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 Assessment methods and invasive...
 Alien plant entry
 DEP-IFAS review of aquatic and...
 Crossword
 From the database
 Meetings
 Books/reports
 Back Cover






Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00004
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    Assessment methods and invasive plant prediction models
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Alien plant entry
        Page 6
    DEP-IFAS review of aquatic and invasive plant research in Florida
        Page 7
    Crossword
        Page 8
        Page 9
    From the database
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Meetings
        Page 14
    Books/reports
        Page 15
    Back Cover
        Page 16
Full Text





A Q U A P H Y T E

A NEWSLETTER ABOUT AQUATIC, WETLAND AND INVASIVE PLANTS

Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
with support from UNIVERSITY OF
The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, FUR IT A
Bureau of Invasive Plant Management V..W
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, _L_ _IA
Waterways Experiment Station,
Aquatic Plant Control Research Program IFAS EXTENSION
The St. Johns River Water Management District

Volume 25 Number 1 Spring 2005 Gainesville, Florida ISSN 0893-7702


To Be or Not To Be:
Assessment Methods and Invasive Plant
Prediction Models
Land managers, facing increasing non-native species and ex-
ploding non-native plant abundance, obvious to all, want help
beyond mere anecdotes and generalizations; managers are in ur-
gent need of at least two tools: 1) a predictive method (a screen-
ing protocol) that enables managers to know in advance which
non-native plants will remain prettily in the yard, and which are
likely to escape their domestic confines and invade natural areas;
and 2) an assessment method that makes it possible to classify
and prioritize already-in-place non-native plants according to
their invasiveness.
Being able to predict plant invasiveness, and being able to clas-
sify existing non-native plants
would enable regulators to allow or prohibit certain species;
would enable eco-managers to determine which areas should
be regularly surveyed so that new invasions might be quickly con-
trolled;
would enable eco-managers to develop and employ smarter
plant management strategies to reduce environmental damage;
would help nurserymen, retailers and their customers who
want to enjoy plants that are from somewhere else; and
would inform plant-buying consumers so that they, too, can
join the fray against non-native plant invasions.

What progress have scientists made in developing predictive
methods and assessment means? The first place one might look
is the APIRS database, an expanding 65,000-item collection of
the scientific literature about invasive plants in Florida, the US
and beyond. (Go to: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ click on "APIRS
Online Database.")
The APIRS bibliographic database includes more than 250 re-
search articles and books that include variations of the keywords,
"assess," "predict" and "invasiveness." (Many more "abstracts"
about the subject are included in dozens of proceedings of man-
agement societies, and are listed in APIRS bibliographies, but
abstracts are not included in the following.)
Among the items listed in APIRS are two ambitious assessment
methods, the National Assessment and the Florida Assessment.


National Assessment
The national assessment protocol is the work of NatureServe,
The Nature Conservancy and the National Park Service. Its pur-
pose is to "make the process of assessing and listing invasive
plants objective and systematic," and is used to assess species
individually for a specified "region of interest." This protocol is
being used to "assess the biodiversity impact of the approximately
3,500 non-native vascular plant species established outside culti-
vation in the United States."
Of the 3,500 plant species targeted for assessment, 382 are
complete and may be downloaded. (These 382 assessments are
included in the 2,052 page PDF file.)
The national assessment classifications include "National I-
Rank," "Ecological Impacts," "Current Distribution," "Trend in
Distribution" and "Management Difficulty." The national assess-
ment protocol was authored by L.E. Morse, J.M. Randall, N. Ben-
ton, R. Hiebert and S. Lu, 2004.
Continued on Page 3



Mary's Picks!

Items ;hii. ,'.hit.,t this issue marked with "*" are
from articles that particularly piqued the interest of
Mary Langeland, the reader cataloger for the APIRS
database.

Fruits and seeds of Ruppia (Potamogetonaceae)
from the Pliocene of Yushe Basin, Shanxi, northern
China and their ecological implications. 2004. By
L.-C. Zhao, M.E. Collinson and C.- S. Li. Botanical
Journal of the Linnean Society 145:317-329.
This reports the discovery of fossil fruits and seeds
from monotypic stands of Ruppia in northern China
dating from 3.5 to 2.3 million years ago. Their pres-
ence apparently indicates the existence of a temperate
climate in this area. The discovery also increases the
range of Ruppia from Europe to eastern Asia.







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A Recognition Guide for 91 Non-Native Plants
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IFAS Publication SP 349
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y.' ..UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA
IFAS EXTENSION







Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 3


Continued from Page 1


Florida Assessment
The Florida assessment protocol is the work of .... !!.i'l_,i.!',_,:
from the University of Florida, Santa Fe Community College
(Gainesville, Florida) and The Nature C,.n ... The purpose
of the Florida assessment is to impartially classify hundreds of
non-native plants in our state, by area (North, Central and South
zones). The result is that many non-native plants are deemed
"OK" to be recommended for use in certain zones of the state.
The original purpose of the assessment was to conform university
publications so that Extension and other university workers were
giving consistent information to the public regarding the use of
non-native plants.
The authors stress this is not a predictive instrument but is
intended only for plant species or cultivars that currently occur
within Florida. Species not yet introduced to Florida "would
require a separate lp" '!, i. instrument, still to be developed." Of
the 193 species selected for assessment, 159 are complete and may
be downloaded.

The IFAS Assessment classifications include
"Not eligible for any uses" (61 plants);
N',. a. be eligible for limited uses if approved by the Invasive
Plant Working Group" (19 plants);
"Caution: may be recoimnended but manage to prevent
escape" (37 plants);
"Not a problem i. but has been documented in
undisturbed natural areas" (42 plants); and
"Not a problem species, and has not been documented in
undisturbed natural areas" (87 species).
Another 34 plants are "not yet assessed" or are ,' progress."

The Florida assessment protocol was authored by A.M. Fox,
D.R. Gordon, J.A. Dusky, L. Tyson and R.K. Stocker, 2005, Univ-
ersity of Florida.

Both the National and Florida assessments are online, and
include PDF files of their method protocols, field survey forms,
and results lists of non-native pi ,-, z i, are believed to be invasive.
The national list includes completed US national assessments for
382 plant species; the Florida list includes completed assessments
for 158 plant species.
NatureServe U.S. Invasive Species Assessment Protocol and
Results: http:/iwww.natureserve.org/getData plantData.jsp
.' i Assessment of the Status Plants in F
Natural Areas Protocol and Results: http: .. ..
assessment. html

Current Prediction and Assessment Literature
Found in the APIRS Database
T he first flurry of research about predictive models and invasive
plant assessment methods appear in the APIRS database
from the mid-1980s. Ten years later came the next small batch
of I i, a, 1I i,," research. Then for 2000 the database reported 12
research items about invasive plant predicting; in 2001 there were
28: in 'i 22...
One thing is clear from looking at these papers: there are a
number of methods for counting plants in a big area, there is some
good information about the morphology and physiology of many


non-native plants and what climates they prefer, etc., but there
seems to be little usable science for the land i~ .-a .,. i .: h,- job
it is to beat back the hundreds of 'i-..I..i plant species.
By the mid 1980s, plant researchers were asking questions
they felt would be useful in creating a predictive mathematical
model, such as: "do invading -..:;-: have definable genetic
characteristics?" At the same time, other scientists had decided
that models cannot be as good as empirical evidence ("what we've
seen a plant do before provides a good indication of what it will
do again"). Roughgarden (1986) said that we can "make just as
good a prediction, i, ,, -_l i", l.q -. restricted to the short term, by
using ad hoc methods requiring less work" than model building
and testing. Thus, strong pants and shoes, a compass, a map and
pen, and the willingness to walk, will yield information for a good
lo -h. qn.1 However, fi the community that is to be invaded is
itself ..ifT. i, variable, then predicting anything about an
invasion will assume the status of a weather report."
By the end of the 1990s, scientists were trying to create useful
lo '- 1,. models using site characteristics, species characteristics
and environmental disturbances (Clarke, 2002). In 1999, Goodwin
found that the original range alone was an effective predictor to
70% accurate. But he concluded that pf.,-h.:'i- of invasiveness
on a j i ', basis is not likely to help stem the i, ... of
. i.. i l., introduced invasive species."
Was significant progress made between 1980 and 1999? See
Rejmanek ('i"", for a review of i,.-:],-..- .',.' .1-:- See
Werren (' 1) for reviews of Risk Assessment Systems (RASs);
he was looking to screen non-native species to identify and control
the -!....p,. i ,..... i.e. plants in the initial stage of invasion -
"before their rate of spread is exponential."
More recently, a scant few researchers have worked on ways to
predict invasions and to assess non-native plants already in new
ranges:
the Weed Invasion Susceptibility Prediction (WISP)
model was 85% to '" ".. accurate for I,. i.,n rangeland species
(Gillham, :', i, ',
the US Geological Survey ranking system, a !n.!q.,t)ttin' .
ranking system," was used to classify 167 species into four invasive
categories (Drake, 2002);
the H, pil Ecological Assessment method was evaluated by
Krauss (2003);
the Genetic Ai:..;iiini for Rule-set Prediction, the
.1 ... 1o niche model" called GARP, developed models on
native geographic 1 .11, 1,1 ... 1 and projected them to other regions
to "pi.,...tt.. the geographical potential of species' invasions with
high accuracy" (F,.: -: i, 2003);
the authors believe Australia's robust, simple, and
understandable National ..n., i 11.1 Assessment System to be
the in: ever ..mA.. m.li at devising a generic scoring system to rank
the importance of established weeds on a national b., ; with it
they listed Australia's 25 most i'-ifi, .m invasive plants (Virtue,
2001);
and Pysek _" ". -, in search of a reliable p".... i-.: says that it's
important to distinguish between archaeophytes (plants introduced
by man to a new area as long ago as several thousand years) and
neophytes (more recent introductions), and that archaeophytes
should be considered non-native plants for modelling purposes.
v.r.
Continued next page








Page 4 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005


Following are articles on prediction and assessment of invasive
plants fom refereed ...... '. and books, in ascending order
by year. APIRS also lists many more abstracts and shorts fom
proceedings of various invasive plant societies.

1958 (republished 2000) Elton, CS. The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and
Plants. University of Chicago Press. 181 pp.
1986 Gray, AJ. Do invading species have definable genetic characteristics?
Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London B314(1167):655-672.
1986 Mollison, D. Modelling biological invasions: chance, explanation,
prediction. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. London. B314(1167):675-692.
1986 Mooney, HA; JA Drake, Eds. Ecology of Biological Invasions of North
America and Hawaii. Ecological Studies 58, Springer-Verlag, New York, 321
pp.
1986 Roughgarden, J. Predicting invasions and rates of spread. In: Ecology of
Biological Invasions of North America and Hawaii, Eds. HA Mooney and JA
Drake, Ecological Studies 58, Springer-Verlag, New York. Pp. 179-188.
1989 Noble, IR. Attributes of invaders and the invading process: terrestrial and
vascular plants. In: Biological Invasions: A Global Perspective, Eds. JA
Drake, et al, John Wiley and Sons LTD, pp. 301-313.
1993 Daehler, CC; DR Strong. Prediction and biological invasions.
Trends in Ecology and Evolution 8:380.
1994 McIntyre, S; S Lavorel. Predicting richness of native, rare and exotic
plants in response to habitat and disturbance variables across a variegated
landscape. Conservation Biology 8(2):521-531.
1995 Pysek, P.; K Prach; P Smilauer. Relating invasion success to plant traits:
an analysis of the Czech alien flora. In: Plant Invasions General Aspects
and Special Problems, P. Pysek, K. Prach, et al, Eds., SPB Academic Publ,
Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp. 39-60.
1996 Daehler, CC; DR Strong. Status, prediction and prevention of
introduced cordgrass Spartina spp. invasions in Pacific estuaries, USA.
Biological Conservation 78(1 ):51-58.
1996 Higgins, SI; DM Richardson; RM Cowling. Modeling invasive plant
spread: the role of plant-environment interactions and model structure.
Ecology 77(7):2043-2054.
1996 Higgins, SI; DM Richardson. A review of models of alien plant spread.
Ecological Modelling 87:249-265.
1996 Kareiva, P. Developing a predictive ecology for non-indigenous species
and ecological invasions. Ecology 77(6):1651-1652.
1996 Mack, RN. Predicting the identity and fate of plant invaders: emergent and
emerging approaches. Biol. Conserve. 78:107-121.
1996 Rejmanek, M. A theory of seed plant invasiveness: the first sketch.
Biological Conservation 78:171-181.
1996 Rejmanek, M; DM Richardson. What attributes make some plant species
more invasive? Ecology 77(6):1655-1661.
1997 Reichard, SH; CW Hamilton. Predicting invasions of woody plants
introduced into North America. Conserv. Biol. 11 (1): 193-203.
1997 Wade, M. Predicting plant invasions: making a start. In: Plant Invasions:
Studies from North America and Europe, Eds. JH Brock; M Wade; P Pysek;
and D Green, Backhuys Publ., Leiden, The Netherlands, pp. 1-18.
1998 Starfinger, U. On success in plant invasions. In: Plant Invasions: Ecological
Mechanisms and Human Responses, Eds. Starfinger, U; K Edwards, I
Kowarik and M. Willamson, Backhuys Publ., Leiden, The Netherlands,
pp. 33-42.
1999 Goodwin, BJ; AJ McAllister; L Fahrig. Predicting invasiveness of plant
species based on biological information. Conserve. Biol. 13(2):422-426.
1999 Hengeveld, R. Modelling the impact of biological invasions. In: Invasive
Species and Biodiversity Management, Eds. OT Sandlund et al; Kluwer
Academic Publishers, Boston, pp. 127-138.
1999 Kan, T Where the wild weeds are: the value of a rapid assessment of
invasive weeds. California Exotic Pest Plant Council News 7(3-4):7-8.
1999 Madsen, JD. Predicting the invasion of Eurasian watermilfoil into northern
lakes. Tech Rept. A-99-2, 36 pp., US Army Corps of Engineers, Waterways
Expt. Station, Aquatic Plant Control Research Program, Vicksburg, MS.
1999 Malakoff, D. Biological invaders sweep in. Science 285:1834-1843.
1999 Rozefelds, AC; R Mackenzie. The weed invasion in Tasmania in the 1870s:
knowing the past to predict the future. 12th Australian Weeds Conf, Papers &
Proc., 12-16 Sept, Hobart, Tasmania, pp. 581-583.
1999 Stocker, RK. Standardizing invasive plant assessment methods for field
inventory. In: Proc. 1998 Joint Symp. Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council


and Fl. Native Plant Soc., June 4-7, 1998, Eds DT Jones and BW Gamble,
pp. 23-33.
1999 Williamson, M. Invasions. Ecography 22(1):5-12.
2000 Arroyo, MTK; C. Marticorena; 0. Matthei; L. Cavieres. Plant invasions
in Chile: present patterns and future predictions. In: Invasive Species in a
( .... ... World; Eds. HA Mooney and RJ Hobbs, Island Press, i.:.. i ..
DC, pp. 385-421.
2000 Higgins, SI; DM Richardson; RM Cowling. Using a dynamic landscape
model for planning the management of alien plant invasions. Ecol. Appl.
10(6):1833-1848.
2000 Rejmanek, M. Invasive plants: approaches and predictions. Austral. Ecol.
25(5):497-506.
2000 Richardson, DM; N Allsopp; CM D'Antonio; SJ Milton; et al. Plant
invasions the role of mutualisms. Biological Reviews 75(1):65-93.
2000 Weiss, JER; DA McLaren. A methodology to assess invasiveness and
impacts of weeds in South Eastern Australia. In: Abstracts, Third Intern.
Weed Sci. Congress, Ed A. Legere, Foz do Iguassu, Brazil, June 6-11, p. 209.
2000 Zalba, SM; MI ... i.: .. CACompagnoni; CJ T i .. ... Using
a habitat model to assess the risk of invasion by an exotic plant.
S; i. ; ,i Conservation 93(2):203-208.
2001 i. .... GW; RM Reich; MAKalkhan; TJ Stohlgren. New approaches
for sampling and modeling native and exotic plant species richness.
Western N. Amer. Naturalist 61(3):328-335.
2001 Groves, RH; FD Panetta; JG Virtue; et al., Eds. Weed Risk Assessment.
CSIRO Publishing, Australia, 244 pp.
2001 Higgins, SI; DM Richardson; RM Cowling. Validation of a spatial
simulation model of a spreading alien plant population. J. Appl. Ecol.
38(3):571-584.
2001 Imm, DW; IE .1 KW McLeod; B Collins. Rare plants of
southeastern hardwood forests and the role of predictive modeling.
Natural Areas J. 21(1):36-49.
2001 Kriticos, DJ; RP Randall. A comparison of systems to analyze potential
weed distributions. In: Weed Risk Assessment, Eds. RH Groves, FD Panetta,
et al., CSIRO ., :, 1.... .. 1. .1 ., pp. 61-79.
2001 Larson, DL; PJ Anderson; W Newton. Alien plant invasion in mixed-
grass prairie: effects : : .. type ,....i ... : ..: disturbance.
Ecological Applications 11(1):128-141.
2001 Lockwood, JL; D Simberloff; ML McKinney; B Von Holle. How many,
and which, plants will invade natural areas? Biological Invasions 3:1-8.
2001 Reichard, S. The search for patterns that enable prediction of
invasion. In: Weed Risk Assessment, Eds. RH Groves, FD Panetta, et al,
CSIRO Publishing, Australia, pp. 10-19.
2001 i ;...... i M. What tools do we have to detect invasive plant
species? In: Weed Risk Assessment, Eds. RH Groves, FD Panetta, et al,
CSIRO Publishing, Australia, pp. 3-9.
2001 Slobodkin, LB. The good, the bad and the reified. Evolutionary Ecol. Res.
3:1-13.
2001 Virtue, JG; RH Groves; FD Panetta. Towards a system to determine the
national : .:. ... of weeds in Australia. In: Weed Risk Assessment, Eds
RH Groves, FD Panetta, et al, CSIRO Pt. 1. :.... .. ., ,:.. pp. 124-150.
2001 Werren, G; D Panetta; S Goosem. Environmental weed risk assessment
in the wet tropics: addressing problems of invasive alien species as a major
threat to landscape integrity and health. Landscape Health of Queensland,
Symposium, Royal Soc. of Queensland, Australia, 20 pp.
2001 Williamson, M. Can the impacts of invasive plants be predicted?
In: Plant Invasions: species ecology and ecosystem management, eds. G
Brundu; J Brock, et al, Backhuys Publ. Leiden, The Netherlands, pp. 11-20.
2001 Wilson, SB; PC Wilson. '. .. I .. ..._ the potential invasiveness of
ornamental plants in the Florida landscape. Southern Nursery Assoc.
Research Conf. 46:486-489.
2002 Boylen, CW; LW Eichler; J Bartkowski; S Shaver. Exotic plant dispersal
through northeastern North America. In: Proc. 11th EWRS Intl. ,.,I
Aquatic Weeds, Sept 2-6, Eds. ADutartre and M-Hi Montel, Moliets et Maa,
France, pp. 419-422.
2002 Campbell, GS; PG Blackwell; FI Woodward. Can landscape-scale
characteristics be used to predict plant invasions along rivers?
J. . i. 29(4):535-543.
2002 Clarke, S; JR Newman. Assessment of alien invasive aquatic weeds in the
UK. In: Papers and Proc., 13th Australian Weeds Conf., eds. II. Spafford
Jacob, J. Dodd, et al, Sept. 8-13, Perth, Western Australia, Plant Prot. Soc.
Western Australia, pp. 142-145.








Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 5


2002 Crooks, JA. 2002. Characterizing ecosystem-level consequences of
biological invasions: the role of ecosystem engineers. Oikos 97:153-166.
2002 Drake, SJ; Weltzin, JF; Parr, PD. Assessment of nonnative invasive plants
in the Doe Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Oak Ridge
National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN, US Dept. Energy, ORNL/TM 2001/113.
2002 IHakanson, L: VV Boulion. Empirical and dynamical models to predict
the cover, biomass and production of macrophytes in lakes. Ecological
.t.. .... 151(2-3):213-243.
2002 Havel, JE; JB Shurin; JR Jones. Estimating dispersal from patterns of
spread: spatial and local control of local invasions. Ecol. 83(12):3306-3318.
2002 Kolar, C.; D Lodge. Progress in invasion biology: predicting invaders. In:
Proc. Invasive Species Screening Wksp. Minimizing risk/maximizing use,
Ed. M. Fraidenburg, Jan 8-9, Las Vegas, NV, pp. 25-26.
2002 Miki, T; M Kondoh. Feedbacks between nutrient .. and vegetation
predict plant species coexistence and invasion. Ecol. Letters 5(5):624-633.
2002 Stohlgren, TJ: GW .i. LD Schell; KA Rimar; et al. Assessing
vulnerability to invasion by nonnative plant species at multiple spatial scales.
Environ. Manage. 29(4):566-577.
2002 Weiss, J; D McLaren. Victoria's pest plant prioritisation process. In: Papers
and Proc., 13th Australian Weeds Conf., Eds. iH Spafford Jacob, J. Dodd,
et al, Sept 8-13, Perth, Plant Prot. Soc. Western Australia, pp. 509-512.
2003 Barendregt, A: AMF Bio. Relevant variables to predict macrophyte
communities in running waters. Ecol. _.. .1 .:...i. 160(3):205-217.
2003 Buckley, YM: DT Briese; M Rees. Demography and management of
the invasive plant Hyperncum perforatum. II. Construction and use of an
individual-based model to predict population dynamics and the effects of
management strategies. J. Applied Ecol. 40(3):494-507.
2003 Gundel, PE. Examples help demonstrate the mechanisms underlying the
development of solutions [Response to Perrings et al., 2002. Biological
invasion risks and the public good: an economic perspective]. Conserve. Ecol.
7(1):RL. [online]URL: http://www.consecol.org/vol7/issl/respl
2003 Jaduraju, NT; RM Kathiresan. Invasive weeds in the tropics. 19th Asian-
Pacific Weed Sci. Soc. Conf., Manila, 'I ...i : ... pp. 59-68.
2003 Krauss, DA; B Bateman; M Ajemian; L Quintana; et al. An evaluation of
a rapid ecological assessment method for urban ecosystems. Proc. Thirtieth
Annual Conf. Ecosystem Restoration and Creation, Ed. PJ Cannizzaro,
.!1 I .. -i Comm. College, Tampa, FL, pp. 158-166.
2003 Lodge, DM; K Slhrader-Frechette. Nonindigenous species: ecological ex-
planation, environmental ethics, and .... I .. i... Conserve. Biol. 17:31-37.
2003 Mack, RN. Phylogenetic constraint, absent life forms, and preadapted alien
plants: a prescription for biological invasions. Internat. J. Plant Sci. 164(30:
S185-S196.
2003 Peterson, ATf; M Papes; DA Kluza. Predicting the potential invasive
distributions of four alien plant species in North America. Weed Sci 51 863-868
2003 Van den Berg, MS; W Joosse; H Coops. A statistical model, ,. I.. ; the
occurrence and dynamics of submerged macrophytes in shallow lakes in The
Netherlands. lHydrobiologia 506-509(1-3):611-623.
2004 Gillham, JI: AL IHild; JHI Johnson; ER Hunt; et al. Weed invasion
susceptibility prediction (WISP) model for use with geographic information
systems. Arid Land Res. Manage. 18(1):1-12.
2004 Gorgens, AHIM; BW Van Wilgen. Invasive alien plants and water resources
in South Africa: ... .. .1 i 1. I,, predictive ability and research
challenges. S. Afr. J. Sci. 100(1):27-33.
2004 Latimer, AM; JA Silander; AE Gelfand; AG Rebelo; et al. (C,.,,, i ,,
threats to biodiversity from invasive alien plants and other factors: a case
study from the Cape floristic region. S. Afr. J. Sci. 100(1):81-86.
2004 Pysek, P: DM Richardson: M Williamson. Predicting and explaining plant
invasions through analysis of source area floras: some critical considerations.
Diversity Distrib. 10(3):179-187.
2004 Richardson, DM: VC Moran: DC Le Maitre; M Rouget; et al. Recent
developments in the science and management of invasive alien plants:
connecting the dots of research knowledge and linking disciplinary boxes.
S. Afr. J. Sci. 100(1):126-128.
2005 Morse, LE: JM Randall: N Benton; R Hiebert; S Lu. NatureServe U.S.
Invasive Species Assessment Protocol and Results: http://www.natureserve.
org/getData/plantData.jsp
2005 Fox, AM; DR Gordon: JA Dusky; L. Tyson; RK Stocker. IFAS assessment
of the status of non-native plants in Florida's natural areas. SS-AGR-225,
Agronomy Dept., Univ. Florida, Gainesville: 1.i i 1 .i ..i,.
assessment.html


* Plant invasion ecology dispatches from the front line.
2004. By D.M. Richardson. Diversity and Distributions 10(5-
6):315-319.
Mary calls this "a thoughtful and broad-ranging editorial"
about biotic invasions, biotic resistance, 11.1 l1.., i i. -
ments, modelling and impacts.


* A. h,,.fi,,f in ;. 44w. I ,.frn precursor or specialized
early angiosperm? 2003. By E.M. Friis, J.A. Doyle, P.K. En-
dress and Q. Leng. Trends in Plant Sciences. '6 9-373.
The authors are 1 ,l ; .1i thatA. ........, is the old-
est known -i_. .... i m They think Archaefructus "might be a
crown-group angiosperm specialized for aquatic habit rather
than a more primitive relative."


* Seed germination responses of Monochoria korsakowii
Regel et Maack, a threatened paddy weed, to 14 min ..~ -Aiin
and soil moisture. 2004. By X.-C. Wan, G.-X. W.v.- and I
Washitani. Plant Species /i.. ..'. 19:203-207.
What were once common paddy weeds have now become
i, .i* i, i. Here's a report on one of them. The authors
conclude that M. korsakowii has declined because it has not
adapted to today's farming system in Japan, which includes
laying rice fields fallow and the use of herbicides.


Blitzkrieg in a marine invasion: Caulerpa racemosa var.
l ';,,,.... reaches the Canary Islands (north-east Atlan-
tic). 2004. By M. Verlaque, J. Afonso-Carrillo, M. C. Gil-Ro-
driguez. et al. Biol. Invasions 6(3):269-281.
An invasive variety of this species, introduced from Aus-
n ,i.i to the it'.It., i..m Sea, now has been found in the
Canary Islands. The finding in proximity to harbors supports
the hypothesis of possible dispersal by ship traffic. Other parts
of the world could soon become infested without more control
on the aquarium trade and ships, i. i. -.ia, 1, i the authors.


* How ;niii .an iilsa between ecology and evolution influ-
ence contemporary invasion dynamics. 2004. By J.G. Lam-
brinos. Ecology 85(8):2061-2070.
The author states that m. ,i,",, pv. ",-', ,ii.-.,q, often experi-
ence rapid evolutionary changes associated with or soon after
their introduction." The genetics of the invading plants can be
altered by founder effects, drift, interbreeding and hybridiza-
tion, local adaptation, migration and dispersal patterns, strong
selectivity, human ii i-,i .i and I.ms I, change. This ar-
ticle reviews previous research that focused on these issues.


* Astroturf seed traps for studying hydrochory. 2004. By
M. Wolters, J. Geertsema, E.R. ( l.,n.., R.M. Veeneklaas. et
al. Functional Ecology 18(1):141-147.
Seed I,,i i by water (hydrochory) "is an important as-
pect of the ...*.. '.4 i,.n dynamics of plant species growing near
streams, rivers, oceans and seas." Described here is a new
method for collecting seeds and other propagules as they drift
and disperse in tidal marshes.







Page 6 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005

ALIEN PLANT ENTRY
Some Observations from the West-Central Illinois Flora
by Dr. Robert Henry, Retired Curator of the RM Myers Herbarium, Ohio State University

F lora authors have observed and recorded alien plants 1o, ..0.l .. since the beginning of plant records. The presence of aliens in a flora
is documented by records and collections, but these may not be accurate or complete and therefore, do not i.l mi. i.... iiil,.
actual time of entry. Most data are post-Eulp... ,. m .. ii... it However, Native Americans, European and *-ili.. i pI..-settlement explorers,
traders, trappers, itinerants and i-,,-., n- homesteaders could, by their inter- and intra-continental activities and movements, .,-. .1-
ample opportunities for alien plant entry and. <.,1.1, i.. i. Also, alien -p.... .1l, could arrive by air, water and animals before and
after human presence. This essay presents some composite observations concerning alien plant entry during the period of 1833 (post-
:.. O! i.. u.t) to 1987 into the west-central Illinois spontaneous or non-cultivated vascular flora. The time of the first entry of an alien plant
into the west-central Illinois flora is unknown.

Systematics
During this period, the alien plants have always been and still are mostly angiosperm (99%). :. (79%). The plant families with the most species
are: Poaceae, Asteraceae, Brassicaceae, Fabaceae, Malvaceae, ( 1.,.. *:i -. '.. \, Imaranthaceae, and Lamiaceae. By 1987 aliens were in 43% of the
families and 8% of the families were all aliens. Chenopodium, Rumex, Malha, Amaranthus, and more recently Bromus, Brassica and Polyvgonum are a
few of the genera with the most aliens. By 1987 aliens were in 38% of the genera and 24% of the genera were all aliens.


Increasing numbers of aliens in the flora is indicated by six percent in 1846 to 25% by 1987. From 1846 to 1952 there was one alien species average
increase per year, whereas from 1953 to 1987 there were about three. The geographical origin has been consistently and predominately European, being
from 74% to the present 82%. The western United States is the source of most aliens from within this country. Deliberate introductions, most being
cultivated, have been about 50%, leaving spontaneous occurrences at about 50%. Naturalization of alien species has increased from zero percent from
the original entries to about 80% now.

Ecology
The alien species have been 98% terrestrial, with about 25% of all terrestrial species alien. Aquatic alien species were few (1%) early and now only
about two percent of the alien species are aquatic, with six percent of all aquatic species being alien. Almost all alien species occur on disturbed land
...: i 1 t* i Land cover is over 90% alien species, principally due to agriculture. There is an interesting paradox regarding the attitude toward alien
plants: The effort to eradicate alien weedy plants vs. the effort to propagate alien food plants (corn, soybeans, etc) and other utilitarian species on the
same land. Forty-six percent of alien species are considered weeds and 40% of weed species are aliens. Of alien weed species in Hancock County, IL,
47% were once cultivated, 85% are from the Old World, 44% were in the county before 1881, and between 1833 and 1978 one species was introduced
per year. 13% of woody weed species were alien, and 40% of herbaceous weed species were alien. Most alien species are annual and biennial (56%),
while 50% of annuals are alien. Most alien species are herbaceous (88-94%). The number of woody species has doubled (6-12%) )... i..:.. ill-advised
plantings such as Elaeagnus spp., Rosa .. '. and Lonicera spp. promoted by government entities. The latter two are now illegal to sell and plant
in Illinois. Twenty-five percent of all herbaceous species and 22% of woody species are alien.
Once arrived, alien species have often become detrimental to the ecosystem as has been extensively documented. Aliens are increasingly occupying
disturbed and natural areas, becoming naturalized and causing a rapid change in vegetation cover and in flora composition, causing more native
species to be rare, threatened, endangered and possibly extinct. As urbanization (including urban ..i industrialization, transportation, recreation,
agriculture (including bioengineered species), clearing and extraction increase, so does disturbed land with alien species, including alien weeds. The
potential for alien species to become weeds is not static but varies with time and environmental conditions. Climate change could favor aliens also. We
probably can expect the percent of alien species to increase and their geographical origin to vary as the flora becomes increasingly homogenized due
to introductions both purposeful and accidental as a result of world commerce. Although most alien immigrants in the near future will continue to be
angiosperms, terrestrial, and herbaceous, this could change in the future.
There is now a rapid increase in our interest and awareness of alien
species and their effects on both the native species in our ecosystems and "An informal survey indicates that no American taxon-
the functioning and beneficial services of these ecosystems. In earlier times, omists are ... on alien plants and that fewu are
alien floristic data was presented to document what was occurring in the
much concerned about the status of aliens in [published]
flora, but response was limited, perhaps due to the fact that the data were much concerned about the status of aliens in ed
floristic and local; they did not stress the present overall ecological/ecosy stem floras. 1979.
deterioration paradigm that is the basis of the current interest in invasive From Changes in the alien flora in two west-central Illinois counties
alien plants. during the past 140 years by RM Myers and RD Henry, American
To decrease or prevent future alien entry, :'i :I introductions are AMidlandNaturalst 101(1):226-230.
being more closely monitored and regulated and a major effort is being made
to reduce accidental entry especially along transportation corridors. Of the
recent alien entries in one west-central illinois county, 68% entered along railroad and highway corridors, locations where disturbed habitats and other
environmental parameters are conducive to alien establishment. Many of the early alien species were purposely introduced to meet settlers' needs for
food and other utilitarian and cultural uses, which then escaped and became naturalized. We still, and will continue to need native and alien species for
these uses. Wildlife commonly uses alien species present in their habitat. Alien entry most likely will not be stopped and the ones already present will
not be eradicated. A more efficient use of the enormous money and labor being spent is needed in their management, which should include a tolerable
objective threshold that is productive, useful, beneficial and compatibly integrated with the dynamic flora of the ecosystem.







Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 7

DEP IFAS Review of Aquatic and Invasive Plant Research in Florida


Aquatic and invasive plant research being performed through-
out Florida was reviewed in Gainesville recently as the Flor-
ida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), Bureau
of Invasive Plant Management, and the University of Florida,
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF-IFAS), Cen-
ter for Aquatic and Invasive Plants hosted a meeting to review
current research being funded by the state agency and UF-IFAS.
Other objectives were to communicate ideas and needs for future
research on aquatic and invasive plants in Florida.
William Torres, Chief of the DEP Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management, and William Haller, Acting Director of the Center
for Aquatic and Invasive Plants welcomed invasive plant scientists
from throughout Florida to the one and a half day gathering. Don
Schmitz, Biologist and Research Contract Manager for the Bureau,
stated in his overview that more than 88 million dollars is spent
annually on invasive plants and animals by all of the various state
agencies in Florida. Of that 88 million, less than $800,000 is spent
on research and outreach. The bulk of the Bureau's money pays
for management efforts, with about half going toward hydrilla
control. Most research money is spent on biological control with
about half of the projects being investigated at UF-IFAS.
Projects covered in the research review included multiple pre-
sentations on biocontrol insects being considered for control of
Casuarina spp., Hydrilla, Lygodium microphyllum, Schinus tere-
binthifolius, Paederia foetida and Dioscorea bulbifera. Potential
invasiveness of ornamental plant species was reviewed as well as
ecological studies of Scleria lacustris, Imperata cylindrica and
Hemarthria altissima. Work on mycoherbicides was reviewed
as well as chemical herbicide studies for controlling Hydrilla,
Lygodium and Imperata cylindrica. Mapping and survey research
was presented, as was an overview of APIRS activities. APIRS
has been a long-time recipient of DEP and UF-IFAS funding
for maintaining and expanding the database and for educational
products and services.

Do alien plants reduce insect biomass? 2004. By D.W.
Tallamy. Conservation Biology]8(6): 1689-1692
Considering how important insects are to the food chain,
the author asks why so little research has been done to answer
important questions about the effects of non-native plants on
native insects, questions such as: 1) Many non-native plants
were spread by humans because of their unpalatability to
insects; as these unpalatable plants spread, what will native
insects eat? 2) How many herbivores will associate with a
non-native plant compared to the number of herbivores in
the plant's native range? 3) Do "generalist" insects do as
well on non-native plants as on natives? 4) To what extent
do generalist insects eat non-native plants? 5) To what extent
does non-native plant abundance affect egg-laying and feed-
ing? 6) How does replacement of native plants with non-na-
tive species affect insectivorous mammals, reptiles and am-
phibians? "Given the pervasiveness of alien plants in North
America and the speed with which they continue to replace
native vegetation, addressing such questions should become
a priority among funding agencies and researchers alike."


DEP areas of current research interest include biological control,
improved practices for chemical control, economic impacts, devel-
opment of screening protocols, and evaluations of mechanical har-
vesters and tussock shredding machines. High priority species for
the current year are Hydrilla and Lygodium microphyllum. High
priority Hydrilla research includes tuber formation and viability,
grass carp/herbicide combinations, and development of new her-
bicide tools. High priority Lygodium microphyllum objectives are
to continue biological control research, determining optimal times
for herbicide treatments, finding new herbicide tools, effects of
fire, and decontamination methods for workers and equipment in
the field for this spore dispersed fern species.


Dr. William Haller,
Acting Director,
Center for Aquatic and
Invasive Plants,
University of Florida, IFAS.


Mr. Don Schmitz, Biologist and
Research Contract Manager,
Bureau of Invasive Plant
Management, Florida Department
of Environmental Protection.


Mr. William Torres,
Bureau Chief, Bureau of
Invasive Plant Management,
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection,


* What makes a weed a weed: life history traits of native
and exotic plants in the USA. 2004. By S. Sutherland.
Oecologia 141(1):24-39.
The author compared ten life history traits for the 19,960
plant species that occur in the USA. He found that a) life
span was the most significant life history trait for weeds
- weeds were more likely to be annuals and biennials
than perennials; b) weeds were more likely to be wetland
adapted, toxic and shade intolerant; and c) weeds were
more likely to be monoecious and trees.








Page 8 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005


Look at the Web Sites, Complete the Crossword, Win a Prize!

The first 10 people (any state, any country) who return the correctly-completed crossword puzzle will win
four each of the two laminated ID guides described on page 2. This puzzle can be solved by referring to two web
sites: the original APIRS web site: http: //plants.ias.ufl.edu and our new web site: http: //plants.ifas.ufl.edu guide
Read the clue, refer to the URL cited, find the answer and fill it in. Photocopy your completed crossword puzzle at


100% and send it via snail mail to:
Gainesville, FL 32653, USA.


CROSSWORD, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants, 7922 NW 71 Street,


Across
1. salt grass, spicata, (...edu/disspi.html)
5. DEP Bureau of Invasive Plant Management
7. banana lily (...edu/photocom.html)
14. Ipomoea common name
15. Dioscorea potato
16. underwater soil
18. below-ground plant part (...edu/glosinlO.html)
20. duckweed, salvinia, reed
21. upright stems are
24. arranged from center (...edu/glosstu.html)
27. Colubrina asiatica (...edu/colasi.html)
28. freshwater sportfish (...edu/guide/fish.html)
29. herbicide modifier (...edu/guide/adjuva.html)
31. tolerances" (...edu/1-mental.html)
34. River State Park: colorful!
(...edu/gallery2.html)
36. President 's Executive Order 13112
(...edu/assessment.html)
38. Prairie State Preserve
(...edu/gallery2.html)
39. Microcystis is a alga
(...edu/guide/2algae.html)
42. Chinese grass (...edu/guide/biocons.html)
44. drink of the gods (...edu/gloss-no.html#n2)
45. measure your width
(...edu/guide/calibinf.html)
46. giant cut grass (...edu/zizmil.html)
48. facultative wetland plant (abbr.)
49. World climbing fern (...edu/lygod.html)
50. Saccharum giganteum common name
(...edu/photos.html)
55. Plant ID chapter (...edu/b-conten.html)
57. section on lakes
(...edu/guide/lakes.html#1lakdisap)
58. very low nutrients, trophic
(...edu/guide/trophstate.html)
59. Xyris is yellow_ grass (...edu/photos.html)
60. Origin of Iris pseudacorus (...edu/iripse.html)
61. cord grasses (...edu/photocom.html)
62. Sapium, Schinus, Taxodium...
63. white-flowered wandering Jew (...edu/traflu.html)
68. Spirodela polyrhiza common name
(...edu/photos.html)
71. 10 million years is a long time
72. last subject on this page
(...edu/guide/mechcons.html)
75. Cookie Cutter is a kind of
(...edu/guide/mechcons.html)
76. milligram (abbr.)
78. 11 lth lake down (...edu/guide/lakesnor.html)
79. wild petunia (...edu/photocom.html)
80. hyacinths won't grow in freezing
85. Florida Extension's "Electronic Data Information
Source" (abbr.)
86. 5th mollusc listed under "Endangered Animals"
(...edu/guide/endanger.html)


87. hard-shelled dry fruit (...edu/gloss-no.html#n11)
88. Spartina .. common name
(...edu/photos.html)
91. where skunk vine comes from
(...edu/paefoe.html)
92. AKA "the fish hawk" (...edu/guide/birds.html)
93. not from around here (...edu/mcdef.html)
96. University of Florida (abbr.)
97. Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (abbr.)
99. A river along its course.
100. Juncus roemerianus, needlerush
(...edu/junroe.html)
102. one equals one gm of water
(...edu/o-conver.html)
103. implying removal or reversal
104. water's ability to neutralize acids
(...edu/guide/alkaln.html)
105. egg-shaped (...edu/gloss-no.html)
106. weight (abbr.)

Down
1. EPA's highest level advisory language on herbicide
labels go to guide, click on keyword "labels"
2. maintenance of plants
(...edu/guide/suplherb.html)
3. punctata = Spirodela punctata
(...edu/lanpun.html)
4. Potamogeton pectinatus pondweed
(...edu/allplants.html)
5. logical; graphy;
6. hand-pulling and raking are control
(...edu/guide/physcons.html)
8. our example of a "solution (sinkhole) lake"
(...edu/guide/lakes.html)
9. acidity scale (...edu/guide/ph.html)
10. Florida's most valuable non-native plants
(...edu/guide/agricul.html)
11. "pertaining to the back"
(...edu/gloss-de.html#d26)
12. shaped like an arrow-head (...edu/gloss-html#s2)
13. first one in row of pictures
(...edu/guide/invplant.html#invvine)
17. a large disorderly crowd
19. duckweed of starlike colonies (...edu/wolflo.html)
21. number of herbicide compounds registered for
use in Florida (...edu/guide/herbcons.html)
22. fifth tree in the row (...edu/treplants.html)
23. "hyacinth boat" 1939
(...edu/guide/mechcons.html)
25. what water hyacinth is to a water hyacinth
weevil; breakfast, lunch, dinner
26. pound (abbr.)
30. torpedograss, repens
31. inundated beakrush (...edu/rhyinu.html)
32. the green word:
(...edu/guide/invplant.html#invsteward)
33. Uniform Resource Locator (abbr.)


35. wetland code for plant that lives in water
36. sandhill; whooping (...edu/guide/birds.html)
37. spatterdock (...edu/photocom.html)
40. West Indian marsh grass, Hymenachne

41. common name ofPontederia cordata
43. a rush with leaf blades, Juncus
(...edu/photos.html)
47. agricultural canals are used for flood control and
for (...edu/guide/canals.html)
51. attracting to a surface; a possible fate of aquatic
herbicides in the environment (...edu/1-mental.html)
52. Brazilian tree, Schinus terebinthifolius
53. Marsilea is water
54. endangered Ii ,.. .,
lily (... edu/guide/endanger.html)
56. boat", 1914
(...edu/guide/mechcons.html)
64. Pennisetum purpureum, grass
65. caric sedges, species
(...edu/photocom.html)
66. Florida's second largest industry at $6.85 B
(...edu/guide/assets.html)
67. "time-release pellets of herbicide"
(...edu/guide/mgmtpics.html)
69. turbidity a measurement of water clarity
70. EPA's mid-level advisory language on herbicide
labels go to guide, click on keyword "labels"
73. national bird, bald
74. Zephyranthes atamasco, lily
(...edu photos.html)
75. hydrilla is a (underwater) plant
76. go to Guide; click on "Map of public waters...";
click on Leon County; read Lake 255 acres
77. genus for camphor tree. on APIRS web site,
click on "401 Native and..."; click on "Plant type
category"; click on "Trees"; find "camphor"
78. ounce (abbr.)
81. ...edu/p-words.html. 37th definition -
"A population within a species..."
82. ...edu/guide/springpics.html. 2nd column,
6th springs down: Springs
83. wild (...edu/zizaqu.html)
84. elephant (...edu/xansag.html)
86. ...edu/guide/springs.html. Under "Some Florida
Springs", fourth pic from left: Springs
89. The subject of this page.
(...edu/guide/geology.html)
90. acronym: Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plant
Information Retrieval System
94. About -Registration
(...edu/guide/sup7herb.html)
95. Accidentally killed plants? Prepare to be
98. pounds per acre (abbr.)
100. Limnobium spongia, frog's
(...edu/lisppic.html)
101. lily: another common name for
Nuphar advena. (...edu/floplants.html)


Bonus question for 2 extra plant recognition guides: What do you hear when you go to: http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu ?
In left column, click on "Florida Photo Sets," scroll down and click on PaN ii.s Prairie State Preserve."





AQUAPHYTE
2 3 4 5 6


I I


16 17

24 25 26


I I I I


I I I


I I I I


I I I I I


I I I I


I I I


12 7 3


f6


79



89


I I I


---Il


I I


- -
04


I I


-EJIL


Spring 2005


I1 1 [


Page 9


viz


45 4

50 51 52






64 6566 67


m


1 6 1


84 f85 8


I I







Page 10 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005


ALMEIDA, C.M.R., MUCH, A.P.,
VASCONCELOS, M.T.S.D.
Influence of the sea rush Juncus maritimus
on metal concentration and speciation in
estuarine --* I. -,1 colonized by the plant.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHN. 38(11):3112-3118. 2004.

ANONYMOUS
Main points of the Invasive Alien Species
Act.
MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT JAPAN,
ONLINE REPORT, HTTP://WWW.ENV.GO.JP/EN/
TOPIC/AS.HTML, 2 PP. 2004.

BALATA, D., PIAZZI, L., CINELLI, F.
A .'M, ni .. among assemblages in areas
invaded by Caulerpa taxifolia and C. rac-
emosa on a subtidal Mediterranean rocky
bottom.
MARINE ECOL. 25(1):1-13. 2004.

BARIK, A., BHATTACHARYA, B.,
LASKAR, S., BANERJEE, T.C.
The determination of n-alkanes in the cu-
ticular wax of leaves of Ludwigia adscen-
dens L.
PHYTOCHEM. ANAL. 15(2):109-111. 2004.

BATARY, P., WINKLER, H., BALDIA.
Experiments with artificial nests on preda-
tion in reed habitats.
J. ORNITHOL. 145(1):59-63. 2004.

BENNETT, D.J., COLODNEY, E.
Propagation protocol for h .1,, tail
(Saururus cernuus).
NATIVE PLANTS J. 2(1):44-45. 2004.

BENNICELLI, R., STEPNIEWSKA,
Z., BANACH, A., SZAJNOCHA,K.,
ETAL
The PI. ofAzolla caroliniana to remove
heavy metals (Hg(ii), Cr(iii), Cr(vi)) from
municipal wastewater.
CHEMOSPHIERE 55(11):141-146. 2004.

BOLSUNOVSKY, A.
Artificial ,d, -,,m,.- 1i4 .- in aquatic plants of


the Yenisei River in the area affected by ef-
11u, ni of a Russian plutonium complex.
AQUATIC ECOLOGY 38(1):57-62. 2004.

BORNMAN, T.G., ADAMS, J.B.,
BATE, G.C.
The influence of fl.. 1l.1.ii geohydrology
on the ,.h i ...it of Sarcocornia pillansii
in the Olifants Estuary on the west coast,

J. ARID ENVIRONMENTS 56(4):603-625. 2004.

BULL, J.S., REED, D.C., HOLBROOK,
S.J.
An .. ,idm.,il.l evaluation of different
methods of restoring Phyllospadix torrevi
(surfgrass).
RESTORATION ECOLOGY 12(1):70-79. 2004.

BURNS, J., JOYNER, J., PAERL, H.,
SHAW, G.
Evaluation of the production and toxicity
of *- spp. in Florida springs.
15TH ANNUAL CONE, FLORIDA LAKE MAN-
AGE. SOC., EDS. HARPER, H.H., AND DARLING,
S.H., TAMPA, FL, SESSION 8, P. 5. 2004.

BUSCH, J., MENDF 0-,.OiHN, LA,
LORENZEN, B., BRIX, H., ETAL
Growth responses of the Everglades wet
prairie species Eleocharis cellulosa and
S,,.... ,. .. r tracyi to water level and
ph.,_:h.ii... availability.
AQUATIC BOTANY 78(1):37-54. 2004.

CHEN, L.J., LEE, D.S., SONG, Z.P.,
SUH, H.S., ETAL
Gene i!,.. from cultivated rice (Oryza sa-
tiva) to its weedy and wild relatives.
ANNALS OF BOTANY 93(1):67-73. 2004.

CIRUJANO, S., CAMARGO, J.A.,
GOMEZ-CORDOVES, C.
Feeding ipc .-, .-c of the red swamp cray-
fish Procambarus clarkii (Girard) on I,. 1-
macrophytes in a Spanish wetland.
J. FRESHWATER ECOLOGY 19(2):219-226. 2004.


FROM THE DATABASE

Here is a -.iig 4 hv research articles, books and reports which have been
entered into the .T.i a,, wetland and invasive plant database since Summer
2004.
The APIRS database contains more than 64,500 citations. To use the free
database online, go to http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ and click on APIRS Online
Database.
To obtain articles, contact your nearest academic library, or a document
delivery service. Full text of records cited in APIRS is not stored electronically.


COFFMAN, G.C., KNIGHT, R.
Giant reed eradication project would pro-
vide economic benefits to impoverished
communities (-: ,-, ,.- ,,
ECOL. RESTORATION 22(2):146-147. 2004.

COLAUTII, R.I., MACISAAC, H.J.
A neutral vc-i,;,:c-.1-. .., to define 'invasive'
species.
DIVERSITY DISTRIB. 10(2):135-141. 2004.

COOPER, C.M., MOORE, M.T., BEN-
NETT, E.R., SMITH, S., ET AL
Innovative uses of vegetated drainage
ditches for reducing agricultural runoff.
WATER, SCIENCE, & TECH. 49(3):117-123. 2004.

COSTANTINI, M.L., SABETTA, L.,
MANCINELLI, G., ROSSI, L.
Spatial variability of the decomposition
rate of ...... tatora in a polluted
area of Lake Titicaca.
J. TROPICAL ECOL. 20(3):325-335. 2004.

COWELL, B.C., DAWES, C.J.
Growth and nitrate-nitrogen uptake by the
'. .m,_b l '. a wollei.
J. AQUiAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:69-71. 2004.

CUDA, J.P., BRAMMER, A.S.,
PEREIRA, R.M., BROZA, M.
Interference of natural regulation of the
aquatic weed mosquito fern (Azolla caro-
liniana) by the red imported fire ant.
AQUATICS 26(2):20-26. 2004.

DAVIS, H.G., TAYLOR, C.M., CIV-
ILLE, J.C., STRONG, D.R.
An allee effect at the front of a plant inva-
sion: Spartina in a Pacific estuary.
J. ECOLOGY 92(2):321-327. 2004.

DE STEVEN, D., TONER, M.M.
Vegetation of upper coastal plain depres-
sion wetlands: environmental templates
and wetland dynamics within a i I : ,- ,'
framework.
WETLANDS 24(1):23-42. 2004.

DING, W., CAI, Z., TSURUTA, H.
Diel variation in methane emissions from
the stands of Carex lasiocarpa and Dey-
euxia .... -. ......' in a cool temperate
freshwater marsh.
ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRON. 38(2):181-188. 2004.

DYE, P., JARMAIN, C.
,\o- a, use by black wattle (Acacia mearn-
sii): implications for the link between re-
moval of invading trees and catchment
I,..ni 1,..' response.
S. AFR. J. SCI. 100(1):40-44. 2004.







Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 11


DYNESIUS, M., JANSSON, R., JO-
HANSSON, M.E., NILSSON, C.
Intercontinental similarities in riparian-
plant diversity and sensitivity to river regu-
lation.
ECOL. APPLICATIONS 14(1):173-191. 2004.

ELLISON,C.A., BARRETO,R.W.
P"s* I1. 1 for the management of invasive
alien ....... 1. oi i_ co-evolved fungal patho-
gens: a Latin American perspective.
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS 6(1):23-45. 2004.

EWE, S.M.L., OVERHOLT, W.A.,
MORGAN, E.C., DIAZ, R., ET AL
A potential biocontrol agent of West Indian
marsh grass (Hymenachne amplexicaulis
(1', ,, documenting the iI. I of
Ischnodemus variegatus ( 1,. m .p. i..i Blis-
sinae) on the photosynthesis and growth of
the invasive exotic grass.
WEST OF EDEN WHERE RESEARCH, POLICY
AND PRACTICE MEET, SOUTHEAST EPPC AND
FLORIDA EPPC, APRIL 28-30, 2004., PENSACO-
LA BEACH, FL, P. 26 (POSTER). 2004.

FIGUEROLA, J., GREEN, A.J.
Effects of seed ingestion and herbivory
by waterfowl on seedling establishment: a
field experiment with wigeongrass Ruppia
maritima in Donana, South-west Spain.
PLANT ECOL. 173(1):33-38. 2004.

GAGNE, R.J., SOSA, A., CORDO, H.
Anew n.1..''; .1i i" of Clinodiplosis
(Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) injurious to al-
l.i,)..!.....J, Alternanthera philoxeroides
(Amaranthaceae).
PROC. ENT. SOC. WASH. 106(2):305-311. 2004.

GALLON, C., MUNGER, C., PRE-
MONT, S., CAMPBELL, P.G.C.
.,,h, .ii study of aluminum accumu-
lation by aquatic plants: effects of fluoride
and pH.
WATER, AIR, SOIL POLL. 153(1-4):135-155. 2004.

GARCIA, L., HOLTKAMP, M.L.
Lake Panasoffkee restoration plan: dredg-
ing to restore fisheries habitat and restore
the historic shoreline.
15TH ANNUAL CONF. FLORIDA LAKE MAN-
AGE. SOC., EDS. HARPER, H.H., AND DARLING,
S.H., TAMPA, FL, SESS. 2, PP. 10-11. 2004.

GENKAI-KATO, M., CARPENTER,
S.R.
Effects of macrophytes on lake eutro-phi-
cation and restoration in relation to lake
morphometry.
IN: ABSTRACTS, 88TH ANNUAL MEETING
ECOL. SOC. OF AMERICA. 2004.


GENNET, S., BATTLES, J., ALLEN-
DIAZ, B., BARTOLOME, J.W.
Initial findings from experimental intro-
ductions reveal clues for restoring an en-
dangered wetland grass (California).
ECOL. RESTORATION 22(2):152-153. 2004.

GRIMSHAW, H.J., MATAMOROS,
W.A., SHARFSTEIN, B.
Seed germination in wild celery, Vallisneria
americana Michx. from Lake Okeechobee,
Fla, U.S.A.: preliminary experimental results.
15TH ANNUAL CONE FLORIDA LAKE MAN-
AGE. SOC., EDS. HARPER, H.H., AND DAR-
LING, S.H., TAMPA, FL, SESSION 1, P. 8. 2004.

HAGER, H.A.
Competitive effect versus competitive re-
sponse of invasive and native wetland plant
species.
OECOLOGIA 139(1):140-149. 2004.

HANGELBROEK, H.H.,
SANTA MARIA, L.
Regulation of propagule size in the aquatic
pseudo-annual Potamogeton pectinatus:
are genetic and maternal non-genetic ef-
fects additive?
EVOLUTION. ECOL. RES. 6(1):147-161. 2004.

HASE, A., NISHIKOORI, M.,
OKUYAMA, H.
Induction of high affinity phosphate trans-
porter in the duckweed Spirodela oligor-
rhiza.
PHYSIOLOGIA PLANT. 120(1):271-279. 2004.

HAUXWELL, J., FRAZER, T.K.,
OSENBERG, C.W.
Grazing by manatees excludes both new
and established wild celery transplants: im-
.1,c.- IC-.,'. for restoration in Kings Bay, FL.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:49-53. 2004.

HAVENS, K.E., SHARFSTEIN, B.,
BRADY, M.A., EAST, T.L.,ETAL
Recovery of submerged plants from high
water stress in a large subtropical lake in
Florida, USA.
AQUATIC BOTANY 78(1):67-82. 2004.

HAYBALL, N., PEARCE, M.
I"!u. n.. :. of simulated grazing and water-
d.-4, on the growth of j-..-,l .. -
choenus ... australis
and Schoenoplectus validus plants.
, --.-UATIC BOTANY 78(3):233-242. 2004.

HIROTA, M., TANG, Y., HU, Q., HI-
RATA, S., ETAL
Methane emissions from different


vegetation zones in a Qinghai-Tibetan pla-
teau wetland.
SOIL BIOL. & BIOCHEM. 36(5):737-748. 2004.

HUMMEL, M., KIVIAT, E.
Review of world literature on water chest-
nut with implications for management in
North America.
J. / I PLANT MANAGE. 42:17-28. 2004.

IBARRA-OBANDO, S.E., HECK, K.L.,
SPITZER, P.M.
Effects of simultaneous changes in light,
nutrients, and herbivory levels, on the
structure and function of a subtropical tur-
tlegrass meadow.
J. EXP. MAR. BIOL. ECOL. 301(2):193-224. 2004.

IMAICHI, R., MAEDA, R., SUZUKI,
K., KATO, M.
D i .. h,!,n,, ,t. morphology of foliose
shoots and .. i t,i -., of Dalzellia zeylanica
(Podostemaceae) with special reference to
their meristems.
BOT. J. LINNEAN SOC. 144(3):289-302. 2004.

IMBERT, D., SAUR, E., BONHEME, L,
ROSEAU, V.
Ti, di4i,-.P taro (Colocasia esculenta) cul-
tivation in the ,. ,i, 1 forest of Guadeloupe
(F.W.I.): impact on forest structure and
plant biodiversity.
REV. ECOL. (TERRE VIE) 59(1-2):181-189. 2004.

ISHII, J., KADONO, Y
Sexual reproduction under fluctuating wa-
ter levels in an ,i,',-i', plant Schoeno-
plectus lineolatus (Cyperaceae): a waiting
strategy?
LIMNOLOGY 5:1-6. 2004.

JANSEN, M.A.K., HILL, L.M.,
THORNELEY, R.N.F.
A novel stress-acclimation response in
Spirodela punctata (Lemnaceae): 2,4,6-
Trichlorophenol triggers an increase in the
level of an extracellular peroxidase, capa-
ble of the oxidative dechlorination of this
xenobiotic I,,,lh,1 ,,i
PLANT, CELL & ENVIRON. 27(5):603-614. 2004.

JIANNINO, J.A., WALTON, W.E.
Evaluation of vegetation management
strategies for controlling mosquitoes in a
southern ( ,i i., 1., constructed wetland.
J AM MOSQUITO CONTROLASSOC 20 18-26 2004

JUNG, W.S., KIM, K.H., AHN, J.K.,
HAHN, S.J., ET AL
.11,:l.1, ,il;.- potential of rice (Orvza sativa
L.) residues against Echinochloa cr.
CROP PROTECTION 23(3):211-218. 2004.







Page 12 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005


KAMAL, M., GHALY, A.E., MAH-
MOUD, N., COTE, R.
Phytoaccumulation of heavy metals by
aquatic plants.
ENVIRON. INTERNAT. 29(7):1029-1039. 2004.

KARPISCAK, M.M., KINGSLEY, K.J.,
WASS, R.D., AMALFI, F.A., ET AL
Constructed wetland technology and mos-
quito populations in Arizona.
J. ARID ENVIRONMENTS 56(4):681-707. 2004.

KESKINKAN, 0., GOKSU, M.Z.L.,
BASIBUYUK, M., FORSTER, C.F.
Heavy metal adsorption properties of a
submerged aquatic plant (Ceratophyllum
demersum).
BIORESOU RCE TECH. 92(2):197-200. 2004.

KIRKAGAC, M., DEMIR, N.
The effects of grass carp on aquatic plants,
plankton and benthos in ponds.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:32-39. 2004.

KYAMBADDE, J., KANSIIME, F., GU-
MAELIUS, L., DALHAMMAR, G.
A comparative study of Cyperus papyrus
and Miscanthidium violaceum-based con-
structed wetlands for wastewater treatment
in a i1 sii .1i climate.
WAI AER RESEARCH 38(2):475-485.2004.

LAUZER, D.
In vitro embryo culture of Scirpus acutus.
PLANT CELL, TISSUE AND ORGAN CULTURE
76(1):91-95. 2004.

LES, D.H., MOODY, M.L., DORAN,
A.S., PHILLIPS, W.E.
A genetically confirmed intersubgeneric hy-
brid in Nymphaea L. (Nymphaeaceae Salisb.).
HORTSCIENCE 39(2):219-222. 2004.

LIAO, S.-W., CHANG, W.-L.
Heavy metal phytoremediation by water
hyacinth at constructed wetlands in Taiwan.
J. / ** : PLANT MANAGE. 42:60-68 2004.

LUDOVISI, A., PANDOLFI, P., TATIC-
CHI, M.I.
A proposed framework for the identifica-
tion of habitat ii, ;,." 1p ii. 1. of mac-
rophytes in River Po catchment basin lakes

HYDROBIOLOGIA 523:87-101. 2004.

MACEINA, M.J., SLIPKE, J.W.
The use of herbicides to control hydrilla
and the effects on young largemouth bass
'1,14 i i. 1,h characteristics and aquatic veg-
etation in Lake Seminole, Georgia.
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:5-11. 2004.


MADEIRA, P.T., VAN, T.K., CENTER,
T.D.
An i ..., ,1 molecular tool for disting-
uishing monoecious and .t_...,. -.,.i: h;, lii I _
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:28-32. 2004.

MCKEE, K.L., MENDELSSOHN, LA,
MATERNE, M.D.
Acute salt marsh dieback in the Mississippi
River deltaic plain: a drought-induced phe-
nomenon?
GLOBAL ECOL. BIOGEOGR. 13(1):65-73. 2004.

MEISENBURG, M.
Melaleuca as an allergen: setting the record
straight.
WIIDLAND WEEDS 7(2):17. 2004.

MIAO, S.L.
Rhizome growth and nutrient resorption:
mechanisms underlying the replacement of
two clonal species in Florida Everglades.
AQUATIC BOTANY 78(1):55-66. 2004.

MILLER, M.L., GUNDERSON, L.H.
Biological and cultural camouflage: the
challenges of seeing the hannrmful invasive
species problem and doing something about it.
IN: HARMFUL INVASIVE SPECIES LEGAL
RESPONSES, M.L. MILLER AND R.N. FABIAN,
EDS., ENVIRONMENTAL LAW INST, WASHING-
TON, DC, PP. 1-50. 2004.

MKANDAWIRE, M., LYUBUN, Y.V.,
KOSTERIN, P.V., DUDEL, E.G.
Toxicity of arsenic species to Lemna .
L. and the influence of plh.. .p-ii.,. on arse-
nic h''i, .l.li' ;
ENVIRON. TOXICOLOGY 19(1):26-34. 2004.

NEWMAN, R.M.
Biological control of Eurasian,, i. i u_!!,,oI
by aquatic insects: basic insights from an
.1,111. problem.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 159(2):145-184. 2004.

PALMER, M.L., MAZZOTTI, F.J.
*i,,.-im. ofEverglades ,iic, ,-, holes.
WETLANDS 24(1):115-122. 2004.

PAU CHARD, A., CAVIERES, L., BUS-
TAMANTE, R., BECERRA, P., ET AL
Increasing the understanding of plant inva-
sions in southern South America: first sym-
posium on alien plant invasions in Chile.
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS 6:255-257. 2004.

PEACOCK, C.E., HESS, T.M.
Estimating evapotranspiration from a reed
bed using the Bowen ratio energy balance
method.
HYDROL. PROCESS. 18(2):247-260. 2004.


PETERSON, J.E., BALDWIN, A.H.
Seedling emergence from seed banks of
tidal freshwater wetlands: response to in-
undation and sedimentation.
AQUATIC BOTANY 78:243-254. 2004.

PETIT, R.J.
Biological invasions at the gene level.
DIVERSITY DISTRIB. 10(3):159-165. 2004.

PEZZATO, M.M., CAMARGO, A.F.M.
Photosynthetic rate of the aquatic macro-
phyte Egeria densa Planch. (Hydrocharita-
ceae) in two rivers from the Itanhaem River
basin in Sao Paulo _...n.. Brazil.
BRAZ. ARCH. BIOL. TECH. 47(1):153-162. 2004.

PRASARTKUL, A.
Three localities for Cryptocoryne crispatu-
la Engler var. crispatula in Thailand.
AQUATIC GARDENER 17(1):26-30. 2004.

PYSEK, P., RICHARDSON, D.M., RE-
JMANEK, M., WEBSTER, G.L.,
ETAL
Alien pl.ii in checklists and ii.i., to-
wards better communication between tax-
onomists and ecologists.
TAXON 53(1):131-143. 2004.

RATTEI, M.R
Lime slurry: an innovative tool for control-
ling aquatic plants.
ECOL. RESTORATION 22(2):147-148. 2004.

RAUSCH DE TRAUBENBERG, C.,
AH-PENG, C.
A procedure to purify and culture a clonal
strain of the aquatic moss Fontinalis anti-
-. .. .. for use as a bioindicator of heavy
metals.
ARCH. ENVIRON. CONTAM. TOXICOL.
46(3):289-295. 2004.

REEDER, T.G., HACKER, S.D.
Factors .-,-, ,n,, to the removal of a
marine grass invader (Spartina -..'.. -
and subsequent potential for habitat resto-
ration.
ESTUARIES 27(2):244-252. 2004.

SCHOLZ, M.
Treatment of 'ul!' pot effluent containing
nickel and copper with constructed wet-
lands in a cold climate.
J. CHEM. TECH. BIOTECH. 79:153-162. 2004.

SEABLOOM, E., VAN DER VALK, A.G.
The development of vegetative zonation
Ip.1. ..i in restored prairie pothole wetlands.
J. APPLIED ECOL. 40(1):9-100. 2004.







Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 13


SERRA, T., FERNANDO, H.J.S.,
RODRIGUEZ, R.V.
Effects of emergent vegetation on lateral
diffusion in wetlands.
WATER RESEARCH 38(1):139-147. 2004.

SILLIMAN, B.R., LAYMAN, C.A.,
GEYER, K., ZIEMAN, J.C.
Predation by the black-clawed mud crab,
Panopeus herbstii, in mid-Atlantic salt
marshes: further evidence for top-down
control of marsh grass production.
ESTUARIES 27(2):188-196. 2004.

SMITH, K., MEZICH, R.
Managing natural aquatic plant commu-
nities in Manatee Springs: the effects of
manatee grazing, nutrient pollution and
flooding.
AQUATICS 26(2): 12-20. 2004.

SOLANO, M.L., SORIANO, P., CIRIA,
M.P.
Constructed wetlands as a sustainable so-
lution for wastewater treatment in small
villages.
BIOSYSTEMS ENGIN. 87(1): 109-118. 2004.

SOOKNAH, R.D., WILKIE, A.C.
Nutrient removal by floating aquatic mac-
rophytes cultured in anaerobically digested
flushed dairy manure wastewater.
ECOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 22:27-42. 2004.

SPENCER, D.F., KSANDER, G.G.
Do tissue carbon and nitrogen limit popula-
tion growth of weevils introduced to con-
trol waterhyacinth at a site in the Sacramen-
to-San Joaquin Delta, California?
J. AQUAT. PLANT MANAGE. 42:45-48. 2004.

TOWNSEND, C.R., DOWNES, B.J.,
PEACOCK, K., ARBUCKLE, C.J.
Scale and the detection of land-use effects
on morphology, vegetation and macro-
invertebrate communities of grassland
streams.
FRESHWATER BIOLOGY 49(4):448-462. 2004.

WANG, S., NIAN, Y., HOU, W., JIN, X.
Macrophyte selection in artificial wetlands.
J. LAKE SCIENCES 16(1):91-96 (IN CHINESE;
ENGLISH SUMMARY). 2004.

WEISNER, S.E.B., MIAO, S.L.
Use of morphological variability in Cladi-
um jamaicense and Typha domingensis to
understand vegetation changes in an Ever-
glades marsh.
AQUATIC BOTANY 78:319-335. 2004.


WILLIS, J.M., HESTER, M.W.
Interactive effects of salinity, flooding, and
soil type on Panicum hemitomon.
WETLANDS 24(1):43-50. 2004.

WOITHON, A., SCHMIEDER, K.
Modelling the breeding habitat of the great
reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus
L.) as part of an integrative lake shore man-
agement system.
LIMNOLOGICA 34(1-2):132-139 (IN GERMAN;
ENGLISH SUMMARY). 2004.

WOITKE, M., HARTUNG, W., GIM-
MLER, H., HEILMEIER, H.
Chlorophyll fluorescence of submerged
and floating leaves of the aquatic resurrec-
tion plant ( / i.u.u,., .,,, intrepidus.
FUNCTIONAL PLANT BIOL. 31(1):53-62. 2004.

WU, Y., RUTCHEY, K., WANG, N.,
GODIN, J.
Impacts of Lygodium microphyllum on bio-
diversity in Everglades wetland eco-sys-
tems: the catastrophic responses in spe-
cies composition and spatial patterns.
SOUTHEAST EPPC AND FLORIDA EPPC, APRIL
28-30, 2004, PENSACOLA BEACH, FL, PP. 22-23
(ABSTRACT). 2004.

YAN, Y., LIANG, Y.
The comparison of secondary production
of macrozoobenthos between a typical al-
gal lake and a typical macrophytic lake.
J. LAKE SCI. 16(1):81-84 (IN CHINESE; ENGLISH
SUMMARY). 2004.

Impact of rising CO2 on emissions
of volatile organic compounds: iso-
prene emission from Phragmites aus-
tralis growing at elevated CO2 in a
natural carbon dioxide spring. 2004.
By P.A. Scholefield, K.J. Doick, B.M.J.
Herbert, et al. Plant, Cell and Environ-
ment 27:393-401.
It is hypothesized that feedback
loops exist between isoprene emission
and global warming. Therefore it is im-
portant to know how isoprene emission
is affected by CO2 concentrations, so
that a figure can be entered into global
warming models. Isoprene is a chemical
produced and emitted by plants; it may
control the concentration of OH in the
atmosphere, and thereby determine the
lifetime of methane in the atmosphere,
methane being the third most impor-
tant "greenhouse gas". This experiment
shows that isoprene is likely to be re-
duced under elevated CO2 levels...


Diversity andDistributions
-A Journal of Conservation
Biogeography
edited by D.M. Richardson
Diversity and Distributions is
a journal that publishes papers on a
wide range of themes relating to the
study of biodiversity. The journal is
billed as "a key forum for research on
the ecology of biological invasions."
Published by Blackwell Publishing
and launched in 1998, the journal is
published in six issues per year.
Diversity and Distributions in-
cludes full-length research papers and
reviews as well as short essays on
biodiversity from particular disciplin-
ary, regional, political or other stand-
points.
For more information, visit the
Blackwell Publishing website at:
www.blackwellpublishing.com and
click on Journals. A limited number of
papers and abstracts are available for
viewing free of charge.


* Invasive species: the search for
solutions. 2004. By C.L. Dybas.
BioScience 54(7):615-621.
This reporter's timely article re-
views the views of the foremost U.S.
invasive species scientists invading
species really are a problem!


* Causes and consequences of inva-
sive plants in wetlands: opportuni-
ties, opportunists and outcomes.
2004. By J.B. Zedler and S. Kercher.
Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences
23(5):431-452.
This is an extensive review of wet-
land invasive plants.

* The Lantana mess -A critical look
at the genus in Florida. 2004. By R.L.
Hammer. The Palmetto 23(1):21-23.
"Avoid low-growing, yellow-flow-
ered lantanas entirely," the author sug-
gests. Figuring out the taxonomy of
lantana in Florida is critical if we are
to know which ones to control. Here is
the story of one mis-identification af-
ter another, by growers and research-
ers alike.







Page 14 AQUAPHYTE Spring 2005


MEETINGS

April 13-15, 2005; Asheville, North Carolina
SOUTHEASTERN LAKES MANAGEMENT CONF.
I1"p *" a.," 2',.p C. .... 1 '. i .-.h tm

April 13-15, 2005; Florence, Alabama
ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEASTERN BIOLOGISTS
hl!11 i I. .hil/

April 18-22, 2005; Reno, Nevada
INVASIVE I't- II-'. CONFERENCE, ASTM
1l II -1"' ., 1? 2C.1 ,2. 1 2 '_ M I 4 1 p

April 16-19, 2005; Alexandria, Virginia
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROFESSIONALS -
hEll "' I..p I1 7/

April 27-28, 2005; T.tmp.t Florida
STORMWATER RESEARCH & WATERSHED
MANAGEMENT CONFERENCE -
http://ww .I.. i .. .. n. '-. ..;n I; ,_conf.htm l

April 26-29, 2005; ClI. I- Illinois
EPA- ENHANCING THE STATES' LAKE MANAGEMENT
PROGRAMS -


May 4-6, 2005; Birmingham, Alabama
JOINT MEETING; SOUTHEAST EPPC AND ALABAMA
INVASIVE PLANT COUNCIL http://www.se-eppc.org/

May 5-6, 2005; Florence, Italy
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS IN INLAND WATERS
!"!'I .: /events/showev. i 'l1 201

May 9-11, 2005; Key West, Florida
FLORIDA EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL


May 12-15, 2005; Melbourne, Florida
FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY
1 t. .. 1 i -, c /

May 12-18, 2005; Nebraska City, Nebraska
PROJECT WET ANNUAL CONFERENCE
h I lp i..,., .. -F /

May 16-20, 2005; Fort Lauderdale, Florida
AQUATIC WEED SHORT COURSE
i lt, ,, i o r if i n iff ,i .J /

June 6-9, 2005; Duck Key, Florida
FLORIDA LAKE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY
h ill Eh ,_ !!*. I Hi.. .I. h1 !, !

June 5-10, 2005; Charleston, South Carolina
SOCIETY OF WETLAND SCIENTISTS
Inc!. % /

July 10-13, `'.6 -, San Antonio, Texas
NATIONAL AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY
hill, "' I '.m ,' /


July, '" ., Marco Island, Florida
FLORIDA ASSOCIATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL
PROFESSIONALS http://ww .. i- ,- /

July 19-22, 2005; Dubuque, Iowa
IZAAC WALTON LEAGUE NATIONAL CONVENTION
http://www.iwla.org/

July 20-26, 2005; Bethlehem, Pennsylvania
INTERNATIONAL WATERLILY & WATER
GARDENING SOCIETY -
http://www.iwgs.org

August 16-17, 2005; 1'i,1i. ,1. iiii- Pennsylvania
MID-ATLANTIC EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL
hpii .. ... i-eppc.org/

August 17-19, 2005; Springmaid Beach, South Carolina
SOUTH CAROLINA AQUATIC PLANT MGMT SOCIETY
( i ',' i ,, ,. /

'-.. P, n,., 8, '-"' Murfreesboro, Tennessee
TENNESSEE EXOTIC PEST PLANT COUNCIL
Il p ... .. .. % }*,{- ,. ',

September 11-15, 2005; Anchorage, Alaska
AMERICAN FISHERIES SOCIETY
http://wwv PI h ,,, 0 ,,,Pol 24I, l,,

October, 2005
MID-SOUTH AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT
SO CIETY iml. "* ., .i fn_, ... t .' i..lt-'-..!

October, 2005; South Padre Island, Texas
TEXAS VEGETATION MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION
http://www.tvma.net/home.htm

October, 2005; I .n.. Florida
ECOSYSTEMS RESTORATION AND CREATION
h ilp .. %. I,,. I.. i 1.* I ..! .i..ip ..,., '.,'.1 *\\ 6 l_ l

November 8-10, 2005; St. Petersburg, Florida
FLORIDA AQUATIC PLANT MANAGEMENT SOCIETY
http://w w v 1,., 1, '',1.,, 2 c ,p2" 52n1 InPi

November 9-11, -'.1>., Madison, Wisconsin
NORTH AMERICAN LAKE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY
ili l '' .' '.' i _! _, ,!_ /

November 29 December 2, 2005; Lucknow, India
INTERNATIONAL SOC. ENVIRONMENTAL BOTANISTS
& NATIONAL BOTANICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE -
http ://w w .V _1 1.1 .. ,, I kl. ..hi 411-11 1111t

* EFi/i.K a~rdiks, in traps of four aquatic species of
the carnivorous genus Utricularia. 2003. By D. ,,-, L.
Adamec and J. Vrba. New ',.. .'. 159:669-675.
Tiny animals such as mites, rotifers and crustaceans are
sucked into the traps (bladders) of bladderworts, thus making
meals. This is a study of the .,- .i,-. of animals inside the
traps. The authors found that at least three digestive enzymes
are produced, at least partly, inside the traps.







Spring 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 15


Books/Reports

WATERLILIES AND LOTUSES Species, Cultivars
and New Hybrids, by P.D. Slocum. 2005. 328 pp.
(Published by Timber Press, 133 SW 2nd Avenue, Suite 450, Portland, OR
97204. ISBN 0-88192-684-1. US$34.95 plus S/H. www.timberpress.com)
This is the fully updated work by the late Perry Slocum, one of the
most important breeders of aquatic plants. Nearly 500 species and cul-
tivars are described and beautifully photographed. (The book includes
species of the genera Nymphaea, Nelumbo, Nuphar Victoria, Euryale,
Barclaya and Ondinea.)

DECLARED PLANTS OF AUSTRALIA An Iden-
tification and Information System, by S. Navie. 2004.
CD.
(Published by the Centre for Biological Information Technology, University
of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 AUSTRALIA. ISBN 186499785-0. AU$80.00
plus S/H. WWW: www.cbit.uq.edu.au/ software/declaredplants/default.htm)
This CD is easily used by your PC. Using the Lucid computer prod-
uct, the ID system combines up to 35 characters to help you key out
300 noxious weeds ("declared plants") plus another 600 weed species
in Australia. The plants are depicted in more than 5,000 color photos.

ICONOGRAFIAY STUDIO DE PLANTS ACUA-
TICAS de la ciudad de Mexico y sus alrededores, by A.
Lot and A. Novelo, Ilustraciones by E. Esparza. 2004.
206 pp.
(Published by Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de
Biologia, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico, DF. ISBN 970-32-21319.
Contact the authors: loth @servidor.unam.mx; lanovelo @servidor.unam.mx)
As Mary says, "This book is awesome!" Its large format includes
beautiful full-page colored drawings of plants and plant parts, plus
large-font descriptions in Spanish. Includes 10 emersed plants; 16
submersed plants; 6 floating-leaved plants; 10 floating plants.

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF INVASIVE PLANTS
IN THE UNITED STATES, edited by E.M. Coombs,
J.K. Clark, G.L. Piper and A.F. Cofrancesco, Jr. 2004.
467 pp.
(Published by Oregon State University Press, 102 Adams Hall, Corvallis,
OR 97331;. ISBN 0-87071-029-X. WWW: http://oregonstate.edu/dept/press)
This is a very thorough review of previous and current bio-con-
trol projects in the US. The first 138 pages cover 16 topics under the
general title of "The Theory and Practice of Biological Control". All
steps and procedures are well-described in logical, straight-forward
language: anyone who wants to understand, can understand.
The next 300 pages, "Target Plants and the Biological Control
Agents", reviews all bio-control agents and experiences for more than
two dozen aquatic, wetland and terrestrial plants, and include color
photos of individual agents, and full descriptions of their biology, re-
lease and effect. The final 20 pages introduces new bio-control proj-
ects for 15 more major invasive plants of the US.
This book might be considered an essential reference for invasive
plant workers world-wide.


The Aquatic Gardener
Some folks enjoy their aquatic plants, as opposed to
those trying to manage uncontrolled growth of weedy
species in large water bodies. For those lovers of water
plants, there is the Aquatic Gardeners Association, Inc.,
(AGA) and their colorful journal, The Aquatic Gardener.
Membership in AGA includes four issues per year. The
stated purpose of AGA is to disseminate information about
aquatic plants, to study and improve upon techniques for
culturing aquatic and bog plants in aquariums and ponds,
to increase interest in aquatic gardening, and to promote
fellowship among members.
The Aquatic Gardener contains lots of information for
the serious hobbyist and plenty of great photographs. The
association is international in scope and includes an an-
nual AGA International Aquascaping Contest. To find out
more, visit their website at www.aquatic-gardeners.org



* Perry Slocum leaves outstanding legacy. By C.B.
Thomas. 2004. Water Garden Journal 19(4): 15.
"Water gardeners around the globe are mourning the
passing of Perry Dean Slocum on November 29, 2004.
At the same time, they are celebrating Perry's life and his
outstanding legacy of achievement."
"[Perry] entered Cornell University with the idea of
be-coming a medical doctor. However, well before he
graduated in 1935, waterlilies had captured his imagination
and soon became his life-long passion. He began growing
them along with other ornamental aquatics as a teen. He
gave up becoming a doctor so that he could grow and share
his beloved aquatics....It became obvious that although he
didn't become a doctor to the body, he became a doctor
for the human spirit through his beloved Nymphaeas,
Nelumbos, and other aquatics."
Mr. Slocum was a member of the Hall of Fame of the
International Waterlily and Water Gardening Association.

* The red waterlilies of Claude Monet their origin
and their venue to Giverny. By M. Wallsten, J. Thorson
and G. Werlemark. 2004. Water Garden Journal 19:5-10
Monet painted red waterlilies. Did he really see them?
Where did they come from? Maybe from Lake Fagertarn
in Sweden?

* A rare feeding observation on water lilies (Nymphaea
alba) by the capped langur (Trachypithecus pileatus).
2004. By A. Kumar and G.S. Solanki. Journal of Raptor
Research 75(3):157-159.
The authors show pictures of a troop of monkeys in
India wading in water and pulling up water lilies, all parts
of which they then eat. Upon analysis, the lilies are shown
to be 23% crude protein.







University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
AQUATIC, WETLAND AND INVASIVE PLANT
INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (APIRS)
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
7922 N.W. 71st Street
Gainesville, Florida 32653-3071 USA
(352) 392-1799 FAX: (352) 392-3462
varamey@ nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu
kpbrown@ ifas.ufl.edu
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu

ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED


New product now available ~


AQUAPHYTE

AQUAPHYTE is the newsletter of
the Center for Aquatic and Invasive
Plants and the Aquatic, Wetland and
Invasive Plant Information Retrieval
System (APIRS) of the University
of Florida Institute of Food and Ag-
ricultural Sciences (IFAS). Support
for the information system is pro-
vided by the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection, the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers Water-
ways Experiment Station Aquatic
Plant Control Research Program
(APCRP), the St. Johns River Water
Management District and UF/IFAS.

EDITORS: Victor Ramey
Karen Brown

AQUAPHYTE is sent to manag-
ers, researchers and agencies in 71
countries around the world. Com-
ments, announcements, news items
and other information relevant to
aquatic and invasive plant research
are solicited.
Inclusion in AQUAPHYTE does
not constitute endorsement, nor
does exclusion represent criticism,
of any item, organization, individ-
ual, or institution by the University
of Florida.


NONPROFIT ORG.
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Aquatic, Wetland and Invasive Plants in Pen-and-Ink
A DVD of high resolution TIF scans of 175 line drawings that include
common and rare, native and non-native species of Florida and the
southeastern U.S. IFAS Publication No. DVD-347. $100.00.
Telephone: 800-226-1764; http://ifasbooks.ufl.edu




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