• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Note
 Table of Contents
 Tuck-up songs
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: "Tuck-up" songs
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083170/00001
 Material Information
Title: "Tuck-up" songs
Physical Description: 123, 1 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Walton, Ellis
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Thomas Nelson and Sons
Place of Publication: London ;
Edinburgh ;
New York
Publication Date: 1895
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Ellis Walton.
General Note: Added title page, engraved.
General Note: Without music.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083170
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002239329
notis - ALH9856
oclc - 41208348

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
        Page ii
    Frontispiece
        Page iii
    Title Page
        Page iv
        Page v
    Note
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Tuck-up songs
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text







































i .... ...
BY


1+9-


-~ rlF--
....r


'dlo ~


. EL S-
*^
P~r/vhL~o" .* -' "'~


'Y~b .Ll

















































The Baldwin Library

FIg :


L,~ ~ :..~- .-~-






























"TUCK-UP" SONGS.

--"r-~v^S~i^--






















''

i.




C ~a~~la

4


"MUSIC HATH CHARMS."


Pa.e zoo.









T6UCK6U P

\CV 0/ 0


v AL E
vVALTON


--


ThorZmas /7e/so/n c Son5S










TUCK-UP" SONGS




BY

ELLIS -WALTON


T. NELSON AND SONS
London, Edinburgh, and Newv York

1895




























NOT E.


The following pieces appear by permission of their respective
publishers:-

Violets-Messrs. S. LUCAS AND WEBER. The Singing Stream, To the Sea-
Gulls-Messrs. R. TucK AND SoNs. The Sweetest Song-Messrs. ENOCH AND
SONS (set to music as a cantata by J. L. Roeckel). Little Idlers, Birdie's Mirror,
A Violet, The Story of a Shower, Come Out, An Accident, Only a Drop, He
Knows that he has Wings, A Daisy Chain, Silent Comforters, The Swallow,
Tastes Differ, To the Sky-lark, A Daisy's Life, Caught, On the Look-out, Nut-
ting Time, Pull Away, Will it Bear? Stand Together, Baby, May, Good-night
to my Doll, Day Dreams-Messrs. CASSELL AND Co., Limited (from "Little
Folks' Magazine").




























CONTENTS.


AIRY FAIRY THINGS, ... ...
A MUTE APPEAL, ...
LITTLE IDLERS, ... ...
AN INTERRUPTED FEAST,... ...
BIRDIE'S MIRROR, ... ... ...
A VIOLET, ......
SISTERS, ......
A LITTLE HEROINE, ... ... ...
THE STORY OF A SHOWER, ... .
FAIRYLAND, ... .. ...
CINDERELLA, ... ...
COME OUT! ......
THE SNOW-MAN, ... ...
WELCOME NEWS, ... ..
SECOND THOUGHTS ARE BEST, ...
MY PARTNER, ... ... ... ...
AN ACCIDENT, ... ... ... ...
A LEAFY HOME, ...
ONLY A DROP, ... ...
TO THE SEA-GULLS, ...
WINTER SUNBEAMS, .. ...
FORGET ME NOT, ... ...
THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER, ...
"1HE KNOWS THAT HE HAS WINGS,"
IN VIOLET LAND, ... ... ...
A DAISY CHAIN, ... ...
SILENT COMFORTERS, ...


THE SWALLOW, ... ... ... 43
A LARK-SONG IN AUTUMN, ... ... 44
TASTES DIFFER ... ... ... 44
VIOLETS, ... ... ... ... 45
THE SINGING STREAM, ... ... 4'
THE DAISY'S WISH, ... ... .47
TO THE SKYLARK, ... ... ... 49
TOIL AND MUSIC, ... ... 50
WHAT'S O'CLOCK ? ... .. .. 51
TO A BUTTERFLY, ... .. ... 2
TWO ON A SWING, ... .. ... 53
A LITTLE NURSE, ... ... ... 55
BIRDIE'S BED, ... ... ... ... 56
A DAISY'S LIFE, ... ... ... 58
CAUGHT, ... ... ... ... 59
DAY DREAMERS, ... .. ... 60
ON THE LOOK-OUT, ... ... ... 61
GOOD-NIGHT TO THE BIRDS, ... 62
FAIRY BOATS, ... ... ... ... 61
MY LITTLE HORSE, ... ... ... 65
NUTTING TIME, ... ... ... 63
ON THE SANDS, ... ... ... 68
PULL AWAY! ...... ... ... ... 70
DOLLY'S ADVENTURE, ... ... 70
A LITTLE SHEPHERD, ... ... 72
GRANDCHILD MARJORIE, ...... 74
A DISCONTENTED MOUSE, ... .. 73








viii CONTENTS.


"ORANGES AND LEMONS,"
BABY'S SWINGING SONG,
"WILL IT BEAR?" ...
STAND TOGETHER! ...
EVENING,
THE SNOWDROP, ...
BABY, ... ... ...
MY DOVE, ...
TWILIGHT, ...
MAY, ... ... ...
SEA TREASURES, ...
GOOD-NIGHT TO MY DOLL,
BUTTERFLIES, ... ...
ECHOES, ...
LITTLE SAILORS, ...


77 RIVAL MINSTRELS ... ... ...
78 "MUSIC HATH CHARMS,''
80 KITTENS,
81 THE SWEETEST SONG,
82 WHO WILL BUY?
83 THE LITTLE READER,
84 THE FROG WHO WOULDN'T A-WOO-
85 ING GO! ...
87 CATCHING SUNBEAMS,
89 WHO HIDES CAN FIND,
E9 A DOOR-MAT DIALOGUE,
91 A MAD CHASE,
92 DAY DREAMS,
94 THE STORY ON THE SCREEN,
96













TUCK-UP SONGS.




AIRY FAIRY THINGS.

WHEN the moon is rising slowly,
And the children are at rest,
Lying hushed, and fair and smiling,
In each cozy, curtained nest,








There's a stirring and a rustle
In the forest far away;
For it's now the little fairies
Have their time of sport and play.

Oh, 'tis merry then to watch them
As they dance beneath the moon,






AIRY FAIRY THINGS.


While the bluebells nod in measure
And ring out a cheery tune.

See their gauzy wings, how glitt'ring,
And their feet so swift and light;
Hark those peals of elfin laughter
'Mid the silence of the night.






,' t ,,





Now at last the dance is over,
And they make a circle there,
While one takes a reed and charms them
With his music sweet and rare.

And this airy fairy splendour,
I am told it glows and gleams
In the wondrous golden region
Of good children's happy dreams





A MUTE APPEAL. 1


A MUTE APPEAL.


AMARY wonders why I wait,
Watching every spoonful
so,
As she takes it from her
plate,
When 'twas but a while ago





That she set a meal for me
Underneath the apple-tree.

Ah, but Rover came that way,
Just a little rough, alas!
And between us, in our play,
It was spilt upon the grass.
Mary sat beside the wall,
Off I ran to tell her all.

So I reached up to her knee,
Gave her hand a gentle pat;
But she only said to me,
" Funny, greedy pussy-cat!
With your bowl of cream, so
fine,
Really, how can you want mine?"





LITTLE IDLERS.


I can't talk-I wonder why.
Does it not seem hard to you
That, however much I try,
I can only just say Mew" ?
Now, till supper comes at eight,
There is nothing but to wait.






L--_-<;---; -








LITTLE IDLERS.

'Tis far too warm to walk to-day-
The bank is soft and dry;
So let the jug and basket stay,
We'll watch the birds go by.
And yet each tiny creature, look,
Has some wee task to do;
Let's take a lesson from their book,
And both be busy, too !






AN INTERRUPTED FEAST. 13


-k AN
Y INTETRRUTPTED T
FEAST.
w"*.; ..> .: .


F,:i' c i.it- \i.r:'1 ii Iul-'-ir pI'iirie,
-A fiil 11 v l ,:I lillr: -ti6e111 .


A t 6 i -oi' thii I ij.1 .






EAn tperche thin that tre.
M [u,_'i 1,:.-_- t... t ,k ,. i ,it,.
Fium uut thufat; keiniail XVvhlite,

The merriest of elves,
No larger than themselves,
Flew lightly as a bee,
And perched within that tree,


-I





14 BIRDIE'S MIRROR.

Ere they could say him nay,
He'd twitched one nut away;
But some one somewhere says,
Ill-gotten gain ne'er pays !"










A cloud of dust outflies;
And squealing with affright,
He swiftly takes to flight.


BIRDIE'S MIRROR.

S.- LEFT alone beside the stream,
'- What does birdie do ?
SGaze about with timid eyes,
Till a little friend he spies
In those waters blue.
S, Round bright eyes just like his own,
S^ Feathers fine and trim-
.. Though the rest be flown away,
2 He can ne'er be dull to-day,
S..-..... While he talks to him !






A VIOLET-SISTERS. 15


A VIOLET.
THERE grew a little flower so shy,
That she could only droop her head;
S' The rest are fairer far than I-
S" Within the shade I'll hide," she said.
Then floated by, as light as air,
A butterfly all gold and blue,
And whispered, In this garden fair,
I find there's none so sweet as you !"



;f _--- -__= -o_






SISTERS.

LITTLE sisters-lovely sisters !-
I would paint you standing there,
With the sunbeams of the morning
Shining full on brow and hair.
I can paint your smiling faces,
And your lips so red and sweet;
I can show the dimpled roundness
Of your little hands that meet.






16 SISTERS.

I can paint the dreamy softness
And the colour of your eyes;
But I wish that I could picture
All the love that in them lies !

Little sisters-tender sisters-
Long together may you stand,


I -- I


jill


1-- A
--~.
I'I*~"
,'- -"

K
/


Dreaming golden dreams at morning,
Thinking glad thoughts hand in hand.

Here, at least, within my picture-
Sweet and childish, bright and fair-
I shall keep you safe for ever,
As you stand before me there.






A LITTLE HEROINE. 17


-.1-a
i Ve~~:


J


A LITTLE HET'OINE.


O- K -LV ;-, i ,lb ..1, t ,.:- ,il-l i .- bl.-_itll,''.
L .Y'i : ,1 l :, -.l f1t, ii, ti ,:;- d.li \ li I :.-1il.l :.

\VWi it I..- i-~:.1 whli-n thl,- r-st are
1i', -t ii- .'
Tlt-I.: a _:- ,,jnv wvitlhin th,: f'-ll.
SI-,,1 ,ly ;a lI mi.,." but thr -h'i- h':i':< kIIn ws
it,
Surely, from all the flock apart;
A little lamb-would its mother lose it,
Or is it dear to her parent heart ?


Only a step from the pastures pleasant-
Close, so close is the flow'ry plain;





A LITTLE HEROINE.


Hark to sheep-bell and song of peasant!
Morning is stirring the earth again.

" Only a step," but who shall take it ?
Heavily frowns the steep ravine;
Scarcely an echo dares to wake it-
Who can measure its depth unseen ?















Only a child, with loose locks flying,
Brave bright eyes, and a tender arm,
To venture down at the lost one's crying,
Pity, and bear him away from harm !

SOnly a child," with many above her
In learning, and beauty, and rank, they say;
But we look and smile, and think, Heaven love
her,
She should be great in the world one day."





THE STORY OF A SHOWER. 19


, i ; ,,, I '. \., ,..
, i + .r" I,- .+-. .. t.,,- ..
Kv ": I," -' *
--
_.:- _" ./.;, -. / 1 _j



THE STORY OF A SHOWER.

LITTLE maidens One and Two
Sewing fast, as well they may,
Little hooded cloaks of blue,
Ready to put on to-day.

Enters little maiden Three-
Come you're losing all the fun;
Time enough for cloaks, for me,
When the rain has well begun !"

Little maidens One, Two, Three,
Gaily playing, till at last
Just a drop or two they see;
Then the shower comes hard and fast.

One and Two laugh at the rain;
As for little maiden Three,
When she scampers home again,
No drowned rat looks worse than she !





FAIRYLAND.


FAIRYLAND.

WOULD you find the way to Fairyland,
l Little child with the wondering eyes ?
You must leave the clasp of my older
hand,
And follow yon pretty bird that flies.

Oh, it may be far you will have to go,
But never your foot must touch the
ground;
And a word might weaken the spell, you
know,
Or even the tiniest heart-beat sound!



",, I. ,".

?1

77f~j Y


20





FAIRYLAND. 21

When you come at last to a magic place, -7/,
A-ripple with laughter and music sweet; '
Where from every flower peeps a roguish
face, *p/-/ 1
And soft bells tinkle on dancing feet; ,4 r
While the faint lights flicker o'er
emerald grass, s ,.', '.
On dazzling forms with the gauz-
iest wings;
And from out dim corners arise and pass / -
A hundred curious, beautiful things; (
When you see strange birds come circling
Tame at the call of an elfin hand, [near,
Or secrets tell in a sprite's small ear-
Oh, then, you will be in Fairyland !
Do you ask me where I learned it all,
Wondering eyes ? Well, I hardly know;
Perhaps in some old, old nursery tale,
Or else in a dream, dear, long ago.


/", .,





22 CINDERELLA.


CINDERELLA.
I WONDER what she dreams of,
In the chimney-corner there,
While the merry blaze is dancing
On her face and shining hair;


- A -


While the broom lies all unheeded,
And the kettle's boiling o'er,
And the bellows and the duster
Glide to rest upon the floor ?

Does she think of Cinderella,
In the wondrous time of old-
Of the magic coach and horses,
Of the prince so fine and bold ?





CINDERELLA.


Ah, my pretty little maiden,
I'm afraid those days are past.
If you wish to find a palace,
And sweet pleasure that will last,

You must turn those idle fingers
Into fairies swift and light,


Make them fly to do your bidding,
Set to work with all their might.

Then, you'll see whatever's cheerless
Fade away and leave no trace,
And the little room becoming
Quite a cozy, happy place !





24 COME OUT.


~ 'w : j...; ". .

COME OUT!
COME, who's for a drive in the fresh, keen air .
No carriage awaits with its prancing pair;
But out in the fields, 'mid a world of snow,
A sledge, you will find, is the best to go.





THE SNOW-MAN. 25

No buds are seen upon branch or bough;
But who shall say it is cheerless now,
When diamonds hang from each frosted height,
And the sun looks down with a cheery light ?
Then leave the chair and the cozy nook,
Forget the toy and the picture-book;
The chimney-corner is warm and wide,
But fairer still is the world outside !





.'--"* '6 '



THE SNOW-MAN.
THE flakes are falling round him, -j
but he heeds not as he stands '"
And looks across the meadows, .
like a monarch o'er his lands ;
No fences brown, no grasses green,
no colours are in sight,
The country of this snow-king is clrIe g.t-
a realm of dazzling white.
His arms, two withered branches, '
stick out from his sides of snow,






THE SNOW-MAN.


His mouth is half-a-dozen scarlet berries in a row;
His cheeks are shapeless, and
his eyes two cinders; while,
for crown,
He wears a battered hat from
which the icicles hang down.

He stands so lean and lanky,
and with such a solemn stare,
That some who come upon him
in the dusk, and unaware,
May feel a little startled as they
see him in the shade,
Yet something more than this wouldd take to make
good folks afraid.

ISee how the birds come tamely
Down and flutter to his feet,
And search the ground for scat-
,, tered seeds and dainty crumbs
A to eat;
.4 He seems to them a kind old
man to let them venture
near,
For they are sweet and inno-
cent, and so they know no
1 fear.


-a-, Sfffw^-i-






WELCOME NEWS. 27


WELCOME NEWS.


NINE little sparrows
Waiting in the snow,
Where to find the next meal
Wishing they could know.

Two older sparrows
Perched upon a rail,
Bringing such a story,
Like some fairy tale:-





28 WELCOME NEWS.





,v ~^ F t ..'.-. 111 ,: ... -.r -













Oh, her eyes are coloured
Like the sky, soft blue;
Mouth like summer rosebud;
Curls of sunny hue "
Has she wings of silver,

Wings ? they have not come yet,
But they will some day "
.1t .'1 ...'



But they will some lay I!





SECOND THOUGHTS ARE BEST. 29


SECOND THOUGHTS ARE BEST!

UPON the road to school, one day,
They loitered, hand in hand,
And watched the fishing-boats that lay
Drawn up along the strand.

I never could like sums," cried Joe,
However I might try "
And patchwork picks my fingers so,"
Said Polly, with a sigh.

I fink it would be nice-don't you ?-
To go away to sea,
And catch the fis', like big folks do."
Yes, let us," answered he.

And we will be so kind, you know,"
Was Polly's happy thought;
For we s'all always let them go
As soon as they are caught! "

We'll have to keep a few," said he;
Or what about our food ?





30 SECOND THOUGHTS ARE BEST.

One must look after that, you see,
In going away for good."

"But when I come to fink of it,
Dear Joe-perhaps we may
Get tired, the least least wzec-est bit,
Of fis', for every day."


He whistled low; and then his brow
Grew serious as could be-
" I really can't remember, now,
What else we'd get at sea.

" And oh, the wind begins to blow;
The skies are gray as lead;
So, Polly dear, suppose we go
Some other day, instead! "





MY PARTNER. 31


IAf- PATNEIL.


'i-r M -. '.,-llt t'_, ;.-, ['" ^! i ] ,-

My two little brothers
--- / and I.
There were ices and creams, pink and white,
And a rich birthday cake, mountains high.

There was jelly, and sweet lemonade;
And we had a good dance in the hall,
Where almost a scramble we made
For the partners most pretty and tall.

And now, as I watched the rest whirl,
I felt rather jealous, you know;
For mine was a fat little girl,
Who trod, oh so hard, on my toe.

Then I saw, in a corner alone,
A lady with such a kind face;
She'd a necklace that sparkled and shone,
And a fan all of feathers and lace.
3





AN ACCIDENT.


I asked her to dance. She said, "Yes,"
S And soon we were spinning around;
SI -- '.'..And I never once stepped on her dress,
.1-i '_ Though it floated a yard o'er the ground.
'So when they are talking to-day
S Of their partners so pretty and tall,
I think of mny lady, and say
That mine was the best, after all!

I "

I, t -.: '."







AN ACCIDENT.
ON the coach my dolly sat,
Going at full speed,
When she tumbled off, poor dear!
And she lies so still, I fear
She is hurt indeed.
Here comes mother! she can tell
What had best be done.
Come along-we'll go to her;
She'll be nurse and comforter,
And doctor, all in one !





A LEAFY HOME. 33


A LEAFY HOME.

As I wander through the garden
In the sunny morning hours,
I could wish I were a birdie,
Born and bred amid the flowers.

Oh, how sweet to waken early,
'Neath a sky of tender blue,
When around the nest are clinging
Little crystal beads of dew;

With a soft wing to unfold me,
And a gay voice singing by;-





ONLY A DROP.

I'd forget about my lessons,
While they taught me how to fly.
Or, without a slate and pencil,
I might learn to count-who knows ?-
By the leaves along the branches,
Or the petals on a rose.
Oh, the peace, the joy, the beauty
-In this leafy home that bide !
You would hardly think a birdie
Could be naughty, if he tried.
Yet, I've hosts o.fjoys to bless me,
And a thousand things to please,
That a birdie never dreamt of
In his nest amid the trees.


S 7 ,.. '.--*-







ONLY A DROP.
"TIRESOME rain-oh, go away-
Let us all get out to play;
Really, now, this day or two,
We have had enough of you."





TO THE SEA-GULLS. 35

Jess her chubby hand holds out,
Draws it backward with a pout:
What a great round heavy drop !
Naughty rain, why can't you stop ? "
But the drop said, "You must know
I came down a while ago;
If you look, my little one,
You will find the rain is gone.
On the porch some friends and I
Rested, sparkling merrily,
When one pushed so close to me
That I tumbled, as you see."





-"-^-.-:- p ,- : .....- ^-.1 .'. :.' .... I


TO THE SEA-GULLS.
WHENCE have you come, and where do you go,
Beautiful sea-gulls that flit to and fro ?
Sailing through many a storm you've been--
Many a troubled and angry scene.
Wandering ones, for a moment stay;
Fair is the picture outspread to-day-
Sunshine and peace over sea and land,
Children at play on the golden sand.






36 WINTER SUNBEAMS.


WINTER SUNBEAMS.
THE old trees creaked and groaned,
And tossed their arms, and moaned,
While clouds began a-snowing;
And I said, 0 north wind drear,
I am weary, do you hear,
Of your endless, dismal blowing !"
Then o'er the frosted grass
Came a little lad and lass-
They tripped along, the cold defying;
And merrily he tried
Her sunny curls to hide
From the flakes around them flying.
With laughter glad and gay,
Too soon they passed away ;
But as I watched them going,
Their voices echoed clear,
And it seemed no longer drear,
Though the north wind went on blowing.





FORGET ME NOT. 37


yrni-> ;"*' ;.



FORGET ME NOT.
OH, who would stay in the house to-day,
While over the meadow the larks still sing,
When counted by hours are the lives of flowers,
And summer itself may soon take wing!
Close as in spring the daisies grow,
As if in the grass they would print our names;
Poppies have set whole fields aglow,
And leap in the air, like living flames.
Here, by a stream, is the pale blue gleam
Of a little flower, to children dear.
It seems to say, I must soon away;
'Forget me not,' till I come next year !"





38 THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER.


THE CLERK OF THE WEATHER.
OH, please can you tell us the way
To the Clerk of the Weather ? They say
He can stop all this rain, if he will,
And drive off the mists from the hill,
And make the sky sunny and blue,
And let out the butterflies too !-
Alas but the journey was long,
And folks kept directing us wrong;
Our naughty shoes, somehow, would stray
Wherever the worst puddles lay.
So here we are back, once again,
All weary and cross, in the rain.
The weather-glass hangs in the hall-
Why, it's rising to Fair," after all;
And look, there's the sun smiling out,
And a butterfly sailing about.
Good Clerk of the Weather-he knew
Quite well, without us, what to do !





IN VIOLET LAND. 39


"HE KNOWS THAT HE HAS WINGS."
BIRDIE on that tiny spray,
How you make it bend and sway !
Though your weight be e'er so small,
Much I fear lest you should fall!
Nay, dear child," the birdie sings:
See, I have my trusty wings;
And I know that, come what may,
They can bear me safe away !"


~ ^ _-^ ;C -T .










IN VIOLET LAND.
LITTLE violet girl! I say,
Would you mind so very much-
Should you hide your flowers away,
If I ventured once to touch ?
Oh, how fresh and cool they seem !
Tell me-had you far to go,





IN VIOLET LAND.


Gathering them ? Sometimes I dream
I am walking where they grow.
I should like to buy a lot;
Wouldn't mother just be pleased!
But no money have I got -
Not to call my own, at least.
Mother's ill, and trade is bad--
(Only twopence earned to-day);
Folks forget the sweeper lad
When the sun shines warm in May.












May I smell them ? Ah, what scent ?
Let me drink it in again.
Now, good-bye; 'tis time I went;
Mother mustn't wait in vain.
I shall take the scent away
On my lips, and in my hand;
She will surely smile, and say,
I have been to violet land !





A DAISY CHAIN. 41


A DAISY CHAIN.


SEATED there amid the hay,
So, at last, I've found you!
Here's a chain of daisies; see,
You look fine as fine can be
When I place it round you.

Listen, dear: the lark's glad song
Rang so sweetly never;
Oh, so much I wish-don't you ?-
That this day so bright and blue
Might go on for ever !





SILENT COMFORTERS.


SILENT COMFORTERS.
EYES downcast, and pout on lip -
What had vexed her ladyship ?
I might ask, and ask away,
Not the least word would she say.
So I made a posy sweet
From my garden trim and neat,





THE SWALLOW. 43

Took it to her, fresh and fair,
As she sat so sadly there.
And it seemed the flowers knew
Just the wisest thing to do,
Nestling there against her cheek,
With no power or need to speak.
For, in quite a little while,
As I watched, there came a smile;
Quickly all the clouds went past,
And the sunshine beamed at last!











THE SWALLOW.
DEAR little swallow, restless rover,
Stay with us yet for a while, I pray;
Still there remains, ere summer is over,
Many a sunny, beautiful day.
When you are far o'er land and river,
Have no fear for your nest, my dear
Safely we'll try to guard it ever,
Ready for you when you come next year !





44 A LARK-SONG IN AUTUMN.-TASTES DIFFER.

A LARK SONG IN AUTUMN.
H E hovered o'er the grasses,
And clover white and red,
And sang, oh, such a tender song-
I could have thought he said:-
The summer turns to autumn,
The grass must turn to hay;
Y.^^ And all the little birds I loved
Have long since flown away.
.. :.. I wonder would they know me,
'If they should ever pass?
And would they find the dear old nest,
'.' I So deep, now, in the grass?
i.," I think it might remind them,
'II If they could hear m6 sing
SThis little tune-the favourite one
I sang them in the spring."

TASTES DIFFER!
;. i Two pretty little birds I know,
Within our field they come and go;
One seems to find his chief delight
In many a wild and wandering flight.
''' The other sings, and seeks his rest
-' For ever near his tiny nest;
SAnd much I fancy-do not you ?-
*: ,, That he's the happier of the two.





VIOLETS.


-7 VIOLETS.

S VIOLETS, pretty violets, that are hiding
in the grass,
Do not be so shy, I pray, but look out
as I pass;
S For I must haste to gather you, and
carry you away
To the great, dim, smoky city, ere the
sun is up to-day.

Violets, simple violets, if I left you here to grow,
A little longer you might live than if I pluck you now;
But you'd never see the city, with its wondrous life
and ways,
You'd be but simple violets the remainder of your days.

Violets, precious violets, there are toilers where I go,
Who cannot reach the deep green woods or watch the
violets grow;
And when you see the welcome they will give to you
to-day,
I think you'll not be sorry that I carried you away !





46 THE SINGING STREAM.


THE SINGING STREAM.
I CAN hear the little stream
Singing out its soft glad song;
Why so happy does it seem,
As it flows and flows along?
Standing now upon the brink,
Watching those fair waters glide,
'Tis its useful life, I think,
i That makes glad the singing tide.

S I :- i i '


onr.,
,I Vi,,r, it,
N ,, .' ,_-, t h eil..l li, d;,.__.tip :- it t\ii _






.1" '- ,' ,
.H tr o t- .t


,. .li






THE DAISY'S WISH.


*_ .I, ,,,.-
-
TILE DAISY'S WISH.
Huw glad and gay the iiuiaduwo,
How still and blue the sky!
How sweet to live here always,
And never, never die "
So thought a great white daisy-
When, o'er the grassy land,
A heedless lad came whistling,
With willow switch in hand.
It snapped her stalk so slender,
And flung her to the ground;
While all her fair companions
In silent grief hung round.
One flow'ret held a tear-drop
Within her eye of blue,
Although you might have fancied
'Twas but a bead of dew.
A hyacinth bent o'er her;
A kingcup shook his head;
4


-y{ f,-:.






THE DAISY'S WISH.


The tender lark that loved her
Would fain have died instead.
Then, presently-a rustling;
The wind came sweeping by;
It lifted up poor daisy,
With something like a sigh,
And dropped her in the streamlet
That ran past rush and reed-
For oh, the sun was scorching,
And she was faint indeed.
Now, like a star she floated,
And now she all but sank,
Until at last she rested
Upon a mossy bank.
There stood a painter's canvas,
And on it, plain as plain,
The sky, the trees, the water,
All nature lived again.
The painter glanced around him,
The daisy pleased his eye;
He put her in his picture,
That she might never die!
--:. ,,, r- _




--.J.,..~' -t j f' ---






TO THE SKYLARK.


TO THE SKYLARK.

WHAT are you singing, little bird,
So gaily in the sunny noon;
A sweeter song I never heard-
Ah, tell me what you call the tune ?

Where are you going, birdie, say ?
Is earth not fair enough for you,


That you must mount and soar away,
On eager wings, into the blue ?

If you must go, well, then, good-bye-
I still can hear you in the air;
So glad you seem, so fast you fly,
Perhaps you know that heaven's up there!





TOIL AND MUSIC.


Ar TOIL AND MUSIC.

JUST a little dark-eyed maiden
SIn our crowded city street,
SWith the twilight shadows
round her,
And the snow beneath her
feet;
But her sweet songs seem to bear us
N here the glad sun warmly shines,
,- t he peaceful home of peasants,
,A nd the glow of purple vines.
SH.i i k she tells of feast and laughter,
Merry children at their play,
Simple toil that ends in music
At the closing of the day.
Now a lullaby she's chanting,
Hushed and dreamy, soft and slow,
Just as baby-brother loved it
When she rocked him to and fro;
And the song to which we listen
Till we turn away and sigh,
Is the song her mother taught her
In the happy days gone by.
Come again, 0 little maiden,
Through our crowded city way;
Let our toiling end in music
At the closing of the day i





WHAT'S O'CLOCK?


WHAT'S O'CLOCK?

" GIVE me back my puff-ball, .
Bertie,
Ere you blow it all away;
'Tis the shepherd's clock-and
by it
I can tell the time of day. 'I
If it tells mefour, you know,
I must say good-bye, and go."

Stay a moment, little Maudie:
I've a stronger breath than you;
Two good puffs will send it flying,
Then the time will be but two.
While the lambs are still at play,
Why should you, dear, run away ?"
"Never mind the time, then, Bertie-
Let me have it, I entreat;
In its down so lightly floating
I can read a secret sweet.
Pretty puff-ball, tell, I pray,
When will be my wedding-day ?"

"Why, you know quite well, sweet Maudie,
That will be when we are grown,
And the roses climb and cluster
Round a cottage of our own.
You are six and I am eight,
So there's yet some time to wait!"






TO A BUTTERFLY.


TO A BUTTERFLY.

BUTTERFLY, butterfly stay with us, stay;
You are the fairest we've looked at to-day.
Who ever saw such a beautiful thing?
As if a rose-petal had just taken wing !
No garden you'll find half so pretty as ours,
So stay with us, play with us, here 'mid the flowers.

Butterfly, butterfly float at your will-
Or if awhile you would sooner be still,
A dear little house we will build for you
Of leaves of the lime which the sun shines through.
No garden elsewhere is so pretty as ours,
So stay with us, play with us, here 'mid the flowers.


~- --.~-

--,--i-
;r-
~a. r
i~W :





TWO ON A SWING.


~'


jmd:


TWO ON A SWING.

OF what shall I sing
As I move to and fro,
'Neath the trees, with a swing,
Oh, so dreamily slow ?
Of butterflies fair,
Or red roses so sweet,
Of the breeze in my hair,
Or the grass at my feet ?
Swing swing!
Of what shall I sing ?





54 TWO ON A SWING.

Stay, surely I know!
There is one at my side,
With paws white as snow,
And brown eyes open wide.






:' i ,









o sSwing!: swing!






'Tis of him I shall sing.
Y e t h is fon'dn ',i s h,"-'
.H mut. .. me he re
'Ti "o' I "s' 'sn.








Yet his fondness is such,
He must follow me here.
Swing swing !
'Tis of him I shall sing.





A LITTLE NURSE. 55


A LITTLE NURSE.

" LITTLE maiden, little maiden I-"--"
Sighed the wild-flowers in the
grass;
" Yesterday you played amongst us, :.. ''
Now with hurried step you .- ..,
pass.
Here, beside the rippling stream, i
Come and rest awhile and dream." .L-V"-

"Little maiden, little maiden !"
Called the birds, with voices clear,
"Yesterday you praised our singing;
Now, it seems, you do not hear.
Stop and join our merry lay,
Ere you hasten on your way."

Pretty flow'rets-darling birdies !"
Said the maiden, soft and low,
Surely you must know I love you;
But I cannot linger now.
Though you want me much, 'tis true,
Some one wants me more than you.

In that cottage past the lane, there,
Stands a little, lonely bed;
On a coarse and crumpled pillow
Lies a little, aching head;
Two eyes look toward the lane,
And they must not look in vain !"





BIRDIE'S BED.


BIRDIE'S BED.

HE will not wake at to-morrow's calling,
Nor sun his wings on the breezy hill:
Just when the first soft dews were falling
I found him lying, so cold and still.
The brooklet paused 'mid its merry rushing;
Trees lent a shadow close and dim;
The very wind its voice seemed hushing
To make a resting-place for him.
Where could I hide them-the downy feathers,
The drooping head with the closed eyes sweet-
Safe from all ruffling winds and weathers,
From curious faces and careless feet?
I came to a hollow, quiet and cozy,
Formed in a tree-trunk, wide and deep;
May blooms dropped in it petals rosy-
'Twas just the spot where he might sleep.
'Tis there that the sun's last smile long lingers,
And birds sing dreamily through the hours;
So I laid him down with tender fingers-
Covered him o'er with moss and flowers.

Under which leaves does he lie at rest, dears,
Elm or sycamore, oak or pine ?
I may not tell, though you rightly guessed, dears;
That is our secret-his and mine






58 A DAISY'S LIFE.














A DAISY'S LIFE.

DAISY, pretty daisy,
Shining through the grass,
Loved of all the children,
S And the birds that pass;
Happy, careless daisy,
Staring at the sun,
Suppose, like me, you'd lessons,
Or work that must be done !
"" Little child," said daisy,
"I have lessons, too;
And the sky's my book, dear,
S Spreading fair and blue.
Daisies cannot work, dear;
Yet I love to think
That I can hold a dewdrop
A thirsty bird might drink !"





CAUGHT.


CAUGHT.


SUCH a famous heap we made,
Lil and I, with pail and spade;
Then we set, to guard the hill,
Her two dollies, Jack and Jill.

But, while we admired the heap,
Up that sly old tide did creep;
Floated quickly o'er the sand,
Cut us all off from the land.

" Never mind me," cried poor Lil;
" Save, oh, save my Jack and Jill!"
But, 'mid many a squeal and squall,
Ere they drowned, I saved them all!






60 DAY DREAMERS.


DAY DREAMERS. iy

A t,. .. 1 L v itl ill tdl,,- ,-,, y t1,1.-
", -
l i.t tiw.n .* tir.. I :.i iii-t Il
S N ,, t!i t I ...k. n t: l1.:i1.
.i., ',, J ,.,i ar.- *>v., ,ii, u i, i n,,t,':- :1
^-.- AI thil .0 Vtin. wi ,ll I i.,!,,-.l,



it 1'-.
' .S r '. 4ii,: ,., ti. ,': ,[: : t !i._ .ls:t
.. :; A ::,Tvi .,. --ih t lil .,,i ,:, y ,.i.u i i ,u-t ini--



.; '' ..thi.: .l1. :. t n i-.t .

V.i. 1 ... r .:i.:.ai .- ilt

Do you love the moonlight, pray,
Better than the sun's bright ray ?





ON THE LOOK-OUT.


Not the least reply you make-
You can be but half awake!
Why some people have agreed
They must call you wise, indeed,
Really now I cannot see.
Thought the owls, "No more can we.
All we know is, that we do
Just as Nature tells us to;
Mind our business-in some eyes,
This may be accounted wise! "











ON THE LOOK-OUT.
WHEN the sun said good-bye at the end of the day,
The rabbits stole out in the twilight to play;
From hole and from corner they crept thick and fast,
But one little rabbit was always the last.
With shy, timid gaze, he would cautiously peer
To see that no sign of a danger was near;
He missed some alarms which the others befell,
But often he lost half the frolic as well!





62 GOOD-NIGHT TO THE BIRDS.


GOOD-NIGHT TO THE BIRDS.
CAN you hear me, little birdies,
From your pear-tree up so high ?
Everything around is sleeping,
None stirs but you and I.
Listen, birdies,
While I sing your lullaby !
Be your slumber soft and peaceful;
May no wind too rough or strong
Wander near you-only breezes,
Soft as mother's evening song,
Rock you gently
In your nest the whole night long !
Mother's hand has smoothed my pillow,
And her kiss is on my face:
Was there one to stroke your feathers
As you nestled in your place ?
If there was, then,
You are sure to sleep in peace.

























,I -

'pA

1% \ \







~- I,
~tvJ



~1~,~? 2:. *L A





64 FAIRY BOATS.


FAIRY BOATS.

Two merry elves, one morning fair,
Flew to the river side,
And lit on two enchanting boats
That rocked upon the tide.

"Hurrah !" they said; now let us take
A journey up the stream :
With our light hearts, and wings for sails,
How short the way will seem !"











What nonsense !" cried a wise old swan,
Who floated gravely by;
I never heard of such a thing-
You cannot, if you try.

No breeze can waft your sails along;
For, if you did but know,
Your boats are water-lily leaves,
And safely moored below !"





MY LITTLE HORSE. 65


MY LITTLE HORSE.
MY father rides a charger gray,
My mother loves her favourite bay,"
My sister's mare has a pedigree,
But my little horse is the horse for me !
Though quiet as a lamb, indeed,
At half a word away he'll speed;
I have a whip and spurs, you know
But these are only kept for show





66 NUTTING TIME.

His temper's perfect as can be;
He's never weary, no, not he;
He never shies, as many do,
Nor gets a pebble in his shoe.

The other horses have their stalls
Within the stable's lonely walls;
But mine lives in the nursery-
So dear is the little horse to me.
By this time you have guessed, of course,
He's nothing but a rocking-horse;
Yet when you see him, you'll agree
That he is the very horse for me.


NUTTING TIME.
IN and out the trees, there,
Merry voices sound;
Where the bank is steepest,
Ripest nuts are found.
Reach a hand and catch them,
Clusters small and great;-
Take care, little maiden,
Set your basket straight.

'Twould not be so pleasant
Gathering them again,
If they once went spinning
Down the dusty lane.





68 ON THE SANDS.


ON THE SANDS.


WE played together on the sands-
The sun was shining brightly;
And I was happy as a king,
While everything went rightly.
" Come, let us build a house," said Maud,
The sailor's little daughter.
Said I, "A castle will be best,
With moat to hold the water."
We went to work with spade and pail,
And I changed pails with Maudie;
For all the paint is washed off mine,
But hers is new and gaudy.
And when the castle all was done,
A famous heap we found it.





ON THE SANDS. 69

" Now let us watch the waves," cried she,
As they creep gently round it."
" No, I shall knock it down," I said,
Since I have helped to build it!"
" Oh, let it stand !" cried Maud, with tears,
And held her spade to shield it.
She vowed I was a bad, bad boy,
That nothing could be clearer;
She bade me go and play alone,
And never more come near her.
So Maud and I are parted now,
In anger and in sorrow;
We never shall be friends again,
No, never-till to-morrozw!










__ ?uL-





70 PULL AWAY-DOLLY'S ADVENTURE.


PULL AWAY!

WHERE the lights glow,
Bright in the tree,
Gay crackers grow-
Pull one with me !

First, hold it tight-
Firmer, I say;
Pull with your might-
Once, twice-away !

What shall we get
Out of this one ?
No one knows yet--
That's half the fun !


DOLLY'S ADVENTURE.

'Tis very well to smile now,
But you gave me such a fright,
0 dolly, when I missed you
In the middle of the night.





DOLLY'S ADVENTURE.


I thought we played together,
When you fell into the stream;
Yet I said-just half awaking-
" That was surely but a dream ;

'" For, spread about my
',' pillow,
'!' Lies her curly golden
- I hair;"
$ i--. And I reached my hand
to touch you,
S-". But, oh dear you were
i ;not there !

I felt so sad and lonely
,. i 'That I cried, but all in
v ain;


(~1


So to see if I could
find you
I went off to sleep
again.


Now, fancy in the morning
There you were, all safe and right;
And nurse said, "Here's poor dolly
Been upon the floor all night! "

Your pretty curls are tangled,
That were nice and smooth before;
So promise, dolly darling,
You will tumble out no more!


-I





A LITTLE SHEPHERD.


A LITTLE SHEPHERD.
THE other sheep have all gone on,
The sheep-boy never looks behind,
And here you sit, so tired and wan,
Poor thing, with none to care or mind.
You don't quite like the dusty road,
And all the busy folk that pass;
You're thinking of some stream that flowed
So cool and fresh, through meadow grass.
Look here, then-see, I've come to bring
A draught of water, clean and sweet-
(It really is a handy thing,
That drinking-fountain up the street).
I'm glad I had my Sunday hat,
The other one would never do;





A LITTLE SHEPHERD.


There is no crown at all to that,
This only lets a little through !
I know of such a lovely place
Beyond the town, where meadows lie,
And when you're ready for a race,
We'll go and find it, you and I.
There's no one there that can annoy,
Or see my shoes so old and worn,
Or call me "little beggar boy,"
And point to where my coat is torn.
I'll be your shepherd kind and true,
And never let you go astray;
I'll whistle merry tunes to you,
You'll nibble at the grass all day.

11 .'. ;.
'-'


.7:--. ., -- .

And when the night comes down in peace,
And stars are peeping from the sky,
My head upon your soft, soft fleece-
We'll rest together, you and I.





74 GRANDCHILD MARJORIE.



"-- ~~ ~-. ":" ----" -"- .. .-~. ..-.-c*-"' -






.. ....... ....... ..
-'. :q


GRANDCHILD MARJORIE.

HE'S but a poor blind fisher,
Whose fishing days are done,
And she a tiny maiden
Whose life has scarce begun;
Yet all day long beside the sea
Sit Ned and little Marjorie.

Ah, you should see her lead him
To the low bench on the pier;
She bids him lean upon her,
And tells him not to fear,





A DISCONTENTED MOUSE. 75

With smile like sunshine on the sea-
This little, cheerful Marjorie.
In vain the children call her
To ramble and to rove,
And you may try to tempt her
With things that children love;
She'd never leave him-no, not she-
Dear, loving, little Marjorie.
His peaceful day is closing,
His sun is in the west,
Alone he'll soon be sailing
To find the Land of Rest;
But there, beside the Eternal Sea,
He'll wait for faithful Marjorie.


A DISCONTENTED MOUSE.
To the breezy cornfield,
When the day was fine,
Quite a merry party
Of mice stole out to dine.
Dainty was the feast there
Spread upon the ground,
Golden shone the wheat-ears,
Large and ripe and sound.
Only one wee mouse
Turned away alone;
While the others feasted,
He, indeed, had none:





76 A DISCONTENTED MOUSE,

Grumbled through the noontide,
Just because the rest
Had, or so he thought it,
Chosen all the best.

j



', i i '



As the moments flew, i








: Don't you think it likely,







He was sadly hungry,
Yes, and sorry too?





"ORANGES AND LEMONS." 77


"ORANGES AND LEMONS."

ORANGES and lemons!"
""_ See them as they sing,
Such a row of beauties,
Like pearls upon a string.
Little heads are nodding,
Little feet keep time,
Little voices mingle
In the old, old rhyme.
S Oranges or lemons,
Which is it to be
When you have to choose,
dears ?
jWhisper it to me.
S" Oranges," you tell me,
And you, and you, and you;
Such a sweet-tooth party,
Why, I never knew!
Oranges and lemons!"
Old Time ever sings;
Sweets and sours in turn, dears,
Thorns and flowers, he brings.
No, we may not choose, dears,
That would never do;
Yet may he come laden
With countless sweets to you !





BABY'S SWINGING SONG.


BABY'S SWINGING SONG.

SEE, the sun is peeping
Through the branches high;
Butterflies are floating,-
Darling mother's nigh.





BABY'S SWINGING SONG. 79

While she sits beside me,
And the hammock swings,
Here I lie, and wonder
Lots and lots of things.

Wonder if the birdies
Only know one song,
That they sing no other
All the morning long.

Wonder would the sun, there,
Oh, so big and clear-
Would it look much bigger
If I went quite near I

Wonder why the birds' song
Dies away so fast;
Are their little throats, then,
Really tired at last ?

Wonder why the sunlight
Flickers so about;
Could it be that some one
Tried to put it out ?

Now I'm tired of wondering-
Eyes begin to blink;
Something weighs upon them-
Is it sleep, you think ?
6






"WILL IT BEAR?"


Now I scarcely hear you,
Birdies in the tree,
For a voice is singing
Lullaby to me.

Soon I shall not see you,
Big sun in the skies;
Yet two bright stars watch me-
Mother's loving eyes!



"WILL IT BEAR?"

WELL, my little people, say,
Standing by the frozen brook,
What's the question of to-day ?
You look grave as judges look.

Let us see if I can guess
What the query is about;
,-- Stay a moment, then-why, yes,
Now indeed the matter's out.

Happy beings, ah, what bliss,
Thus to have no other care
In the whole wide world than this-
Do you think the ice will bear ?


' '
'
,b;
--
-- --





STAND TOGETHER.


STAND TOGETHER!


FIERCE and strong the wind was raving-
I seem fighting with it yet-
When, the hillside steepness braving,
Two wee lassies there I met.

How could children face such weather,
With whole trees uptorn around ?-
Why, they firmly clung together,
And contrived to keep their ground.

And I thought life would be smoother,
And its hours not spent in vain,
If folk stood by one another,
Sharing nobly toil and pain.






EVENING.


I


-i= -" -- '- -
_ '- .... ----- -._ ^



















EVENING.
SEE, the sun a moment lingers
O'er the pale earth, in farewell,
Flames alike the ruined tower
And each flow'ret's closing cell;
Now it sinks behind the hill,
Leaving all things paler still.
Down the path into the valley
Where the quiet waters meet,






THE SNOWDROP. 83

One by one the mild-eyed cattle
Come to bathe their patient feet-
Cattle, trees, and sunset glow
Mirrored, as in glass, below.
Over all a calm has fallen,
Wrapping closely vale and hill;
Gentle faces grow more gentle,
Peaceful thoughts more peaceful still;
Now to weary Earth is given
Something of the peace of Heaven!


THE SNOWDROP.
THE ground will soon be whitening-
Can that be a flake ? Why, no,
'Tis a single snowdrop, surely,
That has dared so soon to blow !
Ah little, lovely snowdrop,
Alone on the brown, brown earth,
Who would dream 'mid these surroundings
Such pureness could have birth ?
Nay, gather it not, but leave it;
It may have been born to teach
Some strange and perfect lesson
No sermon yet could preach.
If each would plant some flower,
Or help one bird to sing,
Then even the world's hard winter
Might wake to an earlier spring.






BABY.


BABY.


WHICH are bluer-summer skies,
Or my darling's deep blue eyes ?
I hardly know,
They are both so blue,
The summer skies and baby's eyes.

Which are brighter-sunbeams fair,
Or the waves of her sunny hair ?
We scarce can tell,
They match so well,
The sunbeams fair and baby's hair.





MY DOVE.


Sweeter, though, is her face to me
Than all sweet things beside that be;
And baby's kiss
I would not miss
For all that you could offer me!




:, .' 1i: ^ ^ ':/






MY DOVE.

I HAVE a pile of picture-books, and quite a score of games,
A cupboard nearly full of toys, and dolls with sweetest
names ;
But nothing in the world, my dove, is half so sweet
as you,
With your little coat of silver gray and pretty eyes so
true.

I wonder if you ever heard about the dove of old
That floated in an ark above the waters deep and cold;
For many days it sheltered there, and then flew out
to see
The fresh face of the dear green earth, where once it
used to be.






86 MY DOVE.

But all the world was covered, and it knew not where
to go-
I think the cruel waters must have drowned its friends,
you know.








5.;z
-. _- _



















So it fluttered back at evening-'twas the wisest plan
and best-
And a kind hand drew it in again, and gave it food
and rest.






TWILIGHT.


TWILIGHT.


OVER the sky faint flushes creep,
Tinting the spire with tender glow,
Touching the birds that nestward sweep,
Mantling the little stream below.

Silence doth fall on home and hill,
Even the stream's low murmurings cease;
All busy things stand calmly still,
Waiting alike Heaven's word of peace.

Dieth the red along the west,
Fadeth the spire into the night;
Tired little children sweetly rest,
Smiling and pure, in robes of white.


~

I
--;-s-=--
s .






























































- I


[//~~c6:~B~~1~ iTq


j/


\)I
1 '5
,----i..;"


~asq





MAY.-SEA TREASURES.


MAY.
JUST an apron full of may,
And a dainty, upturned face;
Children's laughter, fresh and gay,
Ringing all about the place.
Just a may-tree bending low,
Sweetening the air around,
Dropping petals, pure as snow,
Lightly on the mossy ground.
Just a lark up, oh, so high
That his form is lost to view,
Pouring down rich melody
From his realm of perfect blue.
Just the children, bird, and tree,
Only these and nothing more;
Yet they make the world for me
Happier than it seemed before.





SEA TREASURES.
THE tide has turned; the air is cool,
For the summer day is dying;
And in each calm and silvery pool
A fairy world is lying.






90 SEA TREASURES.

Like tiny trees the sea-weeds spread,
And wave in feathery lightness,
.From palest pink to coral red,
S And some of purest whiteness.
( '-'' Here, floating grasses may be seen :



I'. 1


Sdi. I id
14 i | i _,,__, _,ii ii. 1,,_.-,,'i:"- t'',r i ,l.:, -i.; .





lt ; i dt -. -.
I.'.: !:.' ll' S -: ,:-, ,hl:li,-- ".- ] _, .- .,, ,., .- 11nt |.
vH', '-.f' 1. ,, .. .. 1.. ) t.. ..




1.A
I1. W', -,, '.. t L_. : ,ll :., ,,,,i t ~a a ] i .



..'. -* -i ,' . .- *.



-- .. *


|' --- -ki -.",i' l-----,' -
fc^^ ^ ^a. ^i;^,'; }.^ -^ N*





GOOD-NIGHT TO MY DOLL. 91


GOOD-NIGHT TO MY DOLL.

DOLLY dear, good-night, good-night;
Shut your eyes so big and bright.
In my cot so snug, you see,
There's just room for you and me.
When the morning wakes us, dear,
I will dress you-do you hear ?-
In your frock so fine and new,
Pinafore, and bows of blue.
Once I washed you-well-a-day !
How it was, I cannot say,
But your cheeks, so pink before,
Ne'er were rosy any more.





BUTTERFLIES.


BUTTERFLIES.
FLITTING through the jasmine bowers,
Lighting on a woodbine wreath,
Dancing round the trembling flowers,
Scarcely stopping for a breath;
Skimming blossoms honey-laden,
Fluttering earthward, floating high;
In your soft hands, little maiden,
You may catch us, if you try.
So I would, you pretty things,
But that I might hurt your wings."








Follow us, for we are going
To a garden far from here,
Where the loveliest flowers are growing,
And the streams are crystal clear.
You shall see the golden fishes
Leap toward the golden sun;
You shall have your wildest wishes,
If you follow, little one !
Oh, if that could only be;
But you fly too fast for me !"





)4 ECHOES.


ECHOES.

LITTLE children in the wood,
Sporting with the solitude,
How you love to laugh and sing,
Till you make the echoes ring
Cheerily! cheerily !

If you listened, you would hear
Other voices ringing clear:
Far and near, disconsolate,
Calls the wood-dove to her mate,
Constantly constantly !

Hark a sweeter sound than all
On the evening air doth fall;
Now no longer may you roam-
MVother's voice has called you home,
Tenderly tenderly!

Listen, children, all of you-
Life is full of echoes, too;
Words that bless, and words that pain,
All in turn come back again,
Back again!





96 LITTLE SAILORS.


LITTLE SAILORS.


THERE'S a crew of little sailors
Upon the rolling sea;
Their vessel rides in safety,
For she's moored beside the quay;

And something of a sea-life
The youngest understands,
From the shouting of a "heave-ho "
To the tarring of his hands.
There's a crew of lads and lasses;
And often they declare,
"With wind and tide in favour,
And weather always fair,

" And Mat the mate quite ready
For every kind of fun,
There is nothing like the ocean,
When all is said and done !"

One tiny maiden, only,
Stands downcast and apart;
What can have brought the tear-drops,
And vexed that little heart?





LITTLE SAILORS.


Was it some tale of shipwreck,
Of fight with angry wave;
Some yarn of painted savage,
Of cannibal or cave;

Some hint of storm and tempest,
While surf and breakers roar,


c7




-- :.. _

. ... 6-- ."- s:. .i
-,-


That made her vow so firmly
She'd go to sea no more ?

Ah, no no thought did daunt her
Of peril, rock, or wreck;
'Twas a tumble-so they tell me-
On the hard and slippery deck I






9S RIVAL MINSTRELS.


RIVAL MINSTRELS.

WE were tired of building castles,
So we joined, a merry band,
And gave a little concert
On the dry and sunny sand.

We'd a make-believe accordion,
And our banjo was a spade;
'Twas wonderful, considering,
The amount of noise we made.

I forgot the tambourine, though,
And the bones; and for the rest,
How each tried to drown the other
In the song that he knew best.

And soon-would you believe it ?-
The crowd, it grew and grew;
For folks will go on listening,
If to something strange and new.

There was one-a real black minstrel-
Who stood awhile to hear;
His teeth looked, oh, so shiny,
As he smiled from ear to ear.

We took no people's pennies,
Though, for fun, we passed the hat;
We'd played for love, not money,
And were well content with that!




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs