• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Table of Contents
 About Aquaphyte
 Assessing non-native plants in...
 Aquatic, wetland and invasive plant...
 New duckweed drawings
 Murals
 New Florida web projects
 Aquatics - still thriving after...
 Classic book newly available
 IAMSLIC - it's for the librari...
 Odds n' ends
 Meetings
 Books, manuals, and online...
 From the database






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00012
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00012
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    About Aquaphyte
        Page 3
    Assessing non-native plants in Florida's natural areas
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Aquatic, wetland and invasive plant particulars and photographs
        Page 10
    New duckweed drawings
        Page 11
    Murals
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    New Florida web projects
        Page 15
    Aquatics - still thriving after all these years
        Page 16
    Classic book newly available
        Page 17
        Page 18
    IAMSLIC - it's for the librarians
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Odds n' ends
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Meetings
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Books, manuals, and online resources
        Page 26
    From the database
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online


A Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants

Volume 20 Number 2 Winter 2000
Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702


Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants

Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from:

The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

The St. Johns River Water Management District


Contents

About AQUAPHYTE

Assessing Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas

What are Duckweeds?

NEW! Line-drawings of Duckweeds

NEW! Invasive Plants Photo-Mural for Teachers/Trainers

New Florida Web Projects




AQUATICS still thriving after all these years

Classic Book Newly Available: The Biology of Aquatic Vascular Plants

IAMSLIC It's for the librarians!

Odds n' Ends

BE THERE, DO THAT

BOOKS/REPORTS

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRSdatabase



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About Aquaphyte



This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic,
Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS:
Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries.
Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic
plant research are solicited.

Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion
represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the
University of Florida.



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Assessing Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas


What does one do when the ornamental horticulture department of a university is
researching and promoting the use of a non-native plant to commercial growers and
landscapers, while other departments of the same university are researching and
advocating the control and eradication of the very same species? In the non-academic
arena, commercial growers and landscapers are outraged over the perceived threat to their
livelihood, while land managers and environmentalists are adamant about protecting their
remaining natural areas from invasive plant species. To help solve this problem, members
of the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) Invasive
Plants Working Group came up with an assessment protocol for non-native plants in
Florida. The protocol is an attempt to reconcile these different factions, to make sure that
labels of invasiveness can be defended to the satisfaction of everyone concerned, and to
allow those who hold a stake in the issue to be involved in a reasonable approach to its
resolution. KB

The remainder of this article was adapted from one published in the Fall 2000 issue of
Wildland Weeds, a quarterly publication of the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council, and
University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service publication SS-AGR-79, by A.M.
Fox, D.R. Gordon, J.A. Dusky, L. Tyson, and R.K Stocker. For further information,
contact Dr. Alison Fox, E-mail: amfox(@,nv. ifas. ufl. edu

The IFAS Assessment of Non-Native Plants in Florida's Natural Areas (hereafter
referred to as the IFAS Assessment) was developed in 1999 by a subcommittee of the
IFAS Invasive Plants Working Group (A.M. Fox, J.A. Dusky, and R.K. Stocker of the
University of Florida; D.R. Gordon of The Nature Conservancy; and L. Tyson of Santa Fe
Community College).

Wilcove et al. (1998) reported that invasive species are second only to habitat loss in the U.
S. as the leading threat to threatened and endangered species. U.S. federal government
recognition of these issues was emphasized by President Clinton's Executive Order on
Invasive Species (1999). However, it is important to acknowledge that only a small
percentage of introduced species create a problem in natural areas (Lippincott 1996), and




that quantifiable ecological and economic impacts caused by invasive plants range from
negligible to catastrophic.

Around the world there is a concerted effort to develop predictive models, primarily for
species not yet present in a particular area. Many of them appear to be efficient at
identifying potential problem species, especially based on information such as whether a
species has been a problem elsewhere. A concern about many of these models has been
that they are often overly restrictive, in some cases falsely accusing up to 20% of plants
that have never (at least in the studied timescales) been found to be invasive (Reichard and
Hamilton 1997). Managers of natural areas may not consider this to be much of a flaw, but
this is unacceptable to the many people who believe that supplies of plants for food, fiber,
and landscaping should not be unnecessarily restricted.

The invasive "no-brainers" are typically well-established and little-disputed species, many
of which are already subject to state and/or federal regulation. On the other hand, it is
recognized that there are many exotic crops, for example, that do not survive without
human intervention in the form of fertilizers, irrigation, etc. Controversy, however, haunts
the middle ground and usually surrounds those commercially important species that are
either just starting to escape or that appear in natural areas but with unknown or poorly
documented impacts.

Since 1984, the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC) has been classifying
certain plants as Category I: "species that are invading and disrupting native plant
communities in Florida" based "...on the documented ecological damage caused"; or as
Category II: "species that have shown a potential to disrupt native plant communities".
The lists serve a variety of purposes (see "Florida's most invasive plant list" at http://www.
fleppc.org/) with the precautionary objective to alert managers of natural areas to
currently, or potentially, problematic species.

Things become more controversial when these lists are adopted for other purposes, such as
the development of local laws banning the use of certain non-native plants. With a large
gap between the FLEPPC lists and state and federal regulations (on the 1999 lists, only 25
out of 65 Category I species, and 3 out of 60 Category II species, are government-
regulated), it is not surprising that proactive local organizations have embraced the
Category I list.

Such regulations have alarmed ornamental horticulturists and landscape designers, who




question why some commercially important species such as heavenly bamboo (Nandina
domestica, and lantana (Lantana camera) are on the Category I list. Their concerns are
magnified because, while distribution maps are available on the FLEPPC website,
systematic, written criteria and documentary evidence on which the FLEPPC lists are
based are not available.

Purpose and Objectives of the IFAS Assessment

The primary purpose of the IFAS Assessment is to provide a mechanism to be used within
the University of Florida to develop consistent descriptions of, and recommendations for,
the use and management of non-native plants in Florida. Secondary objectives are to
provide a level of information that is intermediate between simple presence or absence on
a list and all the data that are available on any given species; and to identify the frequent
data-gaps in our knowledge of these species which would assist in setting research
priorities. It is also hoped that the IFAS Assessment will provide a tool to help resolve
some of the conflicts between FLEPPC and the Florida Nurserymen and Growers
Association (FNGA).

The requirements for the IFAS Assessment were that it have precisely defined criteria that
are defendable by faculty, all evidence and decisions should be documented and archived
for anyone to review, and it should only be used on species already present in the state.
Far less is published about most invasive species than desired for an assessment, and
anecdotal information can be difficult to defend without further substantiation. Thus, we
have defined documentary evidence as being either published and quantitative, or as
written observations from three biologists, any of whom could be contacted for
confirmation. This process would not be a sufficient replacement for formal (and much
more costly and complex) risk-benefit analysis, such as is performed in the development
of state regulations prohibiting the use of a species.

The IFAS Assessment has five major sections: one to define if a species is invasive in
Florida; and one for each of four indices ecological impacts; potential for expansion;
difficulty of management; and commercial value; closing with the conclusions. The
assessment is intentionally broader than just determining whether a species is invasive (e.
g., the latter two indices provide important information that does not address that issue),
and there is no intention to offset commercial value against ecological impacts.

Invasiveness is very broadly defined in Section I as the establishment of self-sustaining




plant populations that are expanding within a natural plant community with which they
had not previously been associated (Vitousek et al. 1995). To be declared as being
invasive, a plant must be documented in natural areas where there has not been significant
human disturbance, or it must have survived restoration of the natural communities. The
ecological impacts are evaluated in Section II based on the worst known site(s), without or
before any control effort. Scores are assigned to six items in this section that address
disruption of ecosystem processes, impacts on threatened or endangered species,
competitive displacement, changes in community structure, and hybridization with native
species. This impact score is increased if the species can invade a broad range of habitats.
In areas that a plant has invaded, an assessment of high or low potential for further
expansion (one of very few "predictive" questions) is based, in Section III, on the number
of new sites reported to be infested in the last five years. Difficulty of management and
commercial value are assessed, and result in scores based on 10 and 4 items, in Sections
IV and V respectively. A species is considered more difficult to manage if non-target
damage is hard to avoid, if access and methods of control are costly, if there are large or
dispersed areas to be managed, or if the likelihood of regrowth and re-colonization is high.
Commercial value turned out to be the most challenging index because there is no tracking
of state-wide sales receipts by species. Nobody, including representatives from FNGA,
was very satisfied with the rather vague items in this section related to retail sales and
importance to nursery growers or farmers. Thus, an analysis of the economic impact of
potentially invasive plants in the ornamental nursery industry has been proposed as an
important area for future research.

Conclusions

For all indices other than ecological impacts, the scores for a species are assigned to a high
or low category. Scores for ecological impacts, the index which drives the development of
conclusions, are assigned to low, medium, high, or very high categories. Based on the
permutations of these categories for each index, one of the following conclusions is
designated for a species:

Not considered a problem invasive species at this time (low impacts and potential for
expansion)
Caution, prevent escape of this plant (low impacts but high potential for expansion)
Avoid use of this plant (medium to high impacts)
Do not use this plant (high to very high impacts)




While this language has no regulatory authority and is obviously superseded by any state
or federal prohibitions, it is intended to provide consistent guidance.

All species will be reassessed as new information becomes available (especially in relation
to new sites or impacts) and at least every 10 years. Plants with "Caution" or "Avoid"
conclusions are to be reassessed every two years. Additionally, some of the plants
assigned to "Avoid" will be recommended for a formal risk-benefit analysis. Typically
these plants will have medium to high ecological impacts and high commercial value, and
the risk-benefit analysis should be conducted promptly. Species that are rated with very
high impacts, that score highly on all indices, or that have a combination of medium to
high impacts, high potential and low value, will not be recommended for use.

In developing the IFAS Assessment, over 20 species were tested without the formal
collection of documentary evidence. This range of species represented all categories for
each index and all conclusions. In their formal assessment, it takes a substantial effort to
collect and document the appropriate data for each species and we have several part-time
staff dedicated to this task.

As results are compiled, they will be made available online. As a large number of species
are assessed, we will test the structure and questions in the IFAS Assessment. We expect
that the assessment will continuously evolve both from these internal evaluations and from
external input, hence the long-term objective of having an interactive web-based version
rather than just the printable format currently available.

There is no doubt that for many species on the FLEPPC Category I list, similar
conclusions will be reached via the IFAS Assessment. For other species there will seem to
be a reduced level of concern based on our stringent criteria and requirements for
documented evidence. This may seem alarming to managers of natural areas, but we
anticipate that this could provide the impetus to gather more evidence, especially for
species with expanding ranges, so that problem species are quickly reassessed and
recognized. The precautionary approach of the FLEPPC lists is important for the managers
of natural areas and should be continued. The IFAS Assessment is intended to
complement this system and it is hoped that many people will contribute information on
their least-favorite plants.


References:




Lippincott, C. 1996. Current estimates of cultivated, native, naturalized, and weedy plant
species in Florida. Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council Newsletter Summer 1996, Vol 6. No
3, p. 3.

Reichard, S.H. and C.W. Hamilton. 1997. Predicting invasions of woody plants
introduced into North America. Conservation Biology 11:193-203.

Vitousek, P., L. Loope, C. D'Antonio and S.J. Hassol. 1995. Biological invasions as
global change. pp. 213-336 In: S.J. Hassol and J. Katzenberger (eds) Elements of change
1994. Aspen Global Change Institute, Aspen, CO.

Wilcove, D.S., D. Rothstein, J. Dubow, A. Phillips, and E. Losos. 1998. Quantifying
threats to imperiled species in the United States. Bioscience 48:607-615.



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Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant
Particulars and Photographs

University of Florida, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants


Florida's Native Duckweeds

Duckweeds are common plants in Florida.
Although very small, they are nonetheless
sometimes quite noticeable, as when they cover a
pond with dense masses.

Click on the picture on the left to compare the
duckweeds. Note the centimeter-measure in the
W. W picture, remembering that 2.5 cm equals an inch.
These are very small flowering plants indeed; in
.fact, water meal (Wolffia spp.), at 1 to 1.5 mm long,
Sis the smallest flowering plant on earth!

Also see the individual plant pages for the
duckweeds:

Spirodela polvrhiza- giant duckweed
Lemna valdiviana- small duckweed
Wolffia columbiana- water meal
Wolffiella floridana- mud-midget

Landoltia punctata (Spirodela punctata) a non-native duckweed



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New Duckweed Drawings!



These line drawings were just completed by Laura Line, Center for Aquatic
and Invasive Plants, University of Florida. With proper attribution, and for
non-profit purposes, please feel free to use these line drawings for manuals,
brochures, reports, proposals, web sites...

Spirodela polyrhiza giant duckweed

Wolffia columbiana water meal

Wolffiella floridana mud-midget

Landoltia punctata non-native duckweed in Florida>

Also, see the new photos of these duckweeds on the new APIRS web
pages:

Spirodela polyrhiza

Wolffia columbiana

Wolffiella floridana

Lemna valdiviana

Landoltia puncata (Spirodela punctata)


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NEW!
Two PHOTO-MURALS
INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANTS

A Collaborative Effort:
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
and
Cerexagri

Classroom size, Free to Requesting Teachers (K-12)
Send your non-virtual letter for immediate delivery.


Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the plants
depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50%
are also found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and
17% are also found in most of the rest of the U.S.

All plants are depicted in large, strikingly attractive color photographs. Here is the list of plants.

At the request of teachers and enviro-trainers, these photo-murals were produced to be
attention-grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for




homeowners' forums, ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others concerned about
the onslaught of non-native plants in the United States. It was produced by the University of
Florida and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, with printing support from
Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea Grant, the national Aquatic Plant
Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and from the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office.

The photo-murals are available:

-- free-to-teachers:

fully laminated copies of the murals are free to teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who request them in writing, on letterhead, to
the non-virtual APIRSaddress below. there is a limited number of free
copies available -

Please do not telephone or e-mail us about the free photo-mural s offer;
we are happy to accept letters on letterhead from teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who want their free copies. Send your request
letters to: APIRS Photo-Mural, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants,
7922 NW 71 ST, Gainesville, FL 32653.

-- All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764:

They may be purchased singly or as a complete set.

1) SP-293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in.
X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

2) SP-329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated
27 in. X 39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.

3) SP-292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

4) SP-328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X
39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.


OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR!





SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50
plus S/H

Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-1764.
(Credit cards accepted.)

Remember that WHEN YOU PURCHASE A COPY, you also are buying a copy
for a K-12 teacher!




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New Florida Web Projects




The Florida Environments Online (FEOL) project has merged eight research
bibliographies on Florida's biotic communities into one searchable database. The
bibliographies were compiled by scientists and state agencies throughout Florida
and cover the following subjects: ornithology; fish; herpetology; geology; literature
useful to the study of Florida plants; fresh water; ecosystems; and agricultural
history. The total number of records will eventually number more than 13,000.
Although some records have yet to be entered, the system is currently available
online through WebLUIS (the Library User Information Service of the State
University System of Florida). Access can be gained through the library websites of
any of Florida's state universities.

The FEOL database is part of a larger project, Linking Florida's Natural Heritage
(LFNH), that allows students, researchers, and the public to query museum
specimen databases, library catalogs, and other citation databases for taxonomic and
topical information. Collections included in the project are Everglades Online,
Florida Environments Online, the FORMIS Ant Bibliography (29,000 references),
the Sea Turtle Bibliography (12,000 references), the State University System of
Florida library catalogs (more than ten million references (on all subjects)), the
Florida Museum of Natural History's ichthyology and herpetology specimen
collections (143,000 cataloged lots and 149,000 specimens, respectively), the Tall
Timbers Research Station bird specimen collection (3,900 specimens), and a core
collection of several hundred key publications selected for digitization. The LFNH
project on Florida species and ecosystems is available at http://susdl.fcla.edu.lfnh/



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AQUATICS still thriving after all these years




With the recent surge in interest in exotic and invasive species of the terrestrial sort,
many researchers and managers have headed upland from their lakes, rivers and
wetlands. Let it be known that the Aquatic Plant Management Society and its
regional chapters are still alive and thriving with plenty of aquatic plants to take care
of.

The Aquatic Plant Management Society, Inc. (APMS) is an international
organization of scientists, educators, students, commercial pesticide applicators,
administrators, and concerned individuals interested in the management and study of
aquatic plants. The membership reflects a diversity of federal, state, and local
agencies; universities and colleges around the world; corporations; and small
businesses.

Originally known as the Hyacinth Control Society, Inc. when founded in 1961, the
APMS is a respected source of expertise in the field of biological, mechanical, and
chemical aquatic plant management and aquatic plant science. The Society has
grown to include chapters in Florida, Texas, South Carolina, the Midsouth,
Midwest, Northeast, Western, and the Nile Basin. Through these affiliates, annual
meetings, newsletters, and the Journal of Aquatic Plant Management, members
keep abreast of the latest developments in the field.

The objectives of the Society are to assist in promoting the management of nuisance
aquatic plants, to provide for the scientific advancement of members of the society,
to encourage scientific research, to promote university scholarship, and to extend
and develop public interest in the aquatic plant science discipline. For more
information on the APMS and its chapters, go to http://www.apms.org


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Classic Book Newly Available:

C.D. Sculthorpe's
THE BIOLOGY OF AQUATIC VASCULAR PLANTS




In the late Sculthorpe's words, this book is a "monograph treating all aspects of the
comparative biology of freshwater and marine vascular plants." Although written
primarily for undergraduate and graduate students, the author hoped the book also
would be useful to teachers and researchers in the field of aquatic biology.

Koeltz Scientific Books recently announced that they had "found a large quantity of
unbound copies in their warehouse," and had bound them up to sell. This book was
out of print for some years and is considered a classic in its field.

Contents include:

The Salient Features ofAquatic Vascular Plants and the Aquatic
Environment;
A Link with Land Plants: The Structure and Physiology of Emergent Foliage;
Life in two Environments: The Structure & Physiology of Floating Leaves;
Life in the Water: The Structure and Physiology of Submerged Organs;
Life in the Substrate: The Structure and Physiology of Underground Organs;
The Free-Floating Habit;
Vegetative Polymorphism and the Problem ofHeterophylly;
Sexual Reproduction and Natural Affinities;
Vegetative Reproduction and Perennation; Some Aspects of the Geography of
Aquatic Vascular Plants;
The Growth of Hydrophyte Communities and Their Interaction with the
Aquatic Environment;
The Problem ofAquatic Weeds;
The Control ofAquatic Weeds;




The Aesthetic and Economic Value ofAquatic Vascular Plants;
Bibliography (58 p.).

This is the 1985 reprint of the 1971 2nd edition. The book costs 128.00 DM (US$
69.00), plus shipping. Contact Koeltz for more information at koeltz@t online.de


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IAMSLIC It's for the librarians!


IAMSLIC is the International Association of Aquatic and Marine Science
Libraries and Information Centers. Begun in 1975, it has more than 280 members
with one third of the membership working outside the U.S. & Canada. IAMSLIC is
a nonprofit organization providing an annual conference, continuing education
workshops, a quarterly newsletter, a membership directory, electronic mail
conferencing, and special projects. Individuals representing all types and sizes of
libraries and information centers participate, including marine and freshwater
research and policy institutions, government agencies, colleges, universities,
nonprofit and profit organizations.

IAMSLIC offers a unique opportunity to meet librarians and others interested in
aquatic and marine science information from throughout the world in a professional
context. The IAMSLIC 26th annual conference in Victoria, B.C., Canada was
attended by approximately 100 librarians and information specialists from Fiji,
Malaysia, Iceland, Japan, Belgium, Tanzania, Great Britain, Italy, Australia, South
Africa, France and Germany, as well as the United States and Canada. Keynote
speakers were Richard Luce, Director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory
Research Library in New Mexico, and Carla Stoffle, Dean of Libraries at the
University of Arizona. Laura Gasaway, author, lawyer, librarian and nationally
recognized expert on copyright law in libraries presented a special session on
copyright issues and digital licensing.

IAMSLIC promotes cooperation and sharing of resources among libraries and
information centers which specialize in any aspect of aquatic science. Regional
groups include the European Association (EURASLIC), South Pacific, Africa,
Cyamus (west coast of North America), and the Southeastern Association (SAIL,
southeast Atlantic states, Gulf Coast and Caribbean). For more information, visit the
IAMSLIC website at: http://siolibrary.ucsd.edu/iamslic/





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Odds n' Ends


Harmful Nonnative Weed Control Act of 2000. U.S. Senate Bill S. 3222,
introduced by Sen. Larry Craig (with 7 co-sponsors so far), seeks to raise federal
money and to require the Secretary of the Interior to "provide assistance [through
the States] to eligible weed management entities to control or eradicate harmful,
nonnative weeds on public and private lands." The bill was referred to the
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources; it is expected to be reintroduced to
the new Congress in 2001, with possible hearings in the winter. Individuals can read
and track the bill through: http://thomas.loc.gov/home/cl06query.html or contact
Myra Hyde, mhyde(frbeef.org

The World Biodiversity Database (WBD) is now 10 years old. A project of ETI
(Expert Center for Taxonomic Identification), the WBD now has information on
about 120,000 species. The ETI Biodiversity Center, supported by UNESCO, the
Dutch government and the University of Amsterdam, seeks nothing less than to
make it possible to use the Internet to identify plants and animals from all over the
world. Visit their web site: http://www.eti.uva.nl

Vascular Plant Type Catalog. The New York Botanical Garden is working to
become the first major herbarium to place online information about and photographs
of its (90,000) vascular plant type specimens. The web site is clean and easy to use;
the hi-resolution pictures are very well done: http://www.nybg.org/bsci/hcol/vasc/

Biological Invasions Journal. This very interesting new scientific journal, as
described in the last issue of AQUAPHYTE, has to do with plant and animal
invaders. The first several issues of Biological Invasions are now online, and
downloadable as PDF files "by licensed institutions", including Volume 1, Issue
2/3, which has several articles about invading aquatic plants, such as an excellent
article by D.H. Les and L.J. Mehrhoff on the "methods of introduction, avenues and
means of dispersal, and extent of invasiveness" of 18 aquatic plants in southern New
England: http://www.wkap.nl.jrnltoc.htm/1387-3547




AQUA-QUIP. Inland Lake Harvesters is a Wisconsin company making a line of
equipment including aquatic plant harvesters, shuttle barges, shore conveyors and
trailers. In business since 1983. http://www.inland-lake.com

Water Hyacinth on Lake Malawi. This is a news story about the water hyacinth
infestation of Africa's third largest lake, the plant's threat to the lake's biodiversity,
and the methods used to manage the plant since 1996. http://ens.lycos.com/ens/
nov2000/2000L-11-08-11.html

University Scholars Program of the University of Florida supports an online
Journal of Undergraduate Research. Research by these outstanding students
includes several of interest to our readers: Simulation of Rodeo Overspray Damage
to Maidencane, Three Square and Soft-Stem, by Nora Fosman http://web.clas.ufl.
edu/CLAS/jur/0004/fosmanpaper.html; An Evaluation of Fungal Isolates for the
Biological Control of Waterhyacinth, Eichhornia crassipes, by Alison Walker
http://web.clas.ufl.edu/CLAS/jur/0005/walkerpaper.html; Phosphorus and
Nitrogen Flux from Lake Okeechobee Sediments by Valerie K. Ensenat http://web.
clas.ufl.edu/CLAS/jur/0006/ensenatpaper.html; and Propagation of Ludwigia
repens in Florida Springs, by John McKay http://web.clas.ufl.edu/CLAS/jur/0011/
mckay.html

Something a little different. A Danish company, Gartneriet Timmermann A/S,
recognizes the intrinsic beauty of certain wetland plants that others do not, and has
found a market for them. They sell greenhouse-grown decorative displays of plants
such as Scirpus cernuus, Eleocharis geniculata, and species of Carex and Acorus.
http://www.timmermann.dk

Plant Names Database. The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database
of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of all seed plants. The
database includes citations for 1.3 million species. IPNI is sponsored by The Royal
Botanic Gardens, Kew; The Harvard University Herbaria; and the Australian
National Herbarium. http://www.ipni.org/ or the mirror site in the U.S. http://www.
us.ipni.org/


Aquaphyte Contents Aquaphyte page Home




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Meetings


May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org
28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference
Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage



May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org
10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference



June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis.
edu/5intlweedcong.htm
International Weed Science Society

Aquatic Weed Management

Contacts:

Mike Netherland, USA I mdnether(@ufl .edu

Kevin Murphy, UK |I k.murphy@vbio.qla.ac.uk



June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/
wetland082/site.htm
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course



August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www.
sce.Isu.edu/conference
Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice






September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri 2008.
htm
2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute



September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



October 21-23, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB symposium.
htm
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton
Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University



November 18-20 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
11th International Paleolimnology Symposium



August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@(sun.ac.za
The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant
Invasions (EMAPI)
Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University






UNIVERSITY of L(.
UF FLORIDA F
IFAS Extension

Home I Aquaphyte page
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@2007 University of Florida


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Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Books, Manuals, and Online Resources


New Books and Reports
8 Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks
Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book
8 Online Articles and Extension Publications
Extension Publications & Articles
8 Online Books


UNIVERSITY of
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IFAS Extension


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FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic plant database since Spring 2000. The database has more than 52,000 citations.
To receive free bibliographies on specific plants and/or subjects, contact APIRS at 352-
392-1799 or use the database online at http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/database.html

To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library.



Ali, M.M., Murphy, K.J., Abernethy, V.J.
Macrophyte functional variables versus species assemblages as predictors of trophic
status in flowing waters.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 415:131-138. 1999.

Amoros, C., Bornette, G., Henry, C.P.
Environmental auditing: a vegetation based method for ecological diagnosis of
riverine wetlands.
ENVIRON. MANAGE. 25(2):211-227. 2000.

Anchev, M.E., Tomsovic, P.
The Rorippa pyrenaica group (Brassicaceae) in the Balkan Peninsula.
FOLIA GEOBOTANICA 34(2):261-276. 1999.

Anderson, L.W.J.
Dissipation and movement of Sonar, and Komeen following typical applications for
control of Egeria densa in the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, and production and
viability of E. densa fragments following mechanical harvesting (1997/1998).
IN: EGERIA DENSA CONTROL PROGRAM VOL. II: RESEARCH TRIAL REPORTS,
CALIFORNIA DEPT. BOATING AND WATERWAYS, 15 PP. 2000.

Andrzejewska-Golec, E.
Microhairs of Littorella uniflora (L.) Asch. (Plantaginaceae).
FEDDES REPERTORIUM 109(7-8):521-526. 1998.





Austin, D.F.
Displacement of native ecosystems by invasive alien plants the Florida experience,
or how to destroy an ecosystem.
IN: PROC. 1998 JOINT SYMP. FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL AND FLORIDA
NATIVE PLANT SOC., 4-7 JUNE 1998, EDS. D.T. JONES AND B.W. GAMBLE, PP. 3-21. 1999.

Bachmann, R.W., Hoyer, M.V., Canfield, D.E.
Internal heterotrophy following the switch from macrophytes to algae in Lake
Apopka, Florida.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 418:217-227. 2000.

Barrett, P.R.F., Littlejohn, J.W., Curnow, J.
Long-term algal control in a reservoir using barley straw.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 415:309-313. 1999.

Batzer, D.P., Pusateri, C.R., Vetter, R.
Impacts of fish predation on marsh invertebrates: direct and indirect effects.
WETLANDS 20(2):307-312. 2000.

Bennett, C.A., Buckingham, G.R.
Biological control of hydrilla and Eurasian watermilfoil insect quarantine research.
IN: PROC. 1998 JOINT SYMP. FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL AND FLORIDA
NATIVE PLANT SOC., 4-7 JUNE 1998, EDS. D.T. JONES AND B.W. GAMBLE, PP. 363-369. 1999

Bennett, J.P., Chiriboga, E., Coleman, J., Waller, D.M.
Heavy metals in wild rice from northern Wisconsin.
SCI. TOTAL ENVIRON. 246(2-3):261-269. 2000.

Billore, S.K., Singh, N., Sharma, J.K., Dass, P., et al
Horizontal subsurface flow gravel bed constructed wetland with Phragmites karka
in central India.
WATER, SCIENCE & TECHNOL. 40(3):163-171. 1999.

Birks, H.H.
Aquatic macrophyte vegetation development in Krakenes Lake, western Norway,
during the late-glacial and early-holocene.
J. PALEOLIMNOL. 23(1):7-19. 2000.


Bruno, J.F., Kennedy, C.W.




Patch-size dependent habitat modification and facilitation on New England cobble
beaches by Spartina alterniflora.
OECOLOGIA 122(1):98-108. 2000.

Burks, K.C., Austin, D.F.
Ipomoea asarifolia (Convolvulaceae), another potential exotic pest in the United
States.
AQUATICS 22(2): 16, 18. 2000.

Caffrey, J., Barrett, P.R.F., Ferreira, M.T., Moreira, I.S., et al, eds.
Developments in hydrobiology: biology, ecology and management of aquatic plants.
KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL., DORDRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS, 339 PP.

Castelli, R.M., Chambers, J.C., Tausch, R.J.
Soil-plant relations along a soil-water gradient in Great Basin riparian meadows.
WETLANDS 20(2):251-266. 2000.

Chabbi, A.
Juncus bulbosus as a pioneer species in acidic lignite mining lakes: source of
inorganic carbon assimilation and phosphorus uptake kinetics.
MITT. BAD. LANDESVER. NATURKUNDE U. NATURSCHUTZ 17(2):293-302. 1999.

Chan, T.K., Lim, S.H., Tan, H.T.W., Lim, C.P.
Variation of bending capacity along the lamina length of a grass, Imperata
cylindrica var. major (Gramineae).
ANNALS OF BOTANY 84(6):703-708. 1999.

Cilliers, C.J.
Lysathia n. sp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a host-specific beetle for the control of
the aquatic weed Myriophyllum aquaticum (Haloragaceae) in South Africa.
IN: DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROBIOLOGY: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT OF
AQUATIC PLANTS, EDS. J. CAFFREY, P.R.F. BARRETT, ET AL, KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL.,
DORDRECHT, PP. 271-276. 1999.

Connors, L.M., Kiviat, E., Groffman, P.M., Ostfeld, R.S.
Muskrat (Ondatra zibethicus) disturbance to vegetation and potential net nitrogen
mineralization and nitrification rates in a freshwater tidal marsh.
AMER. MIDL. NATURALIST 143(1):53-63. 2000.




Cooper, R.L., Osborn, J.M., Philbrick, C.T.
Comparative pollen morphology and ultrastructure of the Callitrichaceae.
AMER. J. BOTANY 87(2):161-175. 2000.

Dall Armellina, A.A., Bezic, C.R., Gajardo, O.A.
Submerged macrophyte control with herbivorous fish in irrigation channels of
semiarid Argentina.
IN: DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROBIOLOGY: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT OF
AQUATIC PLANTS, EDS. J. CAFFREY, P.R.F. BARRETT, ET AL, KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL.,
DORDRECHT, PP. 265-269. 1999.

Dawson, F.H., Szoszkiewicz, K.
Relationships of some ecological factors with the associations of vegetation in
British rivers.
IN: DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROBIOLOGY: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT OF
AQUATIC PLANTS, EDS. J. CAFFREY, P.R.F. BARRETT, ET AL, KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL.,
DORDRECHT, PP. 117-122. 1999.

Eckert, C.G., Dorken, M.E., Mitchell, S.A.
Loss of sex in clonal populations of a flowering plant, Decodon verticillatus
(Lythraceae).
EVOLUTION 53(4): 1079-1092. 1999.

Ellery, W.N., McCarthy, T.S., Dangerfield, J.M.
Floristic diversity in the Okavango Delta, Botswana as an endogenous product of
biological activity.
IN: BIODIVERSITY IN WETLANDS: ASSESSMENT, FUNCTION AND CONSERVATION VOL.
1, EDS. B. GOPAL, W.J. JUNK, ET AL, BACKHUYS PUBL., LEIDEN, THE NETHERLANDS, PP.
195-226. 2000.

Eriksson, P.G., Weisner, S.E.B.
An experimental study on effects of submersed macrophytes on nitrification and
denitrification in ammonium-rich aquatic systems.
LIMNOL. OCEANOGR. 44(8): 1993-1999. 1999.

Ertug, F.
Plants used in domestic handicrafts in central Turkey.
HERB J. SYSTEMATIC BOT. 6(2):57-68. 1999.


Fox, A.M., Haller, W.T.




Production and survivorship of the functional stolons of giant cutgrass, Zizaniopsis
miliacea (Poaceae).
AMER. J. BOT. 87(6):811-818. 2000.

Gerba, C.P., Thurston, J.A., Falabi, J.A., Watt, P.M., et al
Optimization of artificial wetland design for removal of indicator microorganisms
and pathogenic protozoa.
WATER, SCIENCE & TECHNOL. 40(4-5):363-368. 1999.

Getsinger, K.D., Petty, D.G., Madsen, J.D., Skogerboe, J.G., et al
Aquatic dissipation of the herbicide triclopyr in Lake Minnetonka, Minnesota.
PEST MANAGEMENT SCI. 56:388-400. 2000.

Gumbert, A., Kunze, J.
Inflorescence height affects visitation behavior of bees a case study of an aquatic
plant community in Bolivia.
BIOTROPICA 31(3):466-477. 1999.

Hellblom, F., Bjork, M.
Photosynthetic responses in Zostera marina to decreasing salinity, inorganic carbon
content and osmolality.
AQUATIC BOTANY 65(1-4):97-104. 1999.

Hellsten, S., Dieme, C., Mbengue, M., Janauer, G.A.
Typha control efficiency of a weed-cutting boat in the Lac de Guiers in Senegal: a
preliminary study on mowing speed and regrowth capacity.
IN: DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROBIOLOGY: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT OF
AQUATIC PLANTS, EDS. J. CAFFREY, P.R.F. BARRETT, ET AL, KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL.,
DORDRECHT, PP. 249-255. 1999.

Hofstra, D.E., Clayton, J.S., Champion, P.D., Green, J.D.
Distribution and density of vegetative hydrilla propagules in the sediments of two
New Zealand lakes.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 37:41-44. 2000.

Hossain, M.A., Ishimine, Y., Akamine, H., Murayama, S., et al
Effect of burial depth on emergence of Panicum repens.
WEED SCI. 47(6):651-656. 1999.




Jackson, R., Douglas, M.
An aquatic risk assessment for Cyhalofop-butyl: a new herbicide for control of
barnyard grass in rice.
IN: HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE TO XENOBIOTICS, 11TH SYMP. PESTICIDE
CHEM., CREMONA, ITALY, 11-15 SEPT. 1999, EDS. A.A.M. DELRE, C. BROWN, ET AL, PP. 345-
354. 1999.

Jager-Zurn, I.
The "super-glue" of Podostemaceae is a bacterial slime.
SYMP. BIODIVERSITAT & EVOLUTIONSBIOL., P. 89. 1999.

Jansson, R., Nilsson, C., Dynesius, M., Andersson, E.
Effects of river regulation on river-margin vegetation: a comparison of eight boreal
rivers.
ECOL. APPL. 10(1):203-224. 2000.

Keller, B.E.M.
Genetic variation among and within populations of Phragmites australis in the
Charles River watershed.
AQUATIC BOTANY 66(3): 195-208. 2000.

Khatun, A., Ali, M.A., Dingle, J.G.
Comparison of the nutritive value for laying hens of diets containing Azolla (Azolla
pinnata) based on formulation using digestible protein and digestible amino acid
versus total protein and total amino acid.
ANIMAL FEED SCI. TECHNOL. 81(1-2):43-56. 1999.

King, S.E., Grace, J.B.
The effects of soil flooding on the establishment of cogongrass (Imperata
cylindrica), a nonindigenous invader of the southeastern United States.
WETLANDS 20(2):300-306. 2000.

Knapton, R.W., Petrie, S.A.
Changes in distribution and abundance of submerged macrophytes in the Inner Bay
at Long Point, Lake Erie: implications for foraging waterfowl.
J. GREAT LAKES RES. 25(4):783-798. 1999.

Kost, M.A., De Steven, D.
Plant community responses to prescribed burning in Wisconsin sedge meadows.




NATURAL AREAS J. 20(1):36-45. 2000.


Kraaij, T., Cramer, M.D.
Do the gas exchange characteristics of alien Acacias enable them to successfully
invade the fynbos?
SO. AFR. J. BOT. 65(3):232-238. 1999.

Kunii, H.
Annual and seasonal variations in net production, biomass and life span on floating
leaves in Brasenia schreberi, J.F. Gmel.
JAPANESE J. LIMNOL. 60(3):281-289. 1999.

Kvacek, Z., Sakala, J.
Twig with attached leaves, fruits and seeds of Decodon (Lythraceae) from the
Lower Miocene of northern Bohemia, and implications for the identification of
detached leaves and seeds.
REV. PALAEOBOT. PALYNOL. 107:201-222. 1999.

Lehmann, A., Lachavanne, J.-B.
Changes in the water quality of Lake Geneva indicated by submerged macrophytes.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 42(3):457-466. 1999.

Lenssen, J.P.M., Menting, F.B.J., van der Putten, W.H., Blom, C.W.P.M.
Vegetative reproduction by species with different adaptations to shallow-flooded
habitats.
NEW PHYTOL. 145(1):61-70. 2000.

Les, D.H., Crawford, D.J.
Landoltia (Lemnaceae), a new genus of duckweeds.
NOVON 9(4):530-533. 1999.

Les, D.H., Schneider, E.L., Padgett, D.J., Soltis, P.A., et al
Phylogeny, classification and floral evolution of water lilies (Nymphaeaceae;
Nymphaeales): a synthesis of non-molecular, rbcL, matK, and 18S rDNA data.
SYSTEMATIC BOT. 24(1):28-46. 1999.

Li, M., Kleinhenz, V., Lyall, T., Midmore, D.J.
Response of Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis (Burm. F.) Hensch) to
photoperiod.




J. HORT. SCI. BIOTECHNOL. 75(1):72-78. 2000.


Lindgren, C.J., Gabor, T.S., Murkin, H.R.
Compatibility of glyphosate with Galerucella calmariensis, a biological control
agent for purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria).
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 37:44-48. 1999.

Luciano, S.C., Henry, R.
Biomass of Eichhornia azurea Kunth. and Brachiaria arrecta Stent. in lower
Taquari River, Jurumirim Reservoir, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
VERH. INTERNAL. VEREIN. LIMNOL. 26:1857-1861. 1998.

Matheson, R.E., Camp, D.K., Sogard, S.M., Bjorgo, K.A.
Changes in seagrass-associated fish and crustacean communities on Florida Bay
mud banks: the effects of recent ecosystem changes?
ESTUARIES 22(2B):534-551. 1999.

Medal, J.C., Pitelli, R.A., Santana, A., Gandolfo, D., et al
Host specificity ofMetriona elatoir, a potential biological control agent of Tropical
soda apple, Solanum viarum, in the USA.
BIOCONTROL 44(4):421-436. 1999.

Mohan, B.S., Hosetti, B.B.
Aquatic plants for toxicity assessment.
ENVIRON. RES. 81(4):259-274. 1999.

Molina, J.A., Sardinero, S.
Classification of aquatic plant communities of the Celtiberico-Alcarrefto sector
(central Iberian Peninsula).
ACTA BOTANICA MALACITANA 23:89-98. 1998.

Moreira, I., Monteiro, A., Ferreira, T.
Biology and control of parrotfeather (Myriophyllum aquaticum) in Portugal.
ECOL. ENV. & CONS. 5(3):171-179. 1999.

Morris, M.J., Wood, A.R., Den Breeyen, A.
Plant pathogens and biological control of weeds in South Africa: a review of
projects and progress during the last decade.
AFRICAN ENTOMOL. 7(1):129-137. 1999.




Moyroud, R.
Exotic weeds that threaten the Caribbean: a brief overview and early alarm call.
WILDLAND WEEDS 3(2):4-5, 7-8. 2000.

Muramota, S., Tezuka, F., Agata, W.
Effects of anionic surface active agents on the uptake of aluminum by Cyperus
alternifolius L. exposed to water containing high levels of aluminum.
BULL. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 64(1):122-129. 2000.

Murphy, J.F., Giller, P.S.
Seasonal dynamics of macroinvertebrate assemblages in the benthos and associated
with detritus packs in two low-order streams with different reparian vegetation.
FRESHWATER BIOL. 43(4):617-631. 2000.

Newman, J.R., Watson, R.C.
Preliminary observations on the control of algal growth by magnetic treatment of
water.
IN: DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROBIOLOGY: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGY, AND MANAGEMENT OF
AQUATIC PLANTS, EDS. J. CAFFREY, P.R.F. BARRETT, ET AL, KLUWER ACADEMIC PUBL.,
DORDRECHT, PP. 319-322. 1999.

Ni, H., Moody, K., Robles, R.P., Paller, E.C., et al
Oryza sativa plant traits conferring competitive ability against weeds.
WEED SCIENCE 48(2):200-204. 2000.

Nyakang'o, J.B., Van Bruggen, J.J.A.
Combination of a well functioning constructed wetland with a pleasing landscape
design in Nairobi, Kenya.
WATER, SCIENCE & TECHNOL. 40(3):249-256. 1999.

Pasqualini, V., Clabaut, P., Pergent, G., BenYoussef, L., et al
Contribution of side scan sonar to the management of Mediterranean littoral
ecosystems.
INT. J. REMOTE SENSING 21(2):367-378. 2000.

Pellerin, S., Lavoie, C.
Peatland fragments of southern Quebec: recent evolution of their vegetation
structure.
CAN. J. BOT. 78(2):255-265. 2000.





Pezeshki, S.R., Hester, M.W., Lin, Q., Nyman, J.A.
The effect of oil spill and clean-up on dominant U.S. gulf coast macrophytes: a
review.
ENVIRON. POLLUTION 108:129-139. 2000.

Radoux, M., Cadelli, D., Nemcova, M.
A comparison of purification efficiencies of various constructed ecosystems
(aquatic, semi-aquatic and terrestrial) receiving urban wastewaters.
WETLANDS ECOL. MANAGE. 4:207-217. 1997.

Reitner, B., Herzig, A., Herndl, G.J.
Dynamics of bacterioplankton production in a shallow, temperate lake (Lake
Neusiedl, Austria): evidence for dependence on macrophyte production rather than
on phytoplankton.
AQUAT. MICROB. ECOL. 19(3):245-254. 1999.

Richardson, C.J., Ferrel, G.M., Vaithiyanathan, P.
Nutrient effects on stand structure, resorption efficiency, and secondary compounds
in Everglades sawgrass.
ECOLOGY 80(7):2182-2192. 1999.

Riis, T., Sand-Jensen, K., Vestergaard, 0.
Plant communities in lowland Danish streams: species composition and
environmental factors.
AQUATIC BOTANY 66(4):255-272. 2000.

Rose, C.D., Sharp, W.C., Kenworthy, W.J., Hunt, J.H., et al
Overgrazing of a large seagrass bed by the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatusin outer
Florida Bay.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 190:211-222. 1999.

Sala, M.M., Gude, H.
Role of protozoans on the microbial ectoenzymatic activity during the degradation
of macrophytes.
AQUAT. MICROB. ECOL. 20:75-82. 1999.

Savery, S.
Hydrilla in Wakulla Springs State Park: an update.




AQUATICS 22(1):4, 7-8. 2000.


Schiller, J.R., Zedler, P.H., Black, C.H.
The effect of density-dependent insect visits, flowering phenology, and plant size on
seed set of the endangered vernal pool plant Pogogyne abramsii (Lamiaceae) in
natural compared to created vernal pools.
WETLANDS 20(2):386-396. 2000.

Seca, A.M.L., Cavaleiro, J.A.S., Domingues, F.M.J., Silvestre, A.J.D., et al
Structural characterization of the lignin from the nodes and internodes of Arundo
donax reed.
J. AGRIC. FOOD CHEM. 48(3):817-824. 2000.

Seliskar, D.M., Gallagher, J.L.
Exploiting wild population diversity and somaclonal variation in the salt marsh
grass Distichlis spicata(Poaceae) for marsh creation and restoration.
AMER. J. BOT. 87(1):141-146. 2000.

Soukup, A., Votrubova, 0., Cizkova, H.
Internal segmentation of rhizomes of Phragmites australis: protection of the internal
aeration system against being flooded.
NEW PHYTOL. 145(1):71-75. 2000.

Stafford, H.S.
Observations on the use of Arsenal for the control of Melaleuca quinquenervia
(Cav.) S.T. Blake in a high marsh habitat.
IN: PROC. 1998 JOINT SYMP. FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL AND FLORIDA
NATIVE PLANT SOC., 4-7 JUNE 1998, EDS. D.T. JONES AND B.W. GAMBLE, PP. 291-295. 1999.

Stoyanova, D.
Ultrastructural responses of leaf mesophyll and trap wall cells of Utricularia
vulgaris to cadmium.
BIOLOGIA PLANTARUM 42(3):395-400. 1999.

Suryadiputra, N.N., Gonner, C., Wibowo, P., Ratnawati, E.
The Mahakam Lakes of East Kalimantan, Indonesia.
WETLANDS INTERNATIONAL ASIA PACIFIC INDONESIA PROGRAMME, 4TH INTERNAT'L.
LIVING LAKES CONF., 16-18 JUNE 2000, HANOVER, GERMANY, 15 PP. 2000.




Szabo, S., Braun, M., Borics, G.
Elemental flux between algae and duckweeds (Lemna gibba) during competition.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 146(3):355-367. 1999.

Teisseire, H., Guy, V.
Copper-induced changes in antioxidant enzymes activities in fronds of duckweed
(Lemna minor).
PLANT SCI. 153(1):65-72. 2000.

Toth, A., Lakatos, T., Braun, M., Kiss, B.
Ramet distribution, leaf morphometry and elemental composition of Caltha
palustris L. along a water depth gradient.
FLORA 194(4):431-437. 1999.

Ueno, S., Nakamura, T., Kadono, Y.
Chromosome numbers of Myriophyllum ussuriense Maxim. (Haloragaceae) in Japan.
ACTA PHYTOTAX. GEOBOT. 50(2):225-228. 1999.

Uusi-Kamppa, J., Braskerud, B., Jansson, H., Syversen, N., et al
Buffer zones and constructed wetlands as filters for agricultural phosphorus.
J. ENVIR. QUAL. 29(1):151-158. 2000.

Vandaele, S., Thoeye, C., Van Eygen, B., De Gueldre, G.
Small wastewater treatment plants in Flanders (Belgium): standard approach and
experiences with constructed reed beds.
WATER, SCIENCE & TECHNOL. 41(1):57-63. 2000.

van Dyke, J., Ludlow, J.
Aquatic plant management in a disappearing lake.
AQUATICS 22(2):4, 7-8. 2000.

Van Geest, G.J., Zwaardemaker, N.G., Van Wijngaarden, R.P.A., Cuppen, J.G.
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Effects of a pulsed treatment with the herbicide Afalon (active ingredient Linuron)
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ENVIRON. TOXICOL. CHEM. 18(12):2866-2874. 1999.

Verduin, J.J., Backhaus, J.O.
Dynamics of plant-flow interactions for the seagrass Amphibolis antarctica: field




observations and model simulations.
ESTUARINE, COASTAL AND SHELF SCI. 50(2): 185-204. 2000.

Westlake, D.F.
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Wojcicki, J.J., Song, S., Wang, Y.
Fossil Trapa L. of China. 1. A new locality from the miocene of the Lian He coal
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ACTA PALAEOBOTANICA 39(1):5-14. 1999.

Wright, D.J., Otte, M.L.
Wetland plant effects on the biogeochem-istry of metals beyond the rhizosphere.
BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENT: PROC. ROYAL IRISH ACADEMY 99B(1):3-10. 1999.

Wu, M.-Y., Hacker, S., Ayres, D., Strong, D.R.
Potential of Prokelisia spp. as biological control agents of English cordgrass,
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BIOLOGICAL CONTROL 16(3):267-273. 1999.

Xu, F.-L., Tao, S., Xu, Z.-R.
The restoration of riparian wetlands and macrophytes in Lake Chao, an eutrophic
Chinese lake: possibilities and effects.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 405:169-178. 1999.

Yamamoto, T., Yokotani-Tomita, K., Kosemura, S., Yamamura, S., et al
Allelopathic substance exuded from a serious weed, germinating barnyard grass
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J. PLANT GROWTH REGUL. 18(2):65-67. 1999.

Zhao, K.F., Feng, L.T., Zhang, S.Q.
Study on the salinity-adaptation physiology in different ecotypes of Phragmites
australisin the Yellow River Delta of China: osmotica and their contribution to the
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ESTUARINE, COASTAL & SHELF SCI. 49(AUG)SA:37-42. 1999.




Zheng, W.W., Nilsson, M., Bergman, B., Rasmussen, U.
Genetic diversity and classification of cyanobacteria in different Azolla species by
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THEOR. APPL. GENET. 99(7-8): 1187-1193. 1999.



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