.
htm
2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute



September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



October 21-23, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB symposium.
htm
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton
Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University



November 18-20 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
11th International Paleolimnology Symposium



August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@(sun.ac.za
The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant
Invasions (EMAPI)
Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University







UNIVERSITY of
UK FLORIDA
WFAS Extension
Snfirb 1r Aii1. ii
nmviA wtiwwe t'tints


j- _'tnr r ,


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@2007 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Books, Manuals, and Online Resources


New Books and Reports
8 Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks
Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book
8 Online Articles and Extension Publications
Extension Publications & Articles
8 Online Books


UF


UNIV ERSITY o

IFAS Extension
I rut.-/ Kr Aiip.je-
itvp4i Il W strU ) '?-'101


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FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic plant database since October 1999. The database has more than 51,000
citations. To receive free bibliographies on specific plants and/or subjects, contact APIRS
at 352-392-1799 or use the database online at http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/database.html

To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library.



Abissy, M., Mandi, L.
Comparative study of wastewater purification efficiencies of two emergent
helophytes: Typha latifolia and Juncus subulatus under arid climate.
WATER, SCIENCE & TECHNOL. 39(10-11):123-126. 1999.

Akimoto, M., Shimamoto, Y., Morishima, H.
The extinction of genetic resources of Asian wild rice, Oryza rufipogon Griff: a
case study in Thailand.
GENETIC RESOURCES AND CROP EVOLUTION 46(4):419-425. 1999.

Ansede, J.H., Pellechia, P.J., Yoch, D.C.
Selenium biotransformation by the salt marsh cordgrass Spartina alterniflora:
evidence for dimethylselenoniopropionate formation.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 33(12):2064-2069. 1999.

Arrington, D.A., Toth, L.A., Koebel, J.W.
Effects of rooting by feral hogs Sus scrofa L. on the structure of a floodplain
vegetation assemblage.
WETLANDS 19(3):535-544. 1999.

Balogh, K.V., Presing, M., Hiripi, L., Voros, L.
Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of dissolved humic substances in a shallow
reservoir covered by macrophytes.
INTERNAL. REV. HYDROBIOL. 83:203-206. 1998.





Barreto, R.W., Torres, A.N.L.
Nimbya alternantherae and Cercospora alternantherae: two new records of fungal
pathogens on Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligatorweed) in Brazil.
AUSTRALIAN PLANT PATHOL. 28(2):103-107. 1999.

Bellucci, L.G., Frignani, M., Cochran, J.K., Cecconi, G.
Atmospheric fluxes of toxic metals and environmental changes in the Venice
Lagoon as recorded by salt marshes.
PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS: SIXTH SYMP. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS, 11-14
JULY 1999, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL., K.R. REDDY, ED., UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, CENTER
FOR NATURAL RESOURCES, GAINESVILLE, P. 71. 1999.

Benham, B.L., Mote, C.R.
Investigating dairy lagoon effluent treatability in a laboratory-scale constructed
wetlands system.
TRANS. AMER. SOC. AGRIC. ENG. (ASAE) 42(2):495-502. 1999.

Bergstrom, P.
Using monitoring data to choose planting sites for underwater grasses.
VOLUNTEER MONITOR 11(1): 16-17. 1999.

Best, E.P.H., Boyd, W.A.
Milfo (Version 1.0): A simulatlion model for growth of Eurasian watermilfoil -
user's guide.
INSTR. REPT. A-99-1, U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS, WATERWAYS EXPT. STATION,
AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM, VICKSBURG, MS, 23 PP. 1999.

Bohnenstiehl, K.
Riparian vegetation inventory and mapping at Moenkopi Wash, Hopi Indian
Reservation, using color-infrared, aerial photography, softcopy photogrammetry,
digital orthophotos, multispectral airborne scanner data and a GIS database.
IN: 26TH ANNUAL NATURAL AREAS ASSOC. CONF.: CONSERVATION PLANNING: FROM
SITES TO SYSTEMS, PROGRAM ABSTRACTS, TUCSON, AZ, P. 13. 1999.

Booms, T.L.
Vertebrates removed by mechanical weed harvesting in Lake Keesus, Wisconsin.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 37:34-36. 1999.


Brenner, M., Whitmore, T.J., Lasi, M.A., Cable, J.E., et al




A multi-proxy trophic state reconstruction for shallow Orange Lake, Florida, USA:
possible influence of macrophytes on limnetic nutrient concentrations.
J. PALEOLIMNOL. 21(2):215-233. 1999.

Brunton, D.F., Britton, D.M.
Maritime quillwort, Isoetes maritima (Isoetaceae), in the Yukon Territory.
CANADIAN FIELD-NATURALIST 113(4):641-645. 1999.

Bryson, C.T.
Potential for biological control of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) with
Lepidoptera larvae.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 1999 MEETING OF THE WEED SCIENCE SOC. AMER., J.W. WILCUT, ED.,
SAN DIEGO, CA, VOL. 39, P. 37 (ABSTRACT). 1999.

Burks, K.C.
Nymphoides cristata (Roxb.) Kuntze, new to the U.S. and occurring as a pest plant
in Florida.
ASB BULLETIN 17(2):171. (ABSTRACT) 2000.

Casanova, M.T., Brock, M.A.
Life histories of Charophytes from permanent and temporary wetlands in eastern
Australia.
AUST. J. BOT. 47(3):383-397. 1999.

Ceccherelli, G., Cinelli, F.
Effects of Posidonia oceanica canopy on Caulerpa taxifolia size in a north-western
Mediterranean bay.
J. EXPT. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 240(1):19-36. 1999.

Chen, P.H., Kuo, W.H.J.
Seasonal changes in the germination of buried seeds of Monochoria vaginalis.
WEED RESEARCH 39(2): 107-115. 1999.

Chua, H.
Bio-accumulation of environmental residues of rare earth elements in aquatic flora
Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms in Guangdong Province of China.
SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 214(1-3):79-85. 1998.


Cilliers, C.J.




Biological control of parrot's feather, Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc.
(Haloragaceae), in South Africa.
AFRICAN ENTOMOL. MEMOIR 1:113-118. 1999.

Cohen, M.B., Jackson, M.T., Lu, B.R., Morin, S.R., et al
Predicting environmental impact of transgene outcrossing to wild and weedy rice in
Asia.
IN: BRITISH CROP PROTECTION COUNCIL SYMP. PROC. NO. 72, GENE FLOW AND
AGRICULTURE: RELEVANCE FOR TRANSGENIC CROPS, PP. 151-157. 1999.

Croft, J., Cross, N., Hinchcliffe, S., Lughadha, E.N., et al
Plant names for the 21st century: the International Plant Names Index, a distributed
data source of general accessibility.
TAXON 48(2):317-324. 1999.

Crooks, J.A., Soule, M.E.
Lag times in population explosions of invasive species: causes and implications.
IN: INVASIVE SPECIES AND BIODIVERSITY MANAGEMENT, O.T. SANDLUND, ET AL, EDS.,
KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBLISHERS, BOSTON, PP. 103-125. 1999.

Crow, G.E., Ritter, N.P.
Myriophyllum mattogrossense (Haloragaceae), a rare lowland watermilfoil new to
Bolivia.
RHODORA 101(905):28-39. 1999.

Dalla Vecchia, F., Cuccato, F., La Rocca, N., Larcher, W., et al
Endodermis-like sheaths in the submerged freshwater macrophyte Ranunculus
trichophyllus Chaix.
ANNALS BOT. 83:93-97. 1999.

Daou, H., Talbert, R.E.
Control of propanil-resistant barnyard-grass (Echinochloa crus-galli) in rice (Oryza
sativa) with carbaryl/propanil mixtures.
WEED TECHNOL. 33:65-70. 1999.

Das, S., Jana, B.B.
Dose-dependent uptake and Eichhornia-induced elimination of cadmium in various
organs of the freshwater mussel, Lamellidens marginalis (Linn.)
ECOL. ENGINEERING 12(3-4):207-229. 1999.




De Greef, B., Triest, L.
The use of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) for hybrid detection in
Scirpus from the river Schelde (Belgium).
MOLECULAR ECOL. 8(7):379-386. 1999.

Diamond, P.
Paederiafoetida (Rubiaceae), new to the flora of North Carolina.
SIDA 18(4):1273-1276. 1999.

Ekstam, B., Johannesson, R., Milberg, P.
The effect of light and number of diurnal temperature fluctuations on germination of
Phragmites australis.
SEED SCI. RES. 9(2):165-170. 1999.

Emerson, D., Weiss, J.V., Megonigal, J.P.
Iron-oxidizing bacteria are associated with ferric hydroxide precipitates (Fe-plaque)
on the roots of wetland plants.
APPLIED AND ENVIRON. MICROBIOL. 65(6):2758-2761. 1999.

Fossen, T., Larsen, A., Kiremire, B.T., Andersen, O.M.
Flavonoids from blue flowers of Nymphaea caerulea.
PHYTOCHEMISTRY 51(8): 1133-1137. 1999.

Fox, A.M.
How do we best assess the ecological threats of the invasive plants that are already
here?
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, 2000 MEETING OF THE WEED SCIENCE SOC. AMERICA, J.W.
WILCUT, ED., TORONTO, VOL. 40, P.95 (ABSTRACT). 2000.

Fujita, M., Mori, K., Kodera, T.
Nutrient removal and starch production through cultivation of Wolffia arrhiza.
J. BIOSCI. BIOENG. 87(2):194-198. 1999.

Gabrey, S.W., Afton, A.D., Wilson, B.C.
Effects of winter burning and structural marsh management on vegetation and
winter bird abundance in the gulf coast Chenier Plain, USA.
WETLANDS 19(3):594-606. 1999.


Galatowitsch, S.M., Anderson, N.O., Ascher, P.D.




Invasiveness in wetland plants in temperate North America.
WETLANDS 19(4):733-755. 1999.

Gettys, L.A., Sutton, D.L.
Skyflower.
AQUATICS 21(4):4, 7-9. 1999.

Goldenberg, D.M., Zobel, D.B.
Habitat relations of Corydalis aquae-gelidae, a rare riparian plant.
NORTHWEST SCI. 73(2):94-105. 1999.

Gopalaswamy, G., Kannaiyan, S.
Utilization of Azolla hybrids for bio-reclamation of sodic soil and rice (Oryza
sativa) growth.
INDIAN J. AGRON. 43(3):511-517. 1998.

Graveland, J.
Reed die-back, water level management and the decline of the great reed warbler
Acrocephalus arundinaceus in The Netherlands.
ARDEA 86(2):187-201. 1998.

Hauber, D.P., Lege, L.
A survey of allozymic variation among three members of the Sagittaria graminea
complex (Alismataceae) from the south-eastern United States.
J. TORREY BOT. SOC. 126(3):181-187. 1999.

Healy, B.
Long term changes in a brackish lagoon, Lady's Island Lake, South-east Ireland.
BIOL. AND ENVIRON.: PROC. ROYAL IRISH ACAD. 97B(1):33-51. 1997.

Heard, T.A., Burcher, J.A., Forno, I.W.
Chalcodermus serripes (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) for biological control of
Mimosa pigra: host relations and life cycle.
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 15:1-9. 1999.

Hill, M.P., Cilliers, C.J.
A review of the arthropod natural enemies, and factors that influence their efficacy,
in the biological control of water hyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms-
Laubach (Pontederiaceae), in South Africa.




AFRICAN ENTOMOL. MEMOIR 1:103-112. 1999.


Hinton, T.G., Bell, C.M., Whicker, F.W., Philippi, T.
Temporal changes and factors influencing 137Cs concentration in vegetation
colonizing an exposed lake bed over a three-year period.
J. ENVIRON. RADIOACTIVITY 44(1):1-19. 1999.

Horinouchi, M., Sano, M.
Effects of changes in seagrass shoot density and leaf height on abundances and
distribution patterns of juveniles of three gobiid fishes in a Zostera marina bed.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 183:87-94. 1999.

Husband, B.C., Barrett, S.C.H.
Spatial and temporal variation in population size of Eichhorniapaniculata in
ephemeral habitats: implications for metapopulation dynamics.
J. ECOL. 86(6):1021-1031. 1998.

Ishizawa, K., Murakami, S., Kawakami, Y., Kuramochi, H.
Growth and energy status of arrowhead tubers, pondweed turions and rice seedling
under anoxic conditions.
PLANT, CELL AND ENVIRON. 22(5):505-514. 1999.

Jackson, M.B., Armstrong, W.
Formation of aerenchyma and the processes of plant ventilation in relation to soil
flooding and submergence.
PLANT BIOL. 1(3):274-287. 1999.

Jubinsky, G.
Invasive weeds in Florida and the southern United States: species, impacts, and
management strategies.
WSSA ABSTRACTS, 1999 MEETING OF THE WEED SCIENCE SOC. AMER., J.W. WILCUT, ED.,
SAN DIEGO, CA, VOL. 39, P. 86 (ABSTRACT). 1999.

Kaneene, J.B., Miller, R.
Re-analysis of 2,4-D use and the occurrence of canine malignant lymphoma.
VET. HUMAN TOXICOL. 41(2):164-170. 1999.

Knight, R.L., Kadlec, R.H., Ohlendorf, H.M.
The use of treatment wetlands for petroleum industry effluents.




ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 33(7):973-980. 1999.


Koch, M.S., Madden, C.
Bottom-up linkages between fringe mangroves and seagrasses in a Bahamas tropical
lagoon.
PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS: SIXTH SYMP. BIOGEOCHEMISTRY OF WETLANDS, 11-14
JULY 1999, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL., K.R. REDDY, ED., UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, CENTER
FOR NATURAL RESOURCES, GAINESVILLE, P. 181. 1999.

Kocianova-Mackova, D.
Population structure ofLedum palustre in Klin peat bog in NW Slovakia.
BIOLOGIA BRATISLAVA 54(1):61-65. 1999.

Kraemer, G.P., Chamberlain, R.H., Doering, P.H., Steinman, A.D., et al
Physiological responses of transplants of the freshwater angiosperm Vallisneria
americana along a salinity gradient in the Caloosahatchee Estuary (southwestern
Florida).
ESTUARIES 22(1):138-148. 1999.

LaRoche, F.B., ed.
Melaleuca management plan: ten years of successful melaleuca management in
Florida 1988-1998.
FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL, 106 PP. 1999.

Lavigne, C., Mignot, A., Stocklin, J.
Genetic variation in the response of pollen germination to nutrient availability and
elevated atmospheric C02 concentrations in Epilobium angustifolium.
INT. J. PLANT. SCI. 160(1):109-115. 1999.

Lee, C.-L., Wang, T.C., Lin, C.-K., Mok, H.-K.
Heavy metals removal by a promising locally available aquatic plant, Najas
graminea Del., in Taiwan.
WAT. SCI. TECHNOL. 39(10-11):177-181. 1999.

Lentz, K.A.
Effects of intraspecific competition and nutrient supply on the endangered
northeastern bulrush, Scirpus ancistrochaetus Schuyler (Cyperaceae).
AMER. MIDL. NAT. 142(1):47-54. 1999.




Liu, B., Liu, Z.L., Li, X.W.
Production of a highly asymmetric somatic hybrid between rice and Zizania latifolia
(Griseb): evidence for inter-genomic exchange.
THEOR. APPL. GENET. 98(6-7):1099-1103. 1999.

Lonard, R.I., Judd, F.W.
The biological flora of coastal dunes and wetlands. Ipomoea imperati (Vahl) Griseb.
J. COASTAL RES. 15(3):645-652. 1999.

Lucassen, E.C.H.E.T., Bobbink, R., Oonk, M.M.A., Brandrud, T.-E., et al
The effects of liming and reacidification on the growth of Juncus bulbosus: a
mesocosm experiment.
AQUATIC BOTANY 64:95-103. 1999.

Lundholm, J.T., Simser, W.L.
Regeneration of submerged macrophyte populations in a disturbed Lake Ontario
coastal marsh.
J. GREAT LAKES RES. 25(2):395-400. 1999.

Luque, C.J., Castellanos, E.M., Castillo, J.M., Gonzalez, M., et al
Metals in halophytes of a contaminated estuary (Odiel Saltmarshes, SW Spain).
BASELINE 38(1):49-51. 1999.

Maceina, M., Slipke, J.
Confining grass carp with an electric barrier within an embayment in Lake Seminole.
AQUATICS 21(3):4, 7-9. 1999.

Magee, T.K., Ernst, T.L., Kentula, M.E., Dwire, K.A.
Floristic comparison of freshwater wetlands in an urbanizing environment.
WETLANDS 19(3):517-534. 1999.

Maine, M.A., Sune, N.L., Panigatti, M.C., Pizarro, M.J., et al
Relationships between water chemistry and macrophyte chemistry in lotic and lentic
environments.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 145(2):129-145. 1999.

Marba, N., Walker, D.I.
Growth, flowering, and population dynamics of temperate western Australian
seagrasses.




MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 184:105-118. 1999.


Mars, R., Mathew, K., Ho, G.
The role of the submergent macrophyte Triglochin huegelii in domestic greywater
treatment.
ECOL. ENG. 12:57-66. 1999.

Mislevy, P., Mullahey, J.J., Martin, F.G.
Preherbicide mowing and herbicide rate on tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum)
control.
WEED TECHNOL. 13(1):172-175. 1999.

Moustafa, M.Z.
Nutrient retention dynamics of the Everglades nutrient removal project.
WETLANDS 19(3):689-704. 1999.

Nakai, S., Inoue, Y., Hosomi, M., Murakami, A.
Growth inhibition of blue-green algae by allelopathic effects of macrophytes.
WAT. SCI. TECHNOL. 39(8):47-53. 1999.

Nelson, M., Finn, M., Wilson, C., Zabel, B., et al
Bioregenerative recycling of wastewater in Biosphere 2 using a constructed
wetland: 2-year results.
ECOLOGICAL ENG. 13(1-4):189-197. 1999.

Otto, C.
Effects of prey and turion size on the growth and turion production of the
carnivorous bladderwort, Utricularia vulgaris L.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 145(4):469-478. 1999.

Padgett, D.J.
Nomenclatural novelties in Nuphar (Nymphaeaceae).
SIDA 18(3):823-826. 1999.

Perez-Corona, M.E., Verhoeven, J.T.A.
Biomass allocation and phosphorus productivity of Carex species in relation to soil
phosphorus status.
ISRAEL J. PLANT SCI. 47:97-102. 1999.




Perkins, J., Hunter, C.
An investigation of sanitary indicator bacteria in a macrophyte wastewater-treatment
system.
J. CHARTERED INST. WATER ENVIRON. MGMT. 13(2):141-145. 1999.

Peterken, C.J., Conacher, C.A.
Seed germination and recolonisation of Zostera capricorni after grazing by dugongs.
AQUATIC BOTANY 59:333-340. 1997.

Peterson, B.J., Heck, K.L.
The potential for suspension feeding bivalves to increase seagrass productivity.
J. EXPT. MAR. BIOL. & ECOL. 240(1):37-52. 1999.

Pflugmacher, S., Codd, G.A., Steinberg, C.E.W.
Effects of the cyanobacterial toxin Microcystin-LR on detoxication enzymes in
aquatic plants.
ENVIRON. TOXICOL. 14(1):111-116. 1999.

Pieczynska, E., Kolodziejczyk, A., Rybak, J.I.
The responses of littoral invertebrates to eutrophication-linked changes in plant
communities.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 391(1-3):9-21. 1999.

Randall, T.A., Carlson, J.K., Mroczka, M.E.
Distribution and density of submerged aquatic vegetation beds in a Connecticut
harbor.
RHODORA 101(905):40-45. 1999.

Rasmussen, G., Andersen, S.
Episodic release of arsenic, copper and chromium from a wood preservation site
monitored by transplanted aquatic moss.
WATER, AIR AND SOIL POLLUTION 109(1-4):41-52. 1999.

Roberts, D.E., Church, A.G., Cummins, S.P.
Invasion of Egeria into the Hawkesbury-Nepean River, Australia.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 37:31-34. 1999.

Rojo-Herguedas, I., Olmo, J.L.
The ciliated protozoa of the pitcher plant Sarraceniapurpurea.




ACTA PROTOZOOL. 38(2):155-159. 1999.


Rozefelds, A.C., MacKenzie, R.
The weed invasion in Tasmania in the 1870's: knowing the past to predict the future.
PAPERS & PROC., 12TH AUSTRALIAN WEEDS CONF., 12-16 SEPT. 1999, HOBART,
TASMANIA, PP. 581-583. 1999.

Scarlett, A., Donkin, P., Fileman, T.W., Evans, S.V., et al
Risk posed by the antifouling agent Irgarol 1051 to the seagrass, Zostera marina.
AQUATIC TOXICOL. 45(2-3):159-170. 1999.

Schneider, I.A.H., Rubio, J.
Sorption of heavy metal ions by the nonliving biomass of freshwater macrophytes.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 33(13):2213-2217. 1999.

Soulie-Marsche, I.
Extant gyrogonite populations of Chara zeylanica and Chara haitensis: implications
for taxonomy and paleoecology.
AUSTRALIAN J. BOT. 47(3):371-382. 1999.

Spencer, D.F., Ksander, G.G.
Phenolic acids and nutrient content for aquatic macrophytes from Fall River,
California.
J. FRESHWATER ECOL. 14(2): 197-209. 1999.

Stanley, J.N., Julien, M.H.
The host range of Eccritotarsus catarinensis (Heteroptera: Miridae) a potential
agent for the biological control of waterhyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes).
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 14(3):134-140. 1999.

Stocker, R.K., Haller, W.T.
Residual effects of herbicide-treated Eichhornia crassipes used as a soil amendment.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 415:329-334. 1999.

Volin, J.C.
Bischofiajavanica resists herbicide treatment in a wetland mitigation project
(Florida).
ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION 17(3):166-167. 1999.




Walstad, D.
Hardwater v. softwater plants. Part 1: Calcium requirements.
AQUATIC GARDENER 12(1-4):32-37. 1999.

Walter, D.E.
Cryptic inhabitants of a noxious weed: mites (Arachnida: Acari) on Lantana camera
L. invading forests in Queensland.
AUSTRALIAN J. ENTOMOL. 38(3):197-200. 1999.

Wear, D.J., Sullivan, M.J., Moore, A.D., Millie, D.F.
Effects of water-column enrichment on the production dynamics of three seagrass
species and their epiphytic algae.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 179:201-213. 1999.

Wennstrom, A., Hagner, A.
The distribution of the smut Urocystisjunci and its effect on the host plant Juncus
balticus on the shores of the Gulf of Bothnia, Sweden.
ANN. BOT. FENNICI 36(2):149-155. 1999.

Wilson, D.M., Fenical, W., Hay, M., Lindquist, N., et al
Habenariol, a freshwater feeding deterrent from the aquatic orchid Habenaria
repens (Orchidaceae).
PHYTOCHEMISTRY 50(8): 1333-1336. 1999.

Winder, R.S.
Evaluation of Colletotrichum sp. and Fusarium spp. as potential biological control
agents for marsh reed grass (Calamagrostis canadensis).
CAN. J. PLANT PATHOL. 21(1):8-15. 1999.

Wojcicki, J.J., Zastawniak, E.
Trapa srodoniana, a new fossil species from the pliocene of Belchatow (middle
Poland).
ACTA PALAEOBOT. 38(1):167-174. 1998.

Yavitt, J.B., Knapp, A.K.
Aspects of methane flow from sediment through emergent cattail (Typha latifolia)
plants.
NEW PHYTOL. 139(3):495-503. 1998.




Zepeda, C., Lot, A.
Acuitlacpalli or Sagittaria macrophylla (Alismataceae): a Mexican endemic
hydrophyte and a threatened food resource.
ECONOMIC BOTANY 53(2):221-223. 1999.

Zhang, X., Zhang, F., Mao,D.
Effect of iron plaque outside roots on nutrient uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.):
phosphorus uptake.
PLANT AND SOIL 209(2):187-192. 1999.

Zhao, M., Duncan, J.R., Van Hille, R.P.
Removal and recovery of zinc from solution and electroplating effluent using Azolla
filiculoides.
WATER RESEARCH 33(6): 1516-1522. 1999.

Zuidervaart, I., Tichy, R., Kvet, J., Hezina, F.
Distribution of toxic metals in constructed wetlands treating municipal wastewater
in the Czech Republic.
IN: NUTRIENT CYCLING AND RETENTION IN NATURAL AND CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS,
J. VYMAZAL, ED., BACKHUYS PUBLISHERS, LEIDEN, THE NETHERLANDS, PP. 127-139. 1999.



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