• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Waiting for father
 "A sister to be proud of!"
 A tardy confession
 The naughty doggies
 Footprints on the sands
 A friend indeed
 Cissy and the flower
 Minnie's temper
 Granny's skein
 A white hyacinth
 A peep at some Chinese provinc...
 A clever young couple
 A story of Handel
 Tom and the tiger
 In the orchard
 Freddie's fault
 A happy party
 A lively pet
 Bad company
 A tiresome lesson
 Cat-and-dog life
 What Frank and Lily learnt
 Nora's tea-party
 A snowball battle
 The message of the birds
 How John Chinaman catches...
 Daisy's prayer
 Winnie's lesson
 "Cockle Peter"
 Christmas in the hospital
 A stirring time
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Off and away : pictures and stories
Title: Off and away
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083162/00001
 Material Information
Title: Off and away pictures and stories
Alternate Title: Off and away : pictures and stories for Grave and Gay
Physical Description: 72 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Michael, Charles D
Howell ( Engraver )
Stacey, W. S ( Walter S. ), 1846-1929 ( Illustrator )
Rainey, W ( Illustrator )
Browne, Gordon ( Illustrator )
Dicksee, Margaret Isabel, 1858-1903 ( Illustrator )
S. W. Partridge & Co. (London, England) ( Publisher )
Hazell, Watson & Viney ( Printer )
Publisher: S.W. Partridge & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Hazell, Watson & Viney
Publication Date: c1895
Edition: 6th ed.
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1895   ( local )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Aylesbury
Netherlands
 Notes
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpapers and on back cover.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by Howell after W. Rainey and W. S. Stacey.
General Note: Some Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Cover printed in Holland.
Statement of Responsibility: by C. D. M. ; illustrated by W. Rainey, A.F. Muckley, M. I. Dicksee, G. Browne, etc.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083162
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224115
notis - ALG4376
oclc - 228823920

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Advertising
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Waiting for father
        Page 7
    "A sister to be proud of!"
        Page 8
        Page 9
    A tardy confession
        Page 10
        Page 11
    The naughty doggies
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Footprints on the sands
        Page 14
        Page 15
    A friend indeed
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Cissy and the flower
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Minnie's temper
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Granny's skein
        Page 24
        Page 25
    A white hyacinth
        Page 26
        Page 27
    A peep at some Chinese provinces
        Page 28
        Page 29
    A clever young couple
        Page 30
        Page 31
    A story of Handel
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Tom and the tiger
        Page 34
        Page 35
    In the orchard
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
    Freddie's fault
        Page 39
    A happy party
        Page 40
        Page 41
    A lively pet
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Bad company
        Page 44
        Page 45
    A tiresome lesson
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Cat-and-dog life
        Page 48
        Page 49
    What Frank and Lily learnt
        Page 50
        Page 51
    Nora's tea-party
        Page 52
        Page 53
    A snowball battle
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The message of the birds
        Page 58
        Page 59
    How John Chinaman catches his fish
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Daisy's prayer
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Winnie's lesson
        Page 64
        Page 65
    "Cockle Peter"
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Christmas in the hospital
        Page 68
        Page 69
    A stirring time
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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WAITING FOR FATHER.













( FF .AND




'i-.tulres \i\l Stories

GRAVE AND GAY.

E.
C. D. I.,
.Ai.'TH :, i.i Al h LT>.


ILL' T.-I4TED \
\V. RAINEY, R.I., A. F. MUCKLE.,
M. I. UDICKSEE, G. BRO\\NE. ETC. .


S.W. PARTRI)DGECo.,
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WAITING FOR FATHER

" A SISTER TO BE PROUD OF!

A TARDY CONFESSION

THE NAUGHTY DOGGIES .

FOOTPRINTS ON THE SANDS

A FRIEND INDEED .

CISSY AND THE FLOWER .

MINNIE'S TEMPER

GRANNY'S SKEIN .

A WHITE HYACINTH

A PEEP AT SOME CHINESE PROVINCES

A CLEVER YOUNG COUPLE

A STORY OF HANDEL

TOM AND THE TIGER

IN THE ORCHARD .

FREDDIE'S FAULT .


PAGE

7.

.

10

12

14

16

18

22

24

S26

28

S30

32

S34

S. 36

S39








6 Contents.


A HAPPY PARTY

A LIVELY PET

BAD COMPANY.

A TIRESOME LESSON

CAT-AND-DOG LIFE .

WHAT FRANK AND LILY LEARNT

NORA'S TEA-PARTY .

A SNOWBALL BATTLE .

THE MESSAGE OF THE BIRDS .

How JOHN CHINAMAN CATCHES HIS FISH.

DAISY'S PRAYER .

WINNIE'S LESSON .

"COCKLE PETER" .

CHRISTMAS IN THE HOSPITAL .

A STIRRING TIME


PAGE
S 40

S42

44

S46

S. 48

S50

S52

54

58
* 54

6o

62

64

66

68







WAITING FOR FATHER.
(See Frontispiece.)


" ^.- "S it time for father to come home yet, mother
N dear?" If little May had asked that
question once, she had asked it twenty times
since dinner; and it was not to be wondered
i at that Mrs. Wilson began to get a wee bit
tired of hearing it so often. At last, seeing
that her small daughter was too excited to settle to anything
indoors, Mrs. Wilson said, after looking at the clock,
Father will soon be home now, dearie. Come to the gate
with mother, and we will wait for him." May ran for her
hat; and then, clasping dolly in her arm, and holding fast
to mother's hand, she stood; as you may see her in our picture,
waiting for father.
Would you like to know why May was so specially
anxious on that particular day for father's return? You
shall hear, then. It was her birthday. In the trim little
parlour of the cottage home a grand -tea was laid, with
a wonderful cake of mother's making in the middle of the
table. Naturally, mother and May could not think of
sitting down to that meal without father. So there they
stood, watching and waiting for the father who was all the
world to them.
At last May gave a shout. HERE .he comes And off
she flew, even dropping dolly in her excitement, never
stopping until she rushed, breathless and happy, into father's
outstretched arms. Was the party a success ? That, surely,
is a question that needs no answer I







"A SISTER TO BE PROUD OF!"

HEN Harry Matthews discovered that it was
a frosty morning, he was nearly wild with
delight. Here's a treat, Nell! he said briskly
to his sister, who was crouching over the fire.
S"There'll be skating on the squire's pond to-day.
I say,'Nell," he went on, "don't you wish you
could skate?" "Of course I do, but I can't;
so what's the use of -wishing?" said Nell
gloomily. "I've never even once had on the skates Uncle
John gave me a year ago." Harry was silent for a minute.
Then he said, Look here, Nell-I'll teach you to skate "
" Oh, will you ? cried Nellie delightedly; really, Harry ?"
"Why, yes!" said Harry, surprised, and, if it must be
confessed, a little bit ashamed to notice how his sister's face
brightened. For he did not devote to her nearly as much
of his time as he might and ought to have done.
After breakfast they started out, and on arriving at the
pond found a crowd of skaters already enjoying themselves.
Amongst them was Tom Morris, a school-friend of Harry's;
and he good-naturedly offered to help Nellie. The two boys
took the greatest pains with their pupil, and by dinner-time she
could really manage fairly well. She is a pupil to be proud
of," said Harry, who now found for the first time that Nellie
was a far nicer playmate than many of his school-boy friends.
That first skating lesson was the beginning of a better
understanding between Nellie and her brother; and it was
not long before Harry was heard to say-and to a boy, too 1-
I tell you, Tom Morris, my Nell is a sister to be proud of I"
And Tom agreed!






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LEARNING TO SKATE.


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IO0
A TARDY CONFESSION.


HE apples were gone. That was clear.
But how, and where, and when had they
gone? That was a puzzle; and Farmer
Harty, being a poor hand at conundrums
was inclined to give it up. He stood be-
neath the stripped apple-tree in the orchard,
and scratched his head in a perplexed sort of way. Suddenly
an idea occurred to him, which, however, was evidently not
to his taste. No! he said, I don't believe they'd do it.
Rascals they may be, but thieves never!" and he brought
his big stick down with a thump that -made his sleepy old
dog get up in a hurry. But I'll see! I'll see!"
Then he walked over to the school-house, where a short
conversation with the master resulted in every boy being
asked two plain questions, to which two unvarying replies
were given until it came to Sid Mason's turn. Now, Sid,"
said the master, did you steal the apples ?" "No, sir! "
"Do you know who did ?" "Yes, sir! Every boy in the
school held his breath. "Who was it?" "I cannot tell
you, sir!" The boys gasped. "Then you must bear the
punishment," said the master grimly, reaching for his cane.
But just as the first stroke was about to be given somebody
shrieked, "Don't, sirl I did it l" And out from his place
came big Willie Thompson.
Willie was indeed the culprit. He received the punish-
ment he deserved, and a severe lecture into the bargain. Let
us hope both did him good. As for Sid, the boys made a
hero of him. But whether he was right in acting as he did
is an open question. What is your opinion, little reader?



























































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"'DID YOU STEAL THE APPLES?"






THE NAUGHTY DOGGIES.


S- F OUR little doggies once did live
Together, and quite gay were they;
For they had nothing else to do
But eat, and drink, and play all day.
r F


Two of these doggies lived on milk,
And two on biscuits, crisp and dry;
And when their dinner did appear,
Then brightly gleamed each doggie's eyel


But one day, when their master came,
And brought to them their simple fare,
The doggies who on biscuits fed
Began to fight about their share.


Now, surely that was very sad,
For pups who fight about their food,
Unless they mend their naughty ways,
Will never grow up wise and good I













iii '


III


* .,,,. I

* :


THE PUPS' DINNER-TIME.


'i *1


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14
FOOTPRINTS ON THE SANDS.

SELL, auntie, I don't see that it matters one bit.
If Cecil and I like to play by ourselves, why
S shouldn't we? It's perfectly horrid of that
Gracie Gladman to come poking her nose into
all our fun as she does. We don't want her,
and we won't have her, so there!"
"Come here, Ethel," said Auntie Meg. Ethel obeyed
unwillingly. "Suppose you were to go back to the shore
where you played this morning, do you think you could find
on the sand any of the prints of your shoes?" "Why,
auntie, what a funny question! Of course not The tide
has washed them away hours ago! Besides, what has that
to do with Gracie Gladman ?" "Just this, my hasty little
maiden ; there are other sands than those of the sea-sands
over which no tidal waters ever roll. Sands of time they
are, and the footprints we make on them will remain to tell
how we have walked, till the great sea of eternity washes
them away. When poor Gracie, who has felt so unhappy
since her little sister died, came and asked to join your play,
and you coldly turned away, what kind of footprints did you
leave behind? Oh, my bairnies, none of us can afford to
make such accusing footmarks. Go to Gracie in the morning,
and say you are sorry. Will you?" From the folds of
auntie's dress two muffled voices whispered "Yes"; and
then, after kissing each bowed head, auntie sent the children
to bed.
The next day Cecil and Ethel wandered again on the
sands. Presently they met Gracie, who readily forgave them,
and in a little while they were the best of friends.





















































-::: ~ -
II.2


"CECIL AND ETHEL WAN


-DERED ON THE SANDS.
DERED ON THE SANDS."'


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A FRIEND INDEED.

SHERE was no doubt about it-little Maggie was
Q desperately ill; and her brother Jack, as he knelt
beside her bed, felt as though his heart would
break. For they were all the world to each
other, these two. Their father had died long
ago, and their mother, alas! was mother to them
only in name.
Suddenly Maggie opened her eyes. "Jack," she said,
"if I had a dolly, I think I could get better." A dolly!
How could Jack get her that? She might almost as well
have asked him for the moon! Not for the world would
he tell her so, however. He kissed the little wan face, and
without a word left the room and the house. Walking
dejectedly along a squalid street, he came to a building
brightly lighted. Scarcely knowing why, he looked in. A
school prize distribution was in progress, and Jack gazed
wistfully at the books and toys many of the children were
holding. Presently a lady noticed him, and spoke to him.
Jack never quite knew how it happened, but before long he
found himself telling her all about Maggie and her desire
for a dolly.
The end of it was that the lady went home with Jack;
and that same evening, when Maggie said good-night to
him, a beautiful doll-her very own-was clasped tight in
her tiny arms. Nor was that all; the kind-hearted lady
cared for Maggie till she got well again; she found work
for Jack; and she persuaded the children's mother, with
God's help, to give up her evil ways. Was she not a
friend indeed?





















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....
















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"A BEAUTIFUL DOLL IN HER ARMS.'







CISSY AND THE FLOWER.

DON'T believe it! said little Cissie Barlow.
"Oh!" shouted her Cousin Alec; and "Cissie!"
shrieked her Cousin Flo. "I don't care," said
Cissie loftily; and then she repeated, in a very
determined manner, I don't believe it! Do you
mean to tell me," she went on scornfully, "that
a stupid flower in a pot has the sense to turn
itself towards the sun, and grow towards the light? Do
you expect me to believe that? The girls at school told
me that when I visited my cousins in the country they would
be sure to tell me some strange tales; but I'm not as simple
as you seem to think, even if I do come from London!"
And with that Miss Cissie tossed her head and stamped
her foot defiantly.
Alec and Flo looked at each other. "Well," said Alec
at length, I don't think it is very polite of you, Miss Cissie,
to talk like that, and doubt our word; but we will see if
we can find the gardener, and ask him to tell you about it.
Perhaps you will believe him."
They set off at once, and found John busy weeding.
However, when he had heard all they had to say, he good-
naturedly got up from his work, and bidding the children
follow him, led the way to the greenhouse, where he showed
Cissie all the plants, and explained their habits in such
an interesting manner, that the little girl .quite forgot the
argument that had led to this unexpected treat. But John
didn't forget! When they had seen nearly everything in
the greenhouse, he took Cissie's hand. "Now come this
way, missie, please," he said; and he led her to a corner of














































































IN THE GREENHOUSE.


M- .---~r J-

8~aa b~de!







the greenhouse where two or three plants were standing,
with their stems bent and twisted in a very peculiar
manner. "Oh," said Cissie, how funny they look! "Yes,
my dear," said John; "I don't know how it happened, but
these plants were put aside in an unsuitable place, and
forgotten. Like everything else in nature, however, they
tried to make the best of their surroundings, and you see
the result. Those curious, unshapely twists have been caused
by their efforts to turn towards the light."
"There now! said Flo triumphantly, from the other end
of the greenhouse; do you believe it now, Miss Doubtful ?"
Cissie hung her head, and said nothing.
There was a twinkle of amusement in Gardener John's
eye as he glanced at the little girl; but it presently gave place
to a serious look, and he said slowly-he was a strange man
in some ways was John-" Don't you think, Missie, the
flowers teach us a lesson in this matter? It seems to me
that when they try so hard to turn towards their sun, they
are bidding us look ever to our Sun-even the Sun of
Righteousness-that we may walk ever in the light of all
goodness and all truth. Don't you think so, Missie?"
But Cissie answered never a word; and with bowed head
she walked thoughtfully away.



,.. -. 7 ,-
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44^^^^?


Off ,nd Away.







MINNIE'S TEMPER.


HE day had been very unsatisfactory. That
was the disappointing conclusion arrived at
by Jessie Mortimer when she reviewed the
events of the past few hours. It was Jessie's
birthday, and a party had been arranged in
S. honour of the event. Among the guests was
a girl cousin of Jessie's-Minnie Palmer by name; and she
it was who had spoiled everything. "I can't think what
was the matter with Minnie," said Jessie, as she sat alone
in the summer-house. "I wonder why she was so dis-
agreeable ? "
As if in answer to her question, at that moment Minnie
appeared. Jessie," she said, in a shame-faced way, I want
to speak to you." Well," said Jessie, not very graciously,
" what is it ?" "I know I was perfectly hateful this after-
noon," said Minnie humbly, "and I want to say how sony
I am. It was all through something that put me out before
I left home. I don't expect you to forgive me, but I felt
so miserable that I was obliged to come and tell you I am
sorry, and to bring you the book I had got for your birthday.
Mother says my wretched temper will spoil all my life unless
I conquer it, and-Jessie- But here Jessie put her arms
round Minnie's neck. Poor Minnie," she said, I am sorry
too. Let us try to forget to-day; and perhaps when my next
birthday comes that horrid temper will be quite done with."
The next birthday" is getting near now, and Jessie
and Minnie are very busy preparing for a party that promises
to be a great success. At any rate, Minnie's temper won't
spoil it I













































































" 'JESSIE, I WANT TO SPEAK TO YOU.'


a,.















A",,




iaA





24
GRANNY'S SKEIN.

T was a warm, bright Saturday in June-
just the right kind of day for cricket,
l thought Will, as he hurried over his
^ i morning work about the house, so as to
be able to get to the field in good time
for the match in which he was to take part
That afternoon.
When dinner was over he was all eagerness to be off;
but Granny wanted him to hold a skein of wool for her
to wind before he started. Oh dear! said Will impatiently,
"what a bother!" For Granny was old, and wound very
slowly. He was sorely tempted to run off and let Granny
wait until he came back; but he thought better of it. He
fidgeted dreadfully during the winding process, however;
and that did not help matters, for the skein became badly
tangled one or twice. At last, he could contain himself no
longer. Oh, Granny," he said, this is'such a large skein,
and I'm in such a hurry!" But Granny only answered,
"Never mind, Will; it will soon be done now." When at
length the tiresome task was finished, Granny said, "Thank
you, my boy; now off with you, and you won't enjoy your
game any the less for knowing that I wanted this wool to
complete a shawl for poor little crippled Susie" (a very
particular friend of Will's). I promised she should have it
to-morrow. If you had not helped me, I could not have had
the shawl ready for her, and I should have been so sorry to
disappoint the little maid."
Willie looked shyly into dear old Granny's eyes. "I
should have been sorry, too," he said, and he kissed her.





















,'I' ; "




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IY I


























SANI





26
A WHITE HYACINTH.

SUCH a beautiful flower it was! Little Lizzie
Hardy, who had watched and tended the tiny
green shoot that had sprung so wonderfully from the
brown, dead-looking bulb until it had reached its
1 perfect beauty, thought no other flower could ever
have been quite so lovely as her white hyacinth-
her one treasure.
A great struggle was going on in Lizzie's mind.
She had been to church, and had heard the minister
plead for help to carry on the Master's work amongst the
heathen. Very touchingly he had urged his hearers to do
something for the spread of Christ's kingdom; and at the
end of his appeal he announced his intention of attending
at the vestry the next morning to receive whatever his
congregation might care to give. Lizzie was much troubled
about the matter. Her tender little heart ached for the poor
people who knew nothing of God or of Jesus. But how could
she help them? She had nothing to give. Stay, though!
Her flower! That, at least, was her very own. Could she
give that? Yes, she could; and she did, although in giving it
she gave her all. The old clergyman looked up in surprise
when Lizzie approached him, carrying her precious burden;
but he understood, and accepted the offering.
The little girl thought her gift poor, but God did not so
regard it. The clergyman told the tale of Lizzie's white
hyacinth a few days later at a missionary meeting, and many
were so touched by the simple story of love and sacrifice
that they gave more liberally than they would otherwise have
done, in support of the good work of the missionaries.












































































V CARRYING HER PRECIOUS BURDEN."





28
A PEEP AT SOME CHINESE PROVINCES.


ST is a pity we have no opportunity here for more
than a peep, for China is a most interesting
country. Not the least interesting parts of it are
the provinces of Tonquin and Annam, from which
our artist has chosen the subjects for his pictures.
You will notice that one of his sketches shows a
scene in Nam-dinh, a strongly fortified town, captured by the
French. Next comes a Tonquinese mandarin's banquet, which
is a very ceremonious affair. Endless are the dishes-live
fish, birds'-nest soup, sea-slugs (trizang), roasted puppy, and
half-decayed eggs-which to a Western palate are hardly
inviting. The cooks are said to be very skilful, and delight
in surprising the guests. With everything is served snowy-
white rice.
In the centre of the page is a wedding, which also is a
long, costly ceremony. The poor bride bends low before
her husband, confessing herself his slave. Lower down you
will notice a native forge. With a stone for an anvil, and
a few simple tools, a little charcoal, and goat-skin bellows,
the men do really very fine smiths' work. Below this is a
floating village on the Mekong River, and a fisherman with
a great square net, which he raises up and down with a kind
of crane.
Other pictures to be mentioned are the altar of ancestors,
whose worship is held sacred; a palanquin, showing the mode
of travelling; a tomb of the bonzes-that is, the burial-place
of the Buddhist priests; and an elaborate funeral procession.
You can also see how the women spin silk, and the way
in which the people amuse themselves in the open air.






























iia


A ;TLC r.:\ ILL':





30
A CLEVER YOUNG COUPLE.


HEY were a pair of year-old rooks, newly married;
and, like some other conceited young folks, they
thought themselves very clever. When nesting
time came, they even went so far as to offer advice
to the old rooks on the best methods of laying twigs I
However, they were only snubbed for their pains,
and told to hold their beaks. This offended our young
friend Sambo so much that he and his clever wife left the
rookery altogether, and built for
themselves a delightful little home- -
in a large elm, where their only
neighbours were a pair of magpies.
The magpies seemed disposed to be j
friendly, and Mr. and Mrs. Sarnmbol
felt highly flattered when their nic\
friends declared they had
constructed the most wonder-
ful nest ever seen. Their
relatives came once to urge
them to return to the rookery;
but they gave their visitors
such pert answers that they
soon flew home again.
In course of time, five eggs
were laid in the wonderful
nest; and one evening the two birds /
went off for a last flight together
before Mrs. Sambo should settle
down to her long turn of motherly "GAVE THEIR VISITORS PERT ANSWERS."







N duty. But alas! they little thought what would
happen during their pleasure-trip. When they
returned to their nest, they found those good-
for-nothing magpies, who were only waiting
for such a chance as this to rob them, had
taken a mean advantage of their
absence. Every one of their
p precious eggs had been sucked l
Their grief was great, but they
learnt a valuable lesson.
Very humbly they re-
turned to the rookery, where
their old
frie d
cI e i\-ed i'the r.i-" 'I


them t
build a
"THOSE GOOD-FOR-NOTHING MAGPIES. .
new nest
in the very same tree in which
Mrs. Sambo had herself been '
hatched. But they made no
needless fuss over it. They no
longer gave themselves airs,
nor professed to be cleverer
than their neighbours. They
reared their brood safely;
and are still living, a most
respectable, steady pair of ,l
rooks..
'THE MOST WONDERFUL NEST EVER SEEN."





32
A STORY OF HANDEL.,


EORGE HANDEL, the great musician, was
once, when a boy, invited with his father
to visit an uncle. The father, who did not
want his boy to study music, would not
let him go, fearing that in Halle, where
the uncle lived,, he might find opportunity
for hearing good music, which would only increase his longing
to make it the study of his life. So the father went off alone.
But little George was not easily daunted. He started
out early in the morning, long before his father, for whom
he waited at a spot miles from home. He was so hot
and tired, and he had come so far, that his father could
not find it in his heart to turn him back, so they jogged
on together. At last they reached the end of their journey,
and during their stay at Halle George heard such music
as he had never heard before. One Sunday, after service
in church, the boy suddenly disappeared, and was, :found
playing the organ, while the organist, and his uncle listened
in amazement.-
A whisper of the boy's wonderful talent at last reached
the Duke of Saxony, who sent for him 'and his' father,
and persuaded the latter to let his son study music. The
Duke paid for his lessons, and we all know how, in after
years, he became one of the greatest musicians the world
has ever seen. In his old age, Handel suffered from blind-
ness; but he would not give up his beloved music; and
it used to bring tears to the eyes of many to see the blind
old master being led to the organ, and afterwards before
the company to acknowledge their applause.











































































"THE BLIND OLD MASTER BEING LED BEFORE THE COMPANY."







TOM AND THE TIGER.

--, WOULDN'T be afraid of a tiger,"
S1. said Tom Charlton boldly. I'd
-- take this stick and whack him, crack!
I, crack! and Tom brought the stick
-. down so fiercely on the garden gate
that the top bar broke. "You've done
S --it now," said Jimmy Blake. "Yes,
haven't I !" said Tom gloomily. "I
suppose I ought to tell dad, but I can't. Let's spend the
afternoon in the wood. I'll tell father to-night;" and Tom
walked off, leaving Jim to follow.
The wood was full of beauty, but Tom was too miserable
to notice it. Something was telling him he was a coward.
What a long time Jim was! How quiet the wood seemed!
Hark what was that ? Tom could here soft footsteps. They
came nearer; pit, pat-they were here! Tom started back
with a shriek of terror, for there before him stood a TIGER
With a cry of despair he took to his heels. On he ran,
through the wood and down to the river, where he leaped into
a boat. The tiny craft spun round with his weight, and drifted
from the bank just as the tiger reached the water's edge. A
moment later Tom lost consciousness. When next he opened
his eyes he was in his own room at home; and a day or two
later he heard all about it-the tiger's escape from a menagerie,
the keepers' search for it, their arrival just as Tom jumped
into the boat, and how they had caught the animal and brought
Tom home. Father," said Tom, "I know I was a coward
about meeting that tiger, but at any rate I can be brave about
owning up when I've done wrong-and I will." And he did I

























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"WITH A CRY OF DESPAIR HE TOOK TO HIS HEELS."





36
IN THE ORCHARD.


THE brightest ray the sun can bring,
The freshest air the breeze can blow,
The sweetest song the thrushes sing,
Are in the early morn, you know.



The apples then, all ripe and sweet,
Are sparkling with the crystal dew,
'Tis then the fruit is best to eat,
And that's the time to pluck it, tool



So where the fruit hung overhead
Miss Bell and Kate took "Dot" and "Spy";
They plucked the apples rosy red,
And took them home to make a pie.


And as they homeward went in glee
Across the fields, Kate said to Bell:
"If Tom had been awake, you see,
He might have had this walk as well!"


J. L.










Me.













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~auy















'4 .

















TAKING HOME THEIR TREASURES.

























FREDDIE'S FAULT.


RED, are your lessons ready?" "No-o, mother.
I quite meant to do them, but I put off last night to
play with Will Dawson, and- Fred, did you
write to your Cousin Madge about the book you
promised her?" "Well-I meant to, but I've had
a lot to do this week, and I put it off, and so- Fred,
I thought I heard you say Roy Benson was going to sell
you his white rabbit?" "Yes, he was; but I shall have
to do without it now. I put off seeing him about it, and he
sold it to somebody else." Need we say what Freddie's fault
is? His mother is having a bed-time talk with him on the
subject. Let us hope he will profit by it.
Off and Away.


W&A"





40
A HAPPY PARTY.


IVE imps of mischief," somebody called them once,
S f but that was rather stretching it," as Arthur
Mayhew, one of the five, indignantly remarked.
There was no denying, however, that they were
about as full of mischief as four healthy boys
and a tricky terrier could very well be. Still, in
justice to them all it must be admitted that
their frolics rarely, if ever, took a vicious turn, and they never
wilfully hurt other people's feelings, which is more than can
be said for some young harum-scarums of my acquaintance !
They lived, these five, in a little village on the south
coast; and the one source of pleasure of which they never
tired was the sea. Arthur Mayhew's father was a boatman,
and a boat was at the disposal of the boys at any time.
They knew quite well how to manage the small craft; and,
as they could all swim like ducks, they were as safe on the
water as on land. In their opinion there was no way of
spending a fine, warm Saturday afternoon half so enjoyable
as to get into their boat, push it a little way from the shore,
strip, and plunge into the cool water.
Look at them in our picture. Aren't they happy? Arthur
is sitting in the boat to mind the clothes; but he is so taken
up with the frolics of his friends that he has not noticed
until too late that mischievous Gyp has jumped overboard
with a hat, and he is swimming away with a look on his
face that seems to say he means to take that hat as far as
France, anyhow! He probably won't get there, for Rob
Jackson is after him; but he and the boys will have their
fun all the same, so what does it matter?





























































































" GYP HAS JUMPED OVERBOARD WITH A HAT.


_ C I1_P~~ ~ Lmsl





42
A LIVELY PET.

*LD Mrs. Moore lived by herself in a little
cottage close beside the sea. It was a tiny
house, very plainly built, with nothing at all
Grand about it; but Granny" Moore, as the
neighbours' children called her, dearly loved
the little place. She had lived there nearly
all her life. Her husband, .who had been a sailor, was
drowned one night in a terrible storm almost within sight
of his cottage home; and "granny" had lived on in the little
place ever since.
Mrs. Moore had one son, a bright, merry lad, who loved
his mother very much, and did all he could to help and cheer
her. When he grew old enough to earn his own living,
however, to his mother's dismay he said he wanted to go
to sea; and nothing availed to turn him from his purpose.
So to sea he went; and poor granny was left more lonely.
than ever. But one day the sailor lad reached home again,
and amongst many other presents for his mother he brought
her a parrot, to keep her company while he was away. On
board his ship he had taught the bird to say many things;
and when at last he had to go to sea again, the parrot proved
quite a lively pet.
"Granny," who was very deaf, was obliged to use an
ear-trumpet; and it was most amusing to see Poll perch, as
she often did, on anything handy, and talk' away, while
"granny" held her trumpet to her ear and smiled at the
bird's droll sayings. Poll's favourite sentence was, Cheer
up, mother; Jack will soon be home again!" And often did
"granny" pray that the comforting words might come true.















































































A.

3,.


" 'JACK WILL SOON BE HOME AGAIN.'





44
BAD COMPANY.


WEN, I wish you would keep out of the way
of Jack Sharman. He is not the sort of lad
I care for you to associate with." Mr. Parker
spoke kindly enough, but Owen walked off
looking very surly, and muttering that if
Jack were good enough for Phil Jasmond he
was good enough for him.
On the whole, Owen was rather glad he had not actually
promised his father not to associate with the objectionable
Jack, when, lessons bcin.- over for the day, the two school
friends found the lad waiting for them by the edge of the
wood. Come on, boys," said Jack. I've found some
sport for you. There are snakes about here. Ah! as
something glided under his foot, "there goes one. Pick it
up, Owen Fearing that, if he refused, Jack might think
him a coward, Owen stooped down, and was on the point
of grasping the snake, when he suddenly felt himself taken
by the collar and thrown half a dozen yards away, while a
familiar voice exclaimed, How dare you, Jack Sharman!
You knew that adder might have seriously stung the lad! "
Jack tried to put a bold front on the matter, but failed, and
soon slunk away; while Owen and Phil stood still, looking
very much ashamed, as Mr. Parker explained that he happened
to be.walking through the wood, and came upon the boys just
in the nick of time.
Now," said Mr. Parker, "will you believe that that lad
is no fit companion for either of you ?" The boys whispered
a frightened Yes "; and from that day they have given Jack
Sharman as wide a berth as possible.


















































































" HE FELT HIMSELF TAKEN BY THE COLLAR."


I V1.
'"E ii






46
A TIRESOME LESSON.

EAR me! How much is six times three?
This sum I cannot do;
I think it's very hard to be
At lessons now, don't you?


"The sun is hot, and every spot
Is bright with golden rays;
I think it is a dreary lot
To work on such warm days!"


But through the. garden auntie comes,
And with a smile says she:
"I'll help you, Freda, with your sums-
Then you for play are free.


"Come, don't be idle; work away,
Try hard, my little one!
Then you will feel so glad and gay
To know your work is done."
















































































A HARD SUM.





48
CAT-AND-DOG LIFE.

FtPHE was a Persian pussy; he was a trim,
sleek terrier; and they quarrelled dread-
fully. Slim might be dozing at one end
of the hearthrug, while Flo performed
her toilet at the other end. Suddenly
Flo would take it into her head that
she would like to sit on a certain chair to wash her face.
No sooner was she comfortably settled than Slim would
go over to the chair and tell Flo that he wanted to sit
there. Then they would begin to fight about it, and
there would be no peace in the room until they were both
turned out.
They quarrelled over their food, too. Their mistress
gave them their dinners on one plate; and the way Slim
would gobble up the food, so as to make sure of getting
as many tit-bits as possible, was really quite shocking!
One day they had chicken bones for dinner, and Flo seized
one bone that Slim wanted very particularly. He tried
hard to get it, but Flo would not give it up, and they
fought furiously over it. In their anger they quite forgot
the rest of their dinner; and Bob, the yard-dog, who
happened to be loose, ate it for them! It was funny to
see how foolish they both looked when they found what
their selfishness had cost them.
And-what do you think? Once I knew a boy and girl
who were a wee bit inclined to be like these-Eh ? What?
" Shouldn't tell tales" ? Well, then, I won't! But I consider
selfish children are ten times worse than Flo and Slim, who
after all are only a cat and dog-don't you ?























p-:
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THEY QUARRELLED DREADFULLY.







WHAT FRANK AND LILY LEARNT.

.UNTIE GRACE was on a visit to the home of
her little nephew and niece, and the young
A folks were consequently having a very happy time.
It occurred to auntie, however, that perhaps the children
were thinking rather too much of their own happiness, so
one morning she announced her intention of going to visit
a little sick friend,. and she asked Lily and Frank to go
with her. They looked rather glum over it at first; but
when auntie told them how ill her little friend was, and
how poor, with no mother to love her, and scarcely any
friends to care for her, tears came into their eyes; and
they not only agreed to go, but Lily offered to take one
of her very best dollies as a present for the invalid, while
Frank lamented that he had nothing the poor sick girlie
would care for.
So after breakfast the small party started. To the
children's astonishment their auntie took them to the railway
station, and thence by train some ten miles to the little town
of Wilton, where there was a children's hospital. It was
there, where auntie was evidently well known, that they
found the sick child. Her joy at seeing auntie was quite
touching; and her delight, when Lily gave her the doll,
somehow made that young lady inclined to cry.
The children could not be parted until auntie promised
they should meet again; and, indeed, that was only the
first of many visits to Wilton Hospital, where Lily and
Frank unconsciously learnt the valuable lesson that our
highest pleasure comes, not from seeking our own enjoyment,
but in trying to make others happy.
































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"A LITTLE SICK FRIEND."





52
NORA'S TEA-PARTY.


T happened in this way. Nora had a very special
friend named Ada Morrison. Like most little
girls, Ada was fond of parties; and two or three
times every year her mother allowed her to invite
some of her playmates home to tea. On the
occasion of the last tea-party, Nora had been one
of the guests; and she was so impressed with
Ada's hospitality that she made up her mind to
ask her mother to let her give a party too. This she did;
and as mother was quite willing, Nora, in great glee, set
about preparing for the important event.
Alas! however, as a poet of renown has told us, "The
best-laid schemes o' mice and men" (and little girls, too,
for that matter!) "gang aft a-gley"; and it happened that
only a week before the date of the party, when nothing
remained to be done but to send out the invitations, Nora's
little brother was taken ill. The doctor said he must be
kept absolutely quiet, and so the party had to be given up.
Nora was greatly distressed, of course-but more on -her
brother's account than because of her own disappointment.
She told her mother as cheerfully as she could that they
must just put off the party till Willie was better; and on
the day when the great feast was to have taken place, she
consoled herself by giving a strictly private party to her
dollies-the only guests who could be relied upon not to
disturb Willie!
A few weeks later the proper party was given; and Nora
had, so she said, "a splendid time." Don't you think she
deserved it?





















































Innd


NR. TEA-PA.TY .













NORA S TEA-PARTY.





54
A SNOWBALL BATTLE.


E shall have snow before morning, and plenty
of it," said old Mr. Gayton, the weather-
prophet of Stoneleigh-and he shook his
Head dolefully. For he was a martyr to
rheumatism; and frost, or snow, or wet
meant for him many painful twinges.
Harry Fowler overheard the old man's remark, and went
dancing down the street in an ecstasy of delight. Turning
a corner sharply, he came into violent collision with Will
Coleman, and upset that young gentleman very literally.
" Snow to-morrow, my boy exclaimed Harry, helping Will
to his feet, and never troubling to apologise for having
knocked him over. "Snow to-morrow-old Mr. Gayton
says so "; and thereupon the boys gave vent to their feelings
in a whoop that would not have disgraced a Red Indian
on the war-path. For they knew nothing of rheumatism;
and frost and snow meant for them the merriest, wildest
fun imaginable.
It's bound to come, you know," said Harry, as soon
as he recovered his breath-" the snow, I mean !-old Mr.
Gayton is always right about that-and I've got a plan.
To-morrow morning you and I will start early for school,
and stand by the wall at the corner of Dr. Mason's house.
Jim Harris and the twin Butlers are sure to pass that
way, and you and I will give them such a pelting as they
have never had yet."
"That's all very fine," said Will, "but they will be three
to two, and we might get the pelting! "
"Umr!" said Harry, "I hadn't thought of that! But








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A BATTLE IN THE SNOW.


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I'll tell you what," as a bright idea struck him; I'll get my
sister to come with us; she is almost as good as a boy-any
way, she's worth three ordinary girls. How will that do ?"
"That's better," said Will; "but, I say, it will be rather
a sell if the snow doesn't come after all, won't it ? "
"Oh, go home, Froggy! said Harry, laughing, "and
stop croaking; and mind you meet Sis and me in the
morning. Good-bye And the two boys went their ways.
The next morning proved old Mr. Gayton to have been
a true prophet, for the snow was lying inches deep. Harry
and his sister were up betimes; and half-past eight found
them waiting with Will at Dr. Mason's corner. The
"enemy" presently approached, as Harry had expected;
and though Jim's terrier sounded an alarm, and so spoilt
a little of the suddenness of the attack, boys, and girl, and dog
were soon engaged in a battle royal; and what with shouts,
and laughs, and barks, and flying, snowballs, things were
pretty lively at that corner for the next few minutes.
Unfortunately it had to be a drawn battle, for there was
not time to finish it; but the boys and Sis had had fine
fun, to say nothing of Tiny; and as the snow promised to
last for some days, they were not unwilling that the friendly
contest should be decided on some future occasion.
As to how the battle was resumed, and who were victors
in the end, we have no space to tell; but we can say that
the six snowballers were as good friends after their battle
as before, and that really is the main thing in such matters,
isn't it ?


Off and Away.








THE MESSAGE OF THE BIRDS.


\ TE are merry little birdies,
Just as happy as can be,
Bathing in the shady brooklet,
Hiding in the leafy tree.


i.." Peaceful are our tiny homesteads,
Cheery are our tuneful notes,
Cosy are our robes of feathers,
2 Snug and warm our winter coats.


There is One above, in Heaven,
Who regards our feeblest cry;
Even to the little birdies
Is His mercy ever nigh.


And for children too He careth-
Girls and boys His love may share
Evermore He watches o'er them,
And He waits to hear their prayer.








































































ItLITTLE BIRDIES."







HOW JOHN CHINAMAN CATCHES HIS FISH.

H E is, in some ways, a very clever fellow,
is John Chinaman, as you will no doubt
Agree when you have heard how he catches his
fish. Of course, he knows our way of fishing,
and he does sometimes provide a dinner for
himself and his family by means of rod and
line. But he has another and a very singular
method of catching fish, in which he makes use
"'JOHN CHINAMAN." of the bird known as the cormorant, which is
an admirable swimmer and a good diver, and chases fish
with equal perseverance and success.
A well-known traveller tells us that he once saw a number
of fishermen capturing large quantities of fish by means of
these birds. This is how it was done. One of the fishermen,
standing at the head of the boat, took charge of the birds.
The boat was rowed into mid-stream, and, at a given signal,
the half-dozen or more cormorants stationed on the craft
dived into the water to search for fish. To prevent the birds
from swallowing the fish, each had a band or ring made of
bamboo round its neck. They swam with their prey to the
boat, and the fishermen at once extracted the fishes from their
throats and deposited them in a creel. When fatigued, the
.cormorants rested for a little while on the vessels, resuming
their task whenever the fishermen gave the signal. Some-
times the Chinese use a kind of raft, sometimes a broad
boat; and at night they often suspend fires from the head
of their vessels.
And that is how John Chinaman, with the help of the
cormorant, catches his fish!































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A CHINESE FISHING PARTY.


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DAISY'S PRAYER.

1 T was the evening before the village picnic-an
annual event to which every one looked forward
S -- with pleasure; and as Daisy knelt beside her little
bed, she added this request to her usual prayer:
S" Please, God, let it be a fine day to-morrow for
the picnic." Imagine, then, her grief and dis-
appointment when she woke next morning and
saw a steady drizzle of rain falling from a leaden sky!
Daisy's face quickly became as cloudy as the prospect before
her, and big tears rolled over her cheeks, keeping company
with the raindrops that trickled down the window-pane.
Just when things were at their very worst with poor
Daisy, her father came into the room. "What! crying,
little woman he said. Come, come, this will never do!
We can't have wet. weather indoors as well as out! Cheer
up, Daisy,. and get dressed as soon as you can. I want
you to come with me and see whether we can arrange a
tea for the boys and girls in the schoolroom, as we cannot
have our picnic.'' "Oh, Daddy, how nice!" cried Daisy.
-The tears were soon dried; and directly after breakfast
father and daughter set out. They had not gone far when
they met Farmer Johnson, who stopped for a chat. What
a blessed rain, sir!" said the farmer. I've done nothing
but thank God ever since I opened my eyes this morning.
The land was fair parched for want of it."
The tea in the schoolroom quite made up, so the children
said, for the loss of the picnic; and Daisy prayed at bedtime
that God would forgive her for having thought Him unkind.
God is never unkind," she said earnestly-and she was right.














































































"DAISY KNELT BESIDE HER LITTLE BED."


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64
WINNIE'S LESSON.


SINNIE MAITLAND thought she had never
enjoyed a game so much. You see, it was
a lovely day, for one thing, and then Hetty
Winstone and May Jackson were such
Delightful girls; and the shrubbery was
*. such a splendid place for play!
After a while the girls, feeling tired, sat
down to rest. -Suddenly Winnie cried out,
Where's Roy?" and looked to right and left for the
little three-year-old brother, whom she had been entrusted
to take to the shrubbery for an airing. The little fellow
was nowhere to be seen. Winnie began to cry. Oh, what
shall I do?" she wailed, wringing her hands. "I've lost
him! The three girls searched eagerly in the shrubbery,
but all to no purpose; and at length Winnie was obliged
to go home. Bursting in at the kitchen door, she nearly
overturned Mary, the servant, who was scrubbing the floor.
" Oh, Mary!" she gasped, "have you seen him ?-has he
come home?" Why-who-what's the matter?" said Mary,
bewildered. "Why, Roy I've lost him Oh, what shall
I do?" "But, my dear," said Mary, Roy is upstairs,
asleep. Mrs. Baker found him wandering in the road, and
brought him home." Oh I said Winnie blankly.
Winnie's mother said very little to her careless daughter,
who was not allowed to have charge of the baby again for
many weeks-a terribly hard punishment I You may be sure
that when, some months later, Roy went out with Winnie
once more, there was no fear whatever that he would be lost.
Winnie had learnt her lesson.




























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"'HAVE YOU SEEN HIM ?--HAS HE COME HOME:SI


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66
"COCKLE PETER."

-T HAT was what the village boys called
S him, because his name was Peter, and
.- because he spent most of his spare time
gathering cockles. Peter didn't mind his
strange name in the least, for he made a
Good deal of money by his cockles.
'- But why, you may ask, did Peter
want to make money? Well, because,
in the first place, he wanted to help his widowed mother, who
had a hard struggle to keep her six children and herself
supplied with the necessaries of life. Peter liked a game as
well as any boy; but he was too manly, and loving, and
brave to care for play while his mother worked for him. So,
whenever he could, he went off with his bag, and rake, and
pail for the toothsome fish, which was always in demand.
Peter's other reason for wanting to make money was in
order that he might get on in the world. He knew that in
order to do that he must learn, and to learn he must have
books, and to have books he must have money. And why
did Peter want to get on in the world ? Chiefly, again,, for
his mother's sake. He was a regular mother's boy; and he
had long ago made up his mind that, God helping him, he
would some day try and show his gratitude for all his mother's
love. Did he do it? Yes, and is doing it still. Nobody
dreams of calling him "Cockle Peter" now. He is one of
the cleverest engineers in the country; and all the wealth, and
fame, and honour that are his to-day he lays at the feet of a
dear, gentle, old lady, who proudly calls him My boy-my
son Peter."





































































"WITH HIS BAG, AND RAKE, AND PAIL."







CHRISTMAS IN THE HOSPITAL.


HRISTMAS was drawing near, and there was
great excitement in the wards of Beverton
Children's Hospital. For some days there
'had been mysterious whisperings amongst the
little patients; and the knowing smiles of the
nurses, as they lovingly tended their young
charges, told plainly enough that something unusual was in
the air.
Nobody found out exactly what that "something" was,
however, until Christmas Eve; and then, into the middle of
the largest ward, where all the children who could be moved
were gathered, there was brought an immense Christmas-
tree. Oh, how the children did enjoy it They were very
quiet-many of them were too ill to make much noise;
but their pleasure was none the less on that account. The
tree was brightly lighted with coloured candles, and there
was a gift on it for every child in the hospital. : A delightful
old Father Christmas, who turned out afterwards to be one
of the kind-hearted doctors, made a little speech, and then
unfastened the gifts, which his own small daughter carried
to those of the children who were too weak to walk to the
tree themselves.
When every child in the ward had been made happy with
a gift, and all had been taken back to their cosy beds, there
still remained one gift on the tree, and that was intended for
a little girl whose illness was of such a kind that the good
doctor feared the excitement of the evening might have
harmed her. Poor little- maiden! Though she was very
brave, she could not help feeling a little bit unhappy about















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t i; but the doctor kne, just
I how she felt, and at bed-tinme
ie went himself with his
daughter to see this >oor
1 -, invalid n and promised her
that a month or t\o later,
li hen he hoped she would
AWI,











be quite fetter, anshe hold
o to his little da\\uhteh hir's
birthday party, as she had
daueen obliged to miss the
Christmas-tree. Was not
that kind of him ?
NEWS OF A TREAT IN STORE.







A STIRRING TIME.

, ..~. .AL HAMMOND was particularly happy.
'~~ He was home for the Christmas holidays;
,^ r^ and of that fact everybody in the house was
fully aware, from his father, a grave clergy-
man who loved peace and quietness, right
down to the venerable household cat, who
was well-nigh worried out of her wits with all his noise' and
commotion.
He had only been home three days; but in that short
time he had managed to get through a surprising amount of
mischief.' On the first day of his holiday, he and.the doctor's
son, Matt Wilson, had gone to the Valley Woods for holly.
Both boys knew they were trespassing, for the woods were
the private property of the squire, who, for a certain special
reason, had caused notices to be posted on various trees near
the road, stating that the woods were dangerous, and that
trespassers would be prosecuted. The reason was simply that
some time previously shafts had been sunk in many parts of
the wood, where it had been supposed coal might be found.
The operations, however, had not been successful, and the
*work was abandoned. Railings had been placed round the
shafts, but in course of time they had broken away; and the
squire, hearing that one or two people had had narrow escapes
through nearly tumbling into the old overgrown holes, had
forbidden any one to go into the wood. The boys knew this
well enough; but they went all the same-and came to grief.
Boy-like, they tried to find one of the shafts-and they found
it sooner than they expected, for Hal tumbled over the edge,
and had he not managed to hold on to some rank grass till























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A STIR AT THE CHRISTMAS PUDDING.







Matt rescued him, he would certainly have been killed. The
boys left the wood with never a thought for their holly, glad
to escape without broken bones; and for the rest of the day
they were tolerably quiet. But the next morning they were
as full of life and as ready for mischief as ever; and it was
perhaps excusable that their mothers should have whispered,
in the course of a chat at tea-time, that they would be thankful
to have their young hopefuls safe at school again.
The day following was wet, and Hal was told he must
stay indoors. TJhe prospect was an alarming one for every-
body, until his grown-up sister Grace thought of the happy
notion of taking him into the kitchen, where she was busy
cooking for the festive season. Hal was delighted, and really
managed to help a little, though he complained that stoning
raisins was rather a messy job." But his crowning joy was
the stirring of the Christmas pudding. Isn't this jolly ?"
he exclaimed, as he toiled away with a wooden spoon in the
thick, fruity mixture. "I think, on the whole, I'm having, a
real, stirring time of it-don't you Gracie ? "
And Gracie agreed.


Printed by Hazell, Watson, & Viney, Ld., London and Aylesbury.




-' i--T-D~----


Can be safely and
beneficially taken d-. an
article of daily dictL at
all times and all seasons.


The leading Doctors
and Analysts, and the
Medical Press, testify to
itspurity & superiority.


ADBURY s

eeoea

Absolutely Pure, therefore Best.


C ADBURY'S COCOA is closely allied to milk in the large
proportion of flesh-forming and strength-sustaining elements
that it contains. It is prepared on the principle of excluding
the fatty, indigestible matter with which Cocoa abounds-supplying a
rfiwed thin infusion of absolutely pure Cocoa, exhilarating and
refreshing for Breakfast, Luncheon, Tea, or Supper-giving staying
poworqiid imparting new life and vigour to growing Children, and
thbse .of ."etcate constitutions.


*tiadbury's Cocoa has in a remarkable degree those natural elements of.'
"sustenance which give the system endurance and hardihood, building up muscle,
"and bodily vigour with a steady action which renders it a most acceptable and:
"reliable beverage."-Heallh.


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