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 Front Cover
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 Table of Contents
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Title: Fables for "you"
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083165/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fables for "you"
Physical Description: 66, 6 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Prosser, Eleanor B
Ballingall, W ( Engraver )
Pennefather, S. C ( Illustrator )
"Home words" Publishing Office ( Publisher )
Selwood Printing Works ( Printer )
Butler and Tanner ( Printer )
Publisher: "Home words" Publishing Office
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Butler & Tanner ; Selwood Printing Works
Publication Date: [1895?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
Fables   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Frome
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Eleanor B. Prosser ; with illustrations designed by S.C. Pennefather.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note: Some illustrations engraved by W. Ballingall.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083165
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002236333
notis - ALH6804
oclc - 228107525

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Half Title
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Frontispiece
        Page iv
    Title Page
        Page v
        Page vi
    Table of Contents
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Fables for "you"
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
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        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Advertising
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Back Matter
        Page 73
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text


















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FABLES FOR "YOU."
















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Dra. n byF
S. C. PENNEFATHER.


NEW LIGHT ON THE MATTER.


[See age 20.


--rLV-













FABLES FOR "YOU."








BY

ELEANOR B. PROSSER.


WITH ILLUSTRATIONS
DESIGNED BY S. C. PENNEFATHER.













Zartron :
"HOME WORDS" PUBLISHING OFFICE,
I, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.C.


I











































Butler & Tanner,
The Selwood Printing Works,
Frome, and London.














CONTENTS.


PAGE
I. WORK FOR ALL ... 9
IL THE SECRET OF A HAPPY HOME IO
III. FAITHFUL IN THAT WHICH IS LEAST. 10
IV. NOT "OUT OF THE WOOD" ... 11
V. A MISS IS AS GOOD AS A MILE 12
VI. LOVE MAKES LABOUR LIGHT 13
VII. FOOLISH FEAR DOUBLES DANGER 14
VIII. EXPERIENCE TEACHES. 15
IX. THE WEAK POINT .. 15
X. LOST OPPORTUNITIES 16
XI. Too LATE 16
XII. DON'T LISTEN, AND YOU WON'T HEAR 17
XIII. How TO DEAL WITH SCANDAL .
XIV. TEMPTATION TESTS HONESTY 18
XV. TEST OF WORTH. 19
XVI. NEW LIGHT ON THE MATTER .. 20
XVII. SHARE AND SHARE 20
XVIII. ONLY SPOTS IN THE SUN 21
XIX. THE TEST OF WORK ... 21
XX. USE BEFORE ORNAMENT 22
XXI. NOT QUITE THE SAME THING 23
XXII. THE WAY TO VALUE QUIETNESS 24
XXIII. WORKING FOR THE MASTER" .. 24
XXIV. PRIDE MUST HAVE A FALL. .. .25
XXV. HASTY JUDGMENTS SELDOM JUST ONES 26
XXVI. THE VALUE OF A CLEAR CONSCIENCE 26
XXVII. PRUDENCE BETTER THAN CUNNING.. 27
XXVIII. EARLY DAYS-TRAINING DAYS 28
XXIX. DIFFERENT VIEWS OF A SUBJECT 29
XXX. "LOOK UP". . 29
XXXI. A MOST VALUABLE FRIEND. 30
XXXII. MUCH SPEAKING TENDS TO EvIL SPEAKING .30
XXXIII. JUSTICE ALL ROUND 31
XXXIV. BITTER FRUIT 32
vll








viii firtt ts.

PAGE
XXXV. OFFICE SHOWS THE MAN 33
XXXVI. THE POWER OF FLATTERY. 34
XXXVII. VALUED WHEN LOST 35
XXXVIII. WHERE TO BLAME 36
XXXIX. DOUBTFUL HONESTY 36
XL. PROMISES MAKE FRIENDS; PERFORMANCE .KEEPS THEM 37
XLI. HANDSOME IS THAT HANDSOME DOES 38
XLII. "GLASS HOUSES 40
XLIII. COMPENSATION 41
XLIV. MEDDLING BRINGS ITS OWN REWARD. 41
XLV. COMPROMISE NOT REFORM 42
XLVI. THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY SEEM 42
XLVII. LET WELL ALONE 43
XLVIII. Two LESSONS IN ONE. .. .. 44
XLIX. THE BRIGHT SIDE 45
L. FLOWERS AS WELL AS FRUIT 46
LI. TOLERATION 47
LII. "MORE THAN ONE WAY" 48
LIII. DARKEST BEFORE DAWN" 49
LIV. THE TIME TO REMOVE EVIL 49
LV. A ROLLING STONE GATHERS NO MOSS 50
LVI. EMPTY VESSELS MAKE THE MOST SOUND. 51
LVII. WAIT AND SEE 52
LVIII. WHAT NEXT! 52
LIX. HONOURABLE OLD AGE 53
LX. NEVER WEAR OUT YOUR WELCOME 54
LXI. THE HARDEST WORK OF ALL .. 55
LXII. METTLE NOT EVERYTHING. 56
LXIII. HIGH PLACES .. .57
LXIV. WHEN TO TAKE ALARM 57
LXV. WHERE SAFETY LIES. 58
LXVI. COUNT THE COST 58
LXVII. WHERE WILL IT LEAD ? 60
LXVIII. THE REASON WHY .. 61
LXIX. WISHING AND WORKING .. 62
LXX. FAIR PLAY 63
LXXI. LOOK AT BOTH SIDES. .- 64
LXXII. TRUE PHILOSOPHY 66














FABLES FOR "YOU."






I. WORK FO: 'ALL.

SWONDER what use I am in
the world," murmured a pink-
-'" | edged daisy, as she opened
S/ wide her snowy petals to the
morning sun. "I'm afraid I
.... ,am too small to do any one
Sany good."
d- "Quite a mistake, friend, I
'j .--- assure you," said a dewdrop
-.- that was trembling on a blade
of grass close by. "If it hadn't been for the shadow that you
threw over me, the heat of the sun would have dried me up, and
the blade of grass I am resting on would have withered for want
of its proper nourishment.
Thank you, friend," whispered the daisy, and her pink-edged
petals took a rosier hue as she bent her little head in grateful
acknowledgment.







to V aPhlees fr "110."


II. THE SECRET OF A JAPPY HOME.

CAN'T conceive how you manage to give all
your family house-room," said a willow-wren to
a titmouse. "I haven't half your number, and
yet one or other of them is always tumbling
out of the nest."
S "Perhaps you didn't make it large enough,"
said the titmouse.
"That can't be the reason ; it's as large as yours."
"Ah !" said the titmouse. "Well, you'll excuse my men-
tioning it, but I fancy I've heard that your young ones don't
agree very well."
"It wouldn't make the nest any larger if they did," said the
willow-wren. I don't see what that has to do with it."
"Pardon me, friend," said the titmouse, "but it makes all the
difference in the world. If my twelve didn't, do their best to
accommodate each other, we couldn't get on at all; but I'm
thankful -to say they are all of one mind, and that is what
makes a peaceable home."



III. fAITHFUL IN THAT WHICH IS LEAST.

HAT an insignificant little thing you are !" said a
I raindrop, as it splashed into a puddle by the road
side.
"Perhaps so," replied the puddle, "but I reflect
as much of the sky as I have room for, and the bosom of the
proudest lake can do no more."






utt "trt of tooo W.d."


IV. NOT OUT OF THE WOOD."

HAT a: delightful thing freedom is !" cried
a young horse, as he galloped along the
lane, leaping a fence or two in his way, and
stopping at last to take breath in a quiet
corner where a cow was leisurely grazing.
I never knew what it meant before; but
I'll never go in harness again; take my word for it."
The cow went on grazing, and made no answer.
You don't know what it is to be free," cried the horse;
"you'll have to follow the rest of the herd to the farmyard this
evening to be milked, while I am enjoying myself 'in the depths
of yonder forest. If I were you-I'd--"
What ?" asked the cow.
"Run away, as I have; and escape this wearisome bond-
age."
"It doesn't trouble me," said the cow.
"Ah, that's because you've never tasted the sweets of
liberty."
"Nor have you till this morning, and I fancy your experience
of them will be short; so you'd better make the most of it."
"Why, what do you mean ?" asked the horse.
"What's that you've got round your neck ?" said the cow.
Oh, only just the end of the halter they used to fasten me
with. I can easily shake that off."
"Just so," said the cow, "then if I were you, I'd do it at
once."
"Why?"
"Only that-ah! I thought so," said the cow, as a firm








hand grasped the halter, and in spite of all his struggles, the
young horse was once more a prisoner.
"Ah," said the cow, as she went on thoughtfully with her
dinner, "it's a pity he talked so much about freedom, before
he'd got rid of the halter."






.. I











V. I"IS IS AS POOD AS A' JILE.

S OW, my dears," said a tortoise-shell to her
young family, stay quiet till I come back,
,and I'll bring you a plump, tender mouse. I
Ssaw him come out of his hole a few minutes
ago, and by the time I get back he'll be going
home with his breakfast. I shall just catch
him on his way."
I wouldn't make too sure of that, friend," said the mouse,







Lorioe Mahe s Laouor Light. 13

as he whisked round the corner and darted into his hole under
pussy's very eyes. Plump I" am, and tender I may be; but
I don't fancy your young family will have an opportunity of
testing the truth of your remarks about me this time; so I
should recommend you to look out for a breakfast for them
somewhere else."
Long and patiently did pussy watch at the entrance of the
hole for the mouse to come out; but her watch was vain, and
she went back to her young ones a sadder but a wiser cat.


I!'( VI. LOVE ]IAKES LABOUR RIGHT.
CAN'T think how you can go on sitting here so
..-. quietly; it must be terribly dull work," said a
S cuckoo, as she rested for a moment on the branch
.,A ': of a willow-tree that overhung the shallow brook
~';' J' in whose shelving bank a yellow-hammer had
built her nest under a tuft of waving grass.
I don't find it dull," said the yellow-hammer.
"I'm glad to hear it," said the cuckoo; "but I've seen you
there for a week or more, and I'm sure you must be tired to
death. If you were to follow my example now, it would save
you a world of worry, and all that dreary waiting."
"Ah !" said the yellow-hammer, "I've heard that you don't
hatch your own brood."
"Not I! I leave that for you, and those like you, who don't
mind the trouble."
It never seems a trouble to me," said the yellow-hammer.
"I am always looking for the day when my little ones will break
the shell and reward me for my toil; but perhaps you have
never learnt by experience that 'Love makes labour light.' "





14 rattles fo r "fr."

















VI. FooLISH EAR DOUBLES ANGER.
S v OW, my children, there's nothing to fear;
Sdo as I tell you, and you will be quite safe,"
said the mother bird, as she fluttered over
the nest, trying to urge her young ones to
their first flight. Three of them following her
directions were soon resting their weary little
wings on a neighboring branch, and chirping merrily over their
success; the fourth stood trembling on the edge of the nest,
fearing to brave the unknown peril.
"Come, my son," said the parent bird, "see how foolish your
fears are; your brothers are safe on yonder branch, while you
are shivering here alone. Had you but taken my advice, you
would now have been rejoicing with them, and would have
found as they did that the worst part of many a peril is the
anticipation of it."
anticipation of it."







Tkoe WioaU mtaiuf 15


VIII. EXPERIENCE TEACHES.

, HY do you tremble?" asked an old oak
of a young one that grew near him in
the forest; "there isn't a single leaf on
you that isn't quivering."
"And enough to make me quiver," said
the young one; "didn't you hear that
terrible thunder clap? it went right through
me. I verily believe I'm struck !"
"Struck !" said the old oak compassionately. "Ah you're
young yet. When you have weathered as many storms as I
have, you will know that the roll of the thunder is powerless
to harm you: it is the lightning that does the work."

--*a+'--

IX. THE WEAK fOINT.

( m HAT a splendid animal Cherry is, and what beautiful
milk she gives said a young heifer to a brindled
cow that was chewing the cud in the corner of a
field.
Quite true," said the cow lazily.
"I heard the master say he wouldn't part with her for her
weight in gold," said the heifer.
"Ah, indeed !" said the cow; "perhaps he doesn't know the
awkward trick she has of kicking the pail over as soon as it's
full; she may give good milk, but what's the use of that if she
wastes it all directly after ? "










" -. -... v
S, X. LOST OPPORTUNITIES,

_.. ...'.. ..../HY do you work so hard ?" said the willow
.^i' t tothe mill-wheel, as she dipped her branches
lazily into the stream that turned it.
-- .' "Because I've a great deal to do, ma'am, and
I'm sorry to say I was idle all yesterday," said
u the mill-wheel.
"Well, you needn't go so fast at all events," said the willow;
'it quite tires me to look at you."
"Ah! but I must, you see, ma'am; for I heard the miller
say this morning that if this dry weather went on much longer
he was afraid the brook would get too shallow to turn me; and
then where should I be ?"
You needn't trouble yourself about that," said the willow;
"there's plenty of water to last you all the summer. Why, I
can see it sparkling in the sun a mile off."
"True, ma'am," said the mill-wheel; "but unhappily, if there
were an ocean there it would be of no use to me. You forget
that it never comes back when.it has once gone past me."

--.-96-i---

xi. TOO LATE.
-. DOVE snared by a fowler lay captive in the net;
her mate hovered near, trying to free her, but in
vain.
S"Alas he cried, "for the time when we used to
mount upward together into the blue heaven, before those fatal
meshes bound thee to the earth-will it never more return?
And echo answered, Never more return."







4t0w to RBeal With Soadal. 17

xII. DON'T LISTEN, AND YOU WON'T
JEqAR.
"i -.HY don't you go, Tatters?" said Nettle,
the. white terrier, to her friend. "Didn't
you hear your mistress whistle "
But Tatters was busy polishing a bone,
and didn't answer.
"There it is again; you'll catch it if
you don't go," said Nettle, hoping he'd leave the bone behind.
"I didn't hear it," said Tatters.
"Didn't hear it!" said Nettle; "you must be deaf; I'm sure
it was plain enough."
S"Very likely," said Tatters; "but you see I managed to get
into a bad habit when I was young, of not attending when she
called, and now I very often don't hear her. It's a great pity,
for. I've missed several nice titbits lately that she's given to
Toby, because I didn't come at once. Let me advise you,
Nettle, always to run the moment you are called. It's very
trying, I admit, when you've any particular engagement in hand,
but you'll find the advantage of it in the long run."
---c+98t--

XIII. jlow TO PEAL WITH SCANDAL.
s H E haystack was on fire, and the sparks flew in every
direction.
Blow them out, blow them out! cried the neigh-
bours.
"Let them alone," said the owner; "they will die out
quickly if left to themselves, but if you blow them they will be
fanned into a flame."






18 Fna.Iaos Ba:"fo;~


.7--


XIV, TElmPTATION TESTS HONESTY.
'M ashamed of you, Mag-you needn't pretend to
look another way-I saw your eye on my dinner.
You're a born thief. It's time you began to lead a
Respectable life like mine; and if it weren't for
this tiresome chain, I'd teach you a lesson you
wouldn't forget in a hurry."
" Exactly so, sir," said Mag; "but you see, if it hadn't been







TPest jl Wforth.


for that 'tiresome chain,' as you are pleased to call it, I
shouldn't have made so bold as to come near you. And
perhaps, sir, you'll excuse me if I venture to remind you that
gentlemen like you, who have their dinner found for them
regularly, and plenty of it, haven't the same temptation to
thieve that we poor waifs and strays have. It's very easy for
you to call me hard names; but wait till you're as hungry as
I am, with no chance of a meal but what you pick up, by hook
or by crook, and then see how your morality would hold out."




^-b.'" Xv. TEST OF WO 1TH.
''ii:Y ELL, your day is about over," said a smart,
Snewly-painted signpost, to an old moss-
'J2 covered milestone, half buried in a grassy
bank by the roadside; "it's quite time I
took your place; why I heard an old
Scgentleman only yesterday, complaining that he
couldn't read what was written on you without putting on his
glasses; he couldn't say that of me at all events; you can see
my letters from the end of the lane."
"True, friend," said the milestone, I am old and out of
date; but let me tell you I've done my work well through
many a summer's sun and winter's snow; you may be more
useful now, while your paint is fresh, but I question if you will
last as long."






20 Fa1des for n.i'


XVI. FEW LIGHT ON THE MATTERR.

SEE how much they think of me," said a
lantern to some dips that were hanging on
a nail close by. I heard the master say my
y glasses were to be kept as bright as crystal."
S"Very likely," said the candles; "but of
course you know why ?"
"Because I'm so useful," said the lantern; "the master says
he doesn't know what he should do without me these dark
nights."
"No doubt," said the candles; "but he'd sing a different song
if it weren't for one of us inside you. Did it never occur to
you, friend, that you wouldn't be of the least use to anybody if
our light didn't shine through you-?"

->-t-3g+--

XVII. SHARE AND SHARE.

" \THER, father! What has happened? Why is
it so dark?" cried the young lark to the parent
bird, as, with folded wing, he rested from his up-
ward flight; "the sun is gone, the light has all
faded out of the sky."
He is gone from us, but only to shine elsewhere, my child,"
replied the parent bird ; "and unworthy indeed should we prove
ourselves if we grudged to others the light and warmth so freely
shed on us."







To Tiest orfftrB. 21


XVIII. ONLY SPOTS IN THE SUN.
SHE stable yard was crowded, for the hounds
were to meet close by.
"I don't think much of Skylark," said a
brown cob to a hack that was standing saddled
and bridled at the gate.
No, he's such a dingy colour," said the hack.
I never could bear iron grey," said the cob.
And I've heard it said that his temper is very uncertain,"
said the hack.
"I can quite believe it," said the cob. "I'm sure you will
agree with us, gentlemen," he added, as some of the hounds
came trotting up ; "we were just saying what a very ugly colour
Skylark is."
"Possibly so," said the hounds; "but really he is always so
far ahead of every one in the field that we never notice the
colour of his coat !"


xIX. THE TEST OF WORK.

HE miners toiled in their rocky cavern, separating the
precious stones from the refuse in which they were
imbedded.
"What riches are here exclaimed a traveller as
he gazed on the glittering heaps.
"True, we are much prized by men," answered the jewels;
"but we might lie undiscovered for centuries without being
missed : while yonder grey millstones, that men think little of,
are working for the good of thousands."






Fablp's fur "I I You.I


2y^ xx. JSE BEFORE ORNAMENT.
~ ,_' -..-.... OTHER, mother," squeaked a little pig; "I
S saw such a pretty creature to-day in a
cage; they said he was a sort of cousin of
ours, but he wasn't a bit like you, mother,
much smaller, and a great deal prettier. I
wish we were like him. Who was he ?" "A
guinea-pig, I suppose, child," grunted the old sow; "you're
young and thoughtless now; but you'll soon find out that
beauty is but skin deep, and use comes before ornament. They
are all very well in their way, and some people are foolish
enough to make pets of them ; but who ever heard of a guinea-
pig being made into bacon ? "


r Fpi k_







uot uaite Mire Same Thi;u. 23


XXI, NOT QUITE THE SAME THING.

SQUARREL arose in the farmyard between
the ducks and the geese, as to which were the
most useful members of society. The ducks
contended that though smaller, they were far
more delicate eating, and more refined in their
flavour.
"You seem to forget," cried the geese loftily
as they strutted in procession across the yard, the old gander
leading the way; "we stand on a different platform altogether;
you may be valued for your paltry flesh (though, you may
depend upon it, no one would eat a duck that could get a
goose), but look at us! Our glory lies in the thoughts we
scatter far and wide over the known world ; thoughts that
immortalize our fame, and live for ever in the annals of our
country."
"Excuse me, ladies," said a magpie, who was looking down
on them from the top of an old sundial. I fancy there is one
trifling error in the statement you have just made. If I am not
mistaken, you claim the thoughts you put forth as your own.
Now, though I wouldn't for a moment take upon me to affirm
that no goose's thoughts have ever gone abroad to the world, I
fancy that those which, as you beautifully expressed it, 'live
for ever in the annals of our country,' don't generally originate
with your family. It's a common mistake-you'll forgive my
saying so, I'm sure-for the trough to fancy itself the fountain."


- --4-









XXII. THE WAY TO ALUE UIETNESS.
xxI#. TO
,, '"._ 1J'O70W dull and quiet everything is! there
'" j --isn't pca leaf stirring," said a young sparrow,
as he perched on the bough of a willow-tree
that bent over the water. How delicious a
nice puff of wind would be !"
"j We shall have one before long, if I'm
not mistaken," croaked an old raven; "and if I'm right, you'll
come in for more 'puffs of wind' than you want, I fancy "
Before many hours had passed, a tempest arose and swept
over the country; and in the morning the fields were strewn
with its ravages.
The sun rose calm and bright, and the little sparrow trimmed
his wet feathers on the same bough.
"What a comfort the storm is over," he cried; "between the
rain and the wind, our nest is quite spoilt, I never remember
such a night."
"Ah!" croaked the raven once more, "you've altered your
mind since last night, haven't you ? I think you said it was
too quiet then; but perhaps you have had enough of the puff
of wind you were sighing for. Take my word for it, there's
nothing like a storm to teach you to value a calm."

XXIII. WORKING FOR THE MASTER."
WOULDN'T let my branches lie on the ground
like that, if I were you," said a tall young apple-tree
looking over the orchard wall to an espalier, loaded
with fruit, that grew in a garden close by. "Look
at mine. See how bravely they stand up; the lowest of them







ri4s must favo a FPaUll. 25

is over your head ; and every one that goes by stops to admire
my golden fruit."
"Yes, I know they do," said the espalier.
"No one can see whether you've any fruit or not."
"Perhaps so," said the espalier; "but I don't care for any one
to see it but the master, and I don't think I'm too low down
for him to find it when the time comes; till then I am content
to wait."



XXIV. RIDE MUST jAVE A FALL.
EE how tall I am;" said a gay young poplar
that had shot above the heads of her neigh-
bours in a small plantation; there isn't one
of you I can't look down upon; and what a
delicate green my leaves are!" she con-
tinued, glancing at the dusky foliage of some
Scotch firs, as the setting sun shone through
their branches.
Evening came, and clouds covered the sky. The low roll of
the thunder was heard, and flash after flash lighted up the
darkness. When the morning sun rose, the poplar still stood
erect, but her scorched and withered branches told their melan-
choly tale.
"Ah!" she sighed, as she gazed mournfully around her,
"how little I thought that what I boasted of yesterday would
be my ruin to-day; if I had not held my head so high in my
foolish pride, I should never have been singled out by the
lightning for destruction; even if I have enough life left in me
to get over this shock, my beauty is a thing of the past."
C






26


V6:ktoes foct 111un?


,XXV. ASTY JUDGMENTS SELDOM
-.k.. J- UST PNES.
1 ']'ELL!" I'm thankful my children are not
C4, like that," said a duck, who was leading
ji: yher young brood to the water for their
'-'. first swim. No one can help admiring
my little family. I heard some one say
only yesterday that they were like balls
of golden down; but those creatures-- !" and she glanced
contemptuously at two ungainly cygnets, who were waddling up
the plank that led to the swan-house.
"Wait a bit, ma'am," said an old jackdaw who was standing
near enough to hear her soliloquy; "it's always a pity to form
a hasty judgment. There will come a day by-and-by when
your 'little balls of golden down,'-I'think that was it, wasn't
it ?-will have grown into ordinary ducks like yourself (no
offence, ma'am?) and meantime 'those creatures' will have
turned into swans I fancy, when that day comes, an impartial
judge would give them the prize for beauty, even over your
handsome family "

xxvI. THE YALUE OF A FLEAR CONSCIENCE.
OW is it, that after such a storm as we have just
had, your waters are so clear that I can count the
il pebbles in your rocky bed ?" cried a traveller, as
he bent over the margin of a mountain lake. I
have passed several smaller pools, but their waters had not the
transparency of yours."
"Shall I tell you," whispered the lake: "it is because I have
po mud at the bottom to be stirred up."







rudmp~p, :etter thaun Clnnniu.


-- .
-- -- #.._





XXVII. PRUDENCE JETTE&THAN RUNNING.
SHAT a delicious smell !" cried a young mouse to an
old one, as they came out of a hole in the granary
floor, I'm sure it's toasted cheese ; .there's nothing
like it!"
"Very likely," said the old mouse calmly.
"Do you know," said the young mouse, "I've found a way
of getting it out of the trap without being caught. If you tread






28 va4tles for "a n ."

very lightly, and don't give it time to- tip up, you're all safe.
Won't you come and try?"
"No, thank you," said the old mouse; "and if you take my
advice, you won't either. I've seen plenty of traps in my time,
but I never met with one that I cared to trust myself inside;
and clever as you may think yourself, I fancy you are more
likely to live to grey hairs as I have done if you keep outside
them too!"


--98 1i"-



XXVIII. FARLY PAYS-TRAINING PAYS.
S PARE me a little longer," said the young
vine to the gardener, as he laid hold of one
of her slender branches, to guide it to the
prop he had provided. "I'll grow any way
you like next year, if you'll only let me have
my own way now."
But the gardener shook his head.
"Why not?" murmured the vine; "it's hard I may not have
my freedom a little.longer; it will be time enough, when I am
older, to be guided and trained."
"Ah!" said the gardener, "that only shows how little you
know about it. Each year your branches will grow harder and
less flexible, and where one nail will hold you now, it would
take a dozen in another twelvemonth's time."







"I~d I nmh-P,"t


S.XXIx. PIFFEENT YIEWS OF A
l 4 SUBJECT.
HAT am I to do for breakfast?" said a
Ssparrow-hawk to himself, as he rested from
a long spiral flight. "There isn't a bird
I to be seen anywhere; I can't think what's
S become of them all."
In vain he looked around; not a stray
feather was in sight.
"Well, I suppose I must put up with a mouse," he continued,
"if there's nothing else to be had; but they're very poor eating;
none of the delicate flavour that there is about a thrush or a
linnet. A mole would be more tasty; but they are all under-
ground, I suppose. I'm afraid I shall have to make the best
of a mouse."
"It's very fine for him to talk of 'making the best' of a
mouse," said a hungry cat, who was prowling about; "I only
wish I saw a chance of doing the same; it's what I've been
hunting for half the night. If he never has a worse breakfast
than that, he may be very thankful; it will be a vast deal more
than he deserves."

XXX. -" LOOK UP."
j- TRAVELLER stood on a narrow plank, his eyes
fixed on the foaming torrent beneath.
Help me," he cried, as he clung trembling to the
rail; "help me, or I shall perish in the waters "
"Look up, look up said the voice of his guide; one more
glance downwards, and you are lost; but keep your eye
steadily fixed above, and you will reach the shore in safety."






$0 tdes oy "i ou."

XXXI, v MOST VALUABLE FRIEND.

M OU'LL be glad to hear I am going to change.my
quarters," said a surly-looking mastiff to a shepherd
k dog, I know I'm not popular with any of you;
I'm too plain spoken to be a favourite."
On the contrary, sir," said the shepherd dog, "I am truly
grieved to hear you are leaving us ; for nothing could ever go
the least wrong in the fold without your making such a com-
motion that I was sure to hear of it at once. I assure you you
have been a most valuable friend."


XXXII. UCH SPEAKING TENDS TO EVIL
PEAKING.

HEAR that Pointer won't get the prize after all,"
: said a greyhound to a mastiff, as they met at the
,; corner of the street.
"Why not?" asked the mastiff; "I'm sure he
Deserves it."
"So we all thought; but I've heard it whispered
by two or three lately that there is something wrong about his
pedigree."
"Ah! indeed," said the mastiff.
Yes," said the greyhound, and I'm inclined to believe it,
for the poodle from the Hall mentioned it in confidence to a
friend, and he told it to a cousin of mine. I only wish I could
think it was a mistake "
"A mistake!" said the mastiff, "I should call it a slander;
but that's the way with your 'confidential' friends. They are







t s-tioe al4 3~Ustni4. 31

always ready to believe evil of any one, and to spread reports
without a grain of truth in them, from the,pure love of talking.
If you'll take my advice, friend, in future, you'll think twice
before you listen to a slander, and three times before you repeat
it."
^f? Bna~--.

XXXIII. JUSTICE ALL ROUND.

.f^ T'S all very well, my dears !" said a tabby cat
C. to her young family; "but if I'd done it I should
'have had a can of water thrown at me, or been
beaten within an inch of my life; he ought to
be ashamed of himself!" she continued aloud, as
Bustle, a shaggy Scotch terrier, trotted across the
yard.
"What has he done, mother ?" asked the kittens.
"Done! why he's stolen some sausages off the breakfast
table. If I'd taken them, I should have been called a thief; but
just because he happens to be a favourite, all sorts of excuses
are made for him; it was 'an accident,' a mistake,' 'he didn't
mean it!' I should like to know what he did mean! I can
only say I met him coming out of the room with his mouth
full, and a bit sticking out at each end; and he wouldn't so
much as give me a scrap of skin; and there, he's to be petted,
and made much of, and called 'clever,' when he ought to be
starved for a week! it's a crying injustice!" said the old cat;
and her fur rose and her tail swelled with indignation.
So it is, mother," cried the kittens.
So it is, ma'am," croaked a tame raven from the top-of the
kennel; but perhaps you wouldn't have felt it quite so much
if he'd given you that bit of skin !"






32 Fables lop "in."















XXXIV. BITTER FRUIT.

HIS is very pleasant," cried a young bear as
he floated down the river on a log he had
Found by the water's edge. What a mistake
my mother made when she told me not to get
on to it. It's the nicest time I ever had, and so
I shall tell her when I get back."
And the log floated down the river.
"I wonder when it'll go the other way," cried the little bear
after a time, as the current bore him farther and farther from
home; I'm getting hungry."
But the log floated on.
"I want to go back," cried the little bear again; "I've been
quite far enough, and I'm getting stiff and cramped."
Still the log floated on.
"Oh, dear," cried the little bear, I wish I'd listened to my
mother; I believe she was right after all, and when I get home
I think I'll tell her so."







OflfEoe Stows tho Manm 33

But alas! the poor little bear never had a chance of telling
her so, for he never saw his mother or his home again. He
was seen and captured by some fur-traders, and many a time
in his captivity did he mourn over the disobedience that had
cost him his liberty.
-*-~se-s--

rvXX. OFFICE HOWS THE AN.
OW do you like Tiger?" said Puck to
T .Toby, her ladyship's favourite pug, who
was sunning himself against .the wall by
the stable door.
"Like him!" said Toby, wrinkling his
black nose into contemptuous creases; I
don't suppose any one likes him; but he has nothing to do
with me, as I shall take the first opportunity of telling him,
if he offers to interfere with me."
"Ah! I wish I were in your place," said Puck; "he's won-
derfully altered since he's been put in charge of the yard; he
used to be as friendly as possible, and I've often given him a
tit bit from my own dinner, because he was so pleasant and
sociable; but now he does nothing but growl if any one goes
near his kennel, and leads us all such a life that nobody has a
good word for him."
"Ah!" said Toby, flattening his nose on his forepaws and
blinking at the sun:-" you are not the first I have heard com-
plain of him. I'm sorry for you; but I'm not surprised. He's
not the first, and he won't be the last, whose head has been
turned by the responsibilities of office."







3$ 4 Valyes far "Ltu,"



XXXVI. THE POWER OF FLATTERY.

SHEY say the grey kitten has been stolen," said
^a Dick, the bull terrier, to Bustle.
"You don't say so !" cried Bustle.
Yes; I've been told so, but I can't believe,
it's true. Who could possibly want a kitten
enough to steal it ?"
"Well, as for that," said Bustle, "she was a nice little thing
enough as kittens go, and I'm sorry she's lost."
"Sorry !" said Dick contemptuously; "why, Bustle, my boy,
I'm surprised at you; the world's overrun with kittens-you
pan't go round the corner without seeing a dozen at least; and
I never thought you cared about them."
"Well," said Bustle thoughtfully, "you see, Dick, there are
kittens and kittens ; this one was the most sensible I ever met,
with; it was only the other day she was remarking what a
splendid coat I had, and wishing hers was like it; and yester-
day she told me she'd heard how clever I was at rat-catching,
and she wanted me to give her some lessons. Yes, she was a
superior kitten there's no doubt; and I believe she'd have
turned out well."
"Ah!" said Dick to himself, as Bustle trotted out of the
room, "now I understand. I should have given him credit
for more sense; but I suppose, though it is a humiliating
thought-very-that few of us are superior to flattery, even
from a grey kitten !"







aln1ed wthu Lost. 35


/ ^ XXXVII. VALUED WHEN FOST.

'M sorry poor Tuppy is gone," said the dun cow to
a heifer who was grazing beside her.
"Yes, he was harmless enough," said the heifer,
carelessly moving off as she spoke to a tuft of grass
that looked greener than the rest.
"Where's Tuppy gone ? asked the grey mare,
who had just been turned into the field.
"I don't know,' said the cow; "but he hasn't been here to-
day, and I'm told he's not coming back, poor fellow."
"Dear me!" said an old blind horse, coming up at. the
moment, I hope, ma'am, you are not speaking of Tuppy."
"Yes, I was," said the cow. "I was just saying how I should
miss him, quiet as he was ; many a tender mouthful of grass has
he left for me, because he said his teeth were better than mine
and he could manage thistles; perhaps you can tell us where
he's gone, and if it's true that he's not coming back."
"Indeed, ma'am, I only wish I knew; but I. never heard that
he was gone till you mentioned it, and truly sorry I shall be to
lose him, if it is so. Many's the time he has lifted the latch
of.the gate for me, when I couldn't manage it myself and
wanted to take a stroll in the lane; he was always willing to do
a good turn for any one, though he didn't get much by it. I
only wish I'd known he was going-but it's too late now."
I'm afraid it is," murmured the cow, as she lay down quietly
to chew the cud. "Poor Tuppy, it's a pity we didn't think more
of him when he was with us "










XXXVIII. WHERE TO BLAME.
HE bow was drawn, and the arrow sped on its
Sway. Many and eager were the glances that
-. followed it.
^,, "It has gone beside the mark," cried one.
Y' "It is buried in the turf beyond,".said another.
And it was drawn out and thrown aside contemp-
tuously.
You are unjust, friends," said the arrow. The blame does
not rest with me, but with the careless and unskilful hand that
sent me forth. Give me another chance, with a steady hand
and practised eye, and you will see if I do not hit the mark."

---+ e+--


XXXIX. DOUBTFUL HONESTY.
... l/ I'[" XXvlX
" \ .'II ?.i( UITE a tempting evening for a stroll, my
dears," said a fox to some young pullets
i who were picking up a few grains of
barley left'from their last meal.
S "Yes," said the pullets, but we can't
get outside this tiresome grating."
"Ah, that's a pity!" said the fox; "but perhaps I could
manage to undo the fastening for you. I've managed one of
that sort before-and it's a shame you shouldn't come out.
There's a whole handful of oats just outside the barn door, that
the waggoner dropped when he was feeding the horses just now
-I came on purpose to tell you."


F411108 fur 11 ijtru."







rawises MAIO es vn s; Ulformaizc e Mepis MOM. 37,

"How delightful!" cried the pullets; "make haste-do-be-
fore any one comes to stop us."
"What are you about, you rascal ?" cried Watch, the yard-
dog, as he suddenly appeared round the corner; "be off this
instant, if you value a whole skin."
"Pardon me," said the fox as he skulked off, "I was merely
remarking what a pleasant evening it was-I had no thought
of intruding further; my principle has always been, 'Honesty
is the best policy.' "
"Perhaps so," said Watch; "but I question how far your
practice would have squared with it, if I hadn't happened to
come up when I did."


XL. PROMISES VIAKE fRIENDS; PERFORMANCE
EEPS HEM.

HAT a kind-hearted fellow Rover is," said
j. a fox-terrier to a spaniel, who was lazily
catching flies as they settled on his nose.
S"So I've heard many people say," remarked
the spaniel.
S"But surely you must know it for your-
self. You have been here a good while, haven't you? and
I am only a new comer."
"Precisely so," said the spaniel; "and it is mostly the new
comers that make the remark."
"What do you mean?" asked the terrier; "I am sure nothing
could be kinder than he was ; though I am a perfect stranger to
him, he came up to me of his own accord, and promised- ."
"Just so," said the spaniel, as he caught another fly; "you'll
D







38 tables for "110U.

excuse my interrupting you, but that's where it is; he makes
the same promises to every stranger that comes into the yard.
I believed him once, as you do now, and so have many more;
we have all learnt wisdom by degrees, as you will by and by
when you have found out for yourself what his promises are
worth and how much you can rely upon them."




XLI. HANDSOME IS THAT HANDSOME DOES.


e" HAT a splendid fellow!" said a tadpole
Sto a minnow, as they met on a stone at
the bottom of a clear stream. "Did you
ever see anything like him? It quite
dazzles one's eyes to look at his jacket
in the sun."
"Do you mean that kingfisher ?" asked the minnow.
I don't know the gentleman's name," said the tadpole;
"I've never seen him before."
"Ah! well, I have; and I don't care if I never see him
again. He may be good-looking; but I've lost half my friends
since he came to live in that bank; and to tell the truth, I
don't quite like the way he's looking at me now; so I think
I'll wish you good morning; by the time you're a frog you'll
know that there are things more important than the colour of
our coat! '


-*-1M--
















N'




Z-


i JAI
>.,',




N"I
.






-M L
HA: N -OIT AN M E
.ADO E STA --DSM D ,J .,. ,, :,-,.


I


1 ~







40 Fules fo "1yo."

XLII. I ILASS J4OUSES."

EREN'T you surprised to hear about Sweep
the other day?" said a tortoise-shell to a
tabby cat as they met on the garden wall.
Sweep why what has he been doing ?"
said Tabby.
Only half-killed that little black puppy
that has taken to coming here lately. I believe he would have
finished him off altogether if it hadn't been for his mistress."
"Dear me said Tabby, "what made him do it?"
You may well ask It's all that nasty jealous temper of his;
he thinks so much of himself that he can't bear to see any one else
taken the least notice of. I don't say but what he's a nice gentle-
manly fellow enough in some respects; but I've always heard
that's his weak point, and it's a sad pity he gives way to it so."
"Sad, indeed," said Tabby. "Well, I'm thankful to say I've
always brought up my family to understand that there must be
other cats in the world, and they can't have it all their own
way; by the bye, didn't I hear something about your having an
accident with your mistress's canary this morning? "
Perhaps Tortoise-shell didn't hear, for she sprang to the
ground without answering.
It's very fine for her to talk about Sweep," said Tabby, as
she composed herself to sleep on the top of the wall; "but if
all I hear is true, she killed that miserable little bird out of
pure jealousy, because her mistress took more notice of it than
of her. Ah dear," she continued, as she trimmed her whiskers
thoughtfully, "it's very little people know of themselves; I
shouldn't wonder if all of us would be the better for having-our
eyes opened a bit."






4ediwUnQ ^inwgs its ut(Wi iyewsvd. 41'


XLIII. COMPENSATION.
.." J OW strange! exclaimed a young lark as
She fluttered from the nest in the early
summer morning, and bathed his wings
in ecstasy in the dewy grass. "What
can have happened ? Last night every-
thing seemed almost burnt up and dry
and withered, and we couldn't find a drop of water anywhere;
and now every flower is hanging its head, and every blade of
grass glistening with dew. How is it, father ?"
"Ah, my child," said the old lark, I told you how it would
be last night when you were murmuring, but you wouldn't
believe me. When you have lived through the summer as I
have, you will know that 'where the sun strikes hottest, the dew
lies heaviest.'"
--^-9s+--

XLIV. JMEDDLING BRINGS ITS OWN REWARD.
c" ERO and Prince are having a fight; let's go and
help," said Viper, a small black-and-tan terrier, to
Shis next-door neighbour, Sweep.
"Not I," said Sweep.
"Why not ?" said Viper; "it would be great fun, and Prince
would be glad of our help."
"Glad of your help!" said Sweep, contemptuously; "don't
deceive yourself, my boy; take my advice, and keep out of it.
Prince is quite able to fight his own battles, and if you don't
know it yet, you'll soon find by experience that any one who
takes part in a quarrel, at any rate with such a purpose as yours,
gets abuse from all and gratitude from none."







42 1111s iw wu."


XLV. COMPROMISE NOT J.EFORM.
EE how nice and firm the roads are now," said
the frost to the snow; "every one says it's
quite a pleasure to walk. That's all my
doing, you know When you had your turn
last week, people were all shivering in the
house."
"Very likely," said the snow; "but please to remember that
you've only covered up the mud, and when you're gone you'll
leave the roads worse than you found them."




XLVI. THINGS ARE NOT WHAT THEY jEEM.
" HAT a gloomy hole, mother, and what dark-looking
water; I never can drink that!" said a young
lamb to an old sheep, as he followed her to a shel-
tered corner of the wide field where they were
pastured. "See, mother, there's a much nicer looking pool
down there, with pretty green stuff all over it-do let us go
there."
"Nay, my child," said the old sheep; "yonder 'pretty green
stuff,'-as you call it, covers impurities of all sorts, such as you
would shudder to look at, and which would poison you to drink;
while this water, dark as it looks under the shadow of the trees,
comes from the purest spring that is to be found for miles
around."









SXLVII. ET WELL ALONE.
" .'-i HAT a dull life we do lead in this old
-' fi shed 1" said a rake that was leaning against
'. ; the wall, to a trowel that hung on a nail
opposite the door.
"Speak for yourself," said the trowel;
"I'm quite happy here. I can see all
down the path, whenever the door is open."
"I'm glad you are so easily satisfied," said the rake con-
temptuously. "I must confess that I like a little more life."
Ah, well, every one to his taste; I'm only too glad of a little
quiet after the work I've had the last fortnight."
The gardener came in, and throwing down some flower-pots
in the corner, took up the rake and carried it away.
Evening drew on, and the shed was shut up for the night;
but the rake was not brought back. A week passed away, and
the trowel had been left in undisturbed possession of the shed,
when the door was hastily opened and a boy threw the rake
into the corner, exclaiming as he did so, "There! you're about
done for! "
"Glad to see you, friend!" said the trowel. "I began to
fear we had parted company altogether. Have you had as
much 'life' as you wanted? "
Oh, don't! implored the rake, as he leant wearily against
the wall in his old corner; I have been well punished for my
discontent, and many a time have I wished myself back again.
I wouldn't have minded the work the gardener put me to, but
those children have nearly worn me out. They all wanted me
at once, and quarrelled which was to have me; and then one of
them threw me over the wall, where I lay till one of the garden


Lo~t WOU Al ume.ae






44 kbl1$ forI w a.I

boys picked me up, and brought me back. I shall never be
good for anything again."
"Don't be down-hearted, friend," said the trowel, "a little
rest and a rivet or two will soon set you up again; and in the
meantime you needn't grudge the wear and tear that has taught
you the value of a quiet home, even if you do find it a little dull
sometimes."


S XLVIII. TWO LESSONS IN NE,
" !t.; ^:H dear!" sighed a young sparrow as he
perched for a moment on a slender twig, to
u trim his ruffled feathers and rest his weary
_' little wings, "how terribly rough the wind
::--'""' is: I wish I were safe in the nest under
my mother's wing."
"Cheer up, my boy," cried a robin who was picking up some
seeds in the garden just below; "you'll be better when you've
rested and had some dinner. There's plenty here for us both,
if you'll come down."
"Thank you," said the sparrow in a melancholy tone, "but
I can hardly fly at all in this wind; how I wish I'd listened.
to my mother's advice, and not come so far from home."
"Ah! you're not the first young sparrow that has wished
-that, depend upon it; and if this wind has done you no other
good, you owe it something for teaching you that lesson; and
remember too, for your comfort, that roughly as it handled you
when you were trying to fly against it, if you will only let it do
its work, it will blow you straight home."










XLIX. THE PI3lGHT SIDE.


ITY voT rl.:om the bottom
of my heart, I do indeed,"
1 s d ai a lively little green
-.' lizard to a snail that was
o> slowly crawling up the wall,
on the top of which he was basking in the sun.
"What for ?" asked the snail.
"What for! why, for having to carry that dingy old brown
house of yours about wherever you go. It must be a terrible
hindrance. By the time you've got to the top of the wall, the
sun will have gone round to the other side, and you'll have had
all your trouble for nothing. I'm really very sorry for you."
"Keep your pity, my dear, for those that want it," said the
snail. "I am quite content as I am, and I wouldn't change my


Thp, nriglw Sidlo. 45







Fables far I "I Lrn: ,I


'dingy old brown house' for your fine green coat, I assure you.
It shades me from the sun, and shelters me from the rain ; and
if I have to carry it about, it is always at hand when I want it,
which is more than you can say when you're caught in a shower
half a mile from home."



L. FLOWERS AS ELL AS RUIT.

SELL, I'm thankful to say I'm of some
Service in the world," said a wild raspberry
that grew near the edge of a small planta-
tion; "not like those useless rose brambles,
that go trailing all over the hedges and
trying to attract everybody's notice with
their great white blossoms. It's all very well to talk about
perfume, but I wonder which is the most useful, flowers or
fruit ?"
"Each in its turn, friend," whispered a delicate pink blossom
from the hedgerow.
"Well, I'm determined I'll never waste my strength in that
sort of nonsense, but save it all to put into my fruit."
"I think you're mistaken, friend," whispered the same voice.
"I don't waste my strength by using some of it now to give
pleasure to the passing wayfarer; and I don't fancy the birds--
who have many a winter's meal off my fruit, remember, as well
as yours-will find it any the less sweet because they have
tasted some of its fragrance beforehand."







yTleraitoit. 47



LI. TOLERATION.

"SHALL have to change my quarters if this sort
of thing goes on," said Toby, a fat pug, as he
stretched himself on the barn-door step and
blinked his eyes at the sun; "what with the
S cows, and the pigs, and the poultry, I can't get a
S wink of sleep for the noise! "
"Oh, it's quite unbearable," said a tabby cat who was sitting
inside the doorway watching a hole where a mouse had dis-
appeared a few minutes before. "One has no peace of one's
life, and I should have had that mouse just now, if it hadn't been
for Rover giving that sharp bark that frightened him straight
into his hole."
"And the night is as bad as the day," said Toby; "for when
the fowls have stopped their cackling and gone to roost, and
everything else is quiet, you and your friends raise the neigh-
bourhood with the row you make. You'll forgive my saying so,
but I think it's worse than all the rest put together."
"Indeed," said-the cat with her back up, "under these cir-
cumstances you'll excuse my mentioning a remark I overheard
this morning, that if something wasn't done to stop you from
walking round and round the house a dozen times a day with
your nose in the air, barking at nobody, you would find yourself
some day with a noose round your neck; every one is agreed
that it is a most intolerable nuisance and must be put a stop
to."
Ah!" said Toby thoughtfully, as he laid his nose between
his paws and watched the cat disappearing up a ladder into the
loft; "there may be some truth in what she says, and I suppose







48 rahtls for "IIln."

I brought it on myself; but it never struck me before how
differently one listens to a noise one makes one's self, and a
noise made by other people."

---H<-tgP-

LIT, J-AoRE THAN PNE WAY."
-" OW long have you been here?" asked
a fresh-looking young poplar that grew in
a hedgerow, of a spreading oak not far off.
"I don't exactly know," said the oak,
"somewhere about a hundred years, I
suppose."
"A hundred years! and no taller than that. Why, I was
only planted last spring twelvemonth, and I am nearly as tall
as you now."
Yes, I think you are," said the oak.
"You must have wasted a lot of time," said the poplar.
"That depends on what our time is given us for."
"Well, I suppose there's no doubt it's given us for growing,"
said the poplar as she bent her head to the evening breeze, and
scornfully fluttered her pale green leaves.
"True, friend; but you seem to forget that there is more
than one way of growing, as you would soon find if you came
to measure my trunk round and compare it with yours. If a
banner pole were wanted, they might take you, though I doubt
it; for from the way you are bending now, I question if you
could stand in a gale of wind. But if they were looking for
timber for a man-of-war, I know pretty well which of us would
be chosen."







Tthe Timm tfiy *m"em e Evil. 49


LIII. "JPARKEST BEFORE PAWN."
HE sun was near its setting; a black cloud
swept across the sky, and the rain that had been
falling gently all day, came down in torrents.
"What will become of us ?" murmured a bed
of golden crocuses; "it was bad enough before;
but this is terrible ; we shall never recover, it."
"Cheer up, friends," chirped a robin who had taken shelter
under the eaves of the gardener's cottage ; "it will soon be over.
Have you never noticed that it is always heaviest just before it
clears ?" And even as he spoke the cloud passed over, the sun
shone forth in renewed splendour, and the crocuses raised their
drooping heads, while the robin poured forth his evening song
of praise before going home to roost.


LIV. THE TIME TO REMOVE fVIL.
w ON'T pull me up cried a handsome Scotch thistle
to the farmer, as he grasped her prickly stalk.
"See, I am quite in the corner of the field: and
though I am tall, I take up very little ground.
There are no more of my family anywhere in sight. I am all
alone in my glory."
I dare say," said the farmer; "but if I were to leave you to
scatter those seeds of yours over the field, I wonder how many
of you there would be next year. No, no, my friend; you're
comparatively harmless now, and now is the time for you
to go."

































LV. A ROLLING TONE FATHERS
NO ]VOSS.
HY, where have you found all that honey?"
1 said a young bee to an old one, as he
S watched him returning to the hive laden
with golden nectar.
"In that bed of wild thyme close by,"
said the old bee. "This is the third load
I've brought in this morning, and there's plenty left yet."


50 va-41:88 fav I I VOU. I I







3mpfij 8 vessels Ma, tee WOMst sutud. 51

"Well, I'm sure I've been flying about all over the garden,
to look for some," said the young bee, "but I couldn't find any
worth speaking of. I met a butterfly, and he advised me to go
to the rosary, but there were so many from our hive there before
me that I thought it was of no use to stop. Then I tried the
pansies, but the gardener had just been watering them. So I
went to the mignonette box on the window-sill; but I was very
nearly being caught there, for some one shut the window down,
and I had only just time to escape. Since then I have been
roaming about trying one flower and another as I thought they
looked promising, but I've got hardly any honey."
"Ah!" said the old bee. "Well, I am not surprised, for, by
your own account, you have spent the morning in flying about,
instead of working. If you had kept to one bed, as I did, you
would have brought home a load like mine; but I can't stop
to talk any-longer just now, for I want to take it to the hive."




LVI. EMPTY VESSELS NAKE THE ]MOST SOUND.

--HAT splendid music that gentleman makes !" said
the fife to the cornet, as the big drum struck up a
thundering accompaniment; "I wonder where it
comes from, and what there is inside him to make
it."
"Do you ?" said the cornet. "Well, I can tell you; it comes
from the parchment he's covered with, and he makes it because
he's hollow."
--.W- teb--










S LVII. WAIT AND SEE.
~" \HY don't they bind us up with the rest ?"
said some ears of corn that lay scattered
over the field, while the loaded waggons
passed out at the gate. "We are as well
grown and as full as those in the sheaves;
why should they be stored up in the
granary, while we are left to wither on the ground?"
Ere the murmur died away, a tiny hand joyously grasped,
one by one, the discontented ears, and a little voice cried out
merrily, "Mother, mother, see what a store I've got, and how
full they are; as good as any in the field; won't they make us
a beautiful loaf, mother; what a good thing nobody saw them !"
And the discontented ears listened, and were thankful, for
they knew now why they had been left behind."



LVIII. WHAT NEXT!
"t- OW hard you hit! cried an india-rubber ball as it
rebounded from a garden wall, "you pushed me
quite out of shape for a moment."
Well, I never !" cried the wall, "that's what you
call justice, I suppose! You come and strike against me and
then grumble because I stand my ground to receive you; but
that's the way with your agitators, they go about hitting their
heads against stone walls, and then complain because they get
what they deserve."
































LIX. ONOURABLE PLD AGE,
ELL, you've seen your best days! there's little
S enough of you left now," said a pair of shears to a
spade that was leaning against the hovel door.
"I can do a good day's work yet," said the spade.
"You don't look much like it," said the shears superciliously.
"Your edge is all worn away, and your handle's cracked right
through; I should say you weren't good for much."
"Even so," said the spade. "I'd rather be worn out in good


Tfumaurable Old Ap-.- 153~







54- .raltes far II 1'.n,"

honest work, than lie on the shelf like you, till the rust spoilt
my hinges and made me useless. I heard the gardener say this
morning he should have to get a new pair of shears, for you
were good for nothing."




LX. NEVER WEAR OUT YOUR WELCOME.

,, PARE me a few seeds," cried a mouse to a canary,
S whose cage door had been left open for awhile
for him to take a flight round the room. I'm
so hungry; since this thing they call gas came
in, there are not half so many candles about
Sas there used to be in my grandmother's time,
and I can tell you it's hard work sometimes to
find a meal."
"Take as many as you like," said the canary, you're heartily
welcome: I shall have plenty more by-and-by." And the mouse
helped himself.
"You don't want this lump of sugar, do you ?" he cried the
next day, as he ran nimbly up the curtain to the canary's cage.
"No, you can have it," said the canary, but not quite so
readily as the day before.
"What a delicate bit of cake I smelt it before I came out
of my hole," cried the mouse the third day. "I only wonder
you haven't eaten it long ago; I suppose I may take it."
"Yes, you may this time," said the canary; "but to be plain
with you, I hope this is your last visit. It's all very well to
give you a lift once in a way, but I didn't bargain for having
to do it every day."






















LXI. HE HARDEST RK OF -LL.
,.Lion you he'"e stiw-. cried a fox-te--
T mounted guard over a fishing rod and












basket that lay on the ground beside him.
Yes ; m here," said Lion.
"why, it's more than two hours since I saw you before, and you









had been here a good bit then. You wouldn't catch me wasting
HY, Lion, you here still! cried a fox-ter-

rier as he bounded across a narrow stream,
and alighted close to the spot where a
curly black retriever with a bushy tail
mounted guard over a fishing rod and
basket that lay on the ground beside him.
"Yes; I'm here," said Lion.
"You must have had a lively time of it," cried the terrier;
"why, it's more than two hours since I saw you before, and you

had been here a good bit then. You wouldn't catch me wasting







$6 Fahllvs fir "

my time like that; I've been all round the farm; stirred up a
rabbit warren, and sent the young ones flying; started a whole
flock of sheep on the run; and done no end of business while
you've been lying on the grass doing nothing."
"Nothing!" said Lion, "do you call it nothing, to do the
work my master has given me ?"
"I don't call lying on the grass for two hours, work," said the
terrier.
"Don't you ?" said Lion," perhaps that's because you never
tried it. I find it harder than any I ever had ; but my master
chose it, and that's enough for me."




LXII. SETTLEE NOT EVERYTHING.

WONDER Grey Star didn't fetch more!" said a
worn-out cab horse to a neighbour on the same
stand.
S "I don't," said the other.
"Don't you? Well, I'm surprised," said the first; "he's the
fastest goer I know; he'd beat you in a canter, old fellow, I'm
sure."
"Very likely," said the other, as he thrust his nose into the
bottom of his dinner bag, and to his great regret found it
empty; "but you seem to forget, friend, that he can't see!
He may have plenty of spirit: I dare say he has; but have you
never heard that mettle is dangerous in a blind horse ?"







wkhn f16 ThO Atam.


LXIII. 'IIGH PLACES.
SHAT a terrible gale there was last night,"
I said a rook to his neighbour, as they
picked up their breakfast from the newly-
turned sods in a ploughed field. "I really
thought our tree would have been blown
down; the branches cracked and splintered
all round us."
"It was rough, and no mistake," said the other. "And we're
worse off than you, for we've no shelter at all; still, it is awkward
for any one in a storm like that."
Quite true, gentlemen," said a lark who had just come down
from his morning flight, and was looking about for a caterpillar
to take home with him; "but if I might make so bold as to say
so, you'd find the wind wouldn't trouble you if you were content
to have your nests on the ground like me; but if you will build
so high, you must take the consequences."


LXIV. WHEN TO TAKE LARM.
" f' H I EVES are about, keep close to me, children," cried
San old rabbit, as she was roused from her nightly
slumbers in the pen, by a single deep-toned angry
growl.
"Why, mother?" asked the young ones, "Topsy and Flash
are always barking, and you never take any notice of them."
Topsy and Flash may bark all day, and night too, and it
wouldn't trouble me, unless it spoilt my nap," said the old
rabbit: "but that's Lion's voice; and when he growls you may
be sure there's something wrong."







68 3Pa~$8 %Oy "Ulm"

-. LXV. WHERE SAFETY LIES.

HE sun shone brightly on the waters, and the
tiny waves:. sparkled merrily in its glancing
beams as they bore upon their bosom a gaily
coloured boat.
"Ah!" said one as he stood upon the shore,
"yonder painted toy rides joyously enough
upon the waters now-but what if a storm came? "
The sun set and the angry clouds gathered in the west, the
tempest rose, and the waves lashed themselves in fury against
the rocks.- Where was the boat ? Still riding triumphantly on
the crest of the waves, safe alike in calm and storm, for its cable
was of tempered metal, and it was anchored to a rock.


LXVI. FOUNT THE FOST.

WEEP," said Bustle, a lively terrier, to a
Handsome black -retriever who lived next
door; i' I wish you'd do me a favour. I'll do
,' as much for you when you want it."
All right," said Sweep ; "what is it ?"
"Well," said Bustle, "I made a little mis-
take yesterday-quite an accident, you under-
stand-and ate my week's supper all at once. It wasn't my
fault; cook left it on the sink, and of course I thought it was
meant for one meal; but she was as cross as a bear when she
found it out, and declared I should go without for the rest of
the week."
"That's awkward," said Sweep; "this is only Tuesday."
"Exactly so," said Bustle. "Of course it's out of the question








that I can starve for four days; but she's as obstinate as a mule,
and when she says a thing, she'll stick to it. So, as my princi-
ples won't allow me to steal, I want you to lend me a bone or
two to-day, and I'll pay you back next week."
"Ah !" said Sweep thoughtfully, "and how shall you manage
for the next four days ?"


-- --_ ..... .--.- I I U


Oh, I haven't thought about that yet," said Bustle.
Just so," said Sweep; "but I'm sure you'll agree with me,
my boy, that it's a pity you didn't think about it a little sooner.
I'm very sorry for you-very; but, you see, if I lent you a few
bones to-day, you'd be just as badly off to-morrow, and I
couldn't possibly do it again."


Olouut thr-O Oust.~







60 FaW:0s tor I Llon. I I

"No, I suppose not," said Bustle doubtfully.
"And I think," said Sweep, as he turned towards his kennel,
"that perhaps you'll be less likely to repeat that little mistake
you spoke of if you suffer for it this time, my dear boy; I never
did like 'a feast and a fast' myself, and I don't think you'll be
disposed to try it again."


LXVII. WHERE WILL IT READ?

E must try a fresh place for-the nest this
A time, my dear," said an old owl to his
mate as they stood on the edge'of a ruined
tower, whose crumbling walls were re-
flected in the dark blue waters of the lake.
"Why won't the old one do ? We've
had it so long; and I don't like changing," she replied.
"Nor I, when I see no reason for it," said the old owl; but
I heard them saying this to-day, that the old tower won't last
much longer ; and you wouldn't like the young ones to be buried
in its ruins."
"But surely it will last our time. I don't believe it's any
worse than it was last year; let's try it once again."
"No, my dear," said the old owl solemnly. "I have thought
the matter well over; and your not seeing it doesn't alter the
fact that it is fast crumbling away. I should blame myself if I
let you have your own way and any harm came of it, as I
believe there would."
So the nest was built in an ivy-covered steeple on the opposite
side of the lake; and before the young ones were hatched the
old grey tower lay a heap of ruins on the ground.







Pffh2 TE~sITvu ~~


Ah, my children," said the mother bird, as a few weeks after
her young ones clustered round her on one of its moss-incrusted
stones to listen to the oft-repeated tale of the desolation of their
parents' home, "you will do well to learn while you are young
the wisdom of taking advice from those who are older and
wiser than yourselves. 1, tremble still to think of the ruin my
self-will would have wrought if I had been allowed to have my
own way."

--+---*c


S LXVIII. THE REASON '-HY.

HE shepherd gathered his flock together to lead
them to a better pasture ground.
"Mother," cried a little lamb mournfully, as
it followed the rest across the common, "the
road is so rough, and the stones are so sharp
they hurt my feet."
Cheer up, my child," said the old sheep, "the sun is nearly
setting, and we shall soon be home."
"But, mother, why does the shepherd lead us over this stony
road; couldn't he find an easier one?"
"Perhaps he could, my child, but he knows best, and it may
be that if the path were smooth and the grass pleasant to walk
on, we should not look forward so longingly to the rest at the
end."


































LXIX. WISHING AND WORKING.

WISH the ground weren't so hard," said an idle
young sparrow to a robin, who was busily pick
ing up some grains of corn that had fallen among
a scattered heap of straw.
"So do I," said the robin; "but you see it
generally is hard, this time of year."






Fair la,. 683

"Yes, I suppose so; well then, I wish there were more ber-
ries on the large hawthorn tree. It isn't worth while going to
look for any even, for they are sure to be all gone."
"Yes, you see it's a hard winter," said the robin; "and a
good many of your relations as well as mine have dined on it
every day for this long while."
"I know they have," said the sparrow in a melancholy tone.
"Well, I wish I knew where to find some breakfast. I'm hungry
enough; but I don't see any chance of getting any."
Nor do I," said the robin, while you content yourself with
wishing. If you set about looking for it, I think you'd stand
a better chance. I've had a splendid meal while you've been
wishing' for one. Try my plan, and you'll find it will answer
better."
--*-sH6-*---

LXX. FAIIR LAY.

H dear, I shall never get to the end of this,"
sighed a gig horse, as he stood waiting for
his master at the door of a country inn,
and looked despairingly at the long
stretch of dusty road that lay before him;
S"I know it will kill me."
"Not a bit of it, friend," said a donkey who was picking up
a scanty meal by the roadside. I went over the same ground
this morning, and it didn't kill me: why should it kill you? "
"Ah, but I did it yesterday, and I dare say I shall have to
do it again to-morrow."
"What then ?" said the donkey. "I suppose your master
will give you some supper when you get home ?"








"Oh, yes," said the horse, brightening up for a moment, as he
thought of his bran mash.
"And you'll have a night's rest ?"
I should think so," said the horse briskly, as his thoughts
travelled onwards to his comfortable bed of straw.
And some breakfast before you go out in the morning ?"
"Yes," said the horse absently, for he was wondering whether
there would be any oats with his hay.
"Then, friend, if you won't be above taking a word of advice
from a donkey, I should say, while I was content to take my
master's wages, I wouldn't grumble at having to do his work."

---+-Sfr--

LXXI. ROOK AT BOTH RIDES.

HREE horses stood waiting for their masters in
the stable of a village inn.
"Heigh-ho," sighed the first, "it's weary
work standing here, and they haven't even
given us a mouthful of hay to pass away the
time. It's nothing but slavery from morning to
night. As long as we do the work, they don't care how they
treat us."
"Not a bit," said his neighbour. "I often think it would ,be
a good thing if we were to follow the fashion of the day, and
strike for better food and less work."
"Well, friends," said the third horse, "you know your own
business best; but, at all events, speak for yourselves. I know
my master and he knows me, and I think we're both satisfied;
he never gives me more work than I can get through; and if he




































































.......











LOKA OHsbs


ii~








sees I am a bit tired, he gives me a kind word and a pat that
carries me on as well as a feed of corn and a refreshing drink
of water. I wouldn't change my master's service for the finest
stable in the land; and I take care to let him know it by doing
my work with a will. I know there's a saying, friends, that a
good master makes a good servant; but I'm sure it's quite as
true, that a good servant makes a good master."


--8e--.--


'LXXII. TF-UE PHILOSOPHY.

" -- F OW miserably cold the wind is," said a half-starved
looking horse to a donkey, who was contentedly
munching a thistle close-by.
"Yes, it is cold," said the donkey.
"It's all very well for you with your shaggy coat. But mine's
not so thick, and I can tell you it cuts right through me."
I dare say it does," said the donkey.
It blows right across the common, and there's no shelter
this side of the field."
"Then why don't you go to the other, friend ?" said the
donkey; I've always found it a good rule, when one hasn't
got things to one's mind, if one can't mend one's circumstances
to make the best of them."


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Now ready, cloth gilt, Is.
Volume III. H.R.H. PRINCE LEOPOLD, K.G.
Life and Addresses. With Portrait by T. D. SCOTT.
"This interesting volume."--Princess Louise.
Now ready, cloth gilt, is.
Volume IV. SIR WILFRID LAWSON, BART., M.P.
Life and Speeches. With Portrait drawn by T. D. SCOTT. Life by FREDERICK SHERLOCK.
The "Talks" in these volumes will deal with "the politics of home"-the most important
politics of all-which pre-eminently concern the domestic and social happiness and prosperity of
the people. Each volume is complete in itself.
REVIEWS.
A thoroughly good idea: we can cordially recommend the first volume."-The Guardian.
"The idea of reproducing, in a series of handy books, selections from the writings of our best
and most esteemed 'men of mark' is worthy of the Editor's enterprising mind."-The Record.
"The series will assuredly become popular in the widest sense of the term."-The Church or
England Tenmerance Chronicle.

5ust Published, in handsome binding, suitablefor presentation, Price is. 6d.
JOSEPH LIVESEY:
A LIFE STORY AND ITS LESSONS.
By FREDERICK SHERLOCK, Author of "Illustrious Abstainers," etc.
A fine Portrait of Mr. Livesey, taken from a recent photograph, drawn by T. D. Scott and
engraved by R. & E. Taylor, is given as a Frontispiece.
LONDON: HOME WORDS" PUBLISHING OFFICE, I, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGs, E.C.
69









PRESENTATION VOLUMES.
I.
"The Queen is much pleased with 'England's Royal Home.' "-Windsor, May 2rst.
Now ready, Third Thousand, in rich cloth, gilt edges, toned paper, with 17 Portraits and
Illustrations by T. D. SCOTT, J. D. COOPER, and others. Price 5s.
ENGLAND'S ROYAL HOME.
By the Rev. CHARLES BULLOCK, B.D., Editor of The Fireside, etc.
It is well that this beautiful picture of domestic happiness in high places should be brought
within the reach of a large circle of readers."-The Guardian.
"Exceedingly entertaining."-Swordand Trowel.
"We predict a considerable share of popularity for it."-The Graphic.
REPRINTED FROM "ENGLAND'S ROYAL HOME."
I. Doubly Royal (Third Thousand): Life of II. The Home Life of the Prince Consort
Princess Alice. Rich cloth gilt, with. (Third Thousand). In rich cloth gilt,
Portrait, as. with Portrait, 2s..6d.
II.
In handsome binding, suitable for wedding presentation. 3s. 6d.
THE BRIDE ELECT.
By Mrs. JOHNSON (Daughter of the late Dr. M'Caul), Author of Hints to Untrained
Teachers," etc.
"A truly bridal volume. An elegant and useful wedding gift."-Record.
A book to give a strong sense of responsibility, and to stir up the energies. We should like to
see it much read and much heeded."-Guardian.
III.
Handsome cloth, plate paper, bevelled, gilt, price 5s.
OLD OSCAR: The Faithful Dog.
By H. G. REID, Author of "Art Studies from Landseer," etc. Illustrated after Origina
Sketches by LANDSEER, WILKIE, and WEIR, in the possession of the Author.
CONTENTS.
Old Oscar.. By the Cot.
The Rescue. In the Glen.
The Shower. The Lake.
Grannie. s. The Reapers.
The Friends.
"The circulation of 'Old Oscar,' in various forms, has already reached the number of about
500,000 copies. It is fully equal to 'Rab and his Friends.' "-The Church Standard.
IV..
Handsome cloth, bevelled, gilt, price zs. 6d. Cheap Edition, price Is. 6d.
OUR FOLKS. John Churchill's Letters Home.
By AGNES GIBERNE, Author of Sun, Moon, and Stars," Tim Teddington's Dream," etc.
This unique volume contains forty Portraits of Folks in "Our Village," drawn by Cheret, and
engraved in the first style of art by J. D. COOPER.
V.
Rick cloth, bevelled, gilt, price 2s. 6d., with Portrait and Autograph Letter.
HUGH STOWELL: A Life and its Lessons.
By the Rev. CHARLES BULLOCK, B.D., Author of "England's Royal Home," etc.
He was a genuine successor of our best Reformers."-Dean McNeile.
VI.
In bevelled cloth, gilt, with Portrait, trice 2s.
HUGH McNEILE, and Reformation Truth.
With a Biographical Sketch by the Rev. CHARLES BULLOCK, B.D., Author of "What Church?'
Our Protestantism-so excellent in itself, so won to our country, and so kept-is well worth
keeping still, and keeping pure."-Dean McNeile. Page 68.
LONDON: "HOME WORDS" PUBLISHING OFFICE, I, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.C.
70







Works by the Rev. CHARLES BULLOCK, B.D.,
Formerly Rector of St. Nicholas, Worcester.
I.
Second Thousand. In bevelled cloth, gilt edges, w:th Illustration, Is. 6d.
THE FORGOTTEN TRUTH;
Or, The Gospel of the Holy Ghost. With Selected Hymns
of the Spirit.
CONTENTS.
Chap. I.-The Forgotten Truth. Chap. II.-The Church's Need; or, The Brethren Entreated
Chap. III.-The Quenching of the Spirit.
HYMNS OF THE SPIRIT CONTRIBUTED BY
The Rev. Ray Palmer, D.D. Bishop Wordsworth. Dean Stanley.
Frances Ridley Havergal. Rev. R. Wilton. Rev. Godfrey Thring.
Rev. T. Davis. Christina Forsyth. Rev. C. H. Spurgeon.
Rev. S. J. Stone. Rev. Horatius Bonar, D.D. Rev. Charles Bullock.
I have heard many sermons on the love of the Father, and the love of the Son, but never one
on 'the love of the Spirit.' Is not this truth sadly forgotten ? "-Preface.
"We heartily recommend this thoughtful and thoroughly spiritual treatise."--The Churchman
II.
Second Thousand. In bevelled cloth gilt, toned paper, with Frontispiece, 3s. 6d.
THE BEST WISH.
CONTENTS.
o. The Best Wish. 6. The Quenching of the 12. Fiery Trials.
2. Songs in the Night. Spirit. 13. ANation'sTrueGratitudc
3. The Gospel of the Holy 7. St. Andrew. 14. The Palm Tree.
Ghost. 8. Christian Experience. 15. Harvest Lessons.
4. The Bright Light in the 9. The Census. 16. God's Kingdom.
Clouds. 1o. Missionary Intercession. x7. The Ability of God.
5. The Trinity. iz. Decision for God. 18. Parting Words.
"Worthy of the author of 'The Way Home.' "-Record "A high religious tone."-Rock.
III.
Second Thousand. In bevelled cloth gilt, toned paper, with Frontispiece, 3s. 6d.
WORDS OF MINISTRY.
CONTENTS.
1. The Beloved Disciple. 6. Rebekah's Temptation. i2 Jacob's Retrospect of
2. Elijah. 7. Have Faith in God. Life.
3. The Ministering Women 8. The Gain of Godliness. 13.1 Family Worship, its Di-
at the Cross. 9. Christian Usefulness. 14. J vine Obligation and
4. The Three Professors. to. Charity. Exercises.
5. Martha. 1i. A Christmas Invitation.
"A most practical and profitable work."-The Christian Treasury (Dr. Bonar).
This attractively got-up volume, by the author of'The Way Home,' The Parents' Gift,' and
other well-known works, is well suited in every way for a home gift."-Record.
IV.
IS IT UTOPIAN?
The Evangelization of the Masses by Voluntary Lay Help.
(Reprinted from Can Nothing be Done? ") Tenth Thousand. Is.
We sincerely hope this plea may not be urged in vain."-The Record.
V.
Handsomely bound in crimson and gold, price zs. 6d.
MANY THINGS,
Something well said on almost every topic."- Public Opinion.
Many things' does not contain a single dead thing."--Sword and Trowel
VI.
With many Illustrations, cloth, gilt edges, price 2s.
SHAKSPEARE'S DEBT TO THE BIBLE,
"Cheap and handy: a very welcome addition to Shakspeare literature."-Bookseller.
LONDON: "HOME WORDS" PUBLISHING OFFICE, I, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.C
71








"HOME WORDS" PUBLICATIONS.


MAGAZINES FOR THE HOME.
Edited by the REV. CHARLES BULLOCK, B.D.,
Formerly Rector of St. Nicholas', Worcester, Author of "England's Royal Home."

I.

THE FIRESIDE.
THE NEW VOLUME, RICHLY BOUND, 7s. 6d., CONTAINS

TWO NEW SERIAL TALES.
2. DAYSPRING. By Mrs. MARSHALL.
2. FORBIDDEN TO MARRY. By Mrs. G. LINNEUS BANKS.

3. TEMPERANCE PIONEERS. By FREDERICK SHERLOCK, Author of "Illustrious Abstain-
ers," etc.
4. BIBLE EMBLEMS. By the Rev. C. WARNING BARDSLEY, M.A., Vicar of Christ Church,
Surbiton.
Other Serial Works by well-known Authors.
6d. MONTHLY.
"'The Fireside' is excellent, and wonderfully cheap."-The Times.


II.

HOME WORDS.
Id. Monthly. lSew Volume, 2s.
CONTAINS:
x. Five Thousand Pounds. A Tale by
AGNES GIBERNE.
2. Rain and Shine. A Tale by EMMA
MARSHALL.
3. Our Church Portrait Gallery.
28 Portraits.
4. The Bible Mine. By the Bishop of
SODOR AND MAN.
5. President Garfield. By H. G. REID.
6. Fables for 'You.' ByE. B. PROSSER.
7. The Home Songster. (Various
Authors.)
8. How they Lived in the Olden Time.'
By the Editor.
9. Wayside Chimes. (Various.)
o1. Young Folks' Page. Etc., etc.


III.
THE DAY OF DAYS.
Id. Monthly. NTew Volume, 2s.
CONTAINS:
z. Words of Ministry in the Home.
2. SundayTales Illustrating BibleTruths.
3. Leaves of Christian Biography.
4. Mission Work.
5. The Sunday Bible Hour.
6. The Olive Branch, etc., etc.
"An extraordinary cheap publication."-
East Anglian Daily Times.
"Deserves to be most extensively circula-
ted."-akefield Herald.
"A marvel of cheapness, got up in a superior
style."-Kentish Independent.
"THE DAY OF DAYS, reduced to a penny,
now runs an even race with the favourite HOME
WoRDs."-Peterborough A dvertiser.
"THE DAY OF DAYS, as a Sunday Maga-
zine, is without a rival. Mental vigour and
moral excellence combined."-Hastings and
St. Leonards News.
It is hard to believe, on turning over the
pages, that it is sold at so low a price."-
Church Sunday-School Magazine.
"Bright, pithy, and always welcome."-
Derby Mercury.


LONDON: "HOME WORDS" PUBLISHING OFFICE, -, PATERNOSTER BUILDINGS, E.C.
72




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