• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 In the classroom and in the...
 Wetlands of Turuepano National...
 Mary's picks
 Books/reports
 Aquatic herbicide resistance in...
 Aquatic herbicide resistance in...
 Educational materials
 From the database
 Ecological models for aquatic plant...
 Meetings
 Back Cover














Group Title: Aquaphyte : a newsletter about aquatic, wetland and invasive plants
Title: Aquaphyte
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083179/00003
 Material Information
Title: Aquaphyte newsletter of the IPPC Aquatic Weed Program of the University of Florida, a part of the International Plant Protection Center of the Oregon State University, which is funded by the United States Agency for International Development
Abbreviated Title: Aquaphyte
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Plants
University of Florida -- IPPC Aquatic Weed Program
University of Florida -- Center for Aquatic Weeds
Publisher: The Program
Place of Publication: Gainesville FL
Publication Date: 1981-
Frequency: semiannual
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Aquatic plants -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Genre: Newsletters   ( lcsh )
Newsletters.
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also issued online.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (fall 1981)-
Issuing Body: Vols. for fall 1982- issued with: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Weeds.
Issuing Body: Vols. for <1988-> issued by: University of Florida, Center for Aquatic Plants.
General Note: Title from caption.
General Note: Latest issue consulted: Vol. 12, no. 2 (fall 1992).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083179
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 06513906
lccn - sc 84007615
issn - 0893-7702

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Table of Contents
    In the classroom and in the parks
        Page 1
    Wetlands of Turuepano National Park, Orinoco Delta, Venezuela
        Page 2
    Mary's picks
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Books/reports
        Page 5
    Aquatic herbicide resistance in Hydrilla
        Page 6
    Aquatic herbicide resistance in Landoltia
        Page 7
    Educational materials
        Page 8
        Page 9
    From the database
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Ecological models for aquatic plant growth
        Page 13
    Meetings
        Page 14
    Back Cover
        Page 15
Full Text



Page 4 AQUAPHYTE Winter 2005


More of Mary's pics -

* Factors ,ah o ui., the Agrobacterium-mediated transient
transformation of the *.i t._!d monocot, Typha I ..to r. 2004.
By R. Nandakumar, L. Chen and S.M.D. Rogers. Plant Cell. Tis-
sue and Organ Culture 79:31-38.
This is about how to genetically transform cat-tail, a plant al-
ready useful for heavy metal decontamination, so that it can be
made even more useful.

* A fern that hyperaccumulates arsenic. 2001. By L.Q. Ma,
K.M. Komar, C. Tu, W. Zhang, Y Cai, and E.D. Kennelley. Nature
409:579.
A non-native fern in Florida, Pteris vittata ((I .. ladder
brake), was discovered growing in a site highly contaminated with
chromated copper arsenate. It was found to take up a number of
'.- .;i; of arsenic to concentrations as high as 22,000 ppm. The
authors believe this to be the first known arsenic hyperaccumula-
tor as well as the first fern found to function as a hyperaccumula-
tor, a plant that could be used in arsenic remediation programs to
restore contaminated sites.

* Brahmi (Bacopa monnieri (L.) Pennell) A In-sldh .1 Rasaa-
yana drug of Ayurveda. 2004. By M P.i.mi N '-.1 .1,. i .i and
MN Ravishankara. In /. I......... .:v of Medicinal Plants: Vital-
izer and Therapeutic, ed by K.G. Ramawat, .. Publishers
Inc., Enfield, NH, 302 pp; pgs 89-110.
This aquatic plant, .-i.'.n'-. good for whatever ails ya, placed
second on a priority list of the most important medicinal plants in
India.

* Extensive hydrochory uncouples spatiotemporal patterns of
seedfall and seedling recruitment in a "bird-dispersed" ripar-
ian tree. 2004. By A. Hampe. J. Ecology 92(5):797-807.
Seed. I-. I,- .1 and -. i .11,- abundance of the endangered Span-
ish tree, Frangula alnus, is discussed. "Even complex, : 1,ii; .i. p
dispersal systems may produce remarkably consistent year-to-
year distributions of recruits ... "

* Nests and nest habitats of the invasive catfish Hoplosternum
littorale in Lake Tohopekaliga, Florida: a novel association
with non-native Hydrilla verticillata. By L.G. Nico and A.M
Muench. 2004. Southeastern Naturalist 3(3):451-466.
In Florida, an invasive catfish from South America is using
an invasive plant from Asia to construct its large dome-shaped
nests.

* The effect of sex steroids and corticosteroids on the content
of soluble proteins, nucleic acids and reducing sugars in Wolff-
ia arrhiza (L.) Wimm. (Lemnaceae). 2004. By I.K. Szamrej and
R. Czerpak. Polish J. Environmental .-, : 13(5):565-571.
Because '1 ....is able to use testosterone, cortisone and other
organic substances as energy and carbon sources, the authors sug-
gest the plant can be used in sewage treatment in small urban and
rural environments.

* Personal view Seeds, seed banks and Bi mi,,iih. By M.A.
Leck. 2004. Seed Science Research 14:259-266
A nicely written reminiscence about how a researcher is a
teacher.


* Forensic palynology and iiin..Himnn.. of Salicornia species
(Chenopodiaceae) in northwest Canada and Alaska. 2005.
By P.J. Mudie, S. Greer, J. Brakel, et al. Can. J. Bot. 83:111-123.
Kwaday Dan 7s 'inchi (I 'v. Person Found) died on a Brit-
ish Columbia glacier 550 years ago. A team of researchers studied
Chenopodiaceae pollen found in his stomach and robe using scan-
ning electron microscopy (SEM). The stomach sample contained
pollen grains from Salicornia (Tourn.) L. 1. i.. -i s i 1 a succulent
perennial salt marsh species, most likely Salicornia perennis.

* Conservation team reveals 'floating' islands. 2005. By J.L.
Bartak. Oryx 39(2):126.
Members of a research and conservation initiative in Argentina
found that marsh islands in the Parana River Delta float when
the water level of the wetlands rise, providing shelter to resident
marsh deer il,-1 i;l,. The islands moved ,.,i .1;, carrying
(..'..t.di.lin 3-m trees and, in one high-level event, more than 30
deer.

* T;oL,- .ipln of di';. ,.t;mn.nr.i, distributed hydrophytes: a
molecular appraisal of intercontinental Bliy.ii. .Iii.r. By D.H.
Les, D.J. Crawford, R.T. Kimbsall, M.L. Moody and E. Landolt.
2003. Internat '. J. Plant Sciences 164(6):917-932.
Darwin noted in 1859 that many freshwater flowering plants
have ..in 111.I ranges." Why? Birds carry their seeds? Continen-
tal drift? The authors suggest that birds i..1t!. might be the answer.

* Wetlands of Central America. By A.M. Ellison. 2004. Wet-
lands Ecology and Management 12:3-55.
This is a review of the literture about the 40,000 square kilo-
meters of wetlands of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador,
Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. The five wetland types dis-
cussed are marine, estuarine, riverine, lacustrine and I1. 11 i i,1

* Alien aquatic plants naturalized in Japan: History and pres-
ent status. By Y. Kadono. 2004. Global Environmental Research
8(2):163-169.
The need for education and legal regulation is emphasized as
the professor discusses over 40 species that have escaped and be-
come naturalized in Japan.

* Constraints in range predictions of invasive plant species
due to non-equilibrium distribution p.aAki:cn purple loose-
strife (Lythrum ,'I,ai it in North America. By E. Welk. 2004.
Ecological I .. .'.'.,_ 17 5' 51-567.
What are some of the IoiI. ii' of the models used to pi. L.
.t: !_ _lti..). _i p..,ti.._ of plants outside their native range? Would
i,:,-i.-'..,;,ii "native range distribution" data into the models
make a difference?

* Introducing ..wi iiii palms. By J. Monteverde. 2005. Water
Garden Journal 20(1):5-11.
This interesting article contains a list of 130 species of palms
that like wet feet.

* Reviving Iraq's -;.rl.mid. By A. Lawler. 2004. Science
307(5713):1186-1189.
So as to better make war with each other, Iran and Iraq drained
the ancient marsh lands that once divided their two countries.
Most of the thousands of square kilometers of marsh were turned
to deserts. Can they restore the Garden of Eden?







Winter 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 5


BOOKS/REPORTS


FLORIDA ETHNOBOTANY, by D.F. Austin.
2004. 909 pp.
(Published by CRC Press, 2000 NW Corporate Blvd, Boca
Raton, FL 33431. ISBN 0-8493-2332-0. $149.95 plus S/H. 1-
800-272-7737. WWW: http://www.crcpress.com)
This huge compilation of the literature discusses the uses of
nearly 900 plant species by the native peoples of Florida. In it,
for example, we learn that "Juncus" comes from Latin "iuncus,"
meaning to tie or bind, which is what they used to do with these
flexible-stemmed, tough-leaved rushes. What's more, we learn
that the pith of Juncus, "when dried and oiled, will serve as a
wick."

FEDERAL NOXIOUS WEED DISSEMINULES OF
THE U.S. An interactive identification tool for
seeds and fruits of plants on the United States Fed-
eral Noxious Weed List, by J. Scher. 2005. Compact
Disk.
(Published by the USDA Center for Plant Health Science and
Technology, CDFA Plant Pest Diagnostics Center, 3294 Mead-
owview Road, Sacramento, CA 95832; (916) 262-3181. Email:
julia.1. scher@aphis.usda.gov)
The title says it all: an information guide to the plant propa-
gative units of 105 invasive or potentially invasive plant taxa on
the US "federal noxious weed list." It includes lots of pictures
(about 700), fact sheets, botanical descriptions, ID tips, and dis-
tribution.
An unequalled resource, for those who need it.

OUT OF EDEN AN ODYSSEY OF ECOLOGI-
CAL INVASION, by A. Burdick. 2005. 325 pp.
(Published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 19 Union Square West,
New York, 10003; (212) 741-6900. ISBN 0-374-21973-7.)
Another in the recent cascade of Ini\ .ai\ c" books, this one up-
dates us on the most recent insights and codewords of invasions
experts: we're now in the "Homogecene," where the "homogeni-
zation of the world" is resulting in a "creeping sameness" which
threatens to render all our home territories indistinguishable from
one another. Is this true, really?
The book is an ironically aware 300-page report/philosophical
tract about the "ineffability" of the problem: "Do ecological com-
munities that formed over a geological timespan differ in some
fashion in productivity, in potential stability from those that
were tossed together last month, last year, last century? Do re-
combinant communities differ from "normal" ones? Does time
matter?"
As the author points out, "... humans have yet to devise a tech-
nique for making concerted measurements of ecological commu-
nities over time periods longer than the average human life span."
So what do we really know about eco-invasions and their long
term effects? What policies can we adopt when we don't know
the answers to basic questions?
Oddly, there's no table of contents, nor an index.


THE ROLE OF DISPERSAL, PROPAGULE
BANKS AND ABIOTIC CONDITIONS IN THE
ESTABLISHMENT OF AQUATIC VEGETA-
TION, by G. Boedeltje. 2005. 224 pp.
(Ph.D. Thesis. In English. Aquatic Ecology and Environ-
mental Biology, Department of Ecology, Radboud Universit-
eit, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ISBN 90-9019528-9. Email:
g.boedeltje@science.ru.nl)
This book includes seven journal papers that are based on
Ph.D. research in The Netherlands, and includes a "Synthesis."
The author determined that certain plant species are dispersed by
generative and vegetative diaspores; that water flow pulses sig-
nificantly affect plant dispersal in stream and river systems; that
plant diversity is unlikely in newly created backwaters; and that
certain plant species provide for invertebrate diversity.

ISSUES IN BIOINVASION SCIENCE, EEI 2003:
A Contribution to the Knowledge on Invasive Alien
Species, edited by L. Capdevila-Arguelles and B.
Zilletti. 2005. 147 pp.
(Reprinted from Biological Invasions, Volume 7, No. 1, 2005.
Published by Springer, 101 Philip Drive, Norwell, MA 02061.
ISBN 1-4020-2902-0.)
This book is a collection of 14 papers from Biological Inva-
sions. Research topics include invasive fungi, weeds, shrimp,
crayfish, mosquitoes, fish, rodents and other animals.

DOCUMENTATION, CHARACTERIZATION,
AND PROPOSED MECHANISM OF DIQUAT
RESISTANCE IN LANDOLTIA PUNCTATA (G.
MEYER) D.H. LES AND D.J. CRAWFORD, by
T.J. Koschnick. 2005. 110 pp.
(Ph. D. Thesis. Agronomy Department, University of Florida,
Gainesville. Email: tjkoschnick@ifas.ufl.edu)
These studies documented the first aquatic plant to become re-
sistant to the bipyridylium herbicides, and suggest that the resis-
tance mechanism is related to reduced herbicide transport across
cell membranes.
Hydrocharis morsus-ranae ''\
European frog-bit --i


C 2002 University of Floric
Center for Aquatic & Invasive Plants







Winter 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 7
Hydrilla had been susceptible to very low concentrations of
fluridone.The first signs of fluridone resistance were in 1999. l ~
Major sampling efforts were conducted in 2001-2002. Studies
revealed that hydrilla phenotypes with two- to six-fold higher
fluridone resistance were present in several water bodies. The
mutations were directly related to fluridone resistance and
researchers concluded that they were the result of any one of
three independent somatic mutations at the molecular target site
of fluridone. Fluridone is an enzyme inhibitor, and the molecular
target site is phytoene desaturase (PDS), one of the key enzymes in
carotenoid biosynthesis. In the absence of protective carotenoids,
photobleaching of newly emerging green tissue results. Hydrilla
may be particularly susceptible to mutations caused by ultraviolet
light because a hydrilla leaf blade is only two cell-layers thick.
Treatments with fluridone are more effective toward the surface
(high light intensities) than in deeper water (low light intensities).
This type of selection predicts that if a mutation provides an
adaptive advantage to the plants regenerated from the mutated
cell, the trait can rapidly spread through the population. This could tsron
be the case of the resistant biotypes observed in Florida lakes. In
hydrilla, somatic mutations transmitted in either the apical or any
of the numerous axillary meristems do not necessarily die with .
the rest of the plant, as would be typical in terrestrial systems,// I u se of e
but fragments of hydrilla possessing a meristem can regenerate
into entire plants. Hydrilla is a polyploid plant (chromosome
counts vary widely within a vegetative population). Researchers A'. .. ,,
suggest that the variable ploidy of hydrilla could contribute to its 0 1990, University of Florida, Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants
adaptation and rapid development of herbicide resistance. These
scenarios may have enabled the resistant hydrilla biotypes to become the dominant populations within each lake.

For a more in-depth publication on this topic, see Somatic mutation-mediated evolution ofherbicide resistance in the nonindigenous
invasive plant hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata), 2004, A. Michel, R.S. Areas, B.E. Scheffler, S.O. Duke, M. Netherland, F.E. Dayan,
Molecular Ecology 13:3229-323 7. Contact Michael Netherland at: MDNether@tifas.ufl.edu
Much more information on Hydrilla verticillata can be found on the APIRS web site at: http://p ,,, 1 ; I,, hi .. h, ,.r. l i.i. 2.html
An in-depth review of hydrilla management options, and the issue of fluridone resistance, can be found as a PDF document, Hydrilla
Issues Workshop, Final Report, Gainesville, FL, December 2004, at: http:/ l.I,/ l... l,. I' i, ,- .. /"
More information on herbicide resistance in plants may be found from the International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds:
http://www.wt.. I ... i, .... ,, ,p


Aquatic Herbicide Resistance in Landoltia

rD r. Tyler Koschnick recently received his Ph. D. through the
SAgronomy Department here at the University of Florida. He
'- currently is a visiting assistant professor at the Center for Aquatic
and Invasive Plants and is continuing his research into the resis-
tance of Landoltia punctata to the aquatic herbicide, diquat.
Trials conducted with Landoltia punctata (G. Meyer) D.H. Les
and D.J. Crawford collected from a canal in Lake County, Florida
4 l showed a 50-fold resistance to diquat, and a cross resistance to
i paraquat. The resistance was independent of photosynthesis and
'. I the response to the diquat was delayed compared to a non-resis-
tant biotype. It is presumed that less diquat was transported into
the protoplast. Copper applied in
combination with diquat overcame These studies document the first aquatic plant to
the resistance. It is thought that cop- develop resistance to the bipyridylium herbicides.
per may alter the transport mecha-
Landolta punctata nism for diquat across the plasmalemma or open a secondary site for transport. These relationships
C 2000 University of Florida warrant further study relating to diquat transport and potential resistance mechanisms.
Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants







Page 10 AQUAPHYTE Winter 2005


ADIS,J., JUNK,W.J.
Feeding impact and bionomics of the grass-
ri.,l, Cornops aquaticum on the water
hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes in central
Amazonian floodplains.
STUDIES ON NEOTROPICAL FAUNA AND EN-
VIRON. 38(3):245-249. 2003.

ADLERP.H., MALMQVIST,B.
Predationon'F4N ,:1 il,, (r;fill, 'I : ii _I,,: I
by the carnivorous plant -' .. .. vulgaris
(Lentibulariaceae) in northern Sweden.
ENTOMOL. FENNICA 15(2):124-128. 2004.

AMEKA,G.K., CLERK,G.C.,
PFEIFER,E., RUTISHAUSER,R.
Developmental morphology of Ledermanni-
ella '.. .'..... I -.i -) .. i. i.. ..,,.. from (. ,li.il.,
PLANT SYST. EVOL. 237:165-183. 2003.

AMIAUD,B., TOUZARD,B.
The relationships between soil seed bank,
aboveground vegetation and disturbances
in old embanked marshlands of western
France.
FLORA 199(1):25-35. 2004.

ANTOINE,C., CASTELLA,E.,
CASTELLA-MULLER,J.,
LACHAVANNEJ.-B.
Habitat requirements of freshwater gastro-
pod assemblages in a lake fringe wetland
(Lake Neuchatel, Switzerland).
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 159(3):377-394. 2004.

ARSENAULT,M.P., HAINESA.
Rediscovery of Carex typhina (C., i" I I
in Maine.
RIIODORA 106(925):52-54. 2004.

AZKAB,M.H., SUWELO,I.S.
Seagrass, the dugong food.
IN: SIRENEWS 41:17: FROM: 12T11 ANNUAL CONF.
SOUTH EAASASIAN ZOOS ANDAQUARIAASSOC.,
CISARUA, BOGOR (ABSTRACT ONLY). 2004.


BAATTRUP-PEDERSEN,A., RIIS,T.
i ". 1. I of different weed cutting practices
on macrophyte species diversity and com-
position in a Danish stream.
RIVER RES. APPLIC. 20(2):103-114. 2004.

BACHMANN,R.W., HOYER,M.V.,
CANFIELD,D.E.
Aquatic plants and nutrients in Florida lakes.
AQUATICS 26(3):4,6-8,10-11. 2004.

BASKIN,C.C., BASKIN,J.M.,
CHESTER,E.W.
Seed germination ecology of the summer
annual Cyperus squarrosus in an upredict-
able mudflat habitat.
ACTA OECOLOGICA 26(1):9-14. 2004.

BAZYDLO,E., SZMEJA,J.
Effect of pH, dissolved organic carbon and
total phosphorus concentrations on select-
ed life history traits of Luronium natans
(L.) Raf
POL. J. ECOL. 52(2):191-200. 2004.

BELL,D.M., CLARKE,P.J.
Seed-bank dynamics of ; .. can
spatial and temporal variability explain
habitat segregation?
AUSTRALIAN J. BOT. 52(1):119-131. 2004.

BOUCHARD,V., TESSIER,M.,
DIGAIRE,F., VIVIERJ.-P., ET AL
Sheep grazing as management tool in west-
ern European saltmarshes.
C.R. BIOLOGIES 326(SUP1):S148-S157. 2003.

BRAVIN,L.F.N., VELINI,E.D.,
BUCHIGHANI,M.H.
Air boat development to herbicide .1., i.
application evaluated by DGPS systems in
Brazil.
AQI ATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNU AL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 27 (ABSTRACT). 2004.


FROM THE DATABASE

Here is a sampling of the research articles, books and reports which have
been entered into the aquatic, wetland and invasive plant database since Spring
2005. The APIRS database contains more than 66,000 citations. To use the free
database online, go to http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/ and click on APIRS Online
Database.
To obtain articles, contact your nearest academic Ili, s, or a document
delivery service. Full text of records cited in APIRS is not stored electronically.


BRENNAN,J.K., ANDERSON,L.W.J.
Does the water hyacinth weevil (Neocheti-
na bruchi) respond to changes in host plant
leaf tissue quality in i.-, Iiii.- -- ,i Joa-
quin Delta populations?
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, PP. 40-41 (ABSiTRAC'). 2004.

BUSI,R, VIDOTTO,F., FERREROA.
Resistance patterns to ALS-inhibitors in Cype-
rus .' :......li .. .)enoplectus mucronatus.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS AB-
STRACTS, INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 44.. 2004.

CALLAWAY,J.C., SULLIVAN,G.,
ZEDLER,J.B.
Species-rich plantings increase biomass
and nitrogen accumulation in a wetland
restoration experiment
ECOL. APPIICATIONS 13(6):1626-1639. 2003.

CARLSSON,N.O.L., BRONMARK,C.,
HANSSON,L.-A.
lii-: .din herbivory: the golden apple snail al-
ters ecosystem functioning in Asian wetlands.
ECOLOGY 85(6):1575-1580. 2004.

CARPENTIER,A., PAILLISSONJ.-M.,
MARION,L.
Fish-macrophyte interactions in littoral
and pelagic habitats of a eutrophic shal-
low lake: effects of vegetation shifts on the
community.
IN: ACTES EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM MANAGE-
MENT AND CONSERVATION OF LAKE LITTORAL
VEGETATION, 23-25 OCTOBER 2002, LE BOUR-
GET-DU-LAC, SAVOIE, FRANCE, PP 193-202. 2003.

CEDERGREEN,N., SPLIID,N.H.,
STREIBIGJ.C.
-i.": *;-;,:- .; fi.: sensitivity of aquatic mac-
rophytes towards two herbicides.
ECOTOXIC. ENVIRON. SAFETY 58(3):314-323. 2004.

CHU,J.J.
Using water hyacinth to produce organic
fertilizer.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS ABSTRACTS,
PG. 39. 2004.

CLEMENTS,D.R, DITOM.l v4,-A.,
DARBYSHIRE,S.J., ET AL
The biology of Canadian weeds. 127. Pani-
cum capillare L.
CAN. J. PLANT SCI. 84(1):327-341. 2004.

COSTA,R.H.R., ZANOTELLI,C.T.,
HOFFMANN,D.M., ET AL
Optimization of the treatment of !p; **. .
wastes in water 1 >. i. isl ponds.
WATTER SCI. TECHNOL. 48(2):283-289. 2003.







Page 12 AQUAPHYTE Winter 2005


HENDERSON, J.E., KIRK, J.P.
Economic impacts and aquatic plants: the
angler's piece of the puzzle.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 20-21 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

HOYLE, S.T., BATTEN, C.W.
Environmental i, ,,, Ij,," influencing the
growth ofSalvinia molesta in North Carolina.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING. TAMPA, FL. PP 46-47 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

HUANG,Y., LATORRE,A.,
BARCELO,D., GARCIA,J., ET AL
Factors affecting linear alkylbenzene sulfo-
nates removal in subsurface flow construct-
ed wetlands.
ENVIRON. SCI. TECHNOL. 38(9):2657-2663. 2004.

HUSS, A.A., WEHR, J.D.
Strong indirect effects of a submersed
aquatic macrophyte, allisneria ameri-
cana, on bacterioplankton densities in a
mesotrophic lake.
MICROBIAL ECOLOGY 47(4):305-315. 2004.

JACOBS, J.M., ANDERSON, M.C.,
FRIESS, L.C., DIAK, G.R.
Solar radiation, longwave radiation and
emergent wetland i.,iil n.pi;,'i eesti-
mates from satellite data in Florida, USA.
HYDROLOGICAL SCI. J. 49(3):461-476. 2004.

JAGER, P., PALL, K., DUMFARTH, E.
A method of mapping macrophytes in large
lakes with regard to the requirements of the
water framework directive.
LIMNOLOGICA 34(1-2):140-146. 2004.

JAMES,W.F., BEST,E.P.H., BARKO,J.
Sediment resuspension and light attenuation
in Peoria Lake: can macrophytes nirh, .*
water ,.u!.ilit in this shallow system?
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, PP. 24-25 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

JING, S.-R., LIN, Y.-F.
Seasonal effect on amunonia nitrogen re-
moval by constructed wetlands treating
1i"' i. I river water in southern Taiwan.
ENVIRON. POLLUT. 127(2):291-301. 2004.

KAPLAN,Z., WOLFF,P.
A morphological, anatomical and isozyme
study of Potamogeton x schreberi: confir-
mation of its recent occurrence in Germany
and first documented record in France.
PRESIIA 76(2):141-161. 2004.

KIRK, J.P., HENDERSON, J.E., DE
KOZLOWSKI, S.J.


Hydrilla in the Santee Cooper reservoirs,
South .,. il,.- -lessons learned after 15 years.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA. FL, P. 22 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

KLINK, A.
Content of selected chemicals in two pro-
tected macrophytes: Nvmphaea alba L. and
Nuphar lutea (L.) Sibith. & Sm. in relation
to site chemistry.
POL. J. ECOL. 52(2):229-232. 2004.

KUSTER,A., SCHAIBLE,R.,
SCHUBERT,H.
Light acclimation of I.i,,.., ni. n in
three charophyte species.
AQUATIC BOT. 79(2):111-124. 2004.

KUTZBACH, L., WAGNER, D., PFEI-
FFER, E.-M.
Effect of microrelief and vegetation on
methane emission from wet polygonal tun-
dra, Lena Delta, northern Siberia.
BIOGEOCIIEMISRY 69(3):341-362. 2004.

LAMMENS, E.H.R.R., VAN NES, E.H.,
MEIJER, M.-L., VAN DEN BERG,M.S.
[ I i of commercial fishery on the bream
population and the expansion of Chara
aspera in Lake Veluwe.
ECOLOGICAL MODELLING 177(3-4):233-244. 2004.

LEHTONEN,P.
Federal noxious weeds: potential ip lli ., -
into the United States.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS AB-
STRACTS, INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 85. 2004.

LI, J., JAIN, M., VUNSH, R., VISH-
NEVETSKY, J., ET AL
Callus induction and i.. idh. .l i .: i .'.ir o-
dela and Lemna.
PLANT CELL REP. 22(7):457-464. 2004.

MA,LJ., LI,B., ZHAOB., JING,K., ETAL
Are artificial wetlands good alternatives to
natural wetlands for waterbirds? a case
study on Chongming Island, China.
BIODIVERS. CONSERV 13(2):333-350. 2004.

MAEMETS,H., FREIBERG,L.
( : o I. ?. ,I, .. of reeds on Lake Peipsi and
the floristic consequences of tli. i. i..i,,.in
LIMNOLOGICA 34(1-2):83-89. 2004.

MARHOLD, K., HROUDOVA, Z.,
DUCHACEK, M., ZAKRAVSKY, P.
The Bolboschoenus maritimus group (Cy-
peraceae) in central Europe, including B.
laticarpus, spec. Nova.
PHYTON 44(1):1-21. 2004.


MARSHALL, L.G.I., LOWE, R.L.
Aquatic adjuvants and their impact on ef-
ficacy.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNU-
AL MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 43 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

MARTINS, D., VELINI, E.D.,
NEGRISOLI,E., TERRA, M.A., ET AL
Chemical control of water hyacinth using
different nozzles.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING TAMPA. FL, P 30 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

MELENDO, M., CANO, E., VALLE, F.
Synopsis of aquatic plant-communities of
the class Potametea in the southern Iberian
peninsula.
ACTA BOT GALLIICA 150(4):429-444. 2003.

MONGIN, M.S., HENDERSON, J.E.,
PASTULA, D., DEAMUD, J., ET AL
Economic impact survey of Eurasian wa-
termilfoil removal in Houghton Lake.
AQUA\1IC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 441TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P 25 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

MUKHERJEE, A.K., NANDI, M.,
NANDA, M.K., GHOSH, R.K.
Bio-efficacy and phytotoxicity of new gen-
eration herbicides and their effect on chem-
ical and biological environment of soil in
transplanted rice
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS AB-
STRACTS, INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 77. 2004.

MULLER, K., BORSCH, T., LEGEN-
DRE, L., POREMBSKI, S., ET AL
Evolution of carivory in Lentibulariaceae
and the Lamiales.
PLANT BIOL. 6(4):477-490. 2004.

MURPHY, K.J., HOOTSMANS,M.J.M.
Predictive modelling of ii.l i community
attributes: biomass, biodiversity, biointeg-
rity and biomonitoring.
ACIA LIMNOL. BRAS. 14(3):43-60. 2002.

NASEEMA, A., PRAVEENA, R.,
SALIM,A.M., ETAL
Integrated management of water hyacinth
with Fusarium ...'' .. a. and cashew
nut shell liquid.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS AB-
STRACTS, INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 40. 2004.

NELSON,A.
Overwintering waterlilies.
PONDKEEPER 10(6):38-39. 2004.







Winter 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 13


N RI '-,ON, L., NETHERLAND, M.D.,
SCHARDT, J.D., VAN DYKE, J.M.
Evaluating herbicide strategies to control
Hydrilla verticillata and minimize injury
to the native plant, .... ...... kurziana.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 35 ABSTRACT') 2004.

NIELSEN, K.B., KJOLLER, R., OLS-
SON, P.A., SCHWEIGER, P.F., ET AL
Colonisation and molecular ..h i: i' of ar-
buscular mycorrhizal fungi in the aquatic
plants Littorella '*.: and Lobelia dort-
manna in southern Sweden.
MYCOL. RES. 108(6):616-625. 2004.

NOUREDDIN, M.I., FURUMOTO, T.,
ISHIDA,Y., FUKUI, H.
Absorption and metabolism of bisphenol
A, a C",- ,i. endocrine disruptor, in the
.,i,.L1i edible plant, water convolvulus
(Ipomoea aquatica.
BIOSCI. BIOTECH. BIOCHEM. 68(6):1398-1402. 2004.

OGWANG, J.A.
Managing water hyacinth infestation the
Uganda experience.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS ABSTRACTS,
INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 31. 2004.

OWENS, C.S., GRODOWITZ, M.J.,
NIBLING, F.
What we did on our summer vacation: a
survey of invasive .in.i;, plants on the
lower Rio Grande.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, PP. 30-31 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

PARK, T.S., MOON, B.C., PARK, J.E.
Current status and control of sulfonvlurea
resistant weeds occurring in rice fields of
Korea.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS ABSTRACTS,
INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 47. 2004.

PIETERSE, A.H., KETTUNEN, M.,
DIOUF, S., NDAO, 1., ET AL
Effective biological control of Salvinia mo-
lesta in the Senegal River by means of the
weevil Cyrtobagous salviniae.
AMBIO 32(7):458-462. 2003.

PLUS, M., CHAPELLE, A., LAZURE,
P., AUBY, I., ET AL
Modelling of oxygen and nitrogen. ,
as a function of macrophyte community in
the Thau Lagoon.
CONTIN. SHELF RES. 23(17-19):1877-1898. 2003.


RANIELLO, R., LORENTI, M.,
BRUNET, C., BUIA, M.C.
Photosynthetic plasticity of an invasive
variety of Caulerpa racemosa in a coastal
Mediterranean area: light harvesting capac-
ity and seasonal acclimation.
MAR. ECOL. PROG. SER. 271:113-120. 2004.

RIIS,T., BIGGS,B.J.F., FLANAGAN,M.
Colonisation and temporal dynamics of
macrophytes in artificial stream channels
with contrasting flow regimes.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 159(1):77-95. 2004.

RITTER, N.P.
Too wet for aquatic plants? Floristic com-
position and phytodiversity in the wetlands
along the base of the t:,I I s 'I., 1,
RHODORA 106(925):1-32. 2004.

ROIJACKERS, R., SZABO, S.,
SCHEFFER, M.
F I.- ; Ii. oi.it analysis of the .', 5.. i;l'.1i
between algae and duckweed.
ARCH. HYDROBIOL. 160(3):401-412. 2004.

RUCH, S.A., OWEN, J., ANDERSON,
L.W.J., HENDERSON, D.
Broad-scale herbicide efficacy monitor-
ing for Egeria densa using advanced hy-
droacoustic techniques at multiple sites,
Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California.
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 24 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

SAYGIDEGER, S., DOGAN, M.
Lead and cadmium accumulation and tox-
icity in the presence of EDTA in Lemna mi-
nor L. and Ceratophyllum demersum L.
BULL ENVIRON. CONTEAM.IOX ICOL 73(1)182-189. 2004.

SEAL, A.N., PRATLEY, J.E., HAIG, T.,
LEWIN, L.G.
Screening rice varieties for .i,. i, p nii.
potential against arrowhead (Sagittaria
montevidensis), an aquatic weed infesting
Australian riverine rice crops.
AUSTR. J. AGRIC. RES. 55(6):673-680. 2004.

SHANG, S., SHEN, Q., DU, J., ET AL
The harvesting project technology of sub-
merged plant in Lake Wuliangsuhai of in-
ner Mongolia.
J. LAKE SCI. 16(2):169-177 (IN CHINESE; ENG-
LISH SUMMARY). 2004.

SHIBAYAMA, Y., KADONO, Y.
Floral morph composition and pollen limi-
tation in the seed set of Nymphoides indica

ECOLOGICAL RES. 18(6)725-737 2003
ECOLOGICAL RES. 18(6):725-737. 2003.


SINHA, S., PANDEY, K.
Nickel induced toxic effects and bioaccu-
mulation in the submerged plant, Hydrilla
verticillata (L.f.) Royle under i,1,, l.i1
metal exposure
BULL. ENVIRON. CONiTAM. TOXICOL. 71(6):
1175-1183.2003.

SKOGERBOE, J.G., POOVEY, A.G.,
SLADE, J., DIBBLE, E.D., ET AL
Selective removal of -, i iic pondweed
and Eurasian watermilfoil using endothall
and 2,4-D combinations and the effect on
fish populations: preliminary data.
AQUAIIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 32 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

SORRELL, B.K., DOWNES, M.T.
Water velocity and irradiance effects on in-
ternal :, o 1,, l m. i, i. .,.,. ,,, ofmethane
in submerged Isoetes alpinus and Potamo-
geton crispus.
AQUATIC BOT. 79(2):189-202. 2004.

SOTIAUX, A., VANDERPOORTEN, A.
Check-list, distribution, and conservation
measures of the bryophytes in the Semois
River basin (Belgium, F. c,'.-!
LEJEUNIA, REVUE DE BOTANIQUE, NO. 175, 49
PP. (IN FRENCH; ENGLISH SUMMARY). 2004.

SPEICHERT, G.
Top 10 koi-resistant pl.mi
PONDKEEPER 10(6):52-54. 2004.

STAMMEL, B., KIEHL, K.
Do hoof prints actually serve as a regenera-
tion niche for plant species in fens?
PHYTOCOENOLOGIA34(2):271-286. 2004.

SZANKOWSKI, M., KLOSOWSKI, S.
D .iiii, .li ,i and habitat conditions of the
phytocoenoses of Sphagnum denticulatum
Bridel and W'arnstorfia exannulata (B.. S.
& G.) Loeske in Polish Lobelia lakes.
ACTASOC. BOT. POLONIAE 73(3):255-262. 2004.

SZMEJA, J., BOCIAG, K.
The disintegration of p('i.l d'1 ;- of under-
water plants in soft water lakes enriched
with acidic organic matter.
ACTA SOC. BOT. POLONIAE 73(2):165-173. 2004.

TALLAMY, D.W.
Do alien plants reduce insect biomass?
CONSERV. BIOL. 18(6):1689-1692. 2004.


Continued next page ~







Page 14 AQUAPHYTE Winter 2005

Ecological models for aquatic plant growth

by EPH Best, U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center, Environmental Laboratory

Ecological response models for submersed aquatic plants have been developed at the US Army Engineer Research & Development
Center, Environmental Laboratory during the last decade. All models are based on the carbon flow through the plant and simulate
the response of submersed aquatic vegetation to changes in water level, temperature, water transparency, and biomass-removing activi-
ties (such as mechanical control and grazing) at sites differing in climate.
Two models pertain to invasive aquatic species, i.e. hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) and Eurasian watermilfoil (Myriophyllum spica-
tum), and two models pertain to desired aquatic species, i.e. American wildcelery (Vallisneria americana) and sago pondweed (Pota-
mogeton pectinatus). The models are named: HYDRIL, MILFO, VALLA, and POTAM. Of the four monotypic models, stand-alone
versions 1.0 are available and can be downloaded as executable files at no cost from: http://el.erdc.usace.army.mil/products.cfin?Topic
=model& Type=aquatic The models have been described in technical reports and operation is explained in user manuals, both available
at the same website. Currently more than 140 models per year are being downloaded.
The two monotypic models VALLA and POTAM have been recalibrated and expanded with responses to current velocity and epi-
phyte shading for use at the Upper Mississippi River System (Pool 8). Upgraded stand-alone versions 2.0 are being prepared. These
models have also been translated in Visual Basic, and are currently considered for inclusion in a Decision Support System under discus-
sion for application to the Upper Mississippi System (Pool 5). Pools, short for 'navigation pools,' are permanently inundated impounded
areas above navigation dams (and locks) in rivers.
A competition model describes the behavior of two species competing for the most limiting resource, light, at high and low N and
P availabilities. The species concerned are the meadow-forming American wildcelery and the canopy-forming sago pondweed. This
model will become available for users shortly.
The models can be used to predict habitat suitability, species-characteristic plant response and, in the case of the competition model,
outcomes of competition at variable N and P availabilities at sites differing in climate, water level, water transparency, current velocity,
epiphyte shading, and biomass-removing activities. Preferred sites are lakes, reservoirs, and rivers (including pools).
All of these models can be modified to operate with hydrodynamic, physical, and chemical models such as the US Army Corps of
Engineers uses to predict environmental alterations caused by dredging, water elevation manipulation, altered temperature, altered flow,
altered sediment transport, altered nutrient levels, and altered habitat. In fact, one model, i.e., VALLA, has served already as a test case
for integration with a hydrodynamic (RMA2) and sediment transport (SED2D) model. Publications pertaining to these models may be
obtained from the author.
For more information and a list of related publications, contact Dr. Elly PH. Best, Leader Plant Processes & Effects Team, Envi-
ronmental Laboratory, CEERD-EP-R, U.S. Army Engineer Research & Development Center, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS
39180-6199, USA; 601-634-4246; email: beste@wes.army.mil


TASKER, A.V.
Early detection and improving capacity to sup-
port emergency response to invasive plants.
IN: 4TH INT. WEED SCI. CONGRESS ABSTRACTS,
INT. WEED SCI. SOC., PG. 85. (ABSTRACT). 2004.

TREI, T., PALL, P.
Macroflora in the water courses of Saare-
maa Island (Estonia).
BOREAL ENVIRON. RES. 9(1):25-35. 2004.

VERLAQUE, M., AFONSO-
CARRILLO, J., ET AL
Blitzkrieg in a marine invasion: Caulerpa
racemosa var. cylindracea (Bryopsidales,
Chlorophyta) reaches the Canary Islands
(north-east Atlantic).
BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS 6(3):269-281. 2004.

WAITES, A.R., AGREN, J.
Pollinator visitation, stigmatic pollen loads
and among- population variation in seed set
in Lythrum salicaria.
J. ECOL. 92(3):512-526. 2004.


WANG,G.-X., LI,W., WAN,X-C., ITO,M.
Monochoria vaginalis var. angustifolia, a new
variety of the Pontederiaceae from Thailand.
ACTA PHYTOTAX. SINICA 41(6):569-572. 2003.

WANG, Z.-F., HAMRICK, J.L., GODT,
M.J.W.
High genetic diversity in Sarracenia leuco-
phylla, a carnivorous wet-land herb.
J. HEREDITY 95(3):234-243. 2004.

WENDT-RASCH, L., VAN DEN
BRINK, P.J., CRUM, S.J.H., WOIN, P.
The effects of a pesticide mixture on aquatic
ecosystems differing in trophic status: re-
sponses of the macrophyte Myriophyllum spi-
catum and the periphytic algal community.
ECOTOX. ENVIRON. SAFETY 57(3):383-398. 2004.

WEYEMBERGH, G., GODEFROID,S.,
KOEDAM, N.
Restoration of a small-scale forest wetland
in a Belgian nature reserve: a discussion of
factors determining wetland vegetation es-
tablishment.


AQUATIC CONSERVE : MAR. FRESH. ECOSYST.
14(4):381-394. 2004.

WILDE, S.B., HABRUN, S.E., KEMP-
TON, J., LEWITUS, A.J., ET AL
Continuing investigations on invasive
aquatic vegetation, cyanobacteria, and avi-
an myelinopathy (AVM).
AQUATIC PLANT MANAGE. SOC., 44TH ANNUAL
MEETING, TAMPA, FL, P. 44 (ABSTRACT). 2004.

YAMADA, T., SUZUKI, E.
Ecological role of vegetative sprouting in
the regeneration of Dryobalanops rappa,
an emergent species in a Bornean tropical
wetland forest.
J. TROP ECOLOGY 20(PART 4):377-384. 2004.

ZHAO, L.-C., COLLINSON, M.E., LI,
C.-S.
Fruits and seeds ofRuppia (Potamogetonaceae)
from the Pliocene ofYushe Basin, Shanxi, north-
em China and their ecological implications.
BOT. J. LINNEAN SOC. 145(3):317-329. 2004.







Winter 2005 AQUAPHYTE Page 15


MEETINGS

Weed Science Society of America (WSSA), Annual
Meeting, February 13-17, 2006, New York, NY.
www.wssa.net

National Invasive WeedsAwareness Week (NIWAW),
February 26 March 3, 2006, Washington, DC.
www.nawma.org/niwaw

North American Lakes Management Society
(NALMS), and Georgia Lakes Society, March 8-10,
2006, Columbus, GA.
www.nalms.org -or- georgialakes.org

Association of Southeastern Biologists (ASB), Annual
Meeting, March 29 April 1, 2006, Gatlinburg, TN.
www.asb.appstate.edu/

Florida Vegetation Management Association, Annual
Meeting, April 19-21, 2006, Daytona Beach, FL.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC), Annual
Meeting, April 24-26, 2006, Gainesville, FL.
www.fleppc.org

UF-IFAS Aquatic Weed Control Short Course,
May 1 5, 2006, Coral Springs, FL.
http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/aw/

14th International Conference on Aquatic Invasive
Species, May 14-19, 2006, Key Biscayne (Miami), FL.
www.icais.org/

Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS), Annual
Conference, May 18-21, 2006, Daytona Beach, FL.
www.fnps.org

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council (SE-EPPC),
Annual Conference, May 23-25, Raleigh, NC.
www.se-eppc.org

Weeds Across Borders 2006, May 25-28, 2006,
Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.
www.desertmuseum.org/borderweeds/

Florida Lake Management Society (FLMS), Annual
Conference, June 5-8, 2006, St. Augustine, FL.
www.flms.net

Aquatic Plant Management Society (APMS), Annual
Meeting, July 16-19, 2006, Portland, OR.
www.apms.org

14th NorthAmerican Weed ManagementAssociation
(NAWMA) Conference, Sept. 18-21st, 2006, Calgary,
Alberta, Canada. www.nawma.org

Florida Aquatic Plant Management Society
(FAPMS), Annual Meeting, Oct. 30 Nov. 2, 2006, St.
Petersburg, FL. www.fapms.org


More of Mary's pics

Indigenous cultivation and conservation of totora (Schoeno-
plectus californicus, Cyperaceae) in Peru. By S.A. Banack, X.J.
Rondon, and W. Diaz-Huamanchumo. 2004. Economic Botany
58(1):11-20.
The people around Lake Titicaca are intensively cultivating this
plant as natural populations of the plant are being reduced. "To-
toro" continues to be used to make walls, fences, mats, ceiling and
little boats. In fact, the little boats are the only boats observed used
daily for fishing.

Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) biology, ecology and man-
agement. By G.E. MacDonald. 2004. Critical Reviews in Plant
Sciences 23(5):367-380.
This is a thorough review of the literature on all aspects of one of
Florida's most invasive non-native plants.

Kudzu (Pueraria montana): History, physiology, and ecology
combine to make a major ecosystem threat. By I.N. Forseth and
A.F. Innis. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 23(5):401-413.
In the first half of the 20th century, the government provided
more than 85 million seedlings of kudzu to landowners in the
southeastern United States. Today, kudzu covers more than 7 mil-
lion acres; it spreads by more than 100,000 acres per year. This
paper discusses its ecology and physiology.

The truth about invasive species. By A. Burdick. 2005.
Discover Magazine, May 2005.
Are invasive species really so bad? The author believes new re-
search reveals nature is far more resilient than we thought maybe
we can "stop worrying and learn to love ecological intruders."

The human dimensions of invasive woody plants. By P.
Binggeli. 2004. In: The Great Reshuffling Human Dimensions of
Invasive Alien Species, ed. by J.A. McNeely, pp. 145-159. IUCN,
Gland.
Quick! Name seven purposes of introductions of woody plants.
Give up? Read this...

Invasion of Agave species (Agavaceae) in south-east Spain:
invader demographic parameters and impacts on native spe-
cies. 2004. By E.I. Badano and F.I. Pugnaire. Diversity andDistri-
butions 10(5-6):493-500.
Agave species were introduced as ornamental plants to Spain
in the 1940s, but what has contributed to their large population
increases and spread? And what are their effects on native species
and communities?

Potamogeton taxa proposed by J.F. Wolfgang and his col-
laborators. By Z. Kaplan and J. Zalewska-Galosz. 2004. Taxon
53(4):1033-1041.
A discussion of the taxonomy of 12 species of Polish pond-
weeds.

Editor's Note: In the last issue of AQUAPHYTE (Vol. 25(1), Spring
2005, pg. 6) it was stated that Dr. Robert Henry is retired curator of
the RM Myers Herbarium at Ohio State University. The RM Myers
Herbarium is at Western Illinois University.




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