• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Table of Contents
 About Aquaphyte
 First complete web site about aquatic...
 Crossword puzzle
 APIRS users
 U.S. Invasive Species Advisory...
 AGORA - online access to research...
 U.S. agency 'AIMS' at Internet...
 Photo murals
 Hunt Institute for Botanical...
 The biology of aquatic plants
 Meetings
 Books, manuals, and online...
 Looking beneath the surface
 From the database






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00006
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00001 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Table of Contents
        Page 1
        Page 2
    About Aquaphyte
        Page 3
    First complete web site about aquatic plant management in Florida
        Page 4
    Crossword puzzle
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    APIRS users
        Page 9
    U.S. Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC)
        Page 10
        Page 11
    AGORA - online access to research for low-income countries
        Page 12
    U.S. agency 'AIMS' at Internet sales of banned plants
        Page 13
    Photo murals
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation
        Page 20
    The biology of aquatic plants
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Meetings
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Books, manuals, and online resources
        Page 26
    Looking beneath the surface
        Page 27
        Page 28
    From the database
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
Full Text


AQUAPHYTE Online


A Newsletter about Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants

Volume 23 Number 2 Winter 2003
Gainesville, Florida
ISSN 0893-7702


Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants

Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences
University of Florida
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653
352-392-1799


with support from:

The Florida Department of Environmental
Protection,
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program

The St. Johns River Water Management District


Contents

About AQUAPHYTE

ANNOUNCING the first COMPLETE web site about aquatic plant
management in Florida

HERE IS A CROSSWORD PUZZLE you can do to win a FREE PRIZE!

DOES ANYONE actually use APIRS?

U.S. Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC) A Brief Overview




AGORA: Online access to research for low-income countries

U.S. Agency "AIMS" at Internet Sales of Banned Plants

Large Photo-Murals for K-12 Teachers and Agency Trainers
Invasive Non-Native Plants Photo-Mural
Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural

HUNT INSTITUTE for Botanical Documentation

New Translation of Classic Book, The Biology ofAquatic Plants

BE THERE, DO THAT

BOOKS/REPORTS

LOOKING BENEATH THE SURFACE of the APIRS system

FROM THE DATABASE
a sampling of new additions to the APIRS database


Aquaphyte page I Home

CAIP-WEBSITE(Sufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





About Aquaphyte



This is the newsletter of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and the Aquatic,
Wetland and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System (APIRS) of the
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is provided by the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program (APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS:
Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to managers, researchers, and agencies in 71 countries.
Comments, announcements, news items and other information relevant to aquatic
plant research are solicited.

Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does not constitute endorsement, nor does exclusion
represent criticism of any item, organization, individual, or institution by the
University of Florida.



Aquaphyte Contents I Aguaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





ANNOUNCING http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/guide


- The first COMPLETE web site about aquatic

plant management in Florida


We are in the 18th month of a 24-month production of Aquatic Plant Management in Florida
Waters, A Web Site For The Interested Public. Much of it is online already, awaiting your
attention. ("We" are the University of Florida IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and
the Florida DEP Bureau of Invasive Plant Management.)

Florida is home to 8,000 lakes, 1,700 rivers, thousands of miles of canals, 400 springs, a half-
dozen aquifers, millions of acres of marshes and swamps, and 14 million people. Each lake, each
river and each acre of marsh is unique, often home to native plants and animals, often threatened
by non-native invasive plants, and often surrounded by happy homeowners, many of whom have
their own ideas about what their waterbody should be like. Talk about aquatic plant management
problems!

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/guide is here to help explain Florida's watery ecosystems, the need for
their management, and the methods used for their management. The goal of the web site is:

to help citizens, long-time and recently-arrived, understand plants and their management
in Florida waters

to help field workers, office supervisors, management agencies, elected boards and
government officials, eco-advocacy groups, legislators and others understand plants and
their management in Florida waters.

Come visit this 500+ page, 3,000 photograph web site, click on the major topics, or scroll down
to the large index of keywords.



Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu





WIN A PRIZE!


TO SOLVE THIS CROSSWORD, print out these two pages.

Then refer to two web sites: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu and http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/guide

Read the clue, refer to the URL cited, find the answer, and fill it in. Once it is filled in correctly, send it to us and we will send a
prize. Send completed crossword puzzles to:

CAIP Information Office
7922 NW 71st Street
Gainesville, Fl. 32653


Across 1 2 a 4 5 1 7

1. Our fair state
4. Weight, abb. 11 1- 14
7. Used
containers
must be triple 18 0

8. harvested
plants left in a

9. an alternate
gene (...edu/ a
gloss- a.html)
11. plants
produce it for
fish too
12. 2,000 lbs 41
13. not hard
water, but
14. a quagmire 47
(...edu/gloss-b.
html)
16. a kind of 5n U M
map
17. famous
Strand of 57 so so
orchids (..edu/
gallery2.html) 62
19. Vallisneria
americana (...
edu/allplants.
html) so 67 as 89
21. a measure
of weight 7 71 72 74
22.
flushing rate (...
guide/hyflrt. n
html)
26. keeping the
plant in its
place
30. bi-manual-
powered craft

AD M H92





31. a Regional
Biologist
32. thousandth
of a liter
33. _-grass
(...edu/cljapic.
html)
34.
americana (...
edu/vaampic.
html)
37. at the end
of a nozzle
38. describes
what's legal
and what's not
39. singular
number 26
40. lots of
applicators in
one place
42. genus of
beakrushes (...
edu/rhynch.
html)
43. famous
bacteria (.../
guide/bacteria.
html)
46. first author
listed, From
the Database,
AQUAPHYTE,
summer 2003
(...edu/aquaph.
html)
48. tiny
droplets going
where you
don't want them
50. one of
these: ...edu/
wthhydtub 1.jpg
52. leaves may
be alternate,
whorled, or

53. not bottom,
but
55. "use
rototiller-like
blades to
churn..." (...
guide/
mechcons.html)
57. of
speed, of
application,
of flow
58. the most


- M-


I I I


3 nss


I I


I I


I I I I


(...edu/hillsbor.html)
102. this page is about herbicide testing
and : .../guide/sup7herb.html
104. root really does have __ roots!
(...edu/idthis.html)
106. to put into service
107. amount of production over a given
period of time (...use/glosin9.html)
109. sodium, on the periodic chart
111. the oldest in the Western
Hemisphere is at Ortona, Florida (.../
guide/canals.html)

Down

1. "floating plants" is the plant type
category at ...edu/ .html
2. filiformis drawing at ...
edu/oxyfil2.jpg
3. leaves with large saw-like teeth (...
edu/gloss-de.html)
4. not dry
5. we're on a tectonic platform called
the "Florida (.../guide/
geology.html)
6. 4.410 kg equals two (...edu/o-
conver.html)
7. St. Marks is a (...edu/marks.
html)
8. Point of View abb.
9. the anther to this question
10. not from around here
14. 9th choice under "B", ...edu/
photocom.html
15. another common name for wild
taro (...edu/coespic.html)
18. boat, a necessity in Florida
20. part of the corolla (...edu/gloss-p.
html)
23. Lake Okeechobee is a
lake (.../guide/lakes.html)
24. aeration is provided by an


(.../guide/physcons.html)
25. .../guide/ipmanage.html is about
26. .../guide/sup5herb.html is about use

27. not a freshwater marsh but a
marsh
28. smooth, without hairs (...edu/gloss-fg.
html)
29. obligate abb. (a plant that requires
water)
35. American cupscale grass,
striata (...edu/graplants.html)
36. submersed plant eats animals (...edu/
photocom.html)
37. logy, diversity, tic,
chemistry
40. eighth most abundant natural element
(.../guide/magnes.html)
41. biocontrols nickname (.../guide/
biocons.html)
44. what a harvester does (.../guide/
mechcons.html
45. where aquatic plants are grown for
sale
46. not opposite or whorled leaves, but

47. not even, but
49. Florida's rare pondweed,
Potamogeton (...edu/photos.
html)
51. in the job, the one above
54. same as 20 across
56. ...guide/invplant.html#invsteward -
what this is about
59. Eleocharis baldwinii common name
(...edu/photos.html)
61. replenishes our lakes and rivers
62. to flow away
64. arsenic in the periodic chart
66. bunches of small feathers or hairs
67. the 14th picture on ...edu/subplants.
html
68. what world does it come from: ...edu/
lygod.html


69. fall panic grass, Panicum (...
edu/allplants.html)
70. Sapium sebiferum is Chinese
(...edu/photos.html)
71. large snake prefers river swamps (.../
guide/snakes.html)
72. dead plants fall to the bottom and add
to the
73. shaped like a lance point reversed (...
edu/gloss-no.html)
74. when several management methods
are used at once, they are (or ought to be)
(.../guide/ipmanage.html)
75. egg-shaped (...edu/gloss-no.html)
79. "There's no hydrilla because the grass
carp have it."
80. hydrilla tuber weevil, __ alliii
(.../guide/biocons.html)
84. having a smooth leaf margin (...edu/
gloss-de.html)
87. Sisyrinchium is blue- (...edu/
sisang.html)
89. member of a clone (...edu/gloss- qr.
html)
90. the soft, spongy center of the stem (...
edu/gloss-p.html)
91. scientific abb. for nickel
93. tropical soda (...edu/allplants.
html)
95. copper's abb.
98. a petal might have one (...edu/gloss-
km.html#123)
99. where the equipment's repaired
100. might be found at the ligule
101. not wet
103. invert ingredient
105. 24 hours
106. a web address
108. not out
110. you wish you had on an airboat




enriched (...
guide/
trophstate.html)
60. the
Johns River
flows north in
Florida
62. the center
of the hurricane
63. a National
Wildlife
Refuge (...edu/
chassa.html)
65. southern
(___...edu/
nagupic.html)
66. the sixth
picture of
"Some Florida
Springs" (...
guide/springs.
html)
70. Panicum
repens (...edu/
panrep.html)
73. the least
trophic is
trophic
(...guide/
trophstate.html)
76. multiples
of 2,000 lbs
77. principles
of knowledge
and conduct (.../
guide/
whymanag.
html)
78. a vine's
little helper (...
edu/gloss-tu.
html)
81. Extension
worker (http://
ifas.ufl.edu/
extension/ces.
htm)
82. a pair
83. a member
of a pod
85. Hygrophila
polysperma's
nickname
86. a plant
where we don't
want it
88. alligator
weed,

philoxeroides




(...edu/alphpic.
html)
90. the third
category of
threats listed
on the page, .../
guide/
humimpac.html
92. humic
acids can make
the water -
colored (.../
guide/humacd.
html)
94. star-rush is
a
species (...edu/
dichpic.html)
96. the BIPM
is part of the

97. this Florida
river has
rapids!


Web page created by Crossword Compiler.





APIRS Users


Does anyone actually use APIRS? You bet!


Following are some usage statistics for the APIRS web site:

Time frame: 30 days, November 2003
Average hits: at 4AM, 620 hits/hour; at 3PM, 3,368 hits/hour (56 hits/min)

User sessions/month: 78,234 (an average of 2,607 user sessions/day.)
Users view 137,112 jpeg images/ month and 194,472 html pages/month.

Among the most frequently accessed parts of the web site:
Plant photos/drawings, 137,112 jpeg image downloads/month;
Database, 5,892 searches/month.

In addition to basic support from the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences,the APIRSoffice of the Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants is especially
appreciative of the generous support of the Aquatic Plant Control Research Program of the
Army Corps of Engineers.

In addition, significant support is received from the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, Bureau of Invasive Plant Management. The DEP Bureau was the original sponsor
of the database, and also currently supports web site development, public education and manager
education projects.

Other necessary and much appreciated support has come from the St. Johns River Water
Management District, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville District, and
Cerexagri.



Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





U.S. Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC) -

A Brief Overview

by Randall K. Stocker, Director of the UF-IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants and
Chair of ISAC

In February 1999, the Clinton Administration responded to pressure from scientists,
resource managers, environmentalists, and many others by issuing Executive Order 13112,
Invasive Species. Among other provisions, the Executive Order required the Secretary of Interior
to establish an advisory committee "to provide information and advice for consideration by the
[Invasive Species] Council." The Invasive Species Advisory Committee (ISAC), as it came to
be called, was to be composed of individuals "representing stakeholders," with a broad definition
of who would be considered stakeholders in the invasive species issue, including non-federal
government agencies, the scientific community, non-governmental organizations, trade groups,
commercial interests, and private landowners. This group would be asked to "...recommend plans
and actions at [local to ecosystem-based] levels to achieve the goals and objectives of the
Management Plan," also called for by the Executive Order. These recommendations would be
addressed to the "Invasive Species Council" (now the "National Invasive Species Council" or
NISC), composed of the Secretaries of State, Treasury, Defense, Interior, Agriculture,
Commerce, Transportation, and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.
NISC is co-chaired by the Secretaries of Interior, Agriculture and Commerce. There is currently a
small staff, lead by Executive Director of the Council Lori Williams.

The goals of the NISC/ISAC process included efforts to prevent the introduction of invasive
species; detect and respond rapidly to control invasive species; monitor invasive species
populations; restore native species and habitats; and promote public education.

The first ISAC meeting was held in January 2000 in Washington, DC, and ISAC members were
appointed for two-year terms. Since then, ISAC has meet three times per year, with the most
recent meeting held 29-30 October 2003. I was appointed to the first ISAC group, and re-
appointed in April 2002 for a second term, serving as ISAC chair. With the approaching
conclusion of my second term (my last meeting will be March 2004), this is an appropriate time
to review some of the expectations for ISAC and the subsequent performance of the partners in
this process.

At the first meeting, the Advisory Committee was asked to help executive branch agencies target
resources and address invasive species issues in a coordinated fashion to identify threats and
eradicate invasives where possible. We were asked to outline policy options, and to strive for




practical, budget-based recommendations from the best available science on resource
management. Members were informed that their deliberations would have far reaching
consequences, even international importance.

Results thus far: The Executive Order and the General Accounting Office have asked federal
agencies to identify current federal expenditures on invasive species, an important starting point
for tracking total federal budget allocations. ISAC assisted in the development of this country's
first National Invasive Species Management Plan. There has been a general increase in awareness
of the invasive species issue by federal agency, Congressional, and state agency staff. Public
awareness has increased as the media reports on new problems. Academic programs reflect this
increase in awareness as more campuses develop curricula on invasive species and new centers/
institutes are created. There are still many areas where progress has been limited or non-existent:
deadlines in the National Management Plan were too optimistic and most have been missed;
changes in administration and staffing have delayed progress; and the fundamental role that the
Advisory Committee could play with members of the National Invasive Species Council has not
clearly been defined. Still, significant progress has been made that deserves recognition, and the
scientific community, and especially professional societies such as the Weed Science Society of
America and the Aquatic Plant Management Society, were key factors in that progress.

For more information, go to: http://www.invasivespecies.gov




Aquaphvte Contents I Aquaphyte page Home


CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





AGORA Online access to research for low-income

countries


AGORA, or Access to Global Online Research in Agriculture, is an initiative launched in
October 2003 to provide free or low-cost online access to major scientific journals in agriculture
and related biological, environmental and social sciences to public institutions in developing
countries. Access to over 400 journals from leading academic publishers will be provided via
AGORA. Led by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, the
goal of AGORA is to increase the quality and effectiveness of agricultural research, education
and training in low-income countries, with the long range goal of improving food security.

Founding publishers of AGORA are Blackwell, CABI, Elsevier, Kluwer Academic, Lippincott,
Williams & Wilkins, Nature Publishing Group, Oxford University Press, Springer-Verlag, and
John Wiley & Sons. Of the 400 plus journals being offered, the following are included: American
Journal of Botany, Annals of Botany, Annual Review of Plant Biology, Aquaculture, Aquatic
Botany, Aquatic Ecology, Biological Control, Biological Invasions, Botanical Journal of the
Linnean Society, Conservation Biology, Ecological Modelling, Environmental and Experimental
Botany, Freshwater Biology, Hydrobiologia, International Review ofHydrobiology, Journal of
Ecology, Journal of Experimental Botany, Nature, New Phytologist, Oecologia, Plant Pathology,
Remote Sensing of Environment, Science of the Total Environment, Weed Research, and
Wetlands Ecology and Management.

Access to AGORA will be password controlled and relevant institutions will be required to
register with FAO. Approximately 70 eligible countries have been listed, primarily those with an
annual GNI per capital per year of US$1000 or less. The Publishing Partners reserve the right to
amend the list. Within these countries, AGORA will benefit not-for-profit national academic,
research or government institutions in agriculture and related biological, environmental and
social sciences. This will include universities and colleges; research institutes; agricultural
extension centers, government offices and libraries. A simple online form is all that is required to
register for AGORA and only one form per institution is required.

To learn more about AGORA, go to: http://www.agintemetwork.org/en/about.php


Aquaphyte Contents I Aquaphyte page Home





U.S. Agency 'AIMS' at Internet Sales of Banned

Plants

"The U.S., jolted into action by the mushrooming magnitude of invasive plants and the damage
they have wrought--and continue to cause-- has launched a new, internet-based effort to choke
off dlne'tlic retail sales of banned plants as one phase of a strategy to limit further introduction
and spread of invasive plant species. "

Scientists at the Center for Integrated Pest Management (CIPM) at North Carolina State
University, together with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service (USDA/APHIS), have developed a "web-crawler," software that searches
the internet for web sites selling plants officially defined as noxious weeds or invasive
species*. The system, Agricultural Internet Monitoring System (AIMS), will be used
primarily to locate, then notify, offending vendors, according to R.E. Stinner, lead researcher on
the AIMS program.

Vendors identified by AIMS as offering banned species online will be notified and directed to
stop selling the plants. AIMS will then keep track of retailers who continue to sell illegal plants;
refusal to comply with notification can lead to prosecution and the possibility of substantial fines.

Depending on performance and results from the AIMS program, federal officials will consider
developing a cooperative effort with equivalent organizations in other countries. Authorities in
Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa have expressed an interest in some form of joint effort.

*USDA/APHIS Regulated Pest List. or USDA/APHIS Regulated Pest List in PDF format.
Pests other than weeds are listed (viruses, insects, bacteria, etc.)

For more information, contact Ron Stinner, CIPM, North Carolina State University, 919-515-
1648.

To report internet sites offering prohibited plants for sale, contact Sherrena Harrison


Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home





NEW!
Two PHOTO-MURALS
INVASIVE NON-NATIVE PLANTS

A Collaborative Effort:
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
and
Cerexagri

Classroom size, Free to Requesting Teachers (K-12)
Send your non-virtual letter for immediate delivery.


Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the plants
depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50%
are also found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and
17% are also found in most of the rest of the U.S.

All plants are depicted in large, strikingly attractive color photographs. Here is the list of plants.

At the request of teachers and enviro-trainers, these photo-murals were produced to be
attention-grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for




homeowners' forums, ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others concerned about
the onslaught of non-native plants in the United States. It was produced by the University of
Florida and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, with printing support from
Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea Grant, the national Aquatic Plant
Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and from the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office.

The photo-murals are available:

-- free-to-teachers:

fully laminated copies of the murals are free to teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who request them in writing, on letterhead, to
the non-virtual APIRSaddress below. there is a limited number of free
copies available -

Please do not telephone or e-mail us about the free photo-mural s offer;
we are happy to accept letters on letterhead from teachers (U.S., K-12) and
public agency trainers (U.S.) who want their free copies. Send your request
letters to: APIRS Photo-Mural, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants,
7922 NW 71 ST, Gainesville, FL 32653.

-- All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764:

They may be purchased singly or as a complete set.

1) SP-293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in.
X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

2) SP-329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated
27 in. X 39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.

3) SP-292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in.
$20 each plus S/H.

4) SP-328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X
39 in.
$12 each plus S/H.


OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR!





SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50
plus S/H

Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-1764.
(Credit cards accepted.)

Remember that WHEN YOU PURCHASE A COPY, you also are buying a copy
for a K-12 teacher!




Home |
CAIP-WEBSITEaufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





FOUR CLASSROOM-SIZE, LAMINATED
PHOTO-MURALS FOR YOU!



Two NATIVE FRESHWATER PLANTS

and

Two INVASIVE PLANTS, AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL

A Collaborative Effort:
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, University of Florida
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Cerexagri



All four plant photo-murals are for sale to anyone from 1-800-226-1764; or by visiting the
IFASBOOKS website:

They may be purchased individually or as a complete set.
1) SP 293 Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H.
2) SP 329 MORE Native Freshwater Plants Photo-Mural fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H.
3) SP 292 Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 62 in. X 23 in. $20 each plus S/H.
4) SP 328 MORE Invasive Non-Native Plants fully laminated 27 in. X 39 in. $12 each plus S/H.

OR SAVE MONEY BUY ALL FOUR! SP-336 ALL FOUR PHOTO-MURALS AS
DESCRIBED ABOVE: $39.50 plus S/H Purchase copies from the IFAS Publications Office, 1-800-226-
1764; or visit the IFASBOOKS website (Credit cards accepted.)

These photo-murals were produced at the request of teachers and enviro-trainers to be attention-
grabbing teaching tools for science classes and management agency training, and for homeowners' forums,
ecology clubs, environmental advocacy groups and others interested in marshes, swamps and other wetlands
of the United States. The murals were produced by the University of Florida and the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, with printing support from Cerexagri. Additional printing support came from Sea
Grant, the national Aquatic Plant Management Society, the Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society, and
from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Jacksonville Office.


NATIVE AQUATIC PLANTS


























Lest we forget, with so much current emphasis on invasive non-natives, most plants in the U.S. are
native; beneficial to animals, humans, and the environment; and often beautiful. So, here are two photo-
murals of 76 native freshwater plants of the U.S.. Of the plants depicted, 100% are in Florida; 97% are also
found in the rest of the Southeast U.S.; 50% are found in the Eastern U.S.; 22% are found in the West; and 22%
are found throughout most of the U.S.

Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "native" murals.



NON-NATIVE INVASIVE PLANTS,
AQUATIC AND TERRESTRIAL




INVASEV
NON-NATI B I






IF


EM


Ii


Here are two large photo-murals of 75 invasive non-native plants in the U.S. Of the
plants depicted, 100% are found in Florida, 50% are also found elsewhere in the Southeast U.S.; 50% are also
found in Hawaii; 15% are also found in the West; 15% are also found in the East; and 17% are also found in
most of the rest of the U.S. As in the other photo-murals of this series, all plants are depicted in large, strikingly
attractive color photographs.
Click here for the list of plants featured on the two "invasive" murals.


UNIVERSITY of
UF LORIDA
IFAS Extension
CnTer f-or Aiaft"i


Home
CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
Copyright 2006 University of Florida


.,,Wwv "e lt.nr A,,,,
Sc. ^r
ggs


IL





Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation

A Research Division of Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

"Rachel McMasters Miller Hunt's collecting interests brought together aspects of art,
history, science and literature as they related to plants and gardens. Her private book
collection was well known, and her scholarship led her also to collect related artworks,
portraits and manuscripts significant in the history of botany. Her collecting efforts, as
well as those of the early Hunt Botanical Library staff focused on publications and
manuscripts from 1730 to 1840, a period of intense intellectual ferment and productivity
in botanical history. [1]

The Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentationspecializes in the history of botany. Founded
in 1961, the Institute is an international center for bibliographical research and service in the
interests of botany and horticulture, as well as a center for the study of all aspects of the history
of the plant sciences. It serves the international scientific community through research and
documentation. The Institute maintains authoritative collections of books, plant images,
manuscripts, portraits and data files, and provides publications and other forms of information
service. It serves the reference needs of biologists, historians, librarians, bibliographers and the
interested public.

The Institute's collections are curated by four departments: archives, art, bibliography, and the
library. The current collections include approximately 28,000 books and botanical publications
that date from the 1400s; 24,000 portraits and 30,000 watercolors, drawings and prints;
manuscripts, with 2,000 items such as letters, journals and diaries, field notes, documents, drafts
of published and unpublished books and articles, annotated maps, passports, and other personal
papers of botanists.

Databases at the Hunt Institute include one of the world's largest and most broadly representative
collections of botanical art and illustration; the library, which is searchable via the Carnegie
Mellon University Libraries' online catalogues at http://cameo.library.cmu.edu; the Categorical
Glossary for the Flora of North America Project; the Register of Original Botanical Art; the
Portrait Collection; and databases pertaining to Linnaean dissertations. The Institute is in the
process of formatting existing databases for the Web.

[1] Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation web site at http://huntbot.andrew.cmu.edu





New Translation of Classic Book


The Biology ofAquatic Plants

translated from Heinrich Schenck's German Biologice der Wassergewaechse, 1886,
by Donald H. Les, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of
Connecticut

"... one of the most important general contributions ever made to the study of water
plants..."

Agnes Arber (1920) on Schenck's Die Biologice der Wassergewaechse


Introduction

The German scientific literature of the 19th century comprises an extensive collection of
original, meticulous, and accurate botanical information. As an American graduate student in the
1980's, I was warned lightheartedly, "Never get too excited about your findings because a
German botanist had probably made the same discovery a hundred years ago." Several semesters
of graduate school German gave me access to this literature and revealed the impressive amount
of botanical data that remained virtually inaccessible to most English speaking scientists.
Unfortunately, this problem is exacerbated by the preeminence of the English language in the
contemporary scientific literature, which in English speaking countries has perhaps reduced the
need for fluency in the classical languages.

Die Biologie der Wassergewaechse is an essential reference for students in the field of aquatic
plant biology because it presents an insightful review of major research conducted during the
19th century, a period of intensive botanical investigation. Today, with a shift in emphasis to
molecular and other laboratory based scientific research, basic studies of aquatic plant natural
history have waned and this area is still best represented in the older literature. Die Biologie der
Wassergewaechse contains invaluable knowledge on this topic.

Unfortunately, Schenck's work has become increasingly forsaken in subsequent English language
books written on aquatic plants. In Water plants [1] (1920), the first comprehensive monograph
of aquatic plants to be published in English, Die Biologie der Wassergewaechse is cited more
than 25 times. However, in The Biology ofAquatic Vascular Plants [2] (1967), the work is cited
only nine times and in Limnological Botany [3] (1975), it is not even mentioned.





The reduced citations are not simply due to obsolescence of subject matter, because much of the
content remains accurate to this day. Moreover, Schenck's book provides an important historical
perspective on the state of knowledge that existed in this branch of science during the 19th
century. This book appeared in the aftermath of Darwin's Origin of Species and presents some of
the first characterizations of aquatic plant adaptations with evolutionary overtones.

[1] Arber, A. 1920. Water plants: a study of aquatic angiosperms. Cambridge: University Press.
[2] Sculthorpe, C. D. 1967. The biology of aquatic vascular plants. London: Edward Arnold
(Publishers) Ltd.
[3] Hutchinson, G. E. 1975. A treatise on limnology. Volume 3: Limnological botany. New York:
John Wiley & Sons.

Reprinted with permission.

ISBN 3-906166-11-2, issued in hardcover with six pages of new introduction and eight pages of
new appendix.
$57. Euro (US$72.)
KOELTZ SCIENTIFIC BOOKS, Publishers, Distributors and Mail Order Booksellers in Botany
and Zoology
Street Address: Herrnwaldstr.6, D 61462 Koenigstein / Germany
Mail Address: P.O. Box 1360, D 61453 Koenigstein / Germany
PHONE: National 06174 93720, International 49 6174 93720
FAX: National 06174 937240, International 49 6174 937240
E-MAIL Koeltzat-online.deINTERNET http://www.koeltz.com




Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
Meetings


May 15-18, 2008; Palmetto, Florida www.fnps.org
28th Annual Florida Native Plant Society Conference
Uplands to Estuaries: Celebrating Florida's Native Plant Heritage



May 20-22, 2008; Imperial Palace Casinos, Biloxi, Mississippi http://www.se-eppc.org
10th Annual Southeast EPPC Conference



June 23-27, 2008; International Weed Science Society, Vancouver, Canada http://iws.ucdavis.
edu/5intlweedcong.htm
International Weed Science Society

Aquatic Weed Management

Contacts:

Mike Netherland, USA I mdnether(@ufl .edu

Kevin Murphy, UK |I k.murphy@vbio.qla.ac.uk



June 23-26, 2008; University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida http://www.conference.ifas.ufl.edu/soils/
wetland082/site.htm
Biogeochemistry of Wetlands: Science and Applications Short Course



August 25-26th, 2008; LSU Energy, Coast, and Environmental Building, Baton Rouge, Louisiana http://www.
sce.Isu.edu/conference
Sustainable Management of Deltaic Ecosystems: Integration of Theory and Practice






September 7-12, 2008; Daniel Boone National Forest, Olympia Springs, Kentucky http://tfce.uky.edu/wri 2008.
htm
2008 Eastern Regional Wetland Restoration Institute



September 23-25, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



October 21-23, 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



November 12-14, 2008; Stellenbosch, South Africa http://academic.sun.ac.za/cib/events/Elton CIB symposium.
htm
Fifty Years of Invasion Ecology the Legacy of Charles Elton
Centre of Excellence for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University



November 18-20 2008; Austin Carey Memorial Forest Education Building, Gainesville, Fl. http://soils.ifas.ufl.
edu
Hydric Soils Short Course Specialized Training for Wetland Specialists
UF/IFAS



June 23-26, 2009; Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico http://www.paleolim.org/index.php/symposia/
11th International Paleolimnology Symposium



August 23-27, 2009; Stellenbosch, South Africa www.emapi2009.co.za or rich@(sun.ac.za
The 10th International Conference on the Ecology and Management of Alien Plant
Invasions (EMAPI)
Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), Department of Botany & Zoology, Stellenbosch University







U UNIVERSITY of
Ur FLORIDA
WFAS Extension
C nfrv for ,.,,
colt Ptiwet'-Aipff6


''t Pnr 4A 4 .
X ^


Home I Aquaphyte page
Contact Us: CAIP-WEBSITE(ufl.edu
@2007 University of Florida




Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants

Books, Manuals, and Online Resources


New Books and Reports
Plant Manuals, Field Guides and Textbooks
Langeland/Burks Non-Native Plants Book
Online Articles and Extension Publications
Extension Publications & Articles
Online Books


W Iv Kinr 4.


UNIVERSITY of
FLORIDA
IFAS Extension
I 't'P ftir AiO F '.
Oki 11J; ),;I iV


Home
CAIP-WEBSITE@ufl.edu
Copyright 2007 University of Florida





LOOKING BENEATH THE SURFACE

by Mary Langeland, University of Florida, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, APIRS

As the one who assigns keywords and categories to the thousands of articles, books, and
miscellaneous printed materials for the Aquatic and Invasive Plant Information Retrieval System
(APIRS), I thoroughly enjoy the occasional "oddity" that crosses my desk. After reviewing and
cataloguing hundred of "regular articles" published in refereed journals or reports by government
agencies or books written by earnest authors on the value of biodiversity or environmental
implications of plant invasions, imagine my delight when an out-of-the-ordinary piece of
literature appears in the stacks of papers and books cluttering my office. It causes me to take
stock and, so to speak, "look beneath the surface."

The human face of science usually characterizes these serendipities. The sheer delight and joy
that the researcher experiences rarely shines through in the scientific literature it is de rigueur to
be detached and unbiased. But, as humans, we are not just workers; rather, we respond to our
work and our environment.

Let me share one such gem with you Flowers of Marsh and Stream by lolo A. Williams
(Penguin Books, Ltd., Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England, 1946). Williams saw that

... the winter ponds and streams have their beauty of vegetation, too not on the
banks or near the shores, where the coots and water hens tread sodden alleyways
among the dead and broken stems and leaves of Typha and Sparganium, but in the
clear depths where the tufts of water starwort wave rhythmically to and fro as the
current glides past. On a winter's day they can, seen through the glistening pellucid
stream as one peers down to its sandy bottom, seem the greenest thing in the whole
landscape. (p. 5)

This kind of writing attracts attention because of its insight into why the scientist or researcher
does what they do. Perhaps you have stood on the banks of a clear stream and seen the
incomparable beauty of the natural world, your heart was touched and a desire to protect,
preserve and understand this priceless treasure was born and you were lead to seek a career in the
environmental sciences. In that moment your spirit sought to understand the mystery behind the
creation, behind "the greenest thing in the whole landscape."

Editor's Note: Mary Langeland has performed one of our most important functions at APIRS for
the last fifteen years: the cataloging of literally thousands of citations in the APIRS database.




Mary truly looks beneath the surface to understand the mystery behind the creation. She is an
invaluable asset both to us and to all users of the APIRS database. Thankyou, Mary!


Aquaphyte Contents | Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITE(&ufl.edu
Copyright 2003 University of Florida





FROM THE DATABASE


Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have been entered into
the aquatic, wetland and invasive plant database since Summer 2003. The database has
more than 61,000 citations. To use the free APIRS database online, go to http://plants.ifas.
ufl.edu/search80/NetAns2/.

To obtain articles, contact your nearest state or university library, or a document delivery
service.



Armstrong, N., Planas, D., Prepas, E.
Potential for estimating macrophyte surface area from biomass.
AQUAT. BOT. 75(2):173-179 2003

Arora, A., Singh, P. K.
Comparisons of biomass productivity and nitrogen fixing potential ofAzolla spp.
BIOMASS AND BIOENERGY 24(3): 175-178 2003

Azim, M.E., Wahab, M.A.
Development of a duckweed-fed carp polyculture system in Bangladesh.
AQUACULTURE 218(1-4):425-438 2003

Balestri, E., Cinelli, F.
Sexual reproductive success in Posidonia oceanica.
AQUAT. BOT. 75(1):21-32 2003

Baret, S., Nicolini, E., Le Bourgeois, T., Strasberg, D.
Developmental patterns of the invasive bramble (Rubus alceifolius Poiret,
Rosaceae) in Reunion Island: an architectural and morphometric analysis.
ANN. BOT. 91(1):39-48 2003


Bell, C.E.




Invasive plants of horticultural origin.
HORTSCIENCE 38:14-16 2003

Bennett, A.C.
Alligator weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides) control in Florida sugarcane.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P. 7 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Boutin, C., Jobin, B., Belanger, L.
Importance of riparian habitats to flora conservation in farming landscapes of
southern Quebec, Canada.
AGRIC., ECOSYSTEMS, AND ENVIRON. 94(1):73-87 2003

Brewin, L. E., Mehra, A., Lynch, P.T., Farago, M.E.
Mechanisms of copper tolerance by Armeria maritima in Dolfrwynog Bog, North
Wales initial studies.
ENVIRON. GEOCHEM. AND HEALTH 25(1):147-156 2003

Brown, R. L., Peet, R. K.
Diversity and invasibility of southern Appalachian plant communities.
ECOLOGY 84(1):32-39 2003

Burundukova, O.L., Zhuravlev, Y.N., Solopov, N.V., P'yankov, V.I.
A method for calculating the volume and surface area in rice mesophyll cells.
RUSSIAN J. PLANT PHYSIOL. 50(1):133-139 2003

Campbell, D., Rochefort, L., Lavoie, C.
Determining the immigration potential of plants colonizing disturbed environments:
the case of milled peatlands in Quebec.
J. APPL. ECOL. 40(1):78-91 2003

Campbell, M.H., Nicol, H.I.
Germination, emergence, growth, ecotypes and control of Carex appressa R. br.
(Tussock sedge).
AUSTR. J. EXPER. AGRI. 42(1):27-36 2002

Center, T.D., Hill, M.P.
Field efficacy and predicted host range of the pickerelweed borer, Bellura densa, a
potential biological control agent of water hyacinth.




BIOCONTROL 47(2):231-243 2002


Chandramohan, S., Charudattan, R., Devalerio, J.T., Hanlon, C.
Use of a multiple-pathogen bioherbicide system for integrated management of
torpedograss.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.58 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Chandrasena, N., Pinto, L., Sim, R.
Reclaiming Botany Wetlands, Sydney through integrated management of Ludwigia
peruviana and other weeds.
IN: PAPERS AND PROC., 13TH AUSTRALIAN WEEDS CONF., EDS. H. SPAFFORD JACOB, J.
DODD, ET AL, SEPT. 8-13, PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA, PLANT PROT. SOC. WESTERN
AUSTRALIA, PP. 134-137 2002

Chornesky, E.A., Randall, J.M.
The threat of invasive alien species to biological diversity: setting a future course.
ANN. MISSOURI BOT. GARD. 90(1):67-76 2003

Colmer, T.D.
Long-distance transport of gases in plants: a perspective on internal aeration and
radial loss from roots.
PLANT, CELL AND ENVIRON. 26:17-36 2003

Coops, H., Van Nes, E.H., Van Den Berg, M.S., Butijn, G.D.
Promoting low-canopy macrophytes to compromise conservation and recreational
navigation in a shallow lake.
AQUAT. ECOL. 36:483-492 2002

Cuda, J.P., Dunford, J.C., Macdonald, G.E., Langeland, K.A., et al
Torpedograss, Panicum repens L. (Poaceae): prognosis for classical biological
control in the southeastern United States.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.29 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Cui, L.-H., Luo, S.-M., Zhu, X.-Z., Liu, Y.-H.
Treatment and utilization of septic tank effluent using vertical-flow constructed
wetlands and vegetable hydroponics.
J. ENVIRON. SCI. 15(1):75-82 2003




Davies, J., Honegger, J.1., Tencalla, F.G., Meregalli, G., et al
Herbicide risk assessment for non-target aquatic plants: sulfosulfuron a case study.
PEST. MANAG. SCI. 59(2):231-237 2003

De Groote, H., Ajuonu, 0., Attignon, S., Djessou, R., et al
Economic impact of biological control of water hyacinth in southern Benin.
ECOL. ECONOMICS 45:105-117 2003

Demierre, A., Perfetta, J.
Macrophyte harvesting management in Lake Geneva (Switzerland).
IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS (EURO. WEED RES. SOC.) INTL. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, SEPT. 2-6,
EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, PP. 345-347 (IN FRENCH,
ENGLISH SUMMARY) 2002

De Troch, M., Fiers, F., Vincx, M.
Niche segregation and habitat specialisation of harpacticoid copepods in a tropical
seagrass bed.
MAR. BIOL. 142(2):345-355 2003

Earl, H.J., Ferrell, J.A., Vencill, W.K.
Physiological response of yellow nutsedge to systemic and contact herbicides.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.77 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Eckert, C.G., Lui, K., Bronson, K., Corradini, P., et al
Population genetic consequences of extreme variation in sexual and clonal
reproduction in an aquatic plant.
MOL. ECOL. 12(2):331-344 2003

Estime, L., O'Shea, M., Borst, M., Gerrity, J., et al
Effect of phosphorus concentration on the growth of cattail callus cells.
J. PLANT NUTRITION 26(3):691-707 2003

Filizadeh, Y., Murphy, K.J.
Response of sago pondweed to combinations of low doses of diquat, cutting, and
shade.
J. AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. 40:72-76 2002

Fosman, N.E., Sutton, D.L.
Surface micromorphology of torpedograss (Panicum repens), and three native,




emerged aquatic plants in relation to application of glyphosate.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P. 14 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Fowler, L., Caton, B.P., Fowler, G., Fieselmann, D.A., et al
Creation of a prioritization model to identify weeds of global significance.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P. 15 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Gaskin, J.F.
Molecular systematics and the control of invasive plants: a case study of Tamarix
(Tamaricaceae).
ANN. MISSOURI BOT. GARD. 90(1):109-118 2003

Gichuki, J., Dahdouh Guebas, F., Mugo, J., Rabuor, C.O., et al
Species inventory and the local uses of the plants and fishes of the Lower Sondu
Miriu wetland of Lake Victoria, Kenya.
HYDROBIOLOGIA 458:99-106 2001

Gopal, B., Zutshi, D.P., Van Duzer, C.
Floating islands in India: control or conserve?
INTERNAT'L. J. ECOL. ENVIRON. SCI. 29:157-169 2003

Hammerli, A., Reusch, T.B.H.
Inbreeding depression influences genet size distribution in a marine angiosperm.
MOLECULAR ECOL. 12(3):619-629 2003

Hauxwell, J., Cebrian, J., Valiela, I.
Eelgrass Zostera marina loss in temperate estuaries: relationship to land-derived
nitrogen loads and effect of light limitation imposed by algae.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 247:59-73 2003

Hellsten, S., Ahonen, H., Dieme, C., Diouf, S., et al
Efficiency of a weed cutting boat for controlling Typha australis in the River
Senegal: re-growth potential in relation to timing and cutting depth.
IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS (EURO. WEED RES. SOC.) INTL. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, SEPT. 2-6,
EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, PP. 367-370 2002

Hill, M.P., Oberholzer, I.G.
Laboratory host range testing of the flea beetle, Pseudolampsis guttata (Leconte)




(Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a potential natural enemy for red water fern, Azolla
filiculoides Lamarck (Pteridophyta: Azollaceae) in South Africa.
COLEOPTERISTS BULL. 56(1):79-83 2002

Holt, J.S., Tayyar, R., Khudamrong-sawat, J.
Genetic diversity of giant reed in the Santa Ana River, California.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.62 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Huong, T.T.L., Vermaat, J.E., Terrados, J., Tien, N.V., et al
Seasonality and depth zonation of intertidal Halophila ovalis and Zosterajaponica
in Ha Long Bay (Northern Vietnam).
AQUATIC BOT. 75(2):147-157 2003

Jackson, M.B., Ram, P.C.
Physiological and molecular basis of susceptibility and tolerance of rice plants to
complete submergence.
ANN. BOT. 91:227-241 2003

Jager-Zurn, I.
The occurrence of apical septum in the ovary of Rhyncholacis, Apinagia,
Marathrum and Mourera (Podostemoideae Podostemaceae): taxonomic
implications.
BOT. JAHRB. SYST. 124(3):303-324 2003

James, W.F., Barko, J.W., Eakin, H.L.
Water quality impacts of mechanical shredding of aquatic macrophytes.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 40:36-42 2002

Jose, S., Cox, J., Miller, D.L., Shilling, D.G., et al
Alien plant invasions: the story of cogon-grass in southeastern forests.
J. FORESTRY 100(1):41-44 2002

Kahara, S.N., Vermaat, J.E.
The effect of alkalinity on photosynthesis-light curves and inorganic carbon
extraction capacity of freshwater macrophytes.
AQUATIC BOT. 75(3):217-227 2003


Kato-Noguchi, H., Kugimiya, T.




Preferential induction of alcohol dehydrogenase in coleoptiles of rice seedlings
germinated in submergence condition.
BIOLOGIA PLANTARUM 46(1):153-155 2003

Kellogg, C.H., Bridgham, S.D., Leicht, S.A.
Effects of water level, shade and time on germination and growth of freshwater
marsh plants along a simulated successional gradient.
J. ECOL. 91:274-282 2003

Kellogg, L.E., Bridgham, S.D.
Phosphorus retention and movement across an ombrotrophic-minerotrophic peatland
gradient.
BIOGEOCHEMISTRY 63:299-315 2003

Keppner, E.J., Keppner, L.A.
Biology and conservation status of smoothbark St. John's-wort.
BAY COUNTY AUDUBON SOCIETY, FLORIDA, 29 PP. 2001

Koschnick, T.J., Haller, W.T.
Effects of endothall in irrigation water on selected turf and ornamental species.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.72 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Lalke-Porczyk, E., Donderski, W.
Distribution of epiphytic bacteria on the surface of selected species of helophytes
and nympheides from the littoral zone of the southern part of Jeziorak Lake in
Poland.
POLISH J. ENVIRON. STUDIES 12(1):83-93 2003

Lass, L.W., Prather, T.S.
Improving the detection of Brazilian pepper with geo-spatial enhancement of
hyperspectral remote sensing imagery.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P. 13 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Leslie, A.J., Spotila, J.R.
Alien plant threatens Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) breeding in Lake St.
Lucia, South Africa.
BIOL. CONSERV. 98(3):347-355 2001




Limpens, J., Berendse, F., Klees, H.
N deposition affects N availability in interstitial water, growth of sphagnum and
invasion of vascular plants in bog vegetation.
NEW PHYTOL. 157(2):339-347 2003

Mack, R.N.
The United States naturalized flora: largely the product of deliberate introductions.
ANN. MISSOURI BOT. GARD. 89:176-189 2002

Marion, L., Paillisson, J.-M.
A mass balance assessment of the contribution of floating-leaved macrophytes in
nutrient stocks in an eutrophic macrophyte-dominated lake.
AQUATIC BOT. 75(3):249-260 2003

McKinney, M.L.
Influence of settlement time, human population, park shape and age, visitation and
roads on the number of alien plant species in protected areas in the USA.
DIVERSITY AND DISTRIB. 8(6):311-318 2002

Michel, A., Dayan, F.E., Netherland, M.D., Scheffler, B.E.
Resistance to PDS-inhibitors in an invasive aquatic weed species.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.89-90 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Mille-Lindblom, C., Tranvik, L.J.
Antagonism between bacteria and fungi on decomposing aquatic plant litter.
MICROB. ECOL. 45(2): 173-182 2003

Mueller, T., Robinson, D.K., Main, C.L., Beeler, J.E., et al
Chinese yam (Dioscorea oppositifolia L.) in the Great Smoky Mountains National
Park.
IN: ABSTRACTS, 4TH ANNU. SYMP., SOUTHEAST EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL, APR. 3-5,
NASHVILLE, TN, PP. 17-18 (ABSTRACT) 2002

Nobbs, M.
Effects of vegetation differ among three species of fiddler crabs (Uca spp.)
J. EXP. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 284(1-2):41-50 2003


Norton, D.A., De Lange, P.J.




Fire and vegetation in a temperate peat bog: implications for the management of
threatened species.
CONSERV. BIOL. 17(1):138-148 2003

Orth, R.J., Fishman, J.R., Harwell, M.C., Marion, S.R.
Seed-density effects on germination and initial seedling establishment in eelgrass
Zostera marina in the Chesapeake Bay region.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 250:71-79 2003

Pahl, J.W., Mendelssohn, I.A., Henry, C.B., Hess, T.J.
Recovery trajectories after in situ burning of an oiled wetland in coastal Louisiana,
USA.
ENVIRON. MANAGE. 31(2):236-251 2003

Paling, E.I., Van Keulen, M., Wheeler, K.D., Phillips, J., et al
Influence of spacing on mechanically transplanted seagrass survival in a high wave
energy regime.
RESTORATION ECOL. 11(1):56-61 2003

Peralta, G., Bouma, T.J., Van Soelen, J., Perez-llorens, J.L., et al
On the use of sediment fertilization for seagrass restoration: a mesocosm study on
Zostera marina L.
AQUATIC BOT. 75:95-110 2003

Pinheiro, P., Ferreira, T., Franco, A., Moreira, I.
Radio-tracking movements of grass carp in irrigation channels.
IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS (EURO. WEED RES. SOC.) INTL. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, SEPT. 2-6,
EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, PP. 385-388 2002

Pitelli, R.A., Reis, R.A., Pitelli, R.L.C.M.
Brachiaria decumbens, a major exotic invasive plant in Brazil.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.23 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Pot, R.
Invasion and management of floating pennywort (Hydrocotyle ranunculoides L.f.)
and some other alien species in The Netherlands.
IN: PROC. 11TH EWRS (EURO. WEED RES. SOC.) INTL. SYMP. AQUATIC WEEDS, SEPT. 2-6,
EDS. A. DUTARTRE & M.-H. MONTEL, MOLIETS ET MAA, FRANCE, PP. 435-438 2002




Pro, J., Ortiz, J.A., Boleas, S., Fernandez, C., et al
Effect of assessment of antimicrobial pharmaceuticals on the aquatic plant Lemna
minor.
BULL. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL. 70(2):290-295 2003

Puri, A., MacDonald, G.E., Haller, W.T.
Investigations into fluridone tolerance in selected hydrilla [Hydrilla verticillata (L.
f.) Royle] populations.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.89 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Reichard, S.H., White, P.S.
Invasion biology: an emerging field of study.
ANN. MISSOURI BOT. GARD. 90(1):64-66 2003

Rogers, S.M.D.
Tissue culture and wetland establishment of the freshwater monocots Carex, Juncus,
Scirpus, and Typha.
IN VITRO CELL. DEV. BIOL.-PLANT 39(1):1-5 2003

Rollon, R.N., Vermaat, J.E., Nacorda, H.M.E.
Sexual reproduction in SE Asian seagrasses: the absence of a seed bank in Thalassia
hemprichii.
AQUATIC BOT. 75(2):181-185 2003

Runes, H.B., Jenkins, J.J., Moore, J.A., Bottomley, P.J., et al
Treatment of atrazine in nursery irrigation runoff by a constructed wetland.
WATER RESEARCH 37(3):539-550 2003

San Martin, A.P.M., Adamec, L., Suda, J., Mes, T.H.M., et al
Genetic variation within the endangered species Aldrovanda vesiculosa
(Droseraceae) as revealed by RAPD analysis.
AQUATIC BOT. 75:159-172 2003

Schneider, S., Melzer, A.
The trophic index of macrophytes (TIM) a new tool for indicating the trophic state
of running waters.
INTERN. REV. HYDROBIOL. 88(1):49-67 2003




Schulz,M., Rinke,K., Kohler,J.
A combined approach of photogrammetrical methods and field studies to determine
nutrient retention by submersed macrophytes in running waters.
AQUATIC BOT. 76:17-29 2003

Sebolt, D.C., Landis, D.A.
Neonate Galerucella calmariensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) behavior on purple
loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) contributes to reduced predation.
ENVIRON. ENTOMOL. 31(5):880-886 2002

Shardendu, Salhani, N., Boulyga, S.F., Stengel, E.
Phytoremediation of selenium by two helophyte species in subsurface flow
constructed wetland.
CHEMOSPHERE 50(8):967-973 2003

Simelane, D.O.
Biology and host range of Ophiomyia camarae, a biological control agent for
Lantana camera in South Africa.
BIOCONTROL 47(5):575-585 2002

Simon, 0., Boudou, A.
Direct and trophic contamination of the herbivorous carp Ctenopharyngodon idella
by inorganic mercury and methyl-mercury.
ECOTOXICOL. ENVIRON. SAFETY 50(1):48-59 2001

Skov, E., Valverde, B.E., Wellendorf, H., Andersen, S.B.
Microsatellite-based characterization of weedy rice from three Latin American
countries.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.39 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Slimak, M.W.
When FIFRA and the Clean Water Act collide the Talent decision.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.68 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Socha, R., De Kozlowski, S.
Water quality impacts following hydrilla control using triploid grass carp in the
Santee Cooper lakes, South Carolina.




IN: ABSTRACTS, 41ST ANNU. MEETING, AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY.,
MINNEAPOLIS, MN, JULY 15-18, 2001, P. 28. (ABSTRACT) 2001

Stewart, P.M., Garza, E.L., Butcher, J.T.
Effects of contaminated dredge spoils on wetland plant communities: a literature
review.
IN: BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE SIGNATURES: INDICATOR PATTERNS USING AQUATIC
COMMUNITIES, ED. T.P. SIMON, CRC PRESS, BOCA RATON, PP. 99-112 2003

Strong, G.L., Fischer, AJ.
Imposed drought: a tool to reduce the competitive impact of ricefield bulrush in
organic rice.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.63-64 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Sumpono, Perotti, P., Belan, A., Forestier, C., et al
Effect of diuron on aquatic bacteria in laboratory-scale wastewater treatment ponds
with special reference to Aeromonas species studied by colony hybridization.
CHEMOSPHERE 50(3):445-455 2003

Thompson, T.M.
Distribution and habitat selection of largemouth bass in a Florida limerock pit.
MASTER'S THESIS, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE. 2003.

Tsuji, R., Fischer, AJ., Hill, J.E., Yamasue, Y.
Herbicide resistance in late watergrass: similarity among resistant strains in
morphological and AFLP traits.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, WEED SCI. SOC. AMERICA MEETING, VOL.43, ED. R.J. KREMER,
JACKSONVILLE, FL, P. 44-45 (ABSTRACT) 2003

Van Nes, E.H., Scheffer, M.
Alternative attractors may boost uncertainty and sensitivity in ecological models.
ECOL. MODELLING 159:117-124 2003

Van Wilgen, B.W., Richardson, D.M., Le Maitre, D.C., Marais, C., et al
The economic consequences of alien plant invasions: examples of impacts and
approaches to sustainable management in South Africa.
IN: BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS: ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS OF ALIEN PLANT,
ANIMAL, AND MICROBE SPECIES, ED. D. PIMENTEL, CRC PRESS, BOCA RATON, PP. 243-265
2002




Wang, G., Lin, Y., Li, W., Kohara, H., et al
Mutation in acetolactate synthase gene of sulfonylurea-resistant biotype of
Monochoria korsakowii, an annual paddy weed in Japan.
IN: WSSA ABSTRACTS, MEETING OF THE WEED SCI. SOC. OF AMERICA, VOL.43, ED. R.J.
KREMER, JACKSONVILLE, FL, P.30 (ABSTRACT) 2003




Aquaphyte Contents I Aquaphyte page I Home


CAIP-WEBSITEAufl.edu




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs