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Group Title: University of Florida Office of Research and the Graduate School annual report
Title: Annual report
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083178/00011
 Material Information
Title: Annual report
Series Title: Annual report
Physical Description: Serial
Creator: University of Florida. Office of Research.
Publisher: The Office
Publication Date: 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083178
Volume ID: VID00011
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 143299231

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Back Cover
        Page 9
Full Text





9


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OFFICE OF
RESEARCH
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REPORT
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D despite concern about
the state of the world
economy, the contin-
ued success of science to
produce new ideas and new
solutions gives us reason for
optimism.
The U.S. research and
development system one
that relies heavily on the
nation's public and private
universities remains the
envy of the world. Far from
stagnating, the science and
sengeeating, theurrsin toad DR. WIN PHILLIPS, VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH
engineering occurring today
at our universities is leaping forward, the result of changes at once cultural, technological
and institutional. These changes haven't received a lot of attention outside academe, but
they are reshaping science in America, raising its potential for good even as financial
support dwindles.
One huge change involves how university scientists work.
Where researchers traditionally toiled as individuals or in small groups of like-minded
colleagues, they are increasingly attuned to the benefits of collaboration with those out-
side their expertise.
Another change is technological. Thanks to increasing computing power, ambitious re-
search no longer requires ultra-expensive equipment. Simulation has become a cheaper
- and even more powerful option.
A third change: While still devoted to pure science, universities are more focused on
science that matters to people today. Universities are as likely to market discoveries as
publish them, speeding their delivery to the public.
These changes may seem broad and conceptual, but they have a real and practical
impact. Several notable initiatives at UF tell the story:
Sustainable Energy
Emerging Pathogens
UF Water Institute
UF's statewide collaboration
The current contraction is not the first "down" cycle in the U.S. economy in the past
70 years, and it won't be the last. But beginning with the nation's recovery from World
War II, U.S. university research has been at the heart of the nation's economic strength.
It was university research, after all, that sparked the information technology revolution.
University research has been critical to the genesis of biotechnology and nanotechnology,
both seen as key to a future where a booming world population places an increasing
strain on natural resources.
If history is any guide, the change in university laboratories and research centers
today will play a similarly positive role in the nation's recovery from its current doldrums,
and help the U.S. maintain its status as a global leader.







>-

FLORIDA INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE
W ENERGY ENERGY TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR.
WITH A BIOFUEL PILOT PLANT AND A PROTOTYPE
^Z DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY, THIS STATE
|W CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IS MOVING PROMISING
ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES FROM THE RESEARCH
TO THE PROTOTYPE STAGE. IN THE PAST, IT WAS
RARE FOR UNIVERSITIES TO FOCUS RESOURCES
J ON "SCALING UP" DISCOVERIES TO TEST THEIR
S MERIT AS INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS. INCUBATORS
S LIKE THIS ONE SHIFT THE PARADIGM.





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<7 THE EMERGING PATHOGENS INSTITUTE.
THIS INTERDISCIPLINARY INSTITUTE PULLS
TOGETHER SCIENTISTS FROM EIGHT COLLEGES
TO CONFRONT PATHOGENS THAT MENACE NOT
JUST HUMANS, BUT ANIMALS AND PLANTS.
SUCH A GLOBAL FOCUS WOULD HAVE BEEN
Z UNHEARD OF A FEW YEARS AGO.

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THE UF WATER INSTITUTE. THE SEVERE

DROUGHT THAT PLAGUES MUCH OF THE

SOUTHEAST MAKES OBVIOUS THE GROWING

NEED TO ENSURE ADEQUATE WATER SUPPLIES

FOR PEOPLE AND NATURE ALIKE. UF HAS

HAD MANY RESEARCHERS WORKING ON

DIVERSE WATER PROBLEMS. THE WATER

INSTITUTE DRAWS THEM TOGETHER TO WORK

ON COMMON GOALS AND SOLUTIONS AND IT .

BRINGS INDUSTRY AND PUBLIC POLICY GROUPS -a

INTO THE MIX. V=w










Z

















0 RESEARCH AND MEDICAL INSTITUTIONS
Q AROUND THE STATE INCLUDING SCRIPPS
FLORIDA IN JUPITER, THE BURNHAM INSTITUTE
FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH NEAR ORLANDO
AND THE MOFFITT CANCER CENTER IN
TAMPA ARE EXAMPLES OF THE LINKAGES
ESSENTIAL TO ANSWERING THE BIG QUESTIONS
IN SCIENCE AND MEDICINE.













SUMMARY OF
Sponsored
RESEARCH


Proposals Submitted
Awards Received
New Awards Received
Continuations or Supplementals
Grant and Contract Dollars Awarded
Gifts for Research
Total Sponsored Research Funding
Projects Active During the Fiscal Year
Faculty Receiving Awards
Sponsors


5,430
6,175
2,668
3,507
$549,875,156
$11,776,484
$561,651,640
6,799
1,932
1,047


S562M


Sponsored
c RESEARCH
0


0AI
W WARDS


98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08
FISCAL YEAR


Technology
o TRANSFER
0



S INCOME


z
- 30

20

10

0


98-99 99-00 00-01 01-02 02-03 03-04 04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08
FISCAL YEAR


$500

$400
z
S$300

$200

$100

0






Health Science Center
$291M

Public Health $15M
Dentistry $15M
Veterinary Medicine $14M
Pharmacy $8M
Health Affairs $6M
Nursing $3M

All Other Academic Units
Total $56M
Education $13M
Academic Affairs $10M
Research & Graduate
Programs $7M
Design, Construction &
Planning $5.4M
Health & Human
Performance $5M
Business Administration $4M
Florida Museum of
I I 1ri. J1 H i: .:. '.1 1 I
,-r- i : i : r r, i.r.- : 'I. I
1 r11I I l tl ,I,,1 I
-i,,,,,,,,, t,::,r, : 'T,,, '-i \ I,
,-,ti ,it rl-,- F -it ._ li_ r I.U I
[.._,-,_-, r ,0_ r


liege of
lineering
$67M


College of Liberal
Arts & Sciences
$42M


Research
AWARDS BY


00 ADEM UNIT
ACADEMIC UNIT


Industry
$58M

Foundations
$71M








State/Local
$94M




I IIH I I .
NSF $39M
USDA $32M
DOD $29M
HRSA $17M


Other
$16M


Federal
$323M


H H : I 1 1.1
Energy $10M
VA $10M
NASA $6M
Commerce $6M


DOT
EPA
SAID
Other


11.I.1
$4M
$2M
$1M
$6M


Research
AWARDS BY




SPONSOR






UF lI Office of Research
UNIVERSITY of FLORIDA
P.O. Box 115500
Gainesville, FL 32611-5500


Winfred M. Phillips, D.Sc
Vice President for Research
223 Grinter Hall
P.O. Box 115500
Gainesville, Florida 32611
(352) 392-1582
wphil@ufl.edu

Division of Sponsored Research
Thomas Walsh, Ph.D.
Director
(352) 392-3516
twalsh@ufl.edu
Program Information
(352) 392-4804


UF Research Foundation, Inc.
Frank Ward
Business Manager
(352) 392-5221
fward@ufl.edu


Research Communications
Joseph Kays
Director
(352) 392-8229
joekays@ufl.edu


Proposal Processing
(352) 392-9267

Awards Administration
(352) 392-5991


Office of Technology Licensing
David Day
Director
(352) 392-8929
dlday@ufl.edu


research.ufl.edu


Non-Profit
Organization
U.S. Postage
PAID
Gainesville, FL
Permit No. 94




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