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Title: Kilgore's Florida Planting Guide, 1975
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00083004/00001
 Material Information
Title: Kilgore's Florida Planting Guide, 1975
Series Title: Kilgore's Florida Planting Guide, 1975
Physical Description: 24 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Kilgore Seed Company
Publisher: The Company
Place of Publication: Sanford Fla
Publication Date: 1975
 Subjects
Subject: Seeds -- Catalogs -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: catalog   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida
 Notes
General Note: Cover title.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00083004
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 213386918

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 14a
        Page 14b
        Page 14c
        Page 14d
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Back Cover
        Page 32
Full Text



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1400 WEST FIRST.STREET
SANFORD, FLORIDA 32771


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Important Directions to Customers
By carefully observing the following directions, mistakes and misunderstandings will be loely avoided.


Notice to Our Customers Kilgore Seed Company is at this
time strictly a mail order seed company. We do not have any
connection with any other company such as Asgrow Florida
Company. Asgrow Florida owns and operates all the old Kilgore
Seed stores around the state of Florida and these stores have
no connection with the present Kilgore Seed Company.

How to Order & Shipping Information Please be careful to
sign your name, box number, street or rural route, post office,
state and zip code on every order. In almost all cases shipments
up to 70 pounds will go cheaper by Parcel Post than by any
other means. Unless you specify otherwise this will usually be
our mode of shipping your merchandise to you. If you desire
shipment by bus, railway express, truckline, United Parcel, etc.,
please provide all necessary delivery instructions, such as high-
way and street names. Shipping charges on these various means
of delivery will be either billed to you by Kilgore or they will
be C.O.D., at our discretion. Any residence delivery charges will
be for your account. Please write plainly.

CASH WITH ORDER Ours is a cash business and our prices
are made on that basis. Customers are requested to remit when
ordering and remittances should be made by postal money
orders, checks or cash. Please Do Not Send Stamps.

Postal & Sales Tax Information The postpaid prices in this
catalog include delivery to any point through Zone 5. This
includes all of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,
Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New Jersey,
North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee,
Virginia and West Virginia, and parts of Connecticut, Illinois,
Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma and
Texas. Locations outside Zone 5 will have to pay the additional
postage necessary to effect delivery. Consult your local postman
for applicable rates for your zone. For shipments outside of the
United States, all prices are F.O.B. Sanford, Florida and all
orders should be accompanied by the necessary postage to allow
the type delivery desired.

It is required that 4% sales tax be enclosed by Florida residents
on all items other than vegetable seeds. We are prevented by law
from absorbing these taxes.

NOTICE TO BUYER: Kilgore warrants that seeds or bulbs it
sells will be labeled as required under Florida and Federal seed
laws and that they will conform to the label description.
Kilgore makes no other or further warranty, expressed or
implied.
No liability hereunder shall be asserted unless the buyer or
user reports to Kilgore within a reasonable period after discovery
(not to exceed 10 days) any conditions that might lead to a
complaint. Kilgore's liability on this warranty is limited in
amount to the purchase price of the seeds or bulbs.
Florida Statutes Section 578.26 requires as prerequisite to
suit for defective seeds that sworn complaint against seller
alleging damages sustained be filed with Florida Commissioner
of Agriculture, accompanied by $10.00 filing fee, within ten
days after defect becomes apparent, and copy of complaint be
sent to seller by registered mail.

HANDLING CHARGE Due to increased handling costs, we
have been forced to establish a 50 cent handling charge on all
orders.


OTHER INFORMATION If you desire varieties other than
those listed in our catalog, feel free to write us regarding avail-
ability and pricing. We will usually have some varieties of veg-
etable seeds and field crop seeds on hand which are not included
in our catalog. We also have small packages of typical garden
supply products on which we will be glad to quote prices. Please
note we mention throughout the catalog that we will be most
happy to give you prices on quantities larger than those appear-
ing in the catalog.


Zip Codes Grouped According To Zones


Zone 6
006-059
062
120-123
128-136
496-499
500-525
527-564
570-573
610-612
635
640-646
660-666
668-672
674-691
730-731
735-739
746
763-764
768-769
780-782
785
788
790-797
881
884


Zone 7
565-567
574-588
593
692-693
798-799
800-831
855-859
865-880
882-883


Zone 8
590-592
594-599
832-853
860-864
890-898
900-999


DEFINITION OF TERMS USED IN
KILGORE'S FLORIDA PLANTING GUIDE
Immune. Not subject to damage or injury from attack by a
particular disease-causing organism or virus or by a particular
insect or from certain conditions of soil or climate, either be-
cause of the physical nature of the plant itself or because of
some reaction within the plant which prevents the injurious
agent from causing an adverse effect.

Susceptible. Easily subject to injury or damage from attack by
a particular disease-causing organism or a particular insect or
from adverse soil or climatic conditions.

Resistant. Capable, to some degree, of enduring an attack by a
particular insect or disease-causing agent, or able to withstand
certain adverse conditions of growth.

Tolerant (or moderately susceptible). Varieties may be expected
to survive and make an acceptable crop under moderately ad-
verse conditions, but they may also be expected to become
affected if conditions highly favorable to the disease or insect
continue for a long period.


Kilgore Seed Co., 1400 West First Street, Sanford, Florida 32771


It is our desire to maintain
the prices listed in this
catalog, but due to the long
period of time covered,
the current inflationary
tendencies and the unstable
postal rate structure, we
may be forced to raise
prices during the year. We
hope you will try to under-
stand our position.






ORDER BLANK


Kilgore Seed Company
1400 West First Street
Sanford, Florida 32771




Name .............................................................................................................
P.O. Box, Street,
or R.F.D. No................................................................................... ...............

City................................................................................................. ...............

State.............................................Zip Code ................... Telephone ..............
Ship by Parcel Post Express Truck
Ex. or F Ofce Date
Exp. or Frt. Office......... ......................... ................ ....................19......


OFFICE USE ONLY
Order No.


Date Received


Amount Enclosed
Check lO M.O. ] Cash O
Other EO


BALANCE DUE

CREDIT DUE


IMPORTANTI Be sure address and shipping instructions are correct. Please write plainly.

SPECIAL NOTICE: Remittances should be made by postal money orders, checks, or cash. DO NOT SEND STAMPS
On items not marked postpaid be sure your remittance includes the necessary amount for postage and also the "State
Sales Tax" on non-exempt merchandise.

NOTICE TO BUYER: Kilgore warrants that seeds or bulbs it sells will be labeled as required under Florida and Federal seed
laws and that they will conform to the label description. Kilgore makes no other or further warranty, expressed or implied.
No liability hereunder shall be asserted unless the buyer or user reports to Kilgore within a reasonable period after discovery
(not to exceed 10 days) any conditions that might lead to a complaint. Kilgore's liability on this warranty is limited in amount
to the purchase price of the seeds or bulbs.
Florida Statutes Section 578.26 requires as prerequisite to suit for defective seeds that sworn complaint against seller alleging
damages sustained be filed with Florida Commissioner of Agriculture, accompanied by $10.00 filing fee, within ten days after
defect becomes apparent; and copy of complaint be sent seller by registered mail.
Price
Quantity NOTICE: 50 HANDLING CHARGE ITEMS WANTED Dollars Cents






































Add Fifty Cents (50) For Handling 50

Have you included postage on items not postpaid and "State Sales Tax" on non-exempt merchandise?

You may substitute the next best or most similar of any variety you cannot supply.
SUBSTITUTES:
Please do not substitute without first notifying me.
(Mark "X" in one of above spaces)


"PROMPT SERVICE" Is Our Motto


Date Shipped





ORDER BLANK


Page 2


Kilgore Seed Co.


Price
Quantity ITEMS WANTED Dollars Cents
Dollars Cents


_ I _ I _


4 t


Add Fifty Cents (50t) For Handling 50
Have you included postage on items not postpaid and "State Sales Tax" ?

PLEASE WRITE BELOW The names of neighbors or friends who might be interested in receiving a copy of our Planting Guide

NAMES P.O. Box, Street or R.F.D. CITY STATE ZIP CODE


We Have A GROWING Reputation








SALES TAX

INFORMATION

The Florida Revenue Act as revised in 1968 (Sales and
Use Tax) imposes a 4% tax on the retail sales of many
commodities.


SPECIAL NOTICE--In order to avoid delay in filling
your order, be sure to include with your remittance the
proper amount of sales tax as indicated below. We are
not permitted by law to assume the Sales Tax.


THE RATE OF TAX APPLICABLE TO SALES IS AS
FOLLOWS:
(1) On single sales in amounts from 100 to 254, both
inclusive, 1 shall be added for taxes.
(2) On sales in amounts from 26 to 50q, both inclu-
sive, 24 shall be added for taxes.
(3) On sales in amounts from 510 to 754, both inclusive,
30 shall be added for taxes.
(4) On sales in amounts of 754 to $1.00, both inclusive,
44 shall be added for taxes.
(5) On sales in amounts of more than $1.00, 4% shall
be charged upon each dollar of price, plus the above
bracket charges upon any fractional part of a dollar
in excess of even dollars.


Location and plan of the garden

A level, well drained area, convenient to the house should be
selected for the garden. It should be located where it can be
irrigated if necessary and away from hedges, large trees or the
shade of buildings. On the farm it should be well-fenced to protect
it from rabbits, chickens and other animals.
After selection of a location and determining the size of the
garden, a list of vegetables and flowers should be made. In
selecting varieties, primary consideration should be given to the
likes of the family, also to the size of the plot available. Different
vegetables give variety to the diet.
A map or plan of the garden should be made, showing the
various varieties to be grown, and their position in the garden,
indicating length of rows and the space between rows. In case of
a small, backyard garden, entirely worked by hand, the rows
should be close together, i.e., the smaller figure in column 5 of
our chart on page 2, so that large quantities may be produced on
a limited space.
The planting data given below and on pages 2, 3, and 4 will
help greatly in preparing a plan since seed requirements, planting
depth, distances and time of maturity are given.
Note that planting dates listed below refer to seed planting
dates NOT to transplanting dates.


What and When to Sow Vegetable Seeds in Florida


JANUARY and FEBRUARY


Beans
Beet
Brussels
Sprouts
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Cauliflower
Collard

MARCH
Beans
Beet
Cabbage
Cantaloupe
Carrot
Collard
APRIL
Beans
Cantaloupe
Collard
MAY
Pole Beans
Collard
JUNE
Collard
Eggplant
JULY
Celery
Collard
Eggplant
AUGUST
Broccoli
Brussels
Sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Celery


Corn
Cucumber
Eggplant
Endive
Kale
Kohl Rabi
Leek
Lettuce
Mustard


Corn, Sweet
Cucumbers
Kale
Kohl Rabi
Lettuce
Mustard

Mustard
Okra
Pumpkin

Mustard
Okra

Mustard
Okra

Mustard
Okra
Pepper

Collard
Cucumber
Eggplant
Endive
Garlic
Kale


Onion Seed
Onion Sets
Parsley
Parsnip
Peas, English
Pepper
Potatoes
Radish
Romaine


Okra
Potatoes
Pumpkin
Radish
Spinach
Squash

Radish
Spinach
Turnip

Pumpkin
Spinach

Pepper
Rutabaga

Rutabaga
Spinach
Turnip

Lettuce
Mustard
Okra
Onion Sets
Pepper
Radish


Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash
Swiss Chard
Tomato
Turnip
Watermelon



Swiss Chard
Tomato
Turnip
Watermelon



Watermelon


Spinach
Turnip


Romaine
Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash
Tomato
Turnip


SEPTEMBER
Beans Collard
Beet Cucumber
Broccoli Endive
Brussels Garlic
Sprouts Kale
Cabbage Kohl Rabi
Carrot Leek
Cauliflower Lettuce
Celery Mustard


OCTOBER
Beans Celery
Beet Collard
Broccoli Endive
Brussels Garlic
Sprouts Kale
Cabbage Kohl Rabi
Carrot Leek
Cauliflower Lettuce


NOVEMBER
Beet Collard
Broccoli Eggplant
Brussels Endive
Sprouts Garlic
Cabbage Kale
Carrot Kohl Rabi
Cauliflower Leek
Celery Lettuce

DECEMBER
Beet Collard
Broccoli Eggplant
Brussels Endive
Sprouts Kale
Cabbage Kohl Rabi
Carrot Leek
Cauliflower Lettuce
Celery Mustard


"PROMPT SERVICE" Is Our Motto


Okra
Onion Seed
Onion Sets
Parsley
Parsnip
Peas, English
Radish
Rhubarb
Romaine



Mustard
Onion Seed
Onion Sets
Parsley
Parsnip
Peas, English
Potatoes
Radish



Mustard
Onion Seed
Onion Sets
Parsley
Peas, English
Pepper
Potatoes
Radish



Onion Seed
Onion Sets
Parsley
Parsnip
Peas, English
Pepper
Potatoes
Radish


Rutabaga
Spinach
Squash
Swiss Chard
Tomato
Turnip






Rhubarb
Romaine
Rutabaga
Spinach
Swiss Chard
Turnip





Rhubarb
Romaine
Rutabaga
Spinach
Swiss CLard
Turnip




Romaine
Rutabaga
Spinach
Swiss Chard
Tomato
Turnip








Reference Table for Florida Vegetable Gardens


Many mistakes may be avoided by following directions
given in this table. The time requirements indicated
for crops to reach edible size vary, of course, according
to the season, varieties and soil conditions. Allowance
also must be made for the relative estimate of the


yields, due to climatic and soil conditions. However,
the averages indicated in the table will be found to be
fairly accurate for Florida growing conditions on the
basis of many years of observation and experience.


Kind of vegetable


BEANS (Bush)....................
BEANS (Pole) .....................
BEANS (Bush Lima)............
BEET..........................
BROCCOLI ..........................
BRUSSELS SPROUTS...........
CABBAGE ----......................
CHINESE CABBAGE .....
CANTALOUPE ...................
CARROT.. ---.....................
CAULIFLOWER ...............
CELERY. ........................ ...
COLLARD.....................
CORN (Sweet)...............
CORN (Roasting Ear) ....
COWPEAS (TABLE) .-...-..
CUCUMBER ..............-.....
EGGPLANT.......---.........
ENDIVE (ESCAROLLE) ......
KALE ....................-....
KOHL RABI .................
LEEK .................... .............
LETTUCE (Head) ...........
LETTUCE (Leaf) .............
MUSTARD....................
OKRA ...............- ........
ONION SEED ..... ........
ONION SETS ...............
PARSLEY ........... ...........
PARSNIP ........... ........
PEAS (ENGLISH) ...............
PEPPER ... ....................
POTATOES (IRISH) ........
PUMPKIN.......... ...........
RADISH ........................
RHUBARB.......... ............
RUTABAGA .......................
SPINACH-SAVOY...........
SQUASH (Bush) ................
SQUASH (Running)............
SWISS CHARD ................
TOMATO-GROUND.............
TOMATO-STAKED................
TURNIP............................
WATERMELON ...................


Number
Running feet
of row for
a family of
3 or 4 people
(Includes for
canning)


Seeds or plants
to provide for
a family of
3 or 4 people


I I I -


V1 Ib.t
'/ Ib.
% to 1 Ib.t
1 oz.t
1 pkt. or 25 pits.
15 plants
50 plants
1 pkt. or 50 plts.t
1 pkt.t
2 pkts.t
30 plants
150 plants
1 pkt. or 35 plts.t
'/ Ib.t
'A Ib.t
/2 to % Ib.
1 pkt.
17 plants
pkt. or 50 pits.
I pkt.
1 pkt.t
1 pkt. or 120 pits.
1 pkt. or 90 pits.t
1 pkt. or 60 plts.t
1 pkt.t
1 oz.
1 pkt. or 400 pits.
1 ib.
1 pkt.
1 pkt.
/2 Ib.t
24 plants
12 lbs.
oz.
1 pkt.t
1 pkt. or 15 pits.
1 pkt.
1 pkt.t
I pkt.
1 pkt.
1 pkt.
50 plants
50 plants
1 pkt.f
1 pkt.


Depth to
cover
in
inches


1 %-2
1'/2-2
11 -2
12-%3/

'A-V-
'/4--1/

'/r-%
1/1-3-1

'/4-/2
%V-%
1/8
'/4-1/2
1-2
1-2
1--1V2

'hV
1/-'
%/-'
%-'A
'A

%'-'
%--/2

1-1A
1/2
%1--1/2




1--11/
1/2






1-4
1

12-%2
1/2-

1
2-1i

1/2-

1/2-1


Space
between
rows
in
feet


2-2V/2
3-4
3
1 -2
3
2 1/2-3
2 /2-3
2 1/2-3
4-5
1 1/2-2
3-4
3
2 /2-3
2 V2-3
3-3 1'
3-4
5-6
4-4 /2
1 /'-2
21/2

1 '/2
11/4--2
1 /2-2
2
3-4
1 /2
1 /-1i 12
1 V/2-2
2 /2-3
3
21/2-3 /2
3--3/2
8-10
1-1 '/2
2 /2-3
2
1 '/4-1 2
3-4
6-8
2
3 /2-5
4
1 /--1 '/2
8-10


Set plant from
seedbed or thin
out to inches
in row


3-4
9 or 3 ft. hills
4-5
3-4
18-24
18-24
12-16
8-12
24 or 4 ft. hills
2-3
18-24
4-5
14-18
12-15
15-18
5-6
12 to 24
18 to 36
9
20-24
6-8
5-6
10-15
10-12
8-10
10-15
2-4
1-2
10-12
4
1-2
10-16
9-12
5 ft. hills
1-2
18-24
5-6
6
2 ft. hills
3 or 4 ft. hills
12-15
24-36
16-20
4-6
6 to 8 ft. hills


Approximate time
required to produce
crop, from seed
planted in garden or
from transplanting
plants to garden
(days)


48 to 56
63 to 70
65 to 75
56 to 68
55 to 60 from pits.
90 from plants
62 to 98 from pits.
70 from seed
75 to 95
72 to 95
55 to 62 from pits.
105 to 130 from pits.
50 to 52 from pits.
65 to 80
68 to 87
68 to 85
40 to 50
80 to 85 from pits.
90 to 95 from seed
70
50
140 from seed
66 to 84 from seed
46 from seed
40 to 45
50 to 60
110 to 150 from seed
30 to 60
90
120
50 to 53
60 to 80 from pits.
75 to 90
100 to 118
21 to 25
90 from plants
90
40
42 to 52
60 to 115
58 to 60
70 to 90 from pits.
70 to 90 from pits.
35 to 50
85 to 100


* Make two or more plantings at different times during the season. Number of feet or row indicated is for each planting.
t Number of feet and amount of seed or number of plants indicated are for each planting.




Kilgore Seed Company
1400 West First Street

Sanford, Florida 32771


We Have A GROWING Reputation


1 )







Reference Table for Florida Flower Gardens

Approxi- Set Plants
Average Tender When mate Time Space From Seedbed Where
Kind of Flower Height or to Sowing to ows or Thin Out to to Sow Use
(Inches) Hardy Plant Bloom Inchesin Row Seed
(Feet) Inches in Row Seed
(Months) (Inches)
AGERATUM Dwarf Blue Cap
Regular 18 T Sept-March 2/2 1 6 Flats or Bouquets, Bedding, Borders,
Dwarf 6 Purple Perfection Seedbed Rock Gardens
2 12
ALYSSUM 6 to 8 H Sept.-Jan. 1V2 1 6 Flts or Borders, Rock Gardens
ARCTOTIS DAISY 18 to 22 H Sept.-Jan. 3 to4 3 18 Garden Bouquets, Bedding, Rock Gardens
ASTER 15 to 30 H Nov.-April 3to4 2 18 to 24 d Bouquets, Bedding, Rock Gardens
I ISeedbed BouquetsBedding, RockGardens
BABY'S BREATH 18 to 24 H Sept.-Jan. 2 to 2/2 3 18 Garden Bouquets to Mix with Other Cut Flowers
BACHELOR'S BUTTON 24 to 36 H Sept.-Jan. 3 2 18 Garden Bouquets, Borders, Backgrounds
BALSAM 18to 24 T Sept.-Marcl 1V2 2 18 Se db Edgings or Borders
BEAN-SCARLET 8 to 10 ft. T F-May Vine 6 Garden Ornamental Climber for Shade and
RUNNER 8 to 10ft T Feb.-May 1'/s Vine 6 Garden Attractive Blossoms
RUNNER Attractive Blossoms
BELLS OF IRELAND 20 to 24 H Oct.-May 2 2 18 Garden Bouquets, Borders
BLANKET FLOWER 20 to 24 H Any Month 2 to 3 2 18 Garden Bouquets, Bedding
BLUE LACE FLOWER 24 to 36 H Sept-Jan. 2to3 3 36 Flats or Bouquets, Bedding, Borders,
SSeedbed Backgrounds
CALENDULA 12 to 18 H Sept.-Jan. 3 to 32 2 18 Seedbed Bouquets, Bedding
CALIFORNIA POPPY 12 to 14 H Sept.-Jan. 3 2 6 Garden Bedding, Borders, Rock Gardens
CANDYTUFT 18 to 24 H Sept.-Feb. 2 to 3 2 12 Garden Bouquets, Borders, Rock Gardens
18I Flats or
CARNATION 12 to 18 H Sept.-Dec. 3 to4 2 12 to 18 FSeebe l Bouquets
CELOSIA 24 T Jan.-June 3 1 to 2 12 Garden Bouquets-Dried, Bedding
CLEOME 48 T March-May 2 to 3 3to4 24 Garden Bouquets, Backgrounds
COSMOS 48 T March-May 2 to 3 3 to 4 36 Garden Bouquets, Backgrounds
CYNOGLOSSUM 18 to 24 H Sept.-Marc 2 to 3 2 18 Garden Cuttings to Mix with Other Flwers in
Flats,
DAHLIA 12 to 14 T March-April 3 2 12 Seedbed Bouquets, Bedding
orin BouquetsBedding
Garden
Flats,
DELPHINIUM 36 H Oct.-Nov. 5 3 12 to 18 Seedbed Bouquets, Borders, Backgrounds
or in Bouquets, Borders Backgrounds
Garden
DIANTHUS 12 to 18 H Sept.-March 2/ to 3 2 6 Garden uRuosrdBedding, Borders
Flats or B rdes
GOMPHRENA 12 to 18 T Feb.-July 3 2 12 Seedbed oders
GOURD-ORNAMENTAL 8 to 12 ft. T Feb.-May 4 to Fruit Vine 36 Garden Shading and Ornamental Fruits
HELICHRYSUM 24 to 36 T Sept.-March 2 to 2/2 3 12 to 18 Garden Bouquets-Dried, Backgrounds
HOLLYHOCK 5 to 7 ft. H Aug.-Jan. 5 to 6 3 24 Garden Backgrounds
LARKSPUR 18 to 30 H Nov.-Jan. 22 to 3 3 12 to 18 Garden Bouquets, Bedding, Backgrounds
2 Flats or
LINARIA 16 to 18 H Sept.-Dec. 3 10" for 8 Seedbed Bouquets, Bedding
bedding Garden
LUPINE 30 to 36 H Sept.-Dec. 2 to2' 3 12 Garden Bouquets, ding, Backgroundas
Dwarf Varieties
MARIGOLD 2 15 to 18
Standard 36 Feb.-May Gigantea Sunset Giant Garden Bouquets, Bedding-Dwarf types
T and again i 1 /A to 2
Dwarf 12 to 15 T and 2 4 36 Borders-Dwarf
Sunset Giant 42 to 60 Sept. All Other Varieties
3 15to18
MORNING GLORY 8 to 10ft. T March-June 2 Vine 12 to 18 Garden Shade and Showy, Large, Attractive
I Blossoms
Dwf. Gem Mixture
NASTURTIUM 12 to 18 T Sept.-March 2to3 All Other Varieties Garden Bouquets, Bedding, Rock Gardens
3 12
PAS o S 1 12 Flats or Bouquets, Bedding, Borders,
PANSY 6 to 8 H Sept.-Dec. 3 1 12 Seedbed Rock Gardens


"PROMPT SERVICE" Is Our Motto







Reference Table for Florida Flower Gardens


Approxi- c Set Plants
Average Tender When mate Time S e From Seedbed Where
Kind of Flower Height or to Sowing to n or Thin Outt t o Sow Use
(Inches) Hardy Plant Bloom ( t) Inches in Row Seed
(Months) (Fet) (Inches)
Rosy Morn
PETUNIA Heavenly Blue
PETUNIArf 6 12 H Sept-Jan. 2to3 Bl 2 Flats or Bedding and Roadside Beautification.
Dwarf 6to12 H Sept.-Jan. 2to3 2 12
Standards 15 to 18 All Other Varieties Seedbed Borders, Rock Gardens
3 18
PHLOX 12 to 16 Bedding f6r Gardens. Vacant Lots and
Dwarf 6 to 8 H Sept.-Feb. 3 2 6 Garden Roadsides. Borders-Dwarf,
Dwrf______Rock Gardens
PORTULACA 6 T Feb.-Aug. 1% 1 12 Garden Borders, Rock Gardens
QUEEN ANNE'S LACE 36 to 60 H Sept.-Jan. 2 to 3 4 24 Garden Bouquets to Mix with Other Cut
I Flowers. Backgrounds
SALVIA 18to 24 H Sept.-June 3to 4 3 18 SedF Bouuets, Bedding, Borders
SCABIOSA 15 to 30 H Sept.-Dec. 5 3 12 Garden Bouquets, Bedding
SHASTA DAISY 18 H Sept.-Jan. 4 3 12 to 15 Garden Bouquets, Bedding
Giant
SNAPDRAGON 18 to 24 H Sept.-Dec. 34 3 Half Tal8 Fla Bouquets, Bedding
3 12
STATICE 24 to 36 H Sept.-Jan. 3 3 18 Garden Bouquets, Bedding
SUNFLOWER 36 to 48 T Feb.-Aug. 1 'to 2 3 24 Garden Bouquets, Backgrounds
SWEET PEA 48 to 60 H Sept.-Dec. /2 to 3 3 1 to2 Garden Bouquets
TITHONIA 48 to 60 T Feb.-June 3 4 36 Garden Bouquets, Backgrounds
VERBENA 6to 8 H Any Month 3 2 12 Garden Borders, Rock Gardens
VINCA 18 H Any Month 3 1 12 Garden Bedding, Borders
ZINNIDwarf Flats or Giants for Bouquets and Backgrounds.
ZINNIA 2 12 Seedbed Dwarf Bedding, Borders, and
Dwarf 6 T Feb.-Aug. 1% All Other Varieties in Dwarf Bedding, Borders, and
Standards 24 to 36 3 18 to 24 Garden Rock Gardens

What and When to Sow Grasses, Clovers and Field Crop Seeds in Florida

What and When to Sow Grasses, Clovers and Field Crop Seeds in Florida


JANUARY and FEBRUARY


Alfalfa
Clover, Crimson
MARCH
Beans, Velvet
Benne
Corn, Field
Crotalaria
Grasses
Bermuda, Carpet
APRIL
Beans, Velvet
Beggarweed
Benne
Chufas
Clover, Alyce
Corn, Field
Crotalaria
MAY
Beans, Velvet
Beggarweed
Benne
Chufas
Clover, Alyce
Corn, Field
Crotalaria
JUNE
Beans, Velvet
Beggarweed
Benne
Chufas
Clover, Alyce
Cowpeas


Bahia Grass
Oats

Annual Rye,
Sudan, Bahia
Indigo
Hegari
Millet
Peas


Grasses
Bermuda, Carpet,
Annual Rye,
Sudan, Bahia
Indigo
Hegari
Millet

Grasses
Bermuda, Carpet,
Annual Rye,
Sudan, Bahia
Indigo
Hegari
Millet

Crotalaria
Grasses
Bermuda, Carpet,
Sudan, Bahia
Indigo
Hegari
Millet


Rape
Rye

Peanuts
Rape
Rice
Egyptian Wheat
Sorghum
Sunflower

Peas
Peanuts
Rice
Egyptian Wheat
Sorghum
Sunflower


Peas
Peanuts
Sesbania
Egyptian Wheat
Sorghum
Sunflower


Peanuts
Rice
Sesbania
Egyptian Wheat
Sorghum
Sunflower


JULY
Beans, Velvet
Beggarweed
Chufas
Corn

AUGUST
Cowpeas



SEPTEMBER
Clover, Sweet
Kenland Red


OCTOBER
Clover, Sweet
Kenland Red



NOVEMBER
Clover
Crimson, Sweet,
White, Ladino,
Kenland Red

DECEMBER
Clover
Crimson, Sweet,
White, Ladino,
Kenland Red


Cowpeas
Grasses
Bermuda, Sudan
and Bahia



Grasses
Bermuda, Sudan
and Bahia


Grasses
Bermuda, Bahia




Grasses
Bermuda, Annual
Rye, Carpet, Bahia




Grasses
Bermuda, Annual
Rye, Carpet, Bahia
Lupines


Grasses
Annual Rye,
Carpet, Bahia
Lupines


We Have A GROWING Reputation


Hegari
Millet




Millet
Sunflower



Lupines
Rape
Rye


Lupines
Oats
Rape
Rye


Oats
Rape
Rye



Oats
Rape
Rye


(-11'"".4)







GREEN PODDED BUSH BEANS
Plant 50 lbs. per acre.
In the garden make four plantings at different times.
Plant % lb. to 100 feet of row at each planting.
Culture of Green and Wax Podded Bush Beans. Beans are grown
on all types of soil in Florida, and are not very particular with
reference to soil requirements. Sow seed in drills, 2 to 2% feet
apart, dropping a bean every 2 to 2% inches, and cover 11 to 2
inches deep. In order to help control soil diseases and insure a
better stand, most of Kilgore Seed Company's bean seeds are
treated
The number of days in parentheses after each variety
represents average time to maturity.
ASTRO (50 days) A wide adapted, high-yielding, white-
seeded variety developed primarily for shipping, but with
several desirable characteristics for processing. The plants are
vigorous, large, erect, producing a very heavy and concentrated
set of pods; resistant to the common and N.Y. 15 strains of bean
virus 1. The pods are attractive, somewhat heavier and longer
than Harvester, with comparable seed and fiber development.
Astro has performed well under a wide range of conditions in
Florida.
'lb. .80; I lb. $2.50; 2 b. $4.15; 5 lb. $9.15
CONTENDER (55 days) One of the best green podded bush
beans with multiple disease resistance and ability to produce
under adverse conditions. Pods are 6/2 inches long, stringless,
fleshy and flavorful. Excellent for the home garden or market.
Resistant to common bean mosaic and powdery mildew.
/ lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.65; 5 lb. $7.90
HARVESTER (52 days) A white seeded, round, green podded
bush snap bean. Plants are tall, with dark green leaves, and the
pods are borne well off the ground. The straight stringless pods
are 5" to 6" long and are medium green. Harvester is resistant
to common bean mosaic, and tolerant of rust and root rots. Being
a high yielder and a good shipper this variety tops the northern
market.
/4lb. .75; I lb. $2.35; 2 lb. $3.85; 5 lb. $8.40


HARVESTER
PINTO (65 days) These beans arc grown with mixed results in
Florida. They are used by many people as green beans, but they
are usually utilized as a dry bean. Because of rotting caused by
our high humidity it is often difficult to let them remain on the
bush until they are completely dry, however. To minimize the
loss of the beans to rotting, it helps to pick the beans when the
pods turn yellow and then dry them in a cool, dry location. It
may be necessary during particularly damp weather to support
the plants in some way in order to prevent the pods from touch-
ing the ground.
lb. .75: I lb. $2.35; 2 lb. $3.85; 5 lb. $8.40
TAYLOR'S HORTICULTURAL (64 days) A strain of Dwarf
Horticultural, used primarily for green shelled beans, or some-
times for snap beans. Plants large, productive. Beans of Cran-
berry type, 5/2 to 61/2 inches long, light green turning to cream,
splashed with red; mostly straight.
lb. .80; I lb. $2.45; 2 lb. $4.05; 5 Ib. $8.90


TENDERGREEN IMPROVED (45 days) This smooth, round-
pod bean, averages 6" in length and is found to be stringless,
brittle and has excellent flavor and tenderness. It is also Mosaic
tolerant and yields over a longer period during hot weather.
/4 lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.40; 2 lb. $3.95; 5 lb. $8.65
TENNESSEE GREEN POD (50 days) Preferred bush bean in
many parts of the South. The seed is yellowish brown, flat and
broad and produces pods that are 7" x /4". Pods get stringy when
overgrown. Good for home use.
'/ lb. .75; I lb. $2.35; 2 Ib. $3.85; 5 lb. $8.40
WHITE HALF RUNNER (60 days) Popular across the south.
Young pods are tender. Also grown as a shell bean or for dry
white beans. Pods are 4 inches long, medium light green with
pure white seeds.
/b. .75; I lb. $2.30; 2 Ib. $3.75; 5 lb. $8.15

WAX PODDED BUSH BEANS
RESISTANT CHEROKEE (50 days) This strain is resistant to
common bean mosaic. Plants large, vigorous, erect and prolific.
Early and an enormous yielder, attractive golden-yellow, long,
thick oval pods, nearly straight, entirely stringless and of ex-
cellent quality. Considered the best wax bean for Florida and
the South.
/4lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.65; 5 lb. $7.90

GREEN PODDED POLE BEANS
Plant 50 pounds per acre.
In garden % pound to 50 feet.
Culture of Green Podded Pole Beans. Pole beans are later in
maturing than bush beans, bearing over a longer season and ex-
tremely productive, higher yielding than bush beans, and also
produce larger pods.
Pole beans should be supported by wires or by good strong
poles to keep them off the ground Poles should be 8 to 9 feet
above ground, and firmly in the ground, in rows 3 to 4 feet
apart, and 2 to 3 feet apart in the row. In order to keep pole
beans bearing over a long season, it is important to keep them
closely picked.
DADE (55 days) Developed by the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station for hot, humid southern conditions. Has con-
sistently outyielded McCaslan in Dade County and yielded com-
parably with other varieties throughout the state. Plants are
vigorous and leafy with runners slow to appear. Pods are medium
dark green, 73 inches long, a flattish-oval with pure white
seeds. Has proven resistant to most rusts, Common Bean Mosaic,
Southern Bean Mosaic, black suture and intumescence. Stringless
when picked in the proper stage.
Alb. .85; I lb. $2.75; 2 b. $4.65; 5 b. $10.40
McCASLAN 42 (65 days) A vigorous grower and heavy producer,
unlike other varieties, producing from the ground up over a long
season. The pods are medium green, eight inches long, large, flat,
slightly curved, thick and meaty, stringless, brittle, fine grained,
and of excellent quality if harvested young.
lb. .90; I lb. $2.95; 2lb. $5.05; 5 b. $11.40
MORSE'S POLE NO. 191 (63 days) A high yielding type of
white-seeded Kentucky Wonder, resistant to certain forms of
rust. Plant is vigorous, with dark green leaves. The pods are dark
green, oval, straight, long, averaging from 8 to 9 inches, and
attractive in appearance. Stringless in the marketable stage.
Productive and very desirable for market or home use.
/lb. .90; 1 lb. $2.95; 2 b. $5.05; 5 b. $11.40

Uii







BUSH LIMA BEANS
Fordhook Plant 50 lbs per acre.
Henderson's Plant 40 Ibs. per acre.
In the garden make two plantings at different times. With Ford-
hook plant 1 pound to 100 feet or with Henderson's plant Y
pound to 100 feet.
iClture of Bush Lima Beans In general, cultural requirements of
Bush Lima Beans are similar to those given for green and wax
podded bush beans, but they need more room. Fertilizer should
be applied at least ten days before planting Plant in rows three
feet apart, dropping a bean every 3 to 4 inches in the row,
covering an inch deep.

DIXIE BUTTERPEA SPECKLED (76 days) Very similar in
size and growth to Dixie Butterpea White, but the seed is
brownish-red and speckled all over with darker brown. Excellent
taste, lovely color.
/4 lb. .85; 1 lb. $2.70; 2 lb. $4.55; 5 lb. $10.15

DIXIE BUTTERPEA WHITE (76 days) A baby lima that can set
pods under high temperatures. Bush medium dark green,
vigorous, reaches 16-23 inches in height. Pods are broad oval,
3 x '/ inches.
4 lb. .85; 1 lb. $2.70; 2lb. $4.55; 5 lb. $10.15


FORDHOOK 242


FORDHOOK 242 (72 days) An excellent bearer, producing a
heavy, early yield. The plants are as tall as regular Fordhook,
grow more erect and have a more open appearance. Pods average
3 to 4 inches long and contain 3 to 4 thick beans. Green shell
beans are slightly smaller than regular Fordhook, have light green
seed coats, and are of delicious, finely flavored edible quality.
'A lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.55; 2 lb. $4.25; 5 lb. $9.40
HENDERSON'S BUSH LIMA (Baby Lima) (65 days) An early
variety, hardy and a sure cropper. The plants are small and very
productive. The pods are small in size, very short and narrow,
thin, flat, straight to slightly curved. The seeds are smaller and
not as plump as Fordhook.
lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.65; 5 lb. $7.90
JACKSON WONDER (Old Florida Bush Speckled Butter Beans)
(65 days) Medium in size, spreading, with semi-runners resembling
somewhat Henderson's Bush Lima. Pods are flat, containing 3
to 4 beans. The seeds are small, flat and of light buff color.
Early and very prolific, drought-resistant, a sure cropper and of
good quality.
A lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.15; 2 lb. $3.45; 5 lb. $7.40


POLE LIMA BEANS
Fli Butter Speck & King of Garden Plant 50 lbs. per acre.
Small Sieva Plant 40 lbs per acre
Culture of Pole Lima Beans. Very similar to methods used in
planting green podded pole beans. Make your rows 3 feet apart
and plant seeds 5-6 inches apart, about one inch deep. When
plants are 6 inches tall, thin to 10 inches and drive stakes to
support the plants. The stakes need to be at least 6 feet tall or
you may plant along a fence and use it for support. Cultivate
often, but only when leaves are dry.

FLORIDA BUTTER SPECKLED (85 days) A pole type
"speckled butter bean". Bears well in hot weather. Pods are 31/4
inches long and borne in clusters. Seeds are buff, splashed with
maroon, delightfully flavored.
/4 lb. .85; 1 lb. $2.65; 2 lb. $4.45; 5 lb. $9.90

KING OF THE GARDEN (90 days) The largest of all limas with
large leaves and vines. It has a broad, flat pod of 6 x 1%" and is
for home and market use.
/ lb. .85; lb. $2.70; 2 lb. $4.55; 5 lb. $10.15

SMALL SIEVA (78 days) This excellent home variety bean has
a pod size of 3/2 x 7/8", is broad, flat and medium green in
color. It's seed is white and yields are high. Used often for dried
beans, too.
4 lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.55; 2 lb. $4.25; 5 lb. $9.40


BEET
Plant 6 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden make three plantings at different times.
Plant 1 oz. to 100 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. Plant seeds in rows 1Y to 2 feet apart and when 3
inches high thin to 3 to 4 inches apart in the row. In Florida,
sow from latter part of September to March.
















DETROIT DARK RED


DETROIT DARK RED, MORSE'S STRAIN (70 days) An im-
proved globe-shaped beet of dark red color throughout. Sweet
and of excellent quality. High yielder and mildew resistant.
Short top.
Pkt. .40; oz. .65; lb. $1.45; 1 lb. $4.45
TALL TOP EARLY WONDER (60 days) Tall, upright tops,
good for greens. Roots are a shallow globe, tops are vigorous,
erect, abundant with large blades.
Pkt. .40; oz. .65; % lb. $1.40; 1 lb. $4.30


SWISS CHARD
Plant 4 pounds per acre.
In garden plant one packet to 25 feet of row.
Culture. Plant like beets in the fall, winter, or spring, in rows 2
feet apart and thin to 12 or 15 inches in the row.
LARGE RIBBED, DARK GREEN (68 days) The thick, fleshy,
dark green leaves are chinked or savoyed, and the pearly white
stems are very broad, thick and fleshy. A vigorous, hardy
grower.
Pkt. .45; oz. .80; % lb. $1.70; 1 lb. $5.45


It never pays to plant a bigger garden than your
wife can weed.







BROCCOLI
Sow % to % pound in seedbed to plant acre.
In the garden 1 packet to 40 feet of row, or I packet in seedbed
for 25 plants to set 40 feet of row.
Culture. In Florida, seed may be sown in seedbeds from
September to January. Plants should be set in rows 3 feet apart,
and 1% to 2 feet apart in the row. When the main head is cut,
thick stems form at the base of leaves on the stalk below. At the
end of each branch a medium-sized green head develops.


CHARLESTON WAKEFIELD (70 days) The heads are larger
and broader at the base, not quite so pointed and later in
maturing than Jersey Wakefield. Of uniform size, very solid and
of desirable market quality.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.35; lb. $2.95; 1 lb. $10.55

COPENHAGEN MARKET (68 days) Our early strain of Copen-
hagen Market is short-stemmed, compact with solid, round,
medium-sized heads, having few outer leaves, thus facilitating
close planting, uniform in shape, and matures practically all at
the same time. This uniform maturity is desirable from a
marketing standpoint:
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.35; /4lb. $2.95; I lb. $10.55
EARLY JERSEY WAKEFIELD YR. (62 days) Early, uniform,
slow bolting, but cracks easily. Upright growth, 10-15 inches.
Heads large, conical, pointed and dark green, 5 inch average
diameter, 2-3 pound weight. Yellows resistant.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; /4lb. $2.75; 1 lb. $9.75
GOURMET (68 days) This hybrid cabbage, nearly round, is very
uniform and it has performed well in Florida as well as Texas,
New York and Minnesota. Heads average 5-6 inches in diameter
and weigh 2/-5 pounds.
Pkt. $1.40; oz. $5.10; /4 lb. $11.35; lb. $44.15


WALTHAM 29


WALTHAM 29 (Medium) (75 days from plants) Low growing,
heavy, short, compact plant, which produces a large, central
head. The plant is heavily branched with dark green, tight buds
that are of medium size, evenly distributed. It has ability to
survive periods of hot weather without the heads opening up.
Because of its uniformity, a large portion of the crop matures at
one time. Its excellent dark green color, fine head and bud
texture and high yield make it a valuable addition for Florida.
Excellent for fresh market and freezing.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.60; 4 lb. $3.55; 1 lb. $12.90


BRUSSELS SPROUTS
Sow % pound in seedbed to plant an acre.
In the garden sow I packet in seedbed
Sow seed and cultivate same as cabbage.
CATSKILL (90 days from plants) Sprouts are firm, tightly
packed, about 1-1/2 inches in diameter. Plants about 20 inches
tall.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.90; /4lb. $4.15; I lb. $15.35


CABBAGE
Sow 6 ounces in seedbed to plant an acre or 12 ounces per acre
in field.
For the garden, sow 1 packet in seedbed for 50plants to set 60
feet of row.
Culture. Cabbage is a heavy feeder and should be grown rapidly.
Where planted in seedbeds, which is the common practice,
plant seed thin in drills 6 inches apart, cover % to %
inch deep, using 8 ounces of seed for an acre of plants, and do
not make the soil in seedbeds as rich as soil where plants are to
be set. When seed is planted in the field, use 12 to 16 ounces of
seed per acre. Make rows 2% to 3 feet apart and thin to 12 to 18
inches apart in row, depending on variety and size of head you
wish to produce.
The number of days in parenthesis after each variety indicates
the relative number of days to marketable heads from setting out
plants. From the time seed is sown until the plants are ready for
setting, thirty-five days are usually required.
BADGER MARKET (Yellows Resistant) (72 days) This yellow
resistant cabbage makes a uniform, small, compact, round head,
of attractive dark blue-green color, very firm and hard. It is very
resistant to splitting, and can be left in the field for ten days to
two weeks after it is mature and shows no sign of splitting. It
possesses excellent edible quality.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.35; lb. $2.95; I lb. $10.55


GREENBACK YR.


GREENBACK YR. (74 days) Superior quality, stands cold
weather and packs well. Distinctive ruffled leaves. Resists
bolting. Plant is compact, dark green, short stems. Head is dark
green, nearly round and firm, 7-7/2 inches in diameter, 5-5/2
pounds. Yellows resistant.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.40; 4 lb. $3.15; 1 lb. $11.35

KING COLE (66 days) A new Yellows resistant hybrid with
exceptional uniformity. An early, firm headed cabbage. Plant is
medium and vigorous. Head is almost round, white interior, 7-8
inch diameter and four to six pounds. For market, we recommend
close spacing and early harvest for small head sizes. On muck
soils use minimum nitrogen level to control head size.
Pkt. $1.35; oz. $4.70; / lb. $10.45; I lb. $40.55
LITTLE ROCK (89 days) This Yellows Resistant hybrid forms
hard heads while still small. The firm heads can be harvested at
small size for market or allowed to grow to 6-7 inches in
diameter for kraut. Resistant to splitting because of short cores.
The round heads average 5-6 inches in diameter and weigh from
3-6 pounds.
Pkt. $1.40; oz. $5.00; /4lb. $11.05; 1 lb. $42.95
MAMMOTH RED ROCK (90 days) Largest and best of the late
red cabbages. Stores well. Deep purple-red color. Plant is 14-20
inches tall, large, broad, semi-spreading. Head is a flattened
globe, 8 to 9 inches in diameter and weighing 7 to 8 pounds.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.35; /4lb. $2.95; 1 lb. $10.55

RESISTANT GOLDEN ACRE (64 days) Heads 5V2" deep,
6" diameter and weigh 4-5 pounds each. These plants have
short stems, are erect, uniform, with few outer leaves.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; 4 lb. $2.75; I lb. $9.75

SAVOY CHIEFTAIN (88 days) This is the best of the savoy
types. It is densely curled and bluish-green. The quality is excel-
lent with firm heads and wide adaptability. Heads are 8-10 inches
in diameter and average 5 pounds.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.20; lb. $2.65; I lb. $9.35







CHINESE CABBAGE
Also known as Celery Cabbage.
Plant 1 pound per acre.
In the garden make two plantings at different times.
1 packet to 40feet of row at each planting.
Culture. This is a cool-weather plant and should not be grown
for a late spring or summer crop, because it bolts to seed in hot
weather. Seeds should be planted in 2% to 3 foot rows where
the crop is to mature, thinning out as the plants develop to
stand 8 to 12 inches in the row.
MICHIHLI (70 days from seed planting to edible stage.) Sure
header, maturing uniformly into long, slender, very firm, well
branched, crisp, tender, and sweet heads. It is slightly more
vigorous and darker green than other strains, the heads are more
uniform, and slower to bolt to seed. The heads become 19 to
20 inches tall, 3'/2 to 4 inches thick, tapered near the tip.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.35; '/4lb. $2.95; 1 lb. $10.55


CANTALOUPE
Plant 1 to 2 pounds per acre.
In the garden plant 1 packet to 50 feet row.
Culture. General cultural requirements, diseases and insects and
their control, similar to those of cucumber.
Plant in 5 foot rows, thinning to 2 feet in the row. Apply
fertilizer 10 days before planting, side dress at vining.


SMITH'S PERFECT (90 days) A strong, vigorous vine growth,
withstanding wind and cold damage. Fruits average 4 lbs. Round
in shape, slightly flattened at stem and blossom ends, free of
ribbing, a tough rind; makes a good shipper and market melon.
For market, it is best to harvest them a little on the green side
just as they begin to turn yellow. The flesh is firm, very thick,
with a small seed cavity, of attractive deep orange or salmon
color, and has a delicious flavor.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; / lb. $2.75; 1 lb. $9.75


CARROT
Plant 4 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden make three plantings at different times.
Plant 2 packets to 100 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. Sow in good, deeply worked, fine soil, in drills 1% to 2
feet apart, and cover seed % to % inch deep. When 2 inches high,
thin out to 2 to 3 inches apart. Carrots can be planted in
Florida from August to March.
DANVERS 126 (75 days) This carrot has good interior color,
heavy crown and is a heavy yielder. Good for canning and
freezing. Tops are long, strong and somewhat heat resistant.
Roots are smooth, 7-8% inches long, 1/4-21/4 inches at the
shoulder and tapered.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.20; 4 lb. $2.65; 1 lb. $9.35


k\ "


EDISTO 47

EDISTO 47 (95 days) This variety is resistant to Powdery
Mildew and Alternaria Leaf Spot and tolerant to Downy
Mildew. Melons average about a third larger than Jumbo Hale's
Best. The rind is hard and the flesh firm. Seed cavity is medium
large and the flesh is a deep, rich salmon. The fruit is ribbed
with a heavy, fairly close net. Excellent flavor and texture.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.15; % lb. $2.50; 1 lb. $8.65
HALE'S BEST JUMBO (86 days) A large fruited strain of Hale's
Best, grown extensively in Florida and other southern states.
Fruits are oval in shape, showing some trace of ribbing, with
heavy coarse netting. Average about 4 to 5 lbs. Flesh thick,
relatively small seed cavity, salmon orange color.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.15; / lb. $2.50; 1 lb. $8.75
HONEY DEW (110 days) This green fleshed melon has smooth
skin and averages 8 x 6'/2 inches in size and weighs an average of
6 pounds. It ships well, is a good keeper and is high in sugar.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.15; / lb. $2.50; 1 lb. $8.65
PLANTERS JUMBO (90 days) Developed by the USDA and
Clemson University. Fruit measures about 7 x 6 inches weighing
an average 4 pounds. Has a round oval shape and is well covered
with a smooth net. Deep orange flesh with a small cavity. Ex-
tremely vigorous vines. Resistant to both Powdery and Downy
Mildews. Good taste and overall excellent quality.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; 4lb. $2.75; 1 lb. $9.75

WRITE FOR PRICES ON GARDEN SUPPLY ITEMS.


LONG IMPERATOR 58

LONG IMPERATOR 58 (75 days) This is a new, widely
adapted variety good for shipping, market and the home. The
roots (8-9% inches long and 1-1% inches in diameter) have small
core and a deep color. They are long, slender and slightly
tapered.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; 4 lb. $2.80; 1 lb. $9.95
NANTES STRONG TOP (70 days) Cylindrical roots about 5'/2
to 6'/2 inches long and 1 to 112 inches thick, very stump rooted.
The color is clear orange-red and the core is rather undefined.
An excellent high quality variety for the home garden.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.15; 4 lb. $2.50; 1 lb. $8.75


CAULIFLOWER
Sow 6 ounces in seedbed to plant an acre.
In the garden sow one packet in seedbed for thirty plants.
Culture. Plant in seedbeds from Sept. to Dec. and cultivate the
same as cabbage, spacing 3 to 4 feet between rows and 18 to 24
inches in row. Cauliflower needs rich soil and plenty of moisture.
When head develops to the size of an apple, draw outer leaves
over head and tie with soft cord to produce attractive, white,
solid heads. Our cauliflower seed is grown in black rot free
territory.
EARLY SNOWBALL A (Super Snowball) (55 days from
plants) An early maturing strain. Snowball type, in which curled
formation of leaves over head protects it from sun and from
freezing. Dwarf, compact plants are strong, vigorous. Heads are
large, smooth, solid, pure white and very uniform; recommended
as an early winter crop to mature in cold weather. Susceptible
to "whiptail" and should be grown in alkaline soils with high
pH to avoid trouble.
Pkt. .45; oz. $2.55; 4 lb. $5.85; 1 lb. $22.15

CELERY
Sow % pound in seedbed to plant an acre.
For the garden sow 1 packet in a well protected seedbed for 150
plants to set 50 feet of row.







Culture of Celery. First sowings in Florida are made the latter
part of June and continue to December. Celery is always started
in protected seedbeds. Sow the seed broadcast or in rows 6
inches apart, using 1 pound of seed to 125-150 yards of bed 3
feet wide. The seed should be barely covered with soil.
We recommend use of burlap or white muslin as a cover over the
seedbed stretching it on a tent-shaped or slanting frame built
with the sides about 12 inches from the ground to provide ample
circulation of air.
When plants in seedbed are 6 inches high, transplant to the field
or garden in double rows 3 to 3% feet apart, with 7 inches be-
tween the double rows, and set the plants 4 to 5 inches apart in
the row.
TALL UTAH 52-70 (90 days from transplanting) This celery
variety has a wide adaptability, doing well in Florida and equally
well in several other areas of the country. The plant grows
approximately 23 inches high with a rib length of 11 inches. The
head shape is cylindrical and very compact.
Pkt. .50; oz. $3.65; lb. $8.05; 1 lb. $30.95

COLLARD
Sow % pound in seedbed to plant an acre, or plant 2 pounds,
per acre in field.
For the garden make two sowings at different times. Sow one
packet in seedbed for 35 plants for each planting to get 50 feet
of row.
Culture. Collard is an old standby for winter greens all over the
South. May be started in seedbeds or direct in the field, in rows
2% to 3 feet apart, with plants 14 to 18 inches apart in the row.
Collard can be grown every month of the year in Florida, but it
grows best and produces the highest edible quality during cool
weather. This vegetable should be included in every Florida
family garden, as it is very hardy, easy to grow and will furnish
an abundance of greens, high in health-producing vitamins.
The number of days in parentheses after each variety indi-
cates the time from setting out plants to harvest. It requires
about a month in the seedbed to get plants from seed sowing to
transplanting stage.
GEORGIA SOUTHERN (50 days) Plant grows from two to
three feet tall, is erect and spreading, with many large, undulated
leaves on a white stem. Withstands cold as well as heat, and
adverse soil conditions. A high yielding hardy type, of excellent
quality when cooked. This is the old standard variety for Florida
and the South.
Pkt. .40; oz. .70; 4 lb. $1.55; I lb. $4.95
VATE'S STRAIN (55 days) A very large, vigorous, rather low
growing plant, not subject to wind damage, with large, broad,
heavy, thick leaf blades, the leaf blade developing from the base
of the short stem or petiole. The leaves are smooth with an
attractive deep, dark green color, the stems and leaves never
turning yellow or purplish even in the coldest weather or on poor
soils. It retains this deep green color in shipment and on the
markets. A heavy yielder, slow to bolt to seed in cold or hot
weather. Uniform as to plant type.
Pkt. .45; oz. .75; / lb. $1.60; 1 lb. $5.15


FIELD CORN
Plant 8 to 12 Ibs. per acre.
To increase yields with field corn in Florida two things are
essential, namely closer spacing and ample fertilizer. On good
land 20 to 26 inch spacing in 38inch rows is best.
The number of days indicated after each item represents the
time from seed planting to harvest under average spring con-
ditions in Florida.
COKER 71 (110 days) A new yellow hybrid. Makes a short,
stocky plant with heavy compact ears. Yields well, keeps well.
In IFAS tests, it showed good standability, good ear quality,
excellent ear worm resistance and excellent rice weevil resis-
tance.
1 lb. .75; lb. $2.05; 2 lb. $3.25
DIXIE 18 HYBRID (Certified) (120 days) Dixie 18 is a heavy
yielder, averaging 2 ears per plant. The plants are relatively tall,
sturdy and very vigorous, with a deep root system, resisting
wind damage, lodging and drouth. The ears are uniform. The
grain is yellow and intermediate in texture being harder than
Whatley. Has good resistance to weevil.
/l4b. .65; 1 lb. $1.90; 2 b. $2.95


FUNK'S G-5945 HYBRID (120 days) This new yellow 4-way
cross has given excellent results and offers fine possibilities for
all sections of the state. It consistently makes high yields (two
ears per stalk) of attractive, medium large ears, well covered to
the tips with hard, semi-flint yellow kernels, with extra heavy
shuck, weevil resistant and of excellent keeping quality. The
strong, sturdy stalks stand drouth better than many others.
/4 lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.00; 2 lb. $3.15

ROASTING EAR CORN
Plant 8 to 12 lbs. per acre. In the garden two plantings at
different times. Plant % pound to 200 feet of row.
NORFOLK MARKET (Improved Trucker's Favorite) (68 days)
An extremely early variety. Ears are medium large, averaging
about 10 inches long, with 12 to 14 rows of large, white
kernels, very tender, and of splendid eating quality. Especially
valuable for planting after winter truck crops.
% lb. .90; 1 lb. $2.30; 2 lb. $3.75
OKLAHOMA SILVERMINE (82 days) An exceedingly heavy
yielder of large, heavy ears. The cobs are covered with 14 to 18
rows, and run from 11 to 12 inches in length. Resistant to worm
damage. An excellent variety for shipping, with a heavy dark
green husk that holds its color in shipment and on the market.
This is the standard roasting ear variety grown in Central
Florida for shipment to northern markets.
/4 lb. .90; 1 lb. $2.30; 2 lb. $3.75

SWEET CORN
8 to 12 pounds seed required per acre. In the garden make two
plantings. Plant % pound to 200 feet of row at each planting.
Our Hybrid Sweet Corn seed is now graded and sized for better,
more accurate stands and more uniform maturity.
Culture. Rows should be 2% to 3 feet apart with the plants 8 to
12 inches depending on type and season. Sweet corn requires
much more fertilizer than field corn. Plantings are made in
Florida from October 1st until March.


BONANZA
BONANZA (72 days) This yellow sweet corn is among the
highest quality sweet corns now available. It has very tender
pericarp and it has a good sugar content. The stalks are about 78
inches high and produce a 9-inch ear with a medium taper.
Resistant to H. turcicum blight and has a high resistance to sugar
cane mosaic.
/ lb. $1.20; 1 lb. $3.50; 2 lb. $6.15







GOLD CUP (80 days) This fine hybrid is grown heavily in the
Zellwood area of Fla. and is a favorite for many homeowners.
The ears are uniform about 7 in. long, but filled to the tips.
Plants grow to a height of about 62 ft., easy to till, spray and
pick. The flavor is very sweet.
/lb. $1.30; 1 lb. $3.85; 2 b. $6.85
GOLDEN CROSS BANTAM T51 (84 days) A refined Golden
Cross with a higher row count. High quality in an 8-8'/ inch ear
that slightly tapers.
lb. $1.05; l b. $2.95; 2lb. $5.05
IOANA (74 days) A very productive, yellow-kerneled hybrid.
Vigorous plants are highly resistant to drouth. Ears 7% to 8
inches long, 12 to 14 rowed.
Y4 lb. $1.05; 1 lb. $2.90; 2 lb. $4.95
SILVER QUEEN (94 days) A tender, most delicious white
sweet corn. It has extraordinary quality, always tender, extra
sweet. Plants grow tall with good vigor and produce large ears
with 14-16 rows of clear white kernels. Popular in the Everglades
and Zellwood sweet corn growing areas.
lb. $1.40; 1 lb. $4.25; 21b. $7.65
STOWELL'S EVERGREEN (98 days) Home garden type corn
with ears 7-9 inches long, very tender, white, introduced about
100 years ago.
% lb. .95; 1 lb. $2.55; 2 b. $4.25




COWPEAS, EDIBLE
Plant 20 to 45 pounds per acre in drills
In the garden plant % to 3/4 pound to 150ft. row each planting.
COlture Plant these varieties after the danger of frost is past.
Sow from one to two inches deep in rows three to four feet
apart.
BIG BOY (65 days) This is an erect bush type pea that bears on
top of the vine. The pod is 8-9 in. long with peas larger than
blackeye. Similar to blackeye in taste and appearance but shells
much more easily.
% lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.45; 2 lb. $4.05
CALIFORNIA BLACKEYE No. 5 (70 days) Wilt resistant. Im-
proved variety of Giant Ramshorn. Very vigorous and heavy
yielding pea. Pods are up to 12 inches long with peas larger than
ordinary blackeyes.
% lb. .75; lib. $2.25; 2 b. $3.65
HERBKEN (68 days) A new crowder type cowpea which is a
cross between the Mississippi Silverskin and the Pinkeye Purple-
hull. It produces full 8-10 inch purple pods. Initial tests show it
may outyield Purple Knucklehull by as much as one-third. If you
like to try new varieties, try this one. Let us know how you like
it
% lb. .75; lb. $2.35; 2 lb. $3.85
KNUCKLEHULL PURPLEHULL (56 days) Excellent for can-
ning or freezing or fresh peas. They are not vining, but a strong
erect bush type pea, called "Knucklehull" because of big, plump
peas. The shell is purple when mature and the seed is dark brown
when dried.
% lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.40; 2 lb. $3.95
MISSISSIPPI SILVERSKIN (60 days) Pod is 7 inches long when
mature and silvery in color. The peas set early at the top of the
vines and shell easily. Very similar to Silverskin Crowders.
lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.85
PINKEYE PURPLEHULL (100 days) A white purplehull pea
for market, freezing or home use. The young peas are white
with a pink or purple eye. They have excellent flavor and
usually produce two crops on the plants in one season. Bush
type.
Slb. .75; lb. $2.25; 2 b. $3.65
PURPLE TIP CROWDER (85 days) A crowder-type pea with
large pods filled with easily shelled peas. Called purple tip
because the tip is purple when mature. Very popular. The dried
seed is brown.
4 lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.35; 2 lb. $3.85
PURPLEHULL 49 (66 days) This pea is actually a cross between
a blackeye and a crowder. It is larger than most blackeyes and
the hull is purple. The plant is erect, bush type and makes an
attractive home or market variety.
% lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.55


SNAPEA (65 days) A new cream-type pea. It produces long
pods for best use as snaps, usually between 8-10 inches long.
Shells much the same as Texas Cream 40's if allowed to mature.
Bush type in growth and very resistant to cowpea scab and
Cercospora leaf spot.
lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.35; 2 lb. $3.85
TEXAS CREAM 40 IMPROVED CONCH (62 days) A bush type
conch with usually two crops a season. Pods are oval, straight
and closely filled with light green tender peas. Pods form at the
top of the bush in hands to make it easy to pick. Yields high,
cream peas are good for freezing, market and home use.
lb. .80; 1 lb. $2.40; 2 lb. $3.95
WHITE ACRE RUNNING (80 days) This variety is a vining, run-
ning type that matures early and bears for a long period of time.
The seed is small making it harder to shell but still one of the
best liked peas for home use.
/ lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.25; 2 lb. $3.65


ZIPPER CREAM


ZIPPER CREAM (70 days) High-producing fresh market pea that
is named zipper because it literally shells itself. The peas are so
large that they pop out of the pods. Excellent flavor. Resistant
to curculio, stink bug and weevils because of the thick wall of
the pod.
4 lb. .90; 1 lb. $2.95; 2 lb. $5.05



COWPEAS, FIELD
Culture.
Sow 1 to 1% bushel per acre broadcast (Bushel weighs 60 lb.)
IRON and CLAY MIXED Heavy growth of vines used for soil
improvement and forage. Seed small.
1 lb. $1.45; 5 lb. $3.90



CUCUMBER
In the garden plant 1 packet to 50 feet of row.
Plant 2 pounds per acre.
Culture. Rich, moist, sandy loam soil is the best for growing
cucumbers. Fall plantings are made in late August and in
September. Spring planting in Florida begins early in January
and continues through February. Plant in rows 5 to 6 feet apart,
6 inches apart in the row and thin to 1 to 2 feet between every
two plants in the row.
ASHLEY (70 days) A downy mildew resistant cucumber
developed at Clemson Truck Experiment Station, South Caro-
lina. Widely adapted and heavy yielding, resembling Marketer in
fruit type, but earlier, with somewhat less vigorous vine
growth. Holds attractive shape and color well at marketable
stage.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.05; /4lb. $2.35; 1 lb. $8.15
BURPLESS HYBRID (58 days) Crisp, tasty, not bitter and truly
burpless. It is not necessary to peel it and you may slice it
lengthwise and eat it as a salad relish like celery. Grows to a
length of 12-15 inches.
Pkt. .70; % oz. $3.60; 1 oz. $7.85



















POINSETT
POINSETT (70 days) This new variety was developed at Clem-
son, S.C. The vines are more vigorous than Ashley and are resistant
to Downy and Powdery Mildew; Angular Leaf Spot and An-
thracnose. They are tolerant to Fusarium Wilt and Gummy Stem.
The fruits are about the same length as Ashley, darker green, and
blunt with no tendency to nipple. Yields are higher.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.05; lb. $2.35; 1 lb. $8.15
TEX LONG (65 days) This cucumber is an excellent yielder
with better than average performance under weather stresses.
Fruit is 8/2-9 inches in length with a slight taper and it is dark
green in color. It is a midseason variety with good resistance to
Downy and Powdery Mildews. Has moderate resistance to
Anthracnose, Angular Leaf Spot and Belly Rot. Exhibits
tolerance to Target Spot.
Pkt. .40; oz. .95; /4 lb. $2.05; 1 lb. $6.95
SMR-18 (60 days) This pickle type cucumber has superior
shape, internal structure and disease resistance. It has a small
seed cavity in a fruit 6 inches long and 22 inches in diameter.
Very straight, uniform and blocky with a moderate dark green
color. Resistant to Downy and Powdery Mildews, Race 1 and 2
of Anthracnose and Leaf Spot. Tolerant to Cucumber Mosaic
Virus under favorable conditions.
Pkt. .40; oz. .85; % lb. $1.90; 1 lb. $6.35

EGGPLANT
Sow e pound in seedbed to plant an acre, or 2 to 3 pounds per
acre direct seeded.
For the garden sow one packet in seedbed for 17 plants to set
50 feet of row.
Culture. For a spring crop, plant seed in November, December,
and Janaury; for fall crop, plant in June, July and August. Set in
rows 4 to 5 feet apart and 2% to 3 feet between the plants. Egg-
plant being a long season crop requires several fertilizer applica-
tions. Best results are obtained by applying half or more of a
complete fertilizer at planting time and the remainder when the
crop is one-third to one-half grown. The initial application
should be made in two bands each located 2 or 3 inches below
and 3 inches to the side of the plant row. Subsequent application
should be drilled close to the plant row.
The number of days in parentheses after each variety indicates
the time to first marketable fruits, from setting out plants in
the field or garden. It usually requires six to eight weeks -to
produce plants for field setting.

BLACK BEAUTY (80 days) This is a popular variety for the
home garden and the market. Plants are relatively compact,
24-28 inches high with broad, egg-shaped, dark purple fruit.
Pkt. .45; oz. $3.35; % lb. $7.45; I lb. $28.55
FLORIDA MARKET (COOK'S STRAIN) (87 days) The plant of
this variety is medium high and erect, about 30-36 inches high.
The fruit is a glossy blackish purple shaped as a long oval. It is
resistant to Phomopsis Blight and Fruit Rot.
Pkt. .45; oz. $3.35; 4 lb. $7.45; 1 lb. $28.55


ENDIVE
Sow % to 1 pound in seedbed to plant an acre, or
1 to 1% pounds per acre in the field
For the garden sow one packet in seedbed for 50 plants to set
40 feet of row, or plant one packet to 40 feet of row.
Culture. Plant from August to February in seedbeds or in the
fields or garden the same as lettuce. Set in rows 1% to 2 feet
apart and 9 inches apart in the row. Soil and fertilizer require-
ments are the same as for lettuce.


FULL HEART BATAVIAN (ESCAROLLE) (90 days) The
leaves are large, broad, thick, slightly crumpled, of medium
green color, with thick, nearly white midribs. Our improved
stock of this variety is of the Full-Heart type, developing an
upright growth, producing a very heavy, thick matted plant with
large, deep, well balanced creamy white hearts.
Pkt. .45; oz. .95; /4 lb. $2.15; 1 lb. $7.25
GREEN CURLED RUFFEC, GREEN RIBBED (95 days) Some-
times called "Chicory". A hardy vigorous sort, with deep green,
curled, finely cut leaves, giving a mossy appearance. The midrib
is thick, broad, green, tender and fleshy. A dense mass of
deeply divided leaves forms the head which blanches readily to
a beautiful creamy white.
Pkt. .45; oz. .95; /4 lb. $2.15; 1 lb. $7.25

KALE
Plant 1 ounce to 100 feet of row or 1 packet to 25 feet of row.
Culture. Plant in Florida from August to April, in rows 2% feet
apart, and for large plants thin from 20 to 30 inches apart in the
row. The plants are extremely hardy withstanding cold and
heat.
DWARF BLUE CURLED, VATE'S STRAIN (65 days) Plants
low, spreading, hardy, very slow in bolting when grown over
winter for spring harvest. Leaves tightly curled, dark bluish
green. Holds color well in cold weather.
Pkt. .40; oz. .75; lb. $1.65; 1 lb. $5.35


KOHL RABI
For the garden make short row plantings at different times.
Plant 1 packet to 25 feet of row.
Culture. Grow in rows 1% to 2 feet apart, thinning from 6 to 8
inches apart in the rows. Start fall planting September, and
successive plantings can be made until early spring.
EARLY WHITE VIENNA (55 days) The fleshy stems or so-
called bulbs, are formed above ground and are very light green,
tender and delicate, and of best quality if used when about 2 to
3 inches in diameter, before fully grown.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.25; % lb. $2.80; 1 lb. $9.95
..Rer 1 1 it!


EARLY WHITE VIENNA KOHL RABI


LEEK
Plant I packet to 50 feet of row.
Culture. Leek seed may be planted any time during the fall or
winter directly in the field
GIANT MUSSELBURGH (AMERICAN FLAG) (150 days) Most
popular leek for local market, shipping and home garden. The
edible portion is long, thick, well blanched and the leaf color is
medium green.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.95; lb. $4.30; 1 lb. $15.95

Figures and other data given for maturity, size, and other
characteristics represent averages. They may be expected to
vary according to cultural practice, growing conditions and
other factors, and should be used only for comparing varieties
within a species. We have tried to be accurate and consistent
in compiling these descriptions, and will consider it a kind-
ness if discrepancies or errors are called to our attention.






LETTUCE
NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS REGARDING LETTUCE
SEED. The sale of lettuce seed in the State of Florida is now
regulated by Chapter 5B-38, Florida Statutes. This law is de-
signed to prevent the spread of Lettuce Mosaic through the
lettuce producing areas of Florida. It provides that only seed
which has been tested by the Imperial Valley Vegetable Growers
Association testing facility to show no Lettuce Mosaic Virus
infected seed in 30,000 seeds can be shipped into primary lettuce
growing areas. These lettuce areas are identified as suppressed
areas and only this tested seed can be shipped into and used in
these locales. The present designated areas comprise all or part of
the following counties Lake, Orange, Seminole, Glades,
Hendry, Martin and Palm Beach. Even though only parts of the
above counties, with the exception of Seminole, are designated
suppressed areas, it will be our policy to ship only Mosaic tested
seeds into any of these counties. It is not required that only
Mosaic tested seed be slipped into or used in the remaining
counties so we will offer both untested and tested seeds to
customers in these counties. As we did last year we will have
two price schedules for our lettuce for people outside the
suppressed areas. Our tested seeds will again be identified as
Gold Label and our untested as just that, untested.
Sow 2 to 1 pound in seedbed to plant an acre, or plant 2 to 3
pounds per acre in field For the garden make two plantings at
different times. Sow 1 packet in seedbed for 60 to 80 plants to
set 50 to 75 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. First sowings are made in Florida the beginning of
September and continued until March. In level culture, lettuce
plants are usually set 15 by 15 inches in the field, or in rows I1%
to 2 feet apart, and 10 to 15 inches in the row, or double rows
16 inches apart, with 3% to 4 feet from center to center of
double rows, and 14 inches in the rows.
BIBB (54 days) A distinctive variety of high table quality used
for commercial production, and also suitable for home garden.
Plants form a small rosette head; very early maturing and rather
quick to bolt. Leaves thick, tender, quite smooth; deep green
outside, blanched to creamy yellow within.
Gold Label- Pkt..65; oz. $2.80; 4 lb. $6.25; 1 lb. $23.75
Untested Pkt..40; oz. .95; lb. $2.05; 1 lb. $ 6.95
BLACK SEEDED SIMPSON (45 days) A widely adapted,
dependable, and highly popular leaf variety. Plants early matur-
ing, large, compact when planted closely. Leaves broad, crumpled,
and frilled, light green, of excellent quality.
Gold Label- Pkt. .65; oz. $2.70; lb. $6.00; 1 lb. $22.75
Untested- Pkt..40; oz. .85; lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $ 6.15
DARK GREEN BOSTON (70 days) The heads are of the butter-
head type, medium sized. The broad outer leaves are almost
smooth, with wavy edges and have a dark green color.
Gold Label Pkt..65; oz. $2.80; lb. $6.25; 1 lb. $23.75
Untested Pkt..40; oz. .95; lb. $2.05; 1 lb. $ 6.80


GREAT LAKES 6238

GREAT LAKES 6238 (83 days) The plants are large, vigorous
and have a distinctive, deep grassy-green, attractive appearance.
The heads are relatively large, compact, firm and solid. Great
Lakes 6238 will stand high temperatures, is much less subject to
Bottom Rot, Tip Burn and Slime Rot, and does not bolt so readily
as other varieties of this type.
Gold Label Pkt..70; oz. $3.10; % lb. $6.85; 1 lb. $26.15
Untested- Pkt..50; oz. $1.20; lb. $2.65; 1 lb. $ 9.35


OAK LEAF (45 days) A loose-leaved lettuce especially good
during warm months. It is slower to bolt than other varieties.
Crisp, tender, leaves. Untested seed only.
Pkt. .40; 1 oz. .90; /4 b. $2.00; 1 lb. $6.65
PARRIS ISLAND COS. (Romaine) (68 days) Resistant to lettuce
mosaic, and highly resistant to premature seeding. Similar to
Dark Green Cos, but a shade lighter green, with the leaves of
somewhat heavier texture. Of value wherever mosaic is a limiting
factor. Uniform and attractive.
Gold Label- Pkt..65; oz. $2.80; % lb. $6.25; 1 Ib. $23.75
Untested- Pkt..45; oz. $1.15; % lb. $2.50; 1 Ib. $ 8.75

VALMAINE (Romaine) (68 days) This variety is resistant to
Downy Mildew, and the rigid plants are upright, 14 to 16 inches
in height. The compact portion of the head is 10 to 11 inches
in length and 3 to 4 inches in diameter. The leaves are slightly
savoyed, a feature which gives them a distinctive bumpy
appearance. The outer leaves are dark green, whereas the center
ones are an attractive golden yellow. The salad quality is
excellent.
Gold Label- Pkt..70; oz. $2.95; /4 lb. $6.55; 1 lb. $24.95
Untested- Pkt..50; oz. $1.45; 4 lb. $3.25; 1 lb. $11.75
WHITE BOSTON (75 days) This strain has been selected under
Florida conditions for the development of a large framed lettuce
similar to Big Boston. Produces large heads and heavy yields.
Gold Label- Pkt..65; oz. $2.70; 4 lb. $5.95; 1 lb. $22.55
Untested- Pkt..40; oz. .85; % lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $ 6.15

MUSTARD
Plant 4 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden make two plantings at different times.
1 packet to 40feet of row at each planting.
Culture. General cultural directions similar to those for cabbage,
but is always planted direct in the field or garden. Sow seed
August to March in good rich garden soil in rows 24 inches apart
and thin from 8 to 10 inches in the row.
FLORIDA BROAD LEAF (50 days) Plants tall and upright,
with large, thick, smooth, round to oval, medium green leaves,
8 to 10 inches long and 8 inches wide. It produces more leaf
growth than other varieties.
Pkt. .35; oz. .50; lb. $1.10; lib. $3.15
SOUTHERN GIANT CURLED (60 days) An improved strain,
with ability to stand longer before bolting to seed, though a
little later in maturing. Plants medium large, somewhat spreading
but mostly upright. Leaves large, broad; bright green; curled and
frilled at the edges.
Pkt. .35; oz. .55; lb. $1.25; 1 lb. $3.60
TENDERGREEN or MUSTARD SPINACH (45 days) A dark
green, medium large plant that is heat and drought resistant.
The leaf is thick, smooth, tender and broad.
Pkt. .35; oz. .55; lb. $1.15; 1 lb. $3.35

OKRA
Plant 8 pounds per acre.
In the garden plant 1 ounce to 75 feet of row.
Culture. Okra can be grown in Florida any time from February
until September, but it is a warm-weather plant and will not do
much until the ground becomes warm. Plant in rows 3 to 4 feet
apart and sow thinly in the drill. Okra should be cut every
second day. If this is not done some of the pods become too old
for market and the young plants will stop bearing. Plants should
bear for several months after harvesting starts.













CS


CLEMSON'S SPINELESS







CLEMSON SPINELESS (55 days) Plants are semi-dwarf, grow-
ing to a height of 4V2 feel on fairly good soil and produce
uniform, straight, large, thick, ridged pods of the Perkins' Long
Green type, of good length, averaging 3 to 31/2 inches when
ready for market, green in color, and entirely free from spines,
thus making it easy to pick without discomfort. Pods are thicker
than Perkins' and fill the crates quickly. Plants are close jointed,
and produce an enormous yield.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; '4 lb. $1.15; 1 lb. $3.35

PERKINS' SPINELESS (53 days) Pods similar in size, shape and
appearance to Perkins' Long Green, except they are practically
spineless. Early, productive, semi-dwarf plant 3 feet tall. Selected
for uniformly higher yields of dark green, long, slender pods
desired in the markets. This Perkins' Spineless should not be
confused with Clemson Spineless, being an entirely different and
distinct variety, the pods having the long, slender shape and
dark green appearance of Perkins' Long Green. Perkins' Spineless
can be sold in any market for Perkins' Long Green.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; /4 lb. $1.15; I lb. $3.35


GARLIC SETS- Extra Large
Culture.
These Large Bulbs will separate into several sections, called
cloves. These cloves are planted much the same as you would
plant onion sets. Three bulbs of garlic will plant about 10-15
feet of row.
3 Bulbs- $1.95; 6 Bulbs $2.95; 15 Bulbs $6.65






jo. .


EXCEL (BERMUDA 986) (180 days) Practically free of bolters,
doubles, splits, and color defects. Uniform in maturity, size,
color and shape of bulbs, the shape being a deep or thick-flat,
the color a light yellow. Crisp and mild in flavor, and keeps
better in storage than other Yellow Bermudas.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.70; 4 lb. $3.75; 1 lb. $13.70
GRANEX, WHITE (175 days) This is an excellent hybrid onion
with white skin and white flesh. The bulb is a deep flat and
large, very mild and intermediate in firmness. Storage life is
rather short.
Pkt. .50; oz. $3.50; '/4 lb. $7.75; 1 lb. $29.75


TEXAS EARLY GRANO 502 P.R.R.


ONION SETS
Plant 8 to 12 bushels of sets per acre. In the garden 1 pound of
sets to 50 feet of row.
A bushel weighs about 32 pounds.
Set out in rows 1% feet apart and 1 to 2 inches apart in rows for
green onions. Plant from September to February.
Note: These sets do not make large onions.
White Sets ............. (postpaid) ......... 1 lb. $1.95 ..... 2 lb. $3.05
Yellow Sets ........... (postpaid) ......... 1 lb. $1.95 ..... 2 lb. $3.05
Available from September to February


ONION
For dry bulbs sow 1% pounds in seedbed to plant an acre, or
plant 3 pounds per acre in the field. For the garden sow 1 packet
in seedbed for 350 to 450 plants to set 80 feet of row or plant
1 packet to 80 feet of row.
Culture. For large mature bulbs in Florida, first plantings are
made in late August and continued until November. September
and October are best months to plant. The seed is generally
planted in the open field, where the onions are to grow, in rows
18 inches apart, and when 4 to 5 inches high they are thinned
out from 3 to 4 inches apart, depending on variety and size of
bulbs desired. Do not work soil to onions after they start bulbing.
Onions do best in sandy loam or muck soil.
The number of days after each variety indicates the time
from planting the seed to large mature bulbs under average
Florida conditions.
CRYSTAL WAX BERMUDA (180 days) Early maturing, flat in
shape, of waxy white color, attractive in appearance, and of mild
flavor.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.05; lb. $4.50; 1 lb. $16.70


TEXAS EARLY GRANO 502 P.R.R. (168 days) This strain is
fully ten days earlier, more uniform in shape, and slightly smaller
in size than regular Grano. Bulbs have light straw-colored skin,
with pure, white flesh, are globe or top-shaped,slightly tapering
to the root. Mild in flavor with a sweet taste. Resistant to Pink
Rot.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.00; / lb. $4.40; 1 lb. $16.35

TROPICANA (175 days) This is a red, short-day F-l hybrid
onion. The foliage has good resistance to Purple Blotch and to
the type of blight caused by the fungus Botrytis squamosa. The
bulbs are thick, flat in shape and the flesh is firm and pungent.
The bulbs are commercially acceptable after several months if
kept dry and well aerated.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.90; % lb. $6.25; I lb. $23.80
WHITE KNIGHT BUNCHING (60 days to green onions)
Makes a long stem, much longer than ordinary bunching
onions, pure white in color, and without a bulb. Resistant to
Pink Rot, Thrips and Smut.
Pkt. .50; oz. $1.65; % lb. $3.65; 1 lb. $13.30

PARSLEY
Plant 1 ounce to 150 feet of row, or 2 pounds per acre.
In the garden plant 1 packet to 30 feet of row.
Culture: Parsley can be planted in the fall or spring, in drills 18
inches apart, and thinned to 6 inches in the row. Seed is slow
to germinate and it usually takes from two to three weeks to
produce a satisfactory stand.
EXTRA TRIPLE CURLED (70 days) Plant vigorous in growth,
usually 12 inches tall and spreading 20 inches when given suffi-
cient room with very long, stout stems for bunching. This variety
has been bred and selected for uniform, attractive leaves of dark
green color.
Pkt. .50; oz. .95; / lb. $2.05; 1 lb. $6.95







PEAS
Plant 1 bushel (56 lbs.) per acre in single rows; 1% bushels
(84 lbs.) per acre in double rows.
In the garden make three plantings at different times.
Plant pound to 100 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. Peas are very hardy and are not commonly attacked
by insects. Peas can be grown on almost any kind of soil and
with about the same cultivation as beans. Planting in double
rows, six to eight inches apart, is a good plan, because this
enables the plants to support each other. Single rows should be
spaced two and a half to three feet apart, and double rows
three to three and a half feet apart from center of double
rows, and 1% to 2 inches deep. By working the soil up against
the stems of the plants they will bear longer.
The number of days after each variety indicates the relative
time from planting to first picking.

MELTING SUGAR (Snow) (74 days) Seeds large, round, creamy
white. A leading edible pod variety. Pod is 4-4/2 inches long,
pale green in color with 8-10 peas to the pod.
lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.15; 2 lb. $3.45; 5 lb. $7.40

LITTLE MARVEL IMPROVED (65 days) The most popular pea
for Florida, because of its good quality, earliness and high yield
of well filled pods. Especially adapted to Florida muck soils
where it is a sure cropper with well filled pods, even in warm
seasons. The vines are vigorous stock, dark green in color,
growing about 1% feet tall, and loaded with straight, round,
plump pods about 3 inches long, well filled with 7 to 8 tender
peas.
lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.00; 2 lb. $3.15; 5 lb. $6.65


PROGRESS NO. 9


MORSE'S PROGRESS NO. 9 (64 days) A popular early market
variety and equally popular in the home garden. Plants grow 20
inches high and produce dark green 4/2-inch pointed pods con-
taining 8 to 10 seeds.
4 lb. .65; 1 lb. $1.95; 2 lb. $3.05; 5 lb. $6.40
THOMAS LAXTON (62 days) Dark green pea, 8-10 peas per
pod. Pod is about 31/2 inches long and blunt. Excellent for freez-
ing. Very resistant to Fusarium wilt. Plants 30 36 inches high.
/4 lb. .65; 1 lb. $1.95; 2 lb. $3.05; 5 lb. $6.40


PEPPERS

SWEET VARIETIES

Sow % to 1 pound of seed in seedbed to plant an acre.
Sow 2 to 3 pounds per acre when drilled in field.
For the garden sow 1 packet in a protected seedbed for 24
plants to set 40feet of row.
Culture. For a crop in central Florida sow the seed in June, July
and August; for a long season winter crop on the east coast
plant in August, September and October. For an early spring
crop in Florida west coast sections sow seed in November and in
north Florida in December or January.
High temperature is needed to germinate pepper seed satis-
factorily and it is difficult to get a good stand when the
ground is wet and cold. Hammock land, or rather moist soil, is
best suited to this crop, although any medium good sandy loam
soil, properly fertilized, will grow good peppers. Make rows
three feet apart and set plants 10 to 16 inches in the row. As
this crop is in bearing for a long time, it is most profitable to
make several applications of fertilizer.
The number of days in parentheses after each variety indi-
cates the relative time from setting out plants to picking of
marketable green peppers. It requires six to eight weeks to
produce plants ready for setting.
CUBANELLE (68 days) This pepper is used often for frying.
It is medium thick with waxy, yellow-green to red walls. Fruit
is 4/2 to 5" long tapering to a blunt end. It is excellent in flavor
and sets continuously.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.10; lb. $4.65; 1 lb. $17.25
EARLY CALWONDER (65 days) An early maturing strain of
California Wonder, maturing 7 to 10 days ahead of other strains,
and producing fruits over a long season. The plant is not as tall
and erect in growth as regular California Wonder, but is vigorous
and prolific. The fruits usually are four-lobed and attractive in
appearance, being smooth, dark green, uniform and thick meated.
This early strain is rapidly growing in popularity.
Pkt. .55; oz. $2.60; lb. $5.80; 1 lb. $21.95
YELLOW SWEET LONG (65 days) A sweet flavored, medium
walled, slightly tapered pepper. When young, fruit is waxy
yellow but matures to a bright red. Good for frying and
sandwiches.
Pkt. .55; oz. $2.60; lb. $5.80; 1 lb. $21.95
YOLO WONDER 43 (78 days) An improved strain of Yolo
Wonder which is resistant to Tobacco Mosaic. Fruit size is 4
x 3% inches with 3 to 4 lobes and thick walls.
Pkt. .55; oz. $2.70; /4 lb. $5.95; 1 lb. $22.55


HOT VARIETIES

CHILI JALAPENO (72 days) This pepper is extremely hot. It is
eaten fresh or pickled when young and dark green and dried
when red and mature. The plants are large, productive and bear
over a long period of time. The fruit is 3 x 1 inches and tapers
to a blunt rounded point.
Pkt. .60; oz. $3.10; % lb. $6.85; 1 lb. $26.15
HUNGARIAN YELLOW WAX (60 days) A very early, hot sort,
valuable for canners. Plants are rather dwarf in growth, and
exceedingly prolific. Fruits pendent, medium slender, long,
tapering, smooth and very hot or pungent. Color waxy yellow
changing to bright crimson at maturity.
Pkt. .55; oz. $2.80; lb. $6.25; 1 lb. $23.75
LONG THIN CAYENNE (70 days) A leading variety for
processing as well as for market and home gardens. Plants large,
upright, very prolific. Fruits pendent, dark green turning
brilliant red, long and very slender, with thin walls, tapering to a
point, often somewhat twisted; very pungent.
Pkt. .60; oz. $3.35; /lb. $7.45; 1 lb. $28.55

PUMPKIN
Plant 2 pounds seed per acre.
In the garden plant % ounce to 50 feet.
Culture. Plant 4 to 5 seeds in hills 8 to 10 feet apart one way and
5 feet apart the other way, when the weather gets warm. Can be
planted in corn. Thin to two or three plants after well started.
Give shallow and frequent cultivation until vines begin to run.
Cut pumpkins when fully ripe.








ALMANAC FOR 1975


January
MOON PHASES
S l. C.L r I rl
L 2 I MO 0 t tA *I II MA I II M t
It r F14 It I 4I 47 2 I 2 M4 II I 7 0
r- NL O I 11 I a M 11 1s 12 1 nl



Si 3. & Lit0tu-of L.tto i a tltud of
a NoIS [ th at s .I MIddsl aI0. Saulho Srfl
;;i i: '^ ^ '-i .' - i 'o

SW 430 70 4 17254 42 923 7 02 05 99
2 Th 4 731 438 1034 725 4 4310 34 7 02 06 1034
4 5 7314 39 morn 7 25 4 44 morn 703 507 morn

5 S 5 730440125 72544S 1254 703508 12 43
Mo 6II 730 441 12 07 254 462 017 03509 1 46
7Tu 61 730442 311 725447 306 703509 246
8 We 7 7 30 4 43 4 1 7254 48 4 087 03 5 10 346
9Th 7 7 30 4 44 5 097 25449 5 l 03 440
10Fr 8 7 30 4 46 6 7 25 450 551 7035 12 5 1
I S81 '1 7 304 47 6 447 25 4 51 6 317 035 13 6 18
2. Day's length I m.. h 7. 27m. 10m.
12 Su 8 I 7 30 4 48 ists 7 25 4 52 sets 7 03 5 13 Ise
13Mo 9 7 29 4 49 6 257 24 4 53 6 287 03514 6 42
t4 Tu 9= 7 29 4 50 72 7 24 4 4 7 2 7 703 5 5 7 36
15 We 9 7 29 4 51 8 22 7 24 4 55 8 23 7 02 5 16 8 30
6 Th 101H 7 28 4 52 9 20 23 4 5 9 21 7 02 5 7 9 22
17 Fr 10 727 4 53 10 20 7 23 10 19 7 02 5 8 10 16
18 S 101 7 27 4 55 1 20 7 22 4 591 1 8 7 02 5 19 11 10
Day's length 3). 9m. 3-. 10h. s8m.
19 Su 726 4 6 morn 7 22 5 00 morn 702 5 20 morn
20 Mo II 7 25 4 57 12 20 721 501 12 Is 7 0 521 1206
21Tu 11 725458 122721502 119 701522 103
22 We 12 u 7 24 4 59 226 7 20 5 03 2227 015 23 2 02
23Th 12 724501 329 7 20504 3 24 7 00 5 24 302
24 Fr 12 I1 723 5 02 430 7 19 05 4 24700 S 25 4 01
255 12 722504 526 718 507 521659 526 459
4. Day' length Th. 43m. %h. S0t. 10h. i2m.
26 u '13 722 05 6 6 7 18508 6 11 6595 271 5
27 M 13 7215 06 rie> 7 17 5 0 e 6 58 5 28 9reI
28Tu13l 7 205 07 6 57 716510 6 65829 07
29 e13 7 1850 8 .14 7 15 5 1 6 57 530 818
30Th 13 7 185 0 9297 14 5 13 9 2E 656531 925
31 Fr 4 1 5 71 II10 42713515 410 656 5321032

FANUARY, 1975-Above Ground-12, 16,
17, 21, 22, 25, 26. Below Ground-4, 5,
5, 7, 11, 31.







April
Ln MOON PHASES

q- LL 1 11 W I11 Ia A I 1 W :.1
M m t 11 t4 t 1. 4 Is 1t .
..... .. .. ...... .



X I Latitud .f Latitud of Latitud of
SNorth Stat, M-iddl SItt S5-uth-, Sutat
s a g r T i I- | I. G' s -iS r ',, S 11... rm-
o A a .ls i ita .... o i... i .. .. Mt S
1 Tu 4 5 45 6 25 morn 5 45 6 24 morn 5 496 19 .orn
21WeI 4 5 43626 12355436 2512 30 486 2012 07
3 Th 3 1 5 41 6 27 19 5 426 26 1 14 5 476 211253
Fr 3 5 39 6 28 57 5 4016 27 153 46 6 21 1 34
a 3 5 38 629 2 30 5392 2275 456 22 2II
14. Day's Ingth 12h. 55m. 12h. 52.. 12h. 4Om.
6 Su 2 5 36 313 00 37 29 2 5815 43162 246
7Mo 2 34 632 126 535 630 3 24 5 42 623 3 16
8 Tu 2 533 6 33 3 1 5 31 3 50 5 416 24 3 47
9 We 2 5 31 6 34 4 15 32 4 16 5 40 6 25 4 17
0Th I 529635 425 11633 4353966 448
12 S I 5 26637 7592835 75536 6 27 740
15. Day's length 13h. ISm. 13h. I0m. 12h. S3m.
153 I 5246 39 90052666 6 56535628 837
14Mo 0 5 23 6 4010 0 5 256 37 9 555 346 28 934
5 Tu 0 21 6 41 10575 236 38 0 52 5 326 291030
16 We 5 19642 II 505 216 39 45 5 31630 II 23
7 Th 0 1 6 43 morn 5 20 6 40 morn 5 30 6 30 morn
18 Fr I S 1 6 44 12 365 18 6 42 12 32 5 29 6 3112 12
9 Sa I 5 14 6 45 18 5 166 43 14 5 27 6 32 12 58
16. ay's length 13h. 33m. Il3.h 13. h.7m.
20Su ,I 5 13 6 46 1 S4 5 156 44 1 52 5 26 6 33 I 39
21o M I ni 1 1648 22 5136 45 2275 25 633 2 9
22 Tu I ni 5 0 649 3 00 5 126 46 3 00 5 24 6 34 2 57
23 We 2 S 08 650 3 3210 6 47 332 5 23 6 34 335
24Th 2 507651 509648 407 5 22 635 415
25 Fr 2 505 6 52 5 08 6 49 rses 5 21 6 36 r
26 S 2 5 04 6 3 18 5 06 6 50 8 14 5 20 6 36 7 54
17. Day's length 13h. S2m. 3lh. 46m. 13h. ilm.
27 Su 2 5 02 54 9 23 1 056 51 9 18 519 6 37 8 57
28 Mo 3 501 655 1021 503652 10 155 18638 953
29Tu 3 459657 11 11 502 653 11 06517 63910 45
30 We 3 45 658 113 5 50 654 11 495 5 6 40 II 30

APRIL, 1975-Above Ground-12, 13, 14,
17, 18, 23, 24. Below Ground-2, 3, 4, 7
8, 9, 25, 26, 27, 30.


february _

MOON PHASES
S... a... .. ..t .

F 11 i 1 I M HF it a 1 11 A
1A t Ito a S. a as n ts.


2 LaSitu I La** Sf altltude oS- -



I S. 314 j 17 16 I5 12 547 1215 161 II 5 6 55 5 3211 38
5. Day's length 9h. 59m. 10h. 6m. 1011h. 39m.

3 14 I 15 02 7 10 5 18 12 58 6 54 5 34 12 41
ST 4 7 206 09 5 2 2 016 3 5 35 141
SWt 4 7 2182 3057 5 21 3006 53 5 36 237
Th 0 191 3587 07 522 3 526 52537 3 29
Fr 4 70 520 4 3 06 5 23 4 38 51 53 4 15
85. .l41., 1717 5 21 5 217 05 ( 2435 616 5 5 39 4 58
6. Day's ln 10h. 16m. 06 h. IO 1h. Som.
95 4 7 7 5 23 5 56 7 045 6 5 53 5 40 5 36
10 Mo 4 7 05 5 24 6 27 7 0 5 27 6 24 6 4925 41 11
I1 Tu 4 = 7 04 5 26 sets 7 01 5 28 set 6 48 5 42 t
2 W4 4 7 035 27 7 12 7 005 29 7 13647 543 176
13Th 4 7 025281 8 10595 30 16 46 5 43 8 06
4Fr L 4 T 7 00 530 91065 32 9096455 44 904
3 0 4 i 6 5 1 105 I 6 56 333 1I 3096 44 5 4 9 59
7. Day's length 10h. Sm. IOh. I.m. Ilh. 3m.
16235u 14 6 57 5 32 148 655 4 44096 43 5 5246 54
72 Mo 14 B 65 5 33 mr 654 5 35 6 5 4 53 I
18 Tu 1 6 1452 45 r312S 6 41 5 48 mor


2 Wi 13 6 435 45 7 0 64 5 4 7 1 6 33 5 49 172 0
2 Th 43 I 64 56 38 14 6 49 50 6 35 50 10 4
21Fr 14 6451 9 1 363855 0 0556 942
51 4 6 4 0 542 42 57 6 37 5 51 3 36
. D1'l7,flth 18, 2,. . lo. liGron. 1m.


251Tu 13 6 63 45 ri 6374 8 r
















i 6 72 MOON PHA SS m: (71
263 443 5 701 641 546 7 015 6 3354 702
27 Th 13 6 18 639 4 8 6 15 6355 8 12


FEBRUARY, 1975-Above Ground-12,
13, 17, 18, 22, 23. Below Ground-l, 2,
3,4,7, 8, 28.



















I 0Th 4 54 7 59 43 6 3448755 4 14 6 471 mor
Fr W3 455 47 3 0 35 4 6 44 12 2305 5 13 6 42012 10












l6Fr 4438735 15I 644273311535016533339
37 34 0 4 7 70 4 457 57or 58 5 6 42 or145
21. Day's length 14h. 41m. 34h. 3m.. 1 h. 53m..
4 Su3 4 36 7S 1230 4 40713 2 653 12
4S Mo 0 28 4S66 58" 1 26 514 1 164


Mo 3 4 35 7 03 54 4 5559 1 01 5 011 654 1 48
6Tu 3 450704 2 18 453 700 185 1064 2 1734
1 We 34 4 370 244527 02 2 4509645 248
2aTh 4 47 7 07 3 114 7 03 31250 646 319
9Fr 431 46723 340450704 342507647 3 54
10 4 4 7 0923 4 13 487 05 41 56 6 47 431
21. Day' length 14h.54.m. 14h. 14 m. 14h. I1m.
25 Su 3 4 30 7 0 sent 4 47 7 06 sets 5 05 6 48 sets
12Mo 43 7 51 4 46 07 8 46 0464 8 24
4 We 4 4 4 40 71310 35 4 44 7 0910 30 5 03 6 50 1010
F6 Fr 4 38 7 IS 11 6 4 42 7 1 10 1 13 5 01 6 5 1 09
Sa 4 S,4 37 7 16 morn 4 41 7 12 morn 501 6 52 morn


20. Day's lenlth 14h.. h 3131. 1lh. 53.

SOSu 4 A 4 36 7 17 12 30 4 40 7 13 12 28 5 00 6 53 12 19
19 M 4 T 43S 7 18 1 01 4 39 7 14 1 01 5 00 6 54 12 56
20 Tu 4 4 34 7 19 1 33 4 38 7 1 5 1 33 4 59 6 54 1 34
21 We 4 4 33 7 2 1 2 04 4 37 7 16 2 05 58 6 55 2 12
22Th 3 4 33 7 22 2 39 4 37 23 17 2 4057 6 55 2 1
23 it 24264 2 I1 5 43 74 7 1 4II 014 56 6 57 4 21
21. Days length 14h. 4m. 14h. 44.. 14h. 2..m
25 Su t 4 30 7 24 rise 4 35 7 19 se 4 56 6 58 rise
26 Mo 3 1 429 7 25 9 01 4 34 7 20 8 564 56 6 58 834
27 Tu 3 1 428 7 26 9 47 4 33 7 21 9 42 455 6 59 9 22
28 We 3 i1 428 7 27 10 26 4 33 7 22 0 22 5 7 00 1004
29 Th 3 1 427 7 28 10 59 4 32 7 23 0 56 454 7 00 10 42
30 Fr 3 4 27 7 28 11 29 4 32 7 23 11 27 4 54 7 01 11 16


MAY, 1975-Above Ground-11, 14, 15,
16, 21, 22, 23. Below Ground-1, 5, 6,
10, 24, 27, 28, 29.


MOON PHASES

mi sten I ". c Mil 4 1 Anti I 4A




Northern States Middle States South n State
:I '. I ... I ... i.. I.. I .... I ... I a...n"
I1 1,21 16 3815 49 l0 46 36 15 50110 4216 2915 57110 27
9. Day's length Ilh 14m. Ilh. 16m.. Ilk. 30m.
2 Su 12 6 36 5 50 11 556 355 51 II 51 6285 58 II 30
3 Mo 2111 36 51 mor 633 52 morn 6 2755 mor
4 Tu 112 633 5212 566 325 53 2 51 6 265 591229
5 W 12 6 1 5 53 1 52 6 30 5 54 1 46 6 25 5 59 24
6ThI 11 630555 2416 29 5 55 2366 24600 213
7Fr I 1l 6 28 5 6 3 2316 275 56 3 186 226 01 258
8 11 6 27 5 57 3 58 6 26 5 57 3 546 21 6 02 337

9u 111o 6 255 4 296 24 5 59 4 266 9603 412
IT10 2 M 1o 3 6 23 59 4 57 6 00 4 546 186 03 4 44
11 TuI 3 16 2160 62 5 2 6 061 5 21 6 6 176 04 5 15
12 6 1 6 0 6 18 6 02 ieli 6 16 6 05 se
13 Th 10 6 186 03 7 05 6 17 6 04 7 04 6 15 6 05 7 00
14 Fr 9i 6 6 6 46 05 8026 6 754
Sa 61506 905 6 14 06 02 12 6 07 8 50
Day's lengthI 4m. I lh. 5,m. I IN. 7m.
6 5 -9 6 36 0 06 6 21 07 0026 II6 08 9
173 o 6 2 08 11 07 6 10 6 0811 6 06 09 1
18Tu 8 6096 09 morn 609 6 0II 59 6 08609 I 39
19 W 8 1 60710 12 06 6 07 6 0 morn 6 07 6 10 morn
20Th 8I 116 066 11 1 02 6 06 6 11 12 566 05 6 111234
21 Fr 97 6 16 6 1 53 6 6 2 148 6 046 11 26
522 S 7 602 64 2 3906 1361 2 6 03 6 12 16
12. Day's length 12h. 14m. 12h. 13m.. 12h. I .
23 7 01 6 1 6 1 320 6 01 6 14 3 16 602 13 01
24 Mo 6 6 59 516 6 15 3 546 006 6 13 341
25 Tu 6 557 6 37 4 31 5 57 6 16 4 305 59 614 4 24
26 W 6 5 55 6 18 5 0 56 6 17 5 03 58 6 15 5 03
27 Th 5 5 53 6 1 r .se 5 6 57 6 16 rses
28Fr 5 51 6 0 8 20 5 52 6 19 8 17 5 6 16 8 04
29 S 5 5 6 50 6 9 25 6 17 9 11
13. Day's length 12h. 3Sm. 1h. 33m. 12h. 26m.
3015 5 110 54862310 0S 496221035 15 10 14
Mo 4 5 476 24 5 47623 35 516 9 3

MARCH, 1975-Above Ground-12, 13,
16, 17, 18, 21, 22. Below Ground-1, 2,
3,6, 7, 8, 11, 28, 29,30.








S0 MOON PHASES


Sa. I I s 7 I N I I as1. I
6 .r l e e u IS i 2u i0 7 2 1 7 i 1
3. ays I nth 1 ta m. 11h. 1 4h m.
1T 1 11 1 3t 97 t0 Mt a -1201 I IMM
T S L 3.00o 4 73 9 Lllud5 of L9lltuo 03
d- 0 N F oOt.S Middl Stat h St-r
So t oar ... I... | ... T t. .... t..a ta


S 42 730 orn 4 72 orn 453702 morn




21. Day's length 15h. 1Sm. 15h. 9m. 14h. 14m.
2 Mo 2 4 2 7 2 20 4 30 7 25 1 20 4 53 7 02 3 5
STo 7 2 7 12 2 45 4 30 7 6 12 4 5 7 01 47


4 00 2 I 4 24 7 31 ses 4 29 7 3 331 4 53 7 03 Ises
5 TW 2 I 4 2 3 7 3 1 18 9 4 29 7 3 1 4B 52 7 04I 03
6 Fr I 4 24 7 34 2 1 4 2 8 2 13 4 52 7 041 27
7Sa 423 I354 2 4 29 I249 4 5127 010 7
23. Day' length ISh. 12 15h. 14h. 14m.
8 4 23 7 3 3 28 4 28 7 30 32 4 2 7 06] 3








JUNE, '33' .b7 seo7 ll1, 4 1217,
9Mo M 1 4 2376 1eltr 730 is 4 27 06,I ie
0 Tu 4 22 7 37 804 27 7 1 8 25 4 2 7 07 04
11 We 2 oo 4 22 7 37 9 17 4 27 32 9 13 4 52 7 07 8 53
2 Th B r42 22_738 9 57 4 27 732 908 19
33 Fr 0 422738 0 3 427733 10 4 514 7 08 10 19
4 Sa 4 21 739 II 05 426 3 0445 7 09 10 08
24. Dayr lengIth Sh. 1Im. ISh. 7m. 14h. I3m.
155u 0 1i 4 739 11 374267 4 I1 364 709 6
16 Mo n 4 21 7 9 o 4 26 7 34 m 2 7 09 morn
7 Tu 4 2 7 40 12 0 4 267 35 1208 712 12
8 U 4 21 7 40 12 39 4 26 7 35 12 41 52 7 12 50
19 Th 4 22 4 20 7 7 35 1 7 52i 7 30 1 31
20 Fr I 4 22 41 14 4 27 6 1 574 52 7 2 1
l 4 22 7241 7 44 7 7 36 7 2 42 S373 1104
25. DI's lenlh 15h. 19m. 3Sh. 9.. 14k 18m.
22 S 4 22 28427 736 T33 453 7 11 3 56
23 Mo 2 422 7 41 4 27 7 36 3 3 7 11 r-ei
24 T 12 4 22 7 1 3427 7 36 8 19 453 1 759
25 0 1 4 23 7 4 1 28 7 36 8 55 4 3 11 8 39
26 Th 4 23 7 42 9 30 4 28 7 37 9 274 S4 12 9 1
27 Fr 3.. 4 23 7 42 9 57 4 28 7 37 9 55 4 4712 9 46
28 S. 3 4 24 7 42 10 23 4 29 7 37 10 22 4 54 7 12 10 38
26. Day. length 5h3 I3. 38h. 7m. 146. 33.
29[Su 3 11 4 24 7 42 10 49|4 29 7 36 30 48J- 53731 48
30|Mo |4 25 7 42 II 44 430|7 36I I414| 5| 7 1 19

JUNE, 1975-Above Ground-11, 12, 17,
18, 19, 20. Below Ground-i, 2, 3, 6, 7,
24, 25, 28, 29, 30.








PLANTING BY THE STARS


We have had many requests fror
diacal signs for their planting dat
some of this information in ou
prise the information we have c
the benefit of a large number of
we are not expressing any opini
the content of these pages.

The "Twelve Signs of the Zodiac," you hear spoken of so of-
ten, are the signs of the twelve constellations which are located in
the Zodiac, an imaginary line drawn through the sky of a width
to indicate these groups of stars which determine man's character
at his birth and influence him all through life.
The part of our body governed by a particular constellation
is supposed to be more sensitive when the moon is in that constel-
lation. People with heart trouble will have the most difficulty
when the moon is in the sign Leo; and lovers are more successful
at this time. Tubercular patients are in greatest danger in the sign
Cancer, etc. You can easily follow out the idea for yourself with
the rest of the constellations.
Each constellation, besides controlling certain parts of the
body, has wet or dry tendencies, and barren or productive and
masculine or feminine characteristics, as follows:
LIBRA Airy, Moist, Semi-Fruitful, Masculine.
SCORPIO Watery, Fruitful, Feminine.
SAGITTARIUS Fiery, Dry, Barren, Masculine.
CAPRICORN Earthy, Moist, Somewhat Productive, Feminine.

Then-. Tc hihe
S Twelve Signs of the Zediec ?bo
o~f -, vt. -





W, 0
.- c. "-
W K-

'U .B "Pl a* *i- F1hi hi





AQUARIUS Airy, Dry, Barren, Masculine.
PISCES Watery, Fruitful, Feminine.




ARIES Fiery, Dry and Barren, Masculine.
TAURUS Earthy, Moist and Productive, Feminine.
GEMINI Airy, Dry, Barren, Masculine.
CANCER Watery, Very Fruitful, Feminine.

LEO Fiery, Barren and Dry, Masculine.
VIRGO Earthy, Dry or Barren, Feminine.
For example, you wish to know when it is advisable to paint
your houseor automobile, run down the column headed "Moon's
Signs" until you come to the sign for Aries or Leo. They are both
dry signs and your work will dry quicker than in moist or watery
signs, such as Cancer, Scorpio or Pisces.
If a person is ailing in some part of the body, say the throat,
when the moon comes around to the sign which rules this organ,
it will be very much more sensitive; and an operation performed
on the throat in this sign (Taurus) will probably be unsuccessful.
Astrologers state you can tell what the sex of child will be
by finding out whether the moon will be in a masculine or femi-
nine sign at its birth.
Thus if a child is to be born under the sign of Libra, it will
very likely be a boy; i under Scorpio, Capricn or Pisces, it will
most likely be a girl.
To wean a childwith greatest ease and success, do so when the
moon is in the signs of the Zodiac which do not rule the vital or-
gans of the body, such as Capricorn, Pisces or Sagittarius.


n our customers who use the Zo-
es and other activities to include
catalog. These two pages com-
ompiled. We are printing this for
our customers, but by printing it
on as to the validity or value of


Eggs should always be set so the time for them to hatch will
be in a fruitful sign, such as Cancer. Chicks will mature more
rapidly and be better layers if hatched under these conditions.
Chicks require 21 days to hatch; Ducks and Turkeys 28 and
Geese 30 days, so allow accordingly.
Game chickens will be more courageous and successful
fighters if hatched when the moon is in the sign of Leo, the lion.
When the moon is in the barren signs Gemini, Leo or Virgo,
you can destroy noxious growth, deaden trees, pull weeds, and
turn sod best-especially if the moon is in the last quarter.
Plantingis best done in the signs of Scorpio, Pisces, Taurus, or
Cancer-all fruitful signs. In addition, astrologers aver it is best to
plant all things which yield above ground in the increase of the
moon; and all things which yield below ground, when the moon
is decreasing.
Never plant anything in the barren signs, as they are only
good for grubbing, trimming, deadening and destroying noxious
growths.
For grafting, cut your grafts from good bearing trees at any
time while the trees are dormant, from December to March. Keep
them cool in a dark place, although not too dry or too damp,
until time to use them. Do the grafting just before the sap starts
to flow, while the moon is from new to full (first and second quar-
ters), and while it is passing through the fruitful watery signs of
Cancer, Scorpio, Pisces or the earthy, productive sign, Capricorn.
Planting or grafting done on Sunday will probably not suc-
ceed, as this day is ruled by the sun, and therefore considered a
dry and barren day.
As the Zodiacal sign, Libra, represents beauty in form and
color, being also an airy sign, it is considered the best for flowers.
The seeds should be planted in the first quarter of the moon un-
less seeds from the plant are desired, in which case use the
period between the second quarter and full moon.
REAPING AND HARVESTING
Pick apples and pears in old of the moon and the bruised
spots will dry up, where if they are picked in the new moon the
spots will rot.
Harvest all crops when the moon is growing old--they keep
better and longer.
Dig root crops for seed in the third quarter of the moon.
They will keep longer and are usually drier and better.
Grain intended for future use or seed should be harvested at
the increase of the moon.
Timber cut in the old of the moon will not become worm
eaten nor snap in burning; and fence posts set in the old of the
moon will not "heave" out.
Fruits and vegetables gathered just before Full Moon in the
second quarter will usually stand shipment very much better
than others.
The names of the week days are another expression of the
astrological teachings of the ancients. Centuries of observation
had convinced them that each day of the week is ruled over by a
certain planet, and so they named the day in honor of its ruling
planet. It is not so apparent what the names mean in our lan-
guage, which comes from the Anglo-Saxon tongue, as it is in the
French language, which comes from Latin, the same language in
which the planets are named. Thus Monday is the moon's day.
Tuesday, or Mardi, as it is called in French, is Mars' day. Wednes-
day, or Mercedi, as it is called in French, is Mercury's day.
Thursday, or Jeudi, as it is in French, is Jupiter's day. Friday,
of Vendredi, as the French call it, is Venus' day. Saturday is
Saturn's day; and Sunday is the Sun's day.
Thus, is you wish to do anything which requires the sun's aid
alone, such as destroying germs in bedding from a sick room,
Sunday is the day to put it out to sun.
Friday, being Venus' day, is the best day for proposals of
marriage. Tuesday, being presided over by Mars, is the best day
for any new undertaking.









FARMING UNDER THE MOON


A simple but practical demonstration of planetary influence is
to plant some seed when the moon is in a fruitful sign such as
Cancer, which is in the most fruitful of all the Zodiac, and then
a day or two afterwards when the moon is in the barren sign
Leo, plant some more of the same lot of seed.
The results will clearly show the wisdom and advantage of
working in harmony with Nature--putting your work in time
with her vibrations, so to speak, because of the difference in
the yield from the two plantings.
Moon is increasing during first and second quarters and is
decreasing during third and fourth quarters.
* * * * * * * * *


FIRST QUARTER
During the first quarter of the moon plant the following: As-
paragus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Barley, Cabbage, Cauliflower,
Celery, Cucumbers, Corn, Cress, Endive, Kohl Rabi, Lettuce,
Leek, Oats, Parsley, Onions, Spinach and seeds of flowering
plants.
Avoid the first day of New Moon for planting, also the days
on which it changes quarters.
SECOND QUARTER
During the second quarter of the moon plant: Beans, Egg
Plant, Muskmelon, Peas, Pepper, Pumpkin, Squash, Tomatoes,
Watermelon.
When possible plant seed when the moon is in the fruitful
signs of Cancer, Scorpio or Pisces. The next best signs are
Taurus and Capricorn.
THIRD QUARTER
During the third quarter of the moon plant the following:
Artichoke, Beets, Carrots, Chicory, Parsnips, Potatoes, Radish,
Rutabaga, Turnip and all bulbous flowering plants.
FOURTH QUARTER
During the fourth or last quarter of the moon turn sod, pull
weeds and destroy noxious growths, especially when moon is in
the barren signs, Gemini, Leo or Virgo.

* * * *** * ** **

To quit any habit successfully, you must begin to leave off on
the second day that the moon is in the sign of Sagittarius (the
archer).
If you cut your hair or trim your beard in the sign of Libra,
Sagittarius, Aquarius or Pisces, it will grow thicker, stronger and
more beautiful, astrologers have found.
It has always been considered good to purge with pills when
the moon is in the sign of Pisces and with liquids when it is in the
sign of Virgo or Sagittarius.
The sign the moon is in at a child's birth, astrologers say,
determines its character and fortune in life.
It is said to be lucky for a male child to be born under a mas-
culine sign, but it is considered unlucky for a female child to be
born under any other than a feminine sign.
Love affairs of those born under the sign of Aries, the ram,
will be sudden, full of fancies and of short duration. They will be
quick to anger but just as quick to repent and will not hold
grudges.
Those born under the sign of Taurus will be fond of choice
food, high tempered and inclined to be domineering and persis-
tent, and determined to reach their goal at any cost.
Those born under the sign of Gemini will be fond of mathe-
matics and science or acting and oratory. They will have some
talent for commerce, will have a saving disposition, and be
moderate in all things.


Children born under the sign of Cancer will have keen and
searching minds, will be heroic and pure in morals, even to the
point of austerity, and be quick and clever in business matters.
Children born under the sign of Leo, according to Ptolemy of
Pelusa, surnamed King of Astrologers, will reach positions of hon-
or and trust. They will have a lofty mind, a spirit of fair play,
dignity and firm will. They will be steadfast, brilliant but egotist-
ical and presumptuous, but never lacking in gratitude.
Those born in the period when Virgo exerts its influence will
reach honors through personal merit. They will have a cool dis-
psoition, be merciful, honest and straightforward.
To be born under the sign of Libra is to be endowed with a
love of study, of working with tools, and of music. They will
make a fortune late in life, thanks to some industry connected
with navigation, or water power. Girls born under this sign will
be the most beautiful and attractive.
Those born under the sign of Scorpio will be religious, have a
firm hold on themselves, but be inclined to be dreamy and misan-
thropic. They will be slow to anger and inclined to hold grudges.
The sign of Sagittarius endows those born under it with
simplicity, independence and love of harmony. They will be
timid, misunderstood, skillful with their hands and gifted
with eloquence.
Those born under Capricorn will be rough, self-made people,
builders of their own fortunes, but generally prosperous.
People born under Aquarius are usually geniuses in art, litera-
ture or music, and make splendid politicians, orators and lawyers.
Those born under the sign of Pisces will have very much the
same attributes as those born under Aquarius, but they will not
succeed so quickly.

* *** ************

The
Twelve Signs of the Zodiac
The Ra. ...da F,.


Ge a
Th.A- A


LibrT

lTe Loriu

r4l*


liun

Co.ncr
Th.ea. 6,


Ssospio

Capricomue
I. K -I


Plsce. The Fe.

ZODIAC SIGNS AND THEIR PERIODS
Aquarius-Waterman-Legs-January 20 to February 19.
Pisces-Fish-Feet-February 19 to March 21.
Aries-Ram-Head-March 21 to April 20.
Taurus-Bull-Neck-April 20 to May 21.
Gemini-Twins-Arms-May 21 to June 21.
Cancer-Crab-Breast-June 21 to July 22.
Leo-Lion-Heart-July 22 to August 23.
Virgo-Virgin-Bowels-August 23 to September 23.
Libra-Scales-Reins-September 23 to October 23.
Scorpio-Scorpion-Loins-October 23 to November 22.
Sagittarius-Bowman-Thighs-November 22 to December 22.
Capricorn-Goat-Knees-December 22 to January 20.


.4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4


(K








ALMANAC FOR 1975


July
LO MOON PHASES
usrem cnrat mouaram mrIcII
La I M I CIIT L I 'I Ia nK I

I 1 l ut Iti0 l n.n f l





S 4 4 257 412 II 4 3 7 36 II 1 4 557 12 II 50
2 4 26742 o4 3l 736 orn 4567 12 orn
3T 4 426 741 12 094 31 1736 2 11 4 7 2 24
4Fr 4 4 27 741 12 43 432736 12 464567 II 102
5 (o 4[ 2 1 741 114 33736 1 24 4577 11 44
27. Day' length 15h. i3m. I5h. 2m. 14h. 14m.
6 5 S U 42 741 207433735 211 577 1 233
7 Mo 4 29 7 41 3 004 347 35 3054587 3 27
IT 5 4 2 7 40 sets 4 35 7 35 4 set 4 58 7 11 ,ti
9 5 430 7 40 753 4 35 7 34 7 49 4 59 7 10 734
10Th 51;430740 832436734 829459710 816
IIFr 51431739 907437733 905500710 857
12 S. 6 i 4 32 7 38 9 39 4 37 7 33 9 39 5 00 7 10 9 36
28. Day's length 151. Sm. 14h. S4m. 14h. 9m.
13 Su6 1 4 33 7 38 4 7 32 0 20 7 0 10 14
14 Mo 6 4 34 7 37 1043 4 39 7 32 10 44 5 02 7 09 10 52
15 Tu 6 435737 II 17440731 195027 09 1132
16 We 6 111 4 35 7 36 II 54 4 40 7 31 11 58 5 03 7 09 morn
17 Th 6 i 4 36 7 35 morn 4 41 7 30 morn S 03 7 08 12 14
18Fr 6 4 37735 12 364 427 30 12 405.04708 00
S67438734 124443 729 128504707 150
29. Day's length 14h. 54m. 14h. 4Sm. 14h. Irn.
0 Su 6 1 4 39 7 33 2 16 4 43 7 2 21 5 05 7 06 2 44
21 Mo 6 440733 14444728 318506706 3 40
22 T 6 4 41 7 32 413 4 457 27 4 17 5 06 7 05 437
23We 6 4 42 7 31 ses 4 46 7 26 rises 507 7 05 roses
24Th 6 443730 801447725 75807704 748
r 6 4 44729 8264 48 724 255 07 04 8 19
26 6 4 45 7 28 851 4 497 24 8 51 5 09703 8 49
30. Day's length 14h. 43m. 14h. 34m. 13h. 5Sm.
27 St 61 14 45 7 27 9 1714 49 7 23 17 50 7 03 9 19
o 6 4 46 7 26 9 43 50722 9 44 11 7 02 9 1
29 T 6 14 47 7 250 10104517 21 10 115 117 01 1023
31 Th 6 4 50 7 23 II 16 53 7 19 II 20 5 13 700 11 38

JULY, 1975-Above Ground-8, 9, 14, 15,
16, 17, 18, 21. Below Ground-3, 4, 5,
22, 26, 27, 31.







October

o.-- .nm u. n ML m U#.T mi.ar ^
MOON PHASES
float... I ItI a oL I t IIo II00
a1s1 11 11 M 1as 9%
FL 11i I t i i 11 IA It I .II A If 1 I
LL M 1 n In II a II 1 nA II 2 N


S t Latitudo of Latitul of Lattlld of
iNorthern stO M)idj astits outherm stltM
2 hIof If ant. lf 0. Mth. 31.0.


1 We 1 5 5615 44 I 37 5 55 5 441 3915 53 5 47 1 52
2 Th III 5 57 5 42 2 50 5 56 5 43 2 525 54 5 45 300
3Fr I 5 58540 4055 57 54 40 065 55 5 44 408
4Sa l 5 59 5 38 .es 5 585 39 selt 5 55 5 43 .es
40. Day's length I 1.. 37 I I m. 38. 1 5. 4i..
S 121600 37 546 59 37 548 5 56541 558
6 Mo 12 6 02 5 3 126 6 1 5 35 6295 57 5 40 6 44
7 Tu 12 111 6 03 5 34 7 6 02 5 34 7 155 5575 39 7 34
8We 12 6 04532 8026 03 5 32 8 065 585 37 8 27
9Th 13 6 0 6 04 5 30 9 00 5 585 36 9 22
0 Fr 13I; 1 066 5 28 9 54 6 05 5 29 9 585 59 5 35 1020
S5 11lS6 07526 105406 5 27 10 57 6 00 33 II 17
41. Day's length 1Ih. 17m. 19m. I m. 1m.
S 3 ,3 6 00 S 25 II 5516 07 5 26 5 6 01 5 32 morn
3 o114 6 5 23 morn 06 5 24 mor 6 015 31 12 13
4 Tu 14 1. 2 6 II5 52 12 546095 1 2 6 025 301 09
15 We 14 H 6 12 5 20 52 10 5 21 1 546 03 5 29 2 02
16Th 14 6 135 .2 516 11 520 2 51 604 5 27 2 55
S61515 4 47 13 517 4 46 6 05 525 441
42. Day's length 10h. 57m. Ih. Im. I I. 18m.
Su 6 16 513 5 456 14 5 1 5 436 065 24 5 35
20 o 6 18 5 12 riss 6 15 14 rse 6 07 5 23 rise
21Tu 65 6 510 56617 5 2 59 6 075 21 6 17
221e 5 61 6 5 6 36618 5 39 6 20 59
23Th 16 I 6 22 08 7 22 6 19 5 0 7 2 6 09 5 19! 7 47
24Fr161 6 23 5 06 146 20 5 008 186 0 5 18 8 40
5 16 16 24 5 04 9 12 6 225 9 16 II 5 17 9 36
43. Day's length 10h. 3.m. 0Ih. 42m. I 4Im.
26 S 6 25 5 013 10 151623 5 05 10 18 6 12 5 16 10 37
27 o 6 6 265 01 II 6 2245 03 II 25 6 1215 II 40
28 T 6 6 28 500 morn 625 502 morn 6 13 5 14 morn
29 6 29 12 2 6 265 0 12 4 6 145 1 12 44
10 T 6 30 4 58 1 436 28 5 00 1 43 6 IS15 5 12 1 49
1 Fr 6 324 56 2 566 29 4 58 25 6 16S 11 2 55

OCTOBER, 1975-Above Ground-4, 5, 6.
7, 11, 12, 15, 17. Below Ground-21, 22,
25, 26, 27.


August
ML OON PHtASES (

SI l I::l : I :::M ::::t 0 0
S.L I MA 1 I Mo a t sO t I A K
A. In I.. ..n 1. 1. I :A
aL sI 1 l . nl ... IZI 11 .n1

SLtitou of Leatitd of Latitude t
S. Northern li.-. Middle. OIo Southern Sta
I HM ". I I B `11
S. J o a ,ll rM M r0 m o II f riM MO l 0I
Fr 0 517 2211 58. 4 5417 18 mornS 31 59 morn
2S 6u 4 52 7 21 morn 4 557 17 12 04 5 146 58 12 23
31. Day's gth 141. 27m. 14h. 20m. 13h. 43m.
1 6 4 53 7 20 11 46 4 56 7 I 11 S 44 4 57 1 3
4 Mo 6 4 54718 1 43 4 57 7 I 485 156 56 2 10
5 u 6 4 5517 7 248458713 252516655 313
6W 6 n4567 IS 358 S00711 4015 166 54 4 19
7 Th 6 4 57 7 14 sel 5 01 7 10 .ets 5 17 6 53 .ets
8Fr 6 458713 738 5027 09 7375186 53 732
SSI 5 459712 8 115037 08 8 11519 652 811
32. Day's klngh 14h. IIm. 14h. 3m. I h. 32m.
10Su 11 5 00711 844 504 707 8 45 196 51 851
lI Mo 5 -S501707 9 99 19 5 04 7 05 9 205 20 6 50 9 32
12Tu 5 5 02 7 0 956 505 7 04 9 59 21 6 49 10 13
13 W 5 n 5 03 7 06 10 37 5 06 7 010 4 5 21 6 48 10 59
14Th 5 n) 5 04 7 05 II 23 5 07 7 02 11 27 5 22 6 47 11 49
15 Fr 4 5 05 7 03 morn 5 0817 00 morn 5 22 6 46 morn
6 4 15 06 7 0212 14 S5 0916 5912 18 5 23 6 45 12 41
33. Dayr's lgth I 13. 54m. 136.4. 135. 2I0.
7 Su 4 501 07 01 1 08 5 10 6 58 1 115 24 6 44 I 35
18 Mo 4 11 509659 2 07 5 116 562 1 5 25643 2 32
19Tu 41 5 106 58 3075 126 55 3015 256 42 3 28
20 3 516 64 075 11653 4 105 26641 424
21 Th 3 s 5 12 6 54 r-ies 5 14 6 52 nose 5 27 6 39 rie.
22 Fr 3 5 13 6 53 6 56 5 15506 6 5 27 6 38 6 52
23S1 j3 H 14 6 51 7225 166 49 7 2215 286 37 7 22
4. Day'* length 13h. 35. 13h. 3m. i31I. 7m.
24 5 156 50 7485176477 48 529636 6 753
2 Mo 2 16648 8145 181646 81652916 5 825
26 2 5 7647 8445196 44 846530634 859
27 We 2 5 186 45 9 17 5 206 42 9 20 5 31 6 32 936
28 Th I o52 4 25 6 2 43 9 54 5 2231 6 31 10 17
29 I 5 21 6 42 10 38 5 23 6 39 10 42 5 32 6 30 11 04
0 Sa I 5 21 6 40 1 30 5 23 6 3711 35 5 32 6 29 11 57
I. Day' lenh 13lh 31%.In. 13h. 12m. 12h. S5m.
3 Iu s10 n 22 6 38 morn 5 24]6 36 morn 5 3316 281 morn

AUGUST, 1975-Above Ground-11, 12
13, 14, 17, 18, 19. Below Ground-1, 4:
5,6, 22, 23, 24, 27, 28.







t)ovmber /
MOON PHASES l


1 so l 1 "1 "I I s1 .1 "I'1




S S Northern S Midtdle stat Southern Slate
a I it. It t EM IIt Ioo .o aI=
.. ..5 .- |I80 Sot.... I..0 I -... I 0,6I.., I 80...
S S, I rl *l. r00 r*0 .0I nM (I.
1 S 1161 =6 3314 55 4 1116 3014 57 4 10 617 10 405
44. Day's length 1h.. 19m. 10h. 25m. I1tl. 52m.
25u16 e 6 3414 53 5 27 6 314 56 25617509 5 14
3 o 161 6 35 4 52 sell 6 32 4 55 1..l 6 18 5 08 It
4 Tu 16 ni 6 36 4 5 5 47 6 334 54 5 5 6 19 5 08 6 12
5 W1 I 6 37 4 49 6 42 6 34 4 52 6 46 6 20 5 07 7 0
6Th 6 639 4481 7 396 36451 7446 21506 805
7Fr I1 1 6 4 47 8 40 6 374 50 8 44 6 22 5 05 904
8 161142 446 9426 38449 9 466 23 5 041002
45. DIy's length 101. 2m. 10h. 9m. 18h. 41m.
Su 16 6 43 44510 44 6 39 4 4810 46 6 23 04II00
SM 16 6 44444 1 446 404 47II 466 24 5 03 11 56
II Tu 16 6 454 43 morn 641 46 morn 6 25 5 02 orn
2 6 6 1 4 4 12 6 42 6 4 45 12 42 6 265 01 12 4
3 Th 16 H6 48 4 40 1 39 6 444 44 1 40 6 27 5 00 1 42
4 Fr 166 49 4 0 2 38 6 454 43 2 37 6 28 5 00 2 34
155a I5 I 6 50 4 39 3 36 6 46 4 42 3 34 6 29 4 59 3 27
46. Day's length 9h. 4. 9h. 53m. 1Ih. 39m.


S 6 52 8 4 36 6 484 41 4 33 6 304 59 4 2
5 6 53437 5 35649440 5366 31459 5 17
5 4 654 36 n 6 50 4 39 rses 6 32 4 58 Pse
516 55435 18651439 522 633458 5 44
14 6 57435 6 09 6 534 38 6 13 6 33 457 6 35
1 6 58 4 7 06 6 54 37 7 10 6 3 4 4 57 7 32
14 6 594 33 8 09 6 55 4 37 8 12 6 354 57 8 31


47. Day'. length 9lm.3 m. 40m. 1Ih. 20m.
23 5u 14 7 00 4 32 9 14 6 56 4 36 9 17 6 36 4 56 932
24 Mo 3 7 01 4 32 1021 6 57 4 36 10 23 6 37 4 56 1035
25Tu 13 I 7 02 4 3111 31 6 58 4 35 11 32 6 38 4 56 11 31
26 W 13 5 7 04 4 31 .n 6 594 35 m n 6 39 4 55 morn
27Th 2 7 05 4 30 12 41 7 00 4 3412 42 6 40 4 5512 43
28 Fr 2 7 4 30 1 52 7 01 4 34 1 51 6 40 4 55 1 48
29 S 12 7 07 4 29 3 05 7 03 4 33 3 03 6 41 455 2 55
48. Day's lengh 9h. 20nm.. 9. 29m. 10h. 12m.
30|Su |11| I 7 09|4 29| 4 187 0414 33| 4 15 6 4214 54| 4 02

NOVEMBER, 1975-Above Ground-3, 4,
7, 8, 12, 13, 17. Below Ground-1, 2, 18,
22, 23, 28, 29, 30.


6 Su
7 Mo
8 Tu
9 W
10 Th
122


September
MOON PHASES (0
sasMX m *cavt us *O.r' fitr
1^ --, ^I ,,,,,,M. .1: 1 -m of
SI. iN I I N 4 en I I
L.L II I;eu sole : ,4 111 m

i i l Latto of L ul1,de of LItitudeof
SS North titie MO ln Itl M Souithn StilM .
I Jg
a rn I in ilf io.f oifI In Ilf i
o0 r S SJ a* N, 1*1* .B u ,,.M
1 0 o 5 23 6 36 12 29 5 25 6 34 1226 5 34 6 2 12 55
2Tu 0 o 5 256 35 1 3 26 6 33 39 5 14 6 25 1 58
3W I ;1 5 26 6 33 2 47 5 27 6 31 2 50 5 35 6 24 305
4 T 5 276 31 4 01 5 28 6 29 403 36 6 22 4 14
2Fr I 5 28630 .... 5 29 6 2'8 "I 5 366 21 to
65a 296 5 8 6 2 405 306 6 6 5 37 6 20 6 44
36. Oay's length 12h. 56m. 12h. 54m. 12h. 40m.
7 Su 21 5 30 6 26 7 165 31 6 25 7 185 386 I8 7 26
8Mo 21- 5 316 24 753 5 326 23 755 5 386 17 809
9 T. 3 1 5 32 6 22 8 34 5 33 6 21 8 38 5 39 6 8 55
0 We 311 533621 9205 34 6 20 724540615 944
IITh 3 1 5346 19 10 10 356 1810 15 541 6 13'O 37
12 Fr 4 661 5 6 17 II 541 6 121 31
L3 S1 I m4 V 5 376 16 morn 5 3716 15 morn 5 4216 10pmorn
37. Day's length 12h. 3 12h. 3Sm. 12h. 27m.
l4 S 411l ] 1 412 3 86 1 209 42 609 1228
SM 5 S39 6 2 1 02 6 05 43 608 124
6Tu 5. S 406 10 2015 406 09 204 43 606 2 19
17W 5 41 6 3 01 5 4 07 3 035 44 3 14
8Th 6 4542607 359 5 43 606 4 45604 407
19 r 6. 5436 05 4 57 4 4585 45 6 03 500
I20 S 7 X 5 44 6 03 ri, 5 44 6 I 0 ei 546 6 01 rol
S Dary's length 12h. 17m. 1h. 16m. 12h. 13m.
2ISu 7' 5 45 6 02 6 18 5 45 6 01 6 20 5 46 5 59 6 27
22 Mo7 15 465 59 6 46 5 465 58 6 48 5 47 558 700
231 T 8' 5 475 57 7185475 56 721 5 48557 736
24 W 8 5 5 7 48 5 48 5 54 7 58 5 49 5 56 8 16
25Th 8 5 49553 8 36 495 52 8 40 5 495 54 9 00
26Fr 91 1 5 50 5 52 9 24 S 0 5 51 9 29 5 50 5 53 9 50
27 9 l 5 52 5 50 0 19 5 51 5 49 10 23 5 50 5 52 10 45
39, Doy's Elalh 11.85. bm. 11h. 56m. 1 I. 59m.
11601 9 ,o 5 4II 19 25 23 5550 144
3 Tu 10Is 5 5 44 12 26 5 54 5 45 1230552 5481247

SEPTEMBER, 1975-Above Ground-7, 8
9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 18, 19. Below Ground
1, 2,20, 23, 24, 25, 28, 29.







SDecember
MOON PHASES (.



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t 7 12 428 21 7 074 32 5266 45 4 54 5 8
Th 10 7 13 4 27 6227 08 4 32 6 26 6 464 54 6 47
Fr 9 7 14 4 27 7 24 7 09 4 32 7 28 6 47 44 54 7 47
S 7 I 4 27 8287 10 4 32 8 316 48 4 54 8 46
49. Day's length 9. IIm. 9h. I1m. 10h. 6m.
5u 9 7 4 27 9 6 7 307114 2 326 44 54 943
8 Mo 8 9 7 17 27 10307 1I 4 2 1031 649454 1038
9Tu H 18 42711 28712432 129650 454 11 32
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11 Th 7 71 42712267 1443212266514 551225
12 Fr 6 7 2 4 27 I 2 7 5 4 32 I 22 6 52 4 55 I 18
13 S 6 7 21 4 27 2 24 7 6 42 2 20 6 52 4 5 2 1
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IS Mo 5 b 7 23 4 28 4 22 7 17 4 33 4 18 6 54 4 56 4 02
17 1 72 4 28 619 94 6146554 6 553
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9 Fr 3 7 26 429 5587 20 434 601 6 5 57 622
2 S 2 47 2 29 7 204 7 6 5 58 724

21u 7 30 8 13 2 435 15 657 58 29
22 Mo 117 27 4 30 9 21 2 4 359 24 6 58 4 58 33
23 Tu I 01 7 28 4 31 10 31 7 22 4 36 10 32 6 58 4 59 10 36
24 01 7 28 4 31 11 43 722 4 i36 11 4112 6 59 4 59 11 40
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DECEMBER, 1975-Above Ground-4, 5
6, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16. Below Ground-
1, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29.







BIG MAX (120 days) Flesh suitable for pies. Makes huge Jack
O'Lanterns for Halloween. Up to 70 inches in diameter, weighs
an average of 100 lbs.
Pkt. .65; oz. $1.55; lb. $3.40; 1 lb. $12.35
CONNECTICUT FIELD (LARGE YELLOW) (118 days) Pro-
lific and vigorous, usually planted in cornfields. Extensively
grown for making pies, for canning and for stock feed. Fruits
are large round to slightly flattened, with a hard, smooth sur-
face, slightly ribbed, deep yellow or orange color. Fruits
measure 12 to 14 inches and weigh 15 to 20 pounds.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.05; % lb. $2.30; 1 lb. $7.85

SUGAR OR NEW ENGLAND PIE (110 days) The best variety
for general use, and particularly desirable for pies. Fruits are
round, flattened at ends. Skin is hard, smooth, somewhat ribbed,
of deep orange color. Flesh is thick, sweet and dry, of bright
orange color, and very high quality. Makes delicious pumpkin
pies. Fruits measure eight to ten inches and weigh six to eight
pounds.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.05; Ilb. $2.30; 1 lb. $7.85


RADISH
Plant 10 to 15 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden make four plantings at different times.
1 packet to 25 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. Plant in rows 12 to 18 inches apart and thin to 1 to 2
inches in the row. Successive plantings should be made every
few weeks for a continuous supply. Our radish seed stocks are
produced each year from carefully selected transplanted roots.
EARLY SCARLET GLOBE SHORT TOP (24 days) Excellent
for home and market. Roots are globe shaped with bright
scarlet exterior and white, mild, crisp interior.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; /4 lb. $1.25; 1 lb. $3.75
RED PRINCE (21 days) A Fusarium Wilt resistant variety de-
veloped by the University of Wisconsin. Of Short Top Scarlet
Globe type with short tops and round, bright red roots. Intended
primarily for muck soils, but adapted to other areas. Best
suited for early fall and late spring plantings.
Pkt. .40; oz. .70; % lb. $1.55; 1 lb. $4.95
SPARKLER (25 days) The round to round-oval roots have deep
scarlet skin on upper part with 1/3 of lower portion clear white.
The pure white flesh is crisp and juicy.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; % lb. $1.25; 1 lb. $3.75
ICICLE SHORT TOP (23 days) The straight roots are from 5
to 6 inches long, cylindrical, and very smooth and waxy white
throughout.
Pkt. .40; oz. .65; lb. $1.45; 1 lb. $4.45


RUTABAGA
Plant 1 pound per acre.
In the garden plant one packet to 100 feet of row.
Culture. Rutabaga is best grown as a late fall and winter crop.
Planted in rows 2 feet apart, and the plants thinned to about 5
to 6 inches in the row.
AMERICAN PURPLE TOP (90 days) The smooth roots attain a
much larger size than turnips, slightly oblong, pale yellow with
purple top, and with a very small neck. Flesh is yellow, solid,
tender.
Pkt. .40; oz. .65; % lb. $1.45; 1 lb. $4.55


SPINACH
Plant 12 to 15 pounds per acre in rows, or 20 to 25 pounds per
acre broadcast.
In the garden make two plantings at different times.
Plant one packet to 50 feet of row at each planting.
Culture. Successful for fall and winter planting. Does not grow
well in hot weather. Requires a moist rich soil. Plant seed in
rows 16 to 20 inches apart, and thin to 6 inches apart in the
row.
EARLY NO. 7 (37 days) Fast growing and heavy yielding,
intended primarily for fall and winter harvest in the South and
West. Bolts rapidly, and therefore not well suited for late spring
and summer use. Plants large, vigorous, somewhat spreading,
resistant to Blue Mold (Downy Mildew) and to blight (Cucumber
Mosaic). Leaves large, somewhat savoyed, medium dark green.
Pkt. .40; oz. .50; lb. $1.10; 1 lb. $3.05


NEW ZEALAND (60 days) Not a true spinach but has a flavor
very similar to, but milder than common spinach. It is a heat-
resistant, warm weather plant that is susceptible to frost, so it is
planted from early spring throughout the summer. It reaches a
height of 1-2 feet and is much branched, spreading to 2-3 feet
across. When the plant has reached a spread of a foot or so, the
end 2 or 3 inches of the branches (tender shoots, tips and
leaves) may be harvested. New growth will arise along these cut
branches and these new ends may in turn be harvested. Commer-
cially, whole plants are usually cut above ground when small
and new growth from the cut stem produces a later crop. The
seeds are large and germinate slowly, so they should be soaked
24 hours before planting.
Pkt. .45; oz. .70; lb. $1.65; 1 lb. $5.10


SQUASH
Culture. This is one of the quickest and easiest crops that can
be grown, and usually proves very profitable. The earliest
varieties begin bearing in six or seven weeks from seed Squash
can be grown on almost any kind of soil. Should be well
fertilized
For bush varieties, drill seed in rows at least 3 to 4 feet apart,
thinning to 1 foot when 3 inches high. Bush squash in Florida is
a good paying crop for fall or spring. Plant for spring, during
January, February and March; for fall, from August until
October.
The number of days after each variety represents the average
time required from seed planting to edible or marketable fruits.

BUSH VARIETIES
Plant 2 to 3 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden one packet to 50 feet.
COCOZELLE (65 days) This long, open bush type is popular
for home, market and shipping. The fruit is cylindrical, dark
green with light stripes and approximately 6-8 inches in length.
Pkt. .55; oz. .85; /lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $6.05
EARLY PROLIFIC STRAIGHTNECK (50 days) This variety is
ten days earlier and more productive than other strains of
Straightneck Squash. The plants are vigorous, and the fruits are
of brighter lemon-yellow color. Because of its uniformity,
earliness, high yield and attractive appearance this variety has
grown greatly in popularity, especially in northern markets.
Pkt. .55; oz. .85; /4lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $6.15


YELLOW SUMMER CROOKNECK
Left: Crookneck Right: E. P. Straightneck
YELLOW SUMMER CROOKNECK, IMPROVED (55 days) A
very early and prolific, light lemon-yellow color strain with an
open type of plant growth. Fruits are small with curved neck,
and uniform. Its rich, bright, lemon-yellow color gives it a good
market appearance, and it is in demand on all southern markets.
No better strain of this most popular variety can be secured
anywhere for Florida planting.
Pkt. .55; oz. .85; lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $6.15







GOLDEN REBEL (55 days) A new outstanding hybrid of the
Yellow Summer Crookneck type. The plants are medium sized
with vigorous medium-green foliage. They produce high yields
of full crookneck fruit that is slightly warty and deep cream
yellow in color. Golden Rebel has shown field tolerance to
Mosaic and it has been enthusiastically received by growers in
the South.
Pkt. .80; oz. $2.50; '/ lb. $5.50; 1 lb. $20.75
EARLY WHITE BUSH SCALLOP (60 days) This is a popular
type of squash for shipment to northern markets. The smooth
fruits are of pale green color when very young, becoming white
as they mature, are round and deep, with ridged or scalloped
edges, measuring up to five or six inches across by three inches
thick when ready to market.
Pkt. .55: oz. .85; /4 lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $6.15
HYRIFIC (56 days) An early, productive semi-crook hybrid
with high quality, attractive, uniform fruit. The fruit is bright,
creamy yellow, about 5-6 inches, with a long, smooth, slightly
curved neck.
Pkt. .80; oz. $2.40; / lb. $5.35; 1 lb. $20.15
ZUCCHINI, DARK GREEN (60 days) This plant produces a
rich, dark green, smooth cylindrical fruit about 6 to 8 inches
long. It is vigorous and prolific.
Pkt. .55; oz. .85; '4 lb. $1.90; 1 lb. $6.25
ZUCCO (55 days) This hybrid zucchini-type squash has con-
sistently outyielded open pollinated varieties. Its hybrid vigor
keeps plants bearing under adverse weather conditions. The
fruit is glossy, dark green with lighter green flecking and is
nearly cylindrical with blunt ends, 6-7 inches long.
Pkt. .80; oz. $2.40; lb. $5.35; 1 lb. $20.15

RUNNING VARIETIES
In the garden one packet to 50 feet.
Plant two pounds per acre of running varieties.
Culture. Cultural requirements are similar to bush squash,
but running varieties require much more room, planting in
rows 6 to 8 feet apart and hills 3 to 4 feet apart. Plant 3 to 5
seeds in each hill and thin to two plants, when three inches high.
In these types of squash the vines run 10 to 24 feet. The
fruits are left on the vines until fully grown with a hard rind,
and are then harvested by cutting the stem. Running squash may
be stored in a cool, dry place until desired for use, but must be
handled carefully to avoid bruising.
WALTHAM BUTTERNUT (90 days) Vines produce pear-shaped
yellowish brown or deep buff-colored fruits. Fruits weigh 21/2
to 4 lbs., 8 to 10 inches long, and 3 to 4 inches in diameter at
blossom end. The outer shell is smooth and hard, making this
squash a wonderful shipper and keeper. The dry flesh is yellow,
fine-textured, sweet and of excellent flavor. Also excellent for
making pies.
Pkt. .55; oz. $1.30; 4 lb. $2.85; 1 lb. $10.05
TABLE QUEEN (ACORN) (85 days) Extremely early for a
running squash. Makes an enormous yield over a long season.
Fruits dark green, weighing about 2 lbs., with sides deeply
ribbed, and with a point at the blossom end. Yellow-colored
flesh is fine-grained and sweet when baked like Hubbard
squash. It is a good keeper and desirable for home or market use.
Pkt. .55; oz. .85; % lb. $1.85; 1 lb. $6.15


TOMATO
Sow % pound in seedbed to plant an acre, or
1 pound per acre in field.
For the garden sow one packet in a seedbed for 50 plants to set
150 feet of row.
If plants are staked, sow one packet in seedbed for 50 plants to
set 75 feet of row.
Culture. Tomatoes are grown on all kinds of soil, from a light
sand to a muck. The land should be put in good condition. Seed
may be planted direct in the field or in a seedbed. Plants started
in a seedbed should be 6 to 8 inches high when ready to trans-
plant to the field in 4 to 7 foot rows and 2% to 3 feet apart in a
row, or if staked 16 to 20 inches in the row, rows 4 feet apart.
On the east coast of Florida, first plantings are made during
August and continue until January. North and Central Florida
begin planting for a spring crop the middle of February. For a
fall crop in Central Florida, plantings are made in July and
August.


The number of days indicated after each variety represents
the time required from setting of plants in the field to produce
marketable fruits. It usually takes four or five weeks to produce
plants for field setting.


FLA. MH-1
FLA. MH-1 (75 days) A high yielding variety very resistant to
Fusarium, races 1 and 2, Verticillium, Grey Leaf Spot, Leaf
Molds, Graywall, and tobacco mosaic virus. Tolerant to early
blight. Developed by the IFAS for Fla. conditions. A deter-
minate type with medium size fruit in deep globe shape. NEW.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.80; 4 lb. $6.25; 1 lb. $23.75
FLORADEL (75 days) This tomato combines most of the
desirable features found in the Manalucie, Indian River, and
Manapal varieties. It has the fruit size of Manalucie, the earliness
of Indian River, is near equal to Manapal in blossom-end
smoothness, and, in most trials, has ranked best in yield.
Resistance to diseases and physiological disorders are similar in
the four varieties. Floradel fruit lacks the depth of the other
three varieties, but are firm, fleshy, and of good quality. The
indeterminate plant has good vigor, and the large leaves provide
good sun and wind protection.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.30; 4 lb. $5.05; 1 lb. $18.95


HOMESTEAD 24
HOMESTEAD 24 (70 days) A selected strain of Homestead
tomato. The plants of Homestead 24 are semi-determinate, open,
early in maturing and resistant to Fusarium Wilt. Fruits free
from puffiness and cracking, meaty and firm, excellent for
"green-wrap." Homestead 24 is a heavy yielder and will make
good crops even on wilt-infested soils. It has done well in
Homestead area, both on heavy marl soil and on the rockland,
seems well adapted to all Florida soils.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.30; % lb. $5.05; 1 lb. $18.95
MANALUCIE (82 days) This vigorous growing, disease resistant
variety possesses multiple resistance, being resistant to Fusarium
Wilt and Gray Leaf Spot. Fruit is late, but large throughout har-
vest period. Smooth and relatively resistant to cracking. Firm and
fleshy, and good edible quality. Very slow ripening and must be
allowed to fully mature before harvesting.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.30; 'A lb. $5.05; 1 lb. $18.95

RED CHERRY (70 days) This tomato is widely used for ship-
ping, salad and cocktail purposes. The fruit is very small, red
and globe-shaped.
Pkt. .45; oz. $2.00; % lb. $4.50; 1 lb. $16.55







ROMA VF (70 days) This Italian-type tomato is pear to plum-
shaped, medium in size and a uniform red. It has both
Verticillium and Fusarium resistance.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.30; / lb. $5.05; lb. $18.95
SUNRAY (80 days) Produces large yields of meaty, acid-free,
yellow-orange tomatoes. Its fruit is smooth, very firm and it is
delicious in flavor. Sunray is resistant to Fusarium Wilt.
Pkt. .50; 1 oz. $2.65; /4lb. $5.90; 1 lb. $22.25
TROPIC (85 days) A large variety, stake-type tomato with very
high yields, developed for Fla. by IFAS. Resistant to Vertici-
Ilium, Fusarium, Grayleaf Spot, Graywall, Tobacco Mosaic and
Leaf Molds. Tolerant to early blight. NEW.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.50; % lb. $5.60; 1 lb. $20.75
WALTER (75 days) An excellent new variety developed by the
Bradenton experiment station by Dr. Walter. This tomato is
resistant to Fusarium Wilt, Races 1 and 2, and to Gray Leaf Spot.
Pkt. .50; oz. $2.80; lb. $6.25; 1 lb. $23.75



TURNIP
Plant 2 to 3 pounds of seed per acre.
In the garden make three plantings at different times.
1 packet of turnip seed to 50feet of row.
Culture. Plant in rows 15 to 20 inches apart. Thin early to one
inch, because any over crowding will result in misshapen, slow
growing, poor quality roots. Final thinning should be 4 to 6
inches apart. Thinnings may be used for turnip greens. For best
quality, turnips should be grown rapidly in rich, moist soil. When
turnips are grown for commercial canning and freezing, where
only the tops are used and harvested with machinery, plant in
double rows 4%' to 5 feet apart, 14 inches apart in the double
row, 6 to 8 lbs. of seed is required, no thinning. Turnips can be
planted every month in the year.
JUST RIGHT HYBRID (60 days) Both the roots and the tops of
this hybrid have an excellent flavor. Its roots are smooth, white
and flattened globe-shaped. They measure about 5 inches across
and 31/2 inches thick.
Pkt. .75; oz. $2.35; 1 lb. $5.25; 1 lb. $19.70
PURPLE TOP WHITE GLOBE (50 days) Ours is a very uniform
and well colored strain of this popular variety. Roots globe-
shaped, flesh and skin are white, with purple or red at the stem
end above ground. Fine grained and sweet, of superior quality.
Grown extensively in Florida for shipment to northern markets.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; 'A lb. $1.20; 1 lb. $3.45
SHOGOIN (42 days) An aphid-resistant foliage turnip which
resists the hot, dry weather. It produces an immense yield of
upright growing foliage, excellent for freezing and canning. The
roots are white, semi-globe shaped, but more largely planted for
the tops which are large, thick, succulent, tender, and of finest
mild flavor.
Pkt. .40; oz. .50; 'A lb. $1.05; 1 lb. $2.95
POMERANIAN WHITE GLOBE (50 days) A delicious globe
shaped, white rooted turnip. Roots similar to purple top in
shape and size.
Pkt. .40; oz. .55; A lb. $1.25; 1 lb. $3.45



WATERMELON
Plant 1 pound of seed per acre.
In the garden plant 1 packet to 75 feet of row for a family of
3 to 4 people.
Culture. Watermelons may be grown on nearly all kinds of
Florida soils that have good drainage, but rolling, sandy pine
land is preferred. In general, new land is best for this crop in
order to avoid diseases. The field should be checked off planting
in hills 8 feet apart each way or 7 by 9 feet. Plant to 1 inch
deep, and plants thinned to 2 or 3 plants per hill when they are
still small and when all danger of frost is past, later thinning to 1
plant per hill. The first planting of watermelons for an early
crop in south Florida starts early in December. In central
Florida planting begins January 1st and extends to about Feb-
ruary 15th. Plantings in north Florida are made 2 to 3 weeks
later.
All our melon seed is now treated to control seed-borne
diseases and to give better stands especially if planted early in
cold ground


The number of days after each variety indicates the time
from seed planting to ripe fruit.


CHARLESTON
GRAY





CHARLESTON GRAY 133 (85 days) Is resistant to both
Fusarium Wilt and Anthracnose. It makes a long, gray melon very
slow to "sunburn," with a tough but not particularly thick
rind, very striking in appearance when cut with red meat and
black seed. It is of delicious flavor and quality. A good yielder
and very uniform in size, averaging under good growing con-
ditions about 28 to 35 lbs. Will stay in the field in good con-
dition for several days after it is ripe. This, along with its high
resistance to the two most serious diseases of watermelons,
makes it especially valuable for home garden use and to hold for
a strong market. This variety offers much as a high quality,
disease-resistant, good shipping type melon for Florida.
Pkt. .45; oz. .95; Y lb. $2.10; 1 lb. $7.25
CONGO (90 days) This outstanding variety is resistant to Race
One Anthracnose. The vines remain green longer than other
varieties to protect the melons from sun burning. Congo has an
exceedingly hard, tough rind which resists breakage and bruising
in transit. It is a heavy yielder of large size melons, under good
growing conditions ranging from 32 to 40 pounds.
Pkt. .45; oz. .95; 'Alb. $2.10; 1ib. $7.15
CRIMSON SWEET (85 days) Crimson Sweet was developed
from a cross between Miles and Peacock, the F2 of which was
crossed with Charleston Gray. Fruits of this variety are an
attractive light green with dark green striped rinds and are well
adapted for long distance shipping. No other commercially
acceptable variety on the market has a comparable rind color
and internal quality. The melons average approximately 25
pounds each and are blocky-round. The rind is between three-
fourths and one inch thick. Internally the fruits have a deep red,
firm, fine-textured flesh. Seeds are small and dark brown
mottled. Crimson Sweet has yielded as well or better than
Charleston Gray in many locations.
Pkt. .55; oz. $1.60; lb. $3.55; 1 lb. $12.95
FLORIDA GIANT (BLACK DIAMOND OR CANNONBALL)
(90 days) The vines are of vigorous growth and produce large,
nearly round, solid dark green-skinned melons, with thick rind
and firm, rather coarse grained and fibrous, sweet, deep red,
attractive flesh with small black seeds. Not grown commercially
much anymore, but still popular with the home gardener.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.00; % lb. $2.20; 1 lb. $7.40
JUBILEE (92 days) (Black-seeded Garrisonian) Fruits of Jubilee
are very similar to those of Garrisonian both in external
appearance and in internal qualities. They are long with well-
rounded ends and light green with distinct darker green stripes.
The rind is faintly grooved, hard and tough, adapting it well to
shipping. Average melon weight is 25 to 30 pounds, and the flesh
is an attractive uniformly bright red color, with excellent texture
and flavor. Seeds are black, stippled and large.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.05; 4 lb. $2.30; 1 lb. $7.90
SMOKYLEE (85 days) A new variety developed at the Agri-
cultural Research Center at Leesburg. Smokylee is resistant to
Anthracnose (Race 1) and has a high-type resistance to Fusarium
Wilt. It is high yielding and early to medium in maturity, com-
parable to Charleston Gray. Melons are medium long with well
rounded shoulders at both ends. Rind color is emerald or medium
green, without stripes, but with characteristic indistinctly out-
lined leaf patterns of lighter green color. This characteristic
"smoky" pattern gave it its name. Average melon weight is 20 to
25 pounds. Flesh is uniformly bright red when mature with ex-
cellent texture and quality.
Pkt. .45; oz. $1.00; 'A lb. $2.20; 1 lb. $7.40
SUGAR BABY (75 days) A small icebox type watermelon
weighing from 6 to 10 Ibs. Early and prolific, perfectly round,
with a thin, hard tough rind, which is desirable for shipping.
The melons are distinctly striped when immature, but become
almost black when ripe. Inside appearance and flavor good. This
melon is considered superior to other types of the icebox melons
presently grown.
Pkt. .45; oz. .95; Y4 lb. $2.10; 1 oz. $7.15









OUTSTANDING BOOKS ABOUT FLORIDA


Horhlij s2oo,

ILI 11


We recommend these books by Lewis Maxwell to our customers as excellent read-
ing.

You will find them very interesting and informative and full of descriptive pictures.
The cost of each book is $2.00 with the exception of his latest book, "Florida
Vegetables", which is $3.00. Please add $.35 to cover postage. (Remember all
orders have a $.50 handling charge.)

THESE ARE TAXABLE ITEMS.


nogmm
-EVW
k-'.


18
18


FLORIDA PLANT SELECTOR
This is a concise guide to the selection of more
than 100 landscape plants. All-important photo-
graph of each plant, its landscape use, salt and
cold tolerances, and much other pertinent plant
information are given.

FLORIDA LAWNS AND GARDENS)
This book contains a Florida garden calendar
and planting guide. More information about
Florida lawn grasses is in this book than in any
other book. This book contains basic information
needed for Florida gardening. It is illustrated by
many photographs.

FLORIDA VEGETABLES 4
This book contains the information needed to
grow vegetables in the Florida home garden. This
includes basic information on soil preparation,
fertilization, and pest control. Many photographs
and planting guide are included. Save money;
grow vegetables.

FLORIDA INSECTS 0
This book contains large, clear photographs,
descriptions, life history, collecting information,
and controls of more than 100 insects found in
Florida. This book will be very useful to the home
gardener and student.

FLORIDA FRUIT 4
This picture book is a guide to the selection of
choice fresh fruit that grow well in Florida.
Description, salt and cold tolerances fruiting
dates, culture, propagation, and much other per-
tinent information are given. Save money; grow
fruit.

FLORIDA FLOWERS (Annuals and Bulbs)
All-important photograph of each plant is sup-
ported by proper scientific and common names,
description, culture, and cold tolerance. Also
included are flowering characteristics, planting
dates, landscape use, and principal pests.

FLORIDA'S POISONOUS PLANTS,
SNAKES, INSECTS .
This is a picture book of Florida's poisonous
plants, snakes, and insects. It identifies the more
serious of Florida's poisonous problems and gives
suggestions for First Aid. Parents and newcomers
especially should own this book.

FLORIDA BIRDS >
This is a picture book for the Florida bird
watcher. It contains information on the habits,
food preferences, and identifying characteristics
of the more common Florida birds seen near
water and around homes.


A~

Florida's S
AVAO/701/



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HERBS

Many people have thought of using herbs at least once in
their lifetime but have hesitated because they seemed
mysterious or baffling. This is certainly not the case at
all.
We can use herbs to improve flavor and aroma of many
foods, or for sachets for dresser drawers or for drying in
arrangements and even some medicinal uses Certainly
these are very versatile plants.
Fresh herbs are more useful, because of their strength,
than dried herbs, but since many of the more popular
varieties do not grow wellin Florida, you will have to buy
these, dried, from your food store. Do not let this pre-
vent you from trying them, however. You can raise
your favorites in beds or right along with your other
annuals or vegetables. Most herbs are very attractive in
their growth, they can be used for borders or an effective
part of your landscaping. They grow in very little space,
so even apartment dwellers can try their hand at a few
types by growing them in pots or planters Many people
try parsley or chives in their kitchens.
To encourage the best growth, use fortified soil. Try
adding sterile peat or composted cow or sheep manure.
Be sure to water on a regular schedule to attain best
results.


HERBS FOR THE AMATEUR

SWEET BASIL, LARGE LEAVED (Ocimum Basilicum)
A popular herb that has a pleasant, spicy, clove-like flavor,
especially good in tomatoes and peas. Both leaves and flowers
are used, fresh and dried. These seeds sprout quickly and grow
easily to a height of about 15 inches. Germinates in about
6-14 days.
Pkt. .40; /2oz. .90; 1 oz. $1.50
CHIVES (Allium Schoenoprasum)
Everyone knows these plants that resemble small onions. The
taste is milder than onion and useful in soups, sauces, omelets,
and many other dishes. They are perennials and are very easy to
grow. After the seed is started you can divide the tiny bulbs for
a new start. Beautiful in your kitchen because of the violet
flowers and usefulness. Germinates in 6-14 days, approximately
inches talL
Pkt. .40; oz. $2.75; 1 oz. $4.55
DILL (Anethum Graveolens)
Plant dill seed in the fall. Rich soil and good moisture are pre-
requisites for best results, with seed heads ready for use in April
or May. Leaves and seed are used for flavoring cucumbers, eggs,
sauces and fish. Adds zest to many other vegetables. Germinates
10-21 days, and grows to a height of 3-4 feet.
Pkt. .40; 1 oz. $1.05; /4 lb. $2.65
FLORENCE FENNEL (Foeniculum Vulgare Var. Dude)
Very reminiscent of licorice this anise-like herb is delicious in
soups, and sauces and salads. They grow upright like celery
and blanch near the heart. Also very good raw. Highly nutri-
tious. Germinates in about 12 days, thin when plants are 2"
high. Matures in 90 days and grows to a height of about 2/2 feet.
Pkt. .40; oz. .75; 1 oz. $1.25
SWEET MARJORAM (Origanum Marjorana)
For growing outdoors. This 2 ft. plant has purple spikes that
are used dried in seasoning meats and poultry. Fresh leaves are
delicious in salads. Try slipping some in your drawers for fresh
smelling lingerie and linens. Seed germinates in 10-21 days.
Barely cover with soil.
Pkt. .50; 2 oz. $3.80; 1 oz. $6.30
SAGE (Salvia Officinalis)
This variety is kitchen sage. Excellent in poultry recipes and with
many cheese dishes. Very easily grown from seed into attractive
blue flowered plants that will look lovely with your other
annuals. Germinates in about 2 weeks and reaches a height of
about 2/2 ft Perennial.
Pkt. .40; 4 oz. $1.55; /2oz. $2.55; 1 oz. $4.20


SPEARMINT (Mentha Spicata)
An American favorite. The most popular of all mints this one
is used for many things. For instance, flavoring drinks, meats,
(especially lamb and veal) ice cream, cakes, and frostings. Grows
best in rich, moist shaded areas and needs to be clipped fairly
often. Its growth is nearly 2 ft. and it sprouts in approximately
10-21 days.
Pkt. $1.20
THYME (Thymus Vulgaris)
Another perennial that is attractive as a border outside, and
versatile for flavoring inside. Use in salad dressings, meat,
poultry and vegetables. It reaches a height of 6-9 inches and
germinates in 10-21 days. It must be protected in winter. Space
12" apart.
Pkt. .40; % oz. $3.50; % oz. $5.80; 1 oz. $9.65

OTHER POPULAR HERBS
ANISE (Pimpinella)
A licorice flavor that is useful in cake & cookie baking, making
preserves, in homemade sausage and in tea for colic. The oil from
the herb is especially delicious in sugar cookies. Plants about
1 ft. high.
Pkt. .40; oz. .85; 1 oz. $1.35
BASIL Dark Opal
Very fragrant and handsome herb. A rare combination of herb
and colorful ornamental, this is excellent for beds and borders.
Contrasts nicely with yellows and whites and blues.
Pkt. .80; 1/16 oz. $2.65
BORAGE
Blue flowers about 2 ft. in height widely used for attracting bees.
Sow outdoors in Spring and use young leaves and flowers for sal-
ads or flavor cool drinks. Also good in herb teas and vegetables.
Pkt. .40; /2oz. $1.20; 1 oz. $1.95
CARAWAY (Russian)
About 1 ft. in height. Used for flavoring breads, meats, cakes,
confections, cheese, pastries and liquors.
Pkt. .40; oz. $1.10; 1 oz. $1.80
CATNIP (Nepeta cat)
Plants grow to 3 ft. Leaves said to aid digestion and upset stom-
ach. Widely known to be an intoxicant to cats.
Pkt. .40; oz. $2.75; 1 oz. $4.55
HOREHOUND (Marrubium vulg.)
A favorite medicinal plant used in teas and to season cakes,
candies and meats. Still used in cough drops today. Grows to 2
feet.
Pkt. .40; % oz. $2.40; 1 oz. $4.00
LAVENDER
This delightful fragrance is reminiscent of grandma's day. Used
for dry sachets, it grows to a height of 2 ft. and has lovely lilac
flowers.
Pkt. .40; /4oz. $1.90; oz. $3.15; 1 oz. $5.25
OREGANO
Very thick, hairy green leaves that are strongly aromatic. The
dried leaves are used for cooking and for medicinal purposes.
Grows to 2 feet and has lavender-pink flowers. Used most often
in Italian dishes.
Pkt. .40; oz. $2.25; 2 oz. $3.70; 1 oz. $6.15
PEPPERMINT
Another old favorite, this plant grows to a height of 3 feet and
spreads as it grows. For flavoring jellies and fruits and iced
drinks.
Pkt. $1.20
ROSEMARY
A perennial herb. It grows upright to a height of 3 ft. or more.
Very spicy in odor and the tips and leaves are used for flavoring
and fragrance.
Pkt. .40; 4 oz. $2.70; 2 oz. $4.50; 1 oz. $7.50
SUMMER SAVORY
Best sown in open ground, these small leaves are used fresh or
dried for flavoring meats and stuffings. It grows about 18
inches high.
Pkt. .40; oz. .85; oz. $1.35

WRITE FOR PRICES ON GARDEN SUPPLY ITEMS.








FLOWER SEED
All prices quoted are postpaid.
Write for prices on larger quantities.
What to plant, when and how is listed on Calendar, Pages 3 and 4
If interested in any straight colors, not listed, of any of the
following kinds of flowers, write the Kilgore Seed Company,
1400 W. First Street, Sanford, Florida 32771, stating your de-
sires and ask us to quote you prices
AFRICAN DAISY (Dimorphotheca)
Often called Veldt Daisy or Cape Marigold this Shasta daisy-like
flower has dark centers with colors ranging from white, orange,
buff and salmon. It requires full sun, is planted August Febru-
ary and flowers April July.
Pkt. .35; l/8oz. $1175; /4oz. $2.90; Y oz. $4.80;
1 oz. $8.00


AFRICAN DAISY


AGERATUM
Ageratum is popularly known as the Floss Flower. It is a
favorite garden cut flower and is used for edgings, borders or
bedding in Florida. Plant grows rapidly, has light green foliage,
and many clusters of small tassel-like flowers. Blossoms all
summer. Sow seed in flats or seedbeds.
BLUE PERFECTION Tetra powder blue. 10 in. high.
Pkt. .50; 1/16 oz. $1.95; 1/8oz. $3.25; 1/oz. $5.40;
%zoz. $9.00; 1 oz. $15.00

ALYSSUM
Alyssum makes an attractive winter border or edging plant,
covered with tiny blossoms which form a compact showy carpet
lasting for months through the fall and winter season if kept cut
back. Set plants in garden or thin to 6" apart in 1 foot rows.
NEW CARPET OF SNOW White. 3 in. high. More compact
than the standard strain and slightly later.
Pkt. .35; 1/16 oz. .95; 1/8oz. $1.55; oz. $2.55;
% oz. $4.20; 1 oz. $7.00
ROYAL CARPET Purple. 3 in. high.
Pkt. .45; 1/16 oz. $1.35; 1/8 oz. $2.20; 4 oz. $3.60;
'/oz. $6.00; 1 oz. $10.00


AMARANTHUS
Beautiful deep colored foliage. Sometimes used as an annual in
landscape work. The common name for this plant is Summer
Poinsettia.
TRICOLOR SPLENDENS Yellow, red & green. 4 ft.
Pkt. .35; l/8oz. $1.15; %Aoz. $1.90; oz. $3.10;
1 oz. $5.15


AMARANTHUS TRICOLOR
ARCTOTIS (African Daisy)
These appear like refined Shasta Daisies and about the same size.
Beautiful colors for something exquisitely different. Plant from
August to January, flowers from March to June.
Pkt. .40; 1/16 oz. $1.55; 1/8 oz. $2.55; /4 oz. $4.20;
'/2oz. $7.00; 1 oz. $11.60
ASTERS
Used for cut flowers, bedding and in rock gardens. Sow seed in
flats or seedbeds. Set plants in rather rich, well drained soil,
protected from too much midday and afternoon sun. All mix-
tures are a blending of blue, crimson, pink, purple and white.
CREGO MIXED This variety, also is called "Ostrich Feather."
The double blooms have long, shaggy, twisted petals borne
abundantly on branching plants of robust growth. Plant 18"
apart in rows.
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.10; /4 oz. $1.80; /2 oz. $3.00
1 oz. $5.00
POWDERPUFFS A bouquet variety of upright, narrow plants.
Very early.
Pkt. .35; 1/16oz. $1.15; l/8oz. $1.90; %oz. $3.15;
/2oz. $5.25; 1 oz. $8.75
BABY'S BREATH (Gysophila)
COVENT GARDEN Large misty panicles of pure white, min-
iature blooms. Flowers cover slender stems from October to May.
Straight from Grandma's garden.
Pkt. .35; /2oz. .90; 1 oz. $1.50; 1'/4b. $4.50
BACHELOR BUTTON
Excellent for bouquets, borders and backgrounds. Very free
blooming and must have plenty of sun.
CYANUS MIXED Blue, bright pink, deep strong red, white.
All 3 ft.
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.00; % oz. $1.60; 1 oz. $2.60







BALSAM
Large, double flowers borne in axils of the leaves. Sow seeds in
flats or seedbeds. Plant 12 inches apart in semi-shady spot.
CAMELLIA FLOWERED MIXED White, light pink, rose,
crimson and scarlet. 2-3 ft.
Pkt. .60; 1/8 oz. $1.20; oz. $2.00; /oz. $3.30;
1 oz. $5.50
BELLS OF IRELAND
Odd green bells on 2-foot spikes. Plant seeds in sandy loam
about %" deep. An easy to grow annual useful for bedding also.
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.10; oz. $1.80; oz. $3.00
1 oz. $5.00

BLANKET FLOWER (Gaillardia)
Daisy-like flowers of yellow, orange and dark crimson hues, very
desirable for cutting and garden display. Easily grown, requires
a sandy, moist, well drained soil and a sunny location. Sow seed
in garden, spacing plants 18 to 24 in. apart each way.
PICTA DOUBLE MIXED -
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.05; / oz. $1.75; /2oz. $2.85
1 oz. $4.75

CACTUS
Choice assortment of most attractive, easily and quickly grown
cacti. Makes interesting pot plant with little care or attention
once seed has germinated; some are slow. Will keep growing for
many years. Sow in seed flats and transplant to pots or gardens.
FINEST MIXED Large number of species.
Pkt. $1.60; 1/16 oz. $3.90; 1/8 oz. $6.50;
/4oz. $10.85


CALIFORNIA POPPY


NNW 9 r M
CACTUS
CALENDULA
A fine, showy free-flowering winter annual. It grows quickly
from seed and transplants easily. Sow seed in flats or in the
garden.
CAMPFIRE Deep orange with scarlet sheen.
Pkt. .35; 4 oz. $1.25; '/2oz. $2.05; 1 oz. $3.40
PACIFIC BEAUTY LEMON Lemon yellow.
Pkt. .35; %oz. $1.25; 2oz. $2.05; 1 oz. $3.40
PACIFIC BEAUTY MIXED Deep orange, lemon yellow, and
bright orange.
Pkt. .35; '/oz. $1.25; '/oz. $2.05; 1 oz. $3.40


CALIFORNIA POPPY (Eschscholtzia)
An excellent annual for dry, hot spots. It blooms from March to
May in shades of pink, scarlet, copper, and orange-yellow with
gray-green foliage. Plant September January for Spring bloom.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. .75; % oz. $1.20; %oz. $1.95;
1 oz. $3.20
CANDYTUFT
Clustered heads of daintily colored flowers. Blooms from
Autumn to Spring preferring the cooler weather. It can be trans-
planted, but is better if sown where it is to bloom and thinned
out to about 12 inches apart in rows.
WHITE Giant hyacinth flowered, good cut flowers. 15 in.
Pkt. .35; % oz. $1.40; '2oz. $2.30; 1 oz. $3.80
DWARF FAIRY MIXED Compact umbellata. Shades of
crimson, pink, lavender, rose and white. 8 in.
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.45; '/oz. $2.40; 1 oz. $4.00
CARNATION
Each plant produces many stalks of very large flowers. Sow
seed in flats or seedbeds and transplant, allowing about 12 in.
for each plant.
CHABAUD MIXED Plants grow to 18 inches, lovely
shades of red, pink, yellow, violet and white. Very nice
for flower arrangements.
Pkt. .40; 1/16 oz. $1.60; 1/8 oz. $2.65; %oz. $4.35;
/2oz. $7.20; 1 oz. $12.00
DWARF FRAGRANCE MIXED Upright, stiff stems of 12 to
14 in. plants. Colorful.
Pkt. .40; 1/16 oz. $1.35; 1/8 oz. $2.20; oz. $3.60;
1/oz. $6.00; 1 oz. $10.00



BE SURE TO INCLUDE STATE SALES TAX WHEN
ORDERING FLOWER SEED. WE ARE NOT PER-
MITTED BY LAW TO ABSORB THE TAX.







CELOSIA
Easily grown in any soil. Flowers may be dried for lasting
bouquets. Sow seed in 1 to 2 ft. rows during the winter and
early spring, and thin to about 12 in. in the row.
PAMPAS PLUME of the plumosa group 2% to 3 ft. Beautiful
mixture of reds and yellows.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.65; 4 oz. $2.70; A oz. $4.50;
1 oz. $7.50
CLEOME
Often called Spider Plant these large trusses of salmon-pink
blooms are excellent for bedding, borders, and backgrounds.
Blooms all summer.
ROSE QUEEN Non-fading rose florets. 4 ft.
Pkt. .35; l/8oz. $1.20; /4oz. $2.00; /oz. $3.30;
1 oz. $5.50
COLEUS
Much increased demand for this popular foliage plant. Very
useful in shady locations for color variations.
RAINBOW MIXED Contains unusually bright colors. Wide
range of colors on large leaves.
Pkt. $1.40; 1/64 oz. $2.30; 1/32 oz. $3.80;
1/16oz. $6.30; 1/8oz. $10.50; '%oz. $17.50
COREOPSIS
SUNBURST For an annual that often reseeds itself, try this
deep golden yellow flower with overlapping petals. Borne in
greatest profusion it seems to thrive under neglect. May grow as
a perennial in some areas of Florida.
Pkt. .40; 1/8oz. $1.55; % oz. $ 2.55; % oz. $4.25


COREOPSIS


COSMOS
Plants covered with finely-divided, bright green fern-like foliage.
The blooms are large and double, or single with a crested center.
COSMOS SENSATION MIXED Rose, crimson, white, pink.
Pkt. .35; % oz. $1.10; oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00


CYNOGLOSSUM (Chinese Forget-Me-Not)
Small flowers like Forget-me-nots of beautiful, bright indigo-blue,
cover the branches of the compact, bushy plants. The seed
germinates quickly and its growth is very rapid. Height, approx.
1-1/2 ft.
Pkt. .35; oz. .65; Voz. $1.05; 1 oz. $1.75


CYNOGLOSSUM FIRMAMENT

DAHLIA
Useful for bouquets and bedding. Sow seed in early spring in
flats or seedbeds and transplant to 12 in.
UNWIN'S DWARF MIXED Semi-double dwarf flowers in a
varied assortment of attractive colors. Early flowering, bushy
plants.
Pkt. .75; 1/8oz. $1.45; %oz. $2.35; /zoz. $3.90;
1 oz. $6.50
DELPHINIUM (Perennial Larkspur)
Sow seed in flats or seedbeds or directly in garden in 3 ft. rows
and thin or transplant to from 12 to 18 inches in the row. To
help germination it is desirable to place seed in moist cloth in the
ice compartment of a refrigerator for about 48 hours before
sowing. A constant moisture supply must be provided. They do
best in cool weather.
PACIFIC GIANTS MIXED -
Pkt. $1.10; 1/16 oz. $4.25; 1/8 oz. $7.05; oz. $11.70
DIANTHUS (Pinks)
Hardy, heat resistant clusters that do well in Florida. Fine for
massing, bordering and cut flowers. Plant seed about 6 in. apart
in 2 ft. rows.
DOUBLE GAIETY MIXED Large double flowers in brilliant
range of colors with deeply cut petal edges. Blooms carry the
attractive "Pheasant eye" marking.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.20; '/oz. $2.00; %oz. $3.30;
1 oz. $5.50
SWEET WIVELSFIELD Multiflora type, free flowering and
fragrant with clusters of single blooms. Colors include shades of
white, pink, rose, scarlet, crimson, maroon and salmon, some
zoned and edged with contrasting shades.
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.20; '4 oz. $2.00; /2 oz. $3.30;
1 oz. $5.50

"PROMPT SERVICE" Is Our Motto







GLORIOSA DAISY
SINGLE MIXED These plants are bred from the wild Brown-
Eyed Susans and are from 5-7 in. across. These are yellow, ma-
hogany and bronze, all with chocolate-brown centers. Blooms
from Spring until frost. Up to 3 ft. in height.
Pkt. .35; 1/16 oz. $1.35; 1/8 oz.'$2.20; 4 oz. $3.60;
'/oz. $6.00; 1 oz. $10.00

GOURD
Gourds have become esteemed for many uses. The small fancy
fruits are of multitudinous shapes, sizes and colors. Vines should
be supported on a trellis or fence, spacing plants about 3 ft.
apart. The seed should be sown in a well drained, sunny location
when danger of frost is passed.
LARGE AND SMALL ORNAMENTAL VARIETIES MIXED
Pkt. .45; 4 oz. .90; /oz. $1.50; 1 oz. $2.50
HOLLYHOCK
An annual plant well adapted to the climatic conditions of
Florida. Thrives best on rich, well drained soil, but needs plenty
of water. Seed should be planted in garden, spacing 24 inches
in the row. Difficult to transplant. Makes ideal background.
INDIAN SPRING Mixed colors.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.10; oz. $1.80; /2oz. $3.00;
1 oz. $5.00
LARKSPUR
A cool weather plant that should be planted in November. Sow
seed 1/8 inch deep and water with fine spray. Thin to stand
12-18 inches apart in 3 ft. rows. Like full sun, plenty of water
and fertilizer.
GIANT IMPERIAL MIXED Deep blue, deep carmine, lilac,
pink on salmon, and white.
Pkt. .40; %oz. $1.45; oz. $2.40; 1 oz. $4.00

LINARIA (BABY SNAPDRAGON)
Blooms heavily but for a limited period, making successive
plantings desirable. The plants produce dainty spikes of snap-
dragon-like flowers. Resists frost. Mixture includes scarlet,
chartreuse, white, cerise, yellow, purple, rose, cream, and lilac.
FAIRY BOUQUET IMPROVED -
Pkt. .40; 1/8oz. $1.35; oz. $2.25; 'Aoz. $3.75;
1 oz. $6.25
LOBELIA
MIX Excellent ground cover of tiny flowers. Seed should be
sown from September to May, blooms November May. Does
well in partial shade. Height 5 inches.
Pkt. .35; 1/16 oz. $1.20; 1/8 oz. $2.00; % oz. $3.30;
1/oz. $5.50;


LUPINE
Plants make decorative, palm-like foliage and stems with bristly
hairs. Blooms are pea-shaped borne in spires of varying length.
Thin plants to 12" apart in 3 ft. rows. Will grow in comparatively
poor soil, but they like full sun.
HARTWEGI KING MIXED Shades of dark blue, light blue,
rose, and white.
Pkt. .35; %4oz. $1.10; /oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00

MARIGOLD
These attractive plants with fern-like foliage produce a prolific
number of lovely flowers. The dwarf types for bedding and
edging, the tall types for backgrounds. Withstand heat and
drought, thriving where many plants would not survive.
CRACKERJACK A giant flowered Marigold, very early.
Blooms are uniformly large and double, measuring 3-4 inches
across. They grow 2/2 ft. tall. Colors range from primrose,
yellow, gold and orange.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.10; Y4oz. $1.80; oz. $3.00;
1 oz. $5.00
SMILES Very uniform highly double strain. 2-2% ft. tall.
Yellow.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.10; o4z. $1.80; '/oz. $3.00;
1 oz. $5.00
PETITE ORANGE Improved strain of dwarf orange blooms.
6-8 in.
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.35; oz. $2.20; Y oz. $3.60;
1 oz. $6.00
PETITE YELLOW Dwarf yellow blooms. 6-8 in.
Pkt. .40; 1/8 oz. $1.55; % oz. $2.55; / oz. $4.20;
1 oz. $7.00
SPANISH BROCADE Gold and red bicolor, carnation-form
blooms. 2 in. across. Dwarf in growth. Only 8 in. high. Early.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.10; /4oz. $1.80; 1/2oz. $3.00;
1 oz. $5.00


'-b, J
*r n.


t


MARIGOLD CRACKERJACK


FLORIDA RESIDENTS PLEASE BE SURE TO
INCLUDE STATE SALES TAX ON ALL ITEMS OTHER
THAN VEGETABLE SEEDS. WE ARE NOT PER-
MITTED BY LAW TO ABSORB THE TAX.


LOBELIA







MORNING GLORY (Ipomea)
Favorite quick growing vine with large showy attractive blossoms
for shading porches, covering trellises and fences. Sow seed after
frost, when soil is warm. Germination may be hastened by cutting
or filing through hard outer shell and soaking in warm water for
24 hours before planting.
CLARKE'S HEAVENLY BLUE -
Pkt. .40; 4 oz. .90; 20oz. $1.50; 1 oz. $2.50
PEARLY GATES White.
Pkt. .40; oz. .90; '2oz. $1.50; 1 oz. $2.50
SCARLETT O'HARA Wine red.
Pkt. .70; % oz. $1.35; %oz. $2.25; oz. $3.75
NASTURTIUM
The nasturtium is very easily grown and succeeds best in rather
dry, sandy or gravelly, well-drained but well-fertilized soil. The
large, double and semi-double sweet scented flowers are valuable
for cutting. The plants have a long blossoming period (3-4
months) provided the flowers are kept picked off before the
seed is formed, making them very attractive for bedding plants
and as cut flowers for bouquets. Soaking seed in water over-
night before planting in moist soil helps germination. Plant seed
in 3 ft. rows and thin to 12 inches in the row. If covered on cold
nights, plants will grow and bloom all winter.
SEMI-DOUBLE GLEAM HYBRIDS Mixed colors All
American Selections.
Pkt. .45; /oz. .90; 1 oz. $1.50; lb. $4.50
SEMI-DOUBLE DWARF JEWEL CHOICE Mixed colors, early
top blooming, wide color range. 1 ft.
Pkt. .45; 2 oz. .90; 1 oz. $1.50; 4 lb. $4.50
PANSY
Pansies are the most ideal of all flowering plants for edging or
for bedding in later winter or early spring. Distinctly a cool
weather plant and for a long blooming period it should be
grown in cool weather and in a cool location. Seeds will not
germinate well in hot weather. Sow seeds very shallow in tlats or
in well prepared seedbed soil in a shaded place in late fall.
Transplant seedlings 12-18 inches apart giving some shade and
plenty of water.
TRIMARDEAU MIXED -
Pkt. .70; 1/16 oz. $2.65; 1/8 oz. $4.35; 4 oz. $7.20;
/oz. $12.00; 1 oz. $20.00

PERIWINKLE (VINCA ROSEA)
A pretty ornamental plant, with dark green foliage and dainty,
pink and white flowers. Useful for bedding, edging and massing.
Sow where the plants are to grow and thin to about a foot apart
each way. Does well in partial shade and on poor, sandy soil
around beaches where it is difficult to get other flowering plants
to grow.
BRIGHT EYES Very easy to grow, this colorful perennial
grows in poor soil to a height of about 6 inches but spreads to
about 24 inches. Called Bright Eye because the flower is white
with a bright red eye in the center. Grows equally well in sun or
part shade.
Pkt. .50; 1/16 oz. $1.05; 1/8oz. $1.75; %oz. $2.90;
2 oz. $4.80; 1 oz. $8.00
TALL MIXED COLORS 12 in. high.
Pkt. .65; 1/16 oz. $1.25; 1/8 oz. $2.05; %oz. $3.40;
/2oz. $5.65; 1 oz. $9.40

PETUNIA
Petunias are the most colorful of annual garden flowers. They
will grow in practically any soil and require very little attention
after they are established.
The culture of petunias is simple and quite easy, although many
amateurs find them somewhat difficult to start, due to the fact
that they cover the seed too deeply. Whether sown directly in
the garden or as is generally recommended in flats or seedbeds,
the seeds must not be buried. The very small seeds should be
broadcast thinly on a well-prepared seedbed, pressed into the
soil, and then covered very lightly to a depth of not more than
1/16 to 1/8 of an inch, using sand or better, sand mixed with
peat moss or humus. The moisture content must be kept uniform
until the seeds have sprouted, and the beds should never be
allowed to dry out after seeds are sown. It is best to start seed-
lings in a flat or seedbed in all cases where moisture conditions
can be controlled. The seedbeds should be covered with moist


burlap or muslin until sprouts appear, when this shading material
should be removed immediately,
When the seedlings are well grown in flats or seedbeds, transplant
to the garden or border, setting plants in rows 2 to 3 feet apart
and 12 to 18 inches in the row. Petunias do best in moderately
rich, well drained, moist soil. Since they grow and bloom over
long periods they require a lasting fertilizer like pulverized
sheep manure. In transplanting, set plants the same depth they
were before. If they have sent up a center shoot, it should be
pinched to induce branching and make a more compact plant
form.
STAR MIXED COLORS 1% ft.
Pkt. .50; 1/16 oz. $2.00; 1/8 oz. $3.30; oz. $5.50
FIRE CHIEF F2 Multiflora Compacta, scarlet. 1 ft. high.
Pkt. $1.25; I/16 oz. $5.20; 1/8 oz. $8.60;
oz. $14.30
SILVER BLUE F2 Multiflora Compacta, light blue. 1 ft. high.
Pkt. $1.45; I/16oz. $5.70; 1/8oz. $9.45;
4 oz. $15.75
DWARF ELK'S PRIDE Grandiflora single, plain-edged, deep
violet blue.
Pkt. $1.85; 1/16oz. $23.00; 1/8oz. $38.40;
oz. $64.00


PETUNIA CARNIVAL


CARNIVAL MIXED This new hybrid petunia has attracted
great attention wherever grown. The vigorous plants are bedding
type, with large, ringed and ruffled blooms. Colors include blue,
white, crimson, rose, scarlet, salmon, and cream-pink in solid
colors and some are bi-colored. Very free blooming.
Pkt. $1.15; 1/16 oz. $14.25; 1/8 oz. $23.75;
4 oz. $39.60
PHLOX Drummondi Grandiflora Mix
Can be planted anytime from September to February. Seed di-
rectly for ground cover of lovely shades of pink and white, red
and violet.
Pkt. .75; 1/16oz. $1.50; 1/8oz. $2.45; %oz. $4.05;
2oz. $6.75; 1 oz. $11.25


The person who keeps pulling on the oars, doesn't
have much time to rock the boat.







PORTULACA (MOSS ROSE)
A creeping, succulent plant, with odd thick, fleshy stems and
small, quill-shaped leaves, about 6 inches high which thrives in
sunny locations. Produces waxy flowers of varying colors which
open only in sunshine early in the morning. It is excellent for
edgings or borders. The seed is very fine; sow it thinly where
plants are to grow and do not cover. May be thinned to 10 to
12 inches apart in 1 ft. rows.
DOUBLE CHOICE MIXED COLORS -
Pkt. .60; 1/16 oz. $2.30; 1/8 oz. $3.80; oz. $6.30;
/2oz. $10.45; 1 oz. $17.40
QUEEN ANNE'S LACE
Flower has large heads, made up of tiny white flowers, giving it
a lace-like appearance. The flower clusters are borne on long
stems which make it very suitable to mix with other cut
flowers to give a bouquet an airy appearance. Plant at least 2 ft.
apart in 4 ft rows as crowding stunts the growth of the plants.
Pkt. .40; 1/8 oz. $1.35; /4oz. $2.20; oz. $3.60;
1 oz. $6.00

SALVIA
Suitable for both bedding and borders of medium height. The
plants bear spikes of very showy, intense colored flowers and
make attractive bouquets. Sow seeds in flats or seedbed, trans-
planting to 3 ft. rows, 18 inches in the row.
BLUE BEDDER A perennial salvia which usually comes back
year after year. Very attractive masses of tall blue (purple)
blooms.
Pkt. $1.25; 1/16oz. $2.45; 1/8oz. $4.05; % oz. $6.75;
'/2oz. $11.25; loz. $18.75
BONFIRE Mid-season. 20 inches. Scarlet.
Pkt. .75; 1/16 oz. $1.45; 1/8 oz. $2.40; /4oz. $4.00;
2 oz. $6.60; 1 oz. $11.00
SHASTA DAISY (CHRYSANTHEMUM)
ALASKA Best white American-grown daisy. Long stems, free
flowering. Excellent cut flower.
Pkt. .45; 1/16 oz. .85; 1/8 oz. $1.35; /oz. $2.25;
/ oz. $3.75; 1 oz. $6.20
SNAPDRAGON
Successful only when grown through the winter and early spring
months. The seeds are small and slow to germinate. They should
be planted in a shallow box or seedbed of rich soil, in a cool
shady place and kept continually moist until seeds sprout.
CHOICE MIXED COLORS All American Selection. 2/2 ft. tall.
Rust resistant.
Pkt. .55; 1/8oz. $2.10; /4oz. $3.50; oz. $5.85;
1 oz. $9.75
TETRAPLOID CHOICE MIXED COLORS 2 ft.
Pkt. .85; 1/16 oz. $1.65; 1/8 oz. $2.70; 4 oz. $4.45;
/2oz. $7.35; 1 oz. $12.25

STATICE
Slender, wiry, bushy plants, bearing masses of flowers in delicate
shades of lavender, rose, blue and white. Valued for drying, and
makes an excellent long-lasting flower for bouquets. Sow seeds
in the garden in 3 ft. rows and thin to 18 inches in the row. Very
easily grown. Requires sunny location.
SINUATA MIXED Everlasting. 2/2 ft.
Pkt. .45; %oz. .90; /2 oz. $1.50; loz. $2.50

STRAWFLOWER (HELICHRYSUM)
Large showy flowers of straw-like texture which retain their
brilliant colors when dry, making them useful for decorative
bouquets. The seed should be sown where plants are to bloom
in 3 ft. rows, and thin out 18 inches apart. Plants grow 2 to 3
feet high and make a showy background.
SEMI-DWARF MIXED -
Pkt. .35; 1/8 oz. $1.20; /4oz. $2.00; V oz. $3.30;
I oz. $5.50
FARM
Give fools their gold, and knaves their power;
Let fortune's bubbles rise and fall;
Who sows a field, or trains a flower,
Or plants a tree, is more than all.
Whittier


SUNFLOWER (HELIANTHUS)
Easily grown and does best in a sunny location, it being a heat
tolerant annual. Fine background for lower plantings, or can be
grown in clumps. Successive sowings of seed can be made for
cutting during the months of May through September. Thin
plants to 2 ft. apart in 3 ft. rows.
SUNGOLD Double, golden yellow. 31/ to 4 ft.
Pkt. .45; oz. .90; Voz. $1.50; 1 oz. $2.50
SWEET PEAS
These varieties are heat resistant and best adapted to Florida soil
and climate. They do best in cool weather. They are heavy
feeders and need very rich soil. Plant seeds one inch apart and
cover two inches deep. When plants are five inches high, thin to
three or four inches apart, furnish wire supports for vines to run
upon. Fertilize and water frequently. Keep flowers cut off every
day to prevent seed pods forming and to prolong the blooming
periods. Sunshine and fresh air are very essential.
EARLY MULTIFLORA SUPREME
CHRISTMAS RED SUPREME Crimson.
Pkt. .60; oz. $1.20; 1 oz. $2.00
CHOICE MIXED -
Pkt. .60; '/oz. $1.20; 1 oz. $2.00
EARLY SPENCER
PRINCESS ELIZABETH Salmon.
Pkt. .60; /2oz. $1.15; loz. $1.90
CHOICE MIXED -
Pkt. .55; 2oz. $1.10; 1oz. $1.80
CUTHBERTSON FLORIBUNDA
CHOICE MIXED -
Pkt. .55; % oz. $1.10; 1 oz. $1.80

KNEE-HI
These are bedding plants. Plant in open areas, not next to build-
ings or fences. Does not need staking or nets. Free flowering
straight stemmed, 5-7 blooms per stem.
CHOICE MIXED Assorted colors. 20 in.
Pkt. .70; /2 oz. $1.45; 1 oz. $2.40
TITHONIA
TORCH Often 4 inches across, these daisy-like blooms are pro-
duced in abundance on tall plants and are striking in contrast to
the large velvety gray-green leaves. Brightens any garden. Plant
February to April, flowers May- September. Makes an inexpen-
sive temporary hedge. Also good for cut flowers,
Pkt. $1.00; 1/16oz. $1.65; 1/8oz. $2.70; %oz. $4.50;
V oz. $7.50;
VERBENA
Spreading, bushy, and covered with heads of brilliant flowers in
shades of blue, red, rose, lavender, white and scarlet. Seed
should be soaked in water 48 hours in a refrigerator. Sow where
they are to grow and thin to a foot apart in 2 rows.
IDEAL FLORIST STRAIN Mixed colors, early. 10 in. high.
Pkt. .70; 1/8 oz. $1.45; oz. $2.35; % oz. $3.90;
1 oz. $6.50




ASSORTMENTS


CUT FLOWER MIX
Luscious assortment of long-lasting cut flowers. Best for
Spring planting, lasts until frost.
oz. .90; oz. $1.50; 1oz. $2.50

FLOWER GARDEN MIX
This excellent assortment of tall and border varieties
will delight any gardener anywhere. Plant after danger of
frost for color all Spring and Summer.
/ oz. .80; oz. $1.30; 1 oz. $2.10







ZINNIA
The zinnia is one of the most easily grown flowers for Florida,
thriving in almost any soil and under almost any conditions.
While seedling plants of zinnias can be transplanted, they do best
when the seed is sown directly in the garden where the plants
are to flower. Seeds should not be sown, however, until the soil
has warmed up and danger of low temperatures is past. For best
results, provide a deep, rich soil and give plenty of water when
needed especially in blooming time. For the best development of
plants, they should be given ample room to allow free branching
for sturdy plant development, which will assure the production
of large, well formed, double flowers. Successive sowing can be
made all through the summer and as late as the end of August
in Florida.
Zinnias are practically free from all plant diseases and insects.
Late in their growth, however, they may be subject to powdery
mildew, but if the plants are properly spaced so that a free
circulation of air is possible, this trouble should not be serious.

DAHLIA FLOWERED
GOLDEN DAWN Golden yellow.
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.10; 12oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00
ILLUMINATION Bright pink.
Pkt. .35; /4oz. $1.10; /zoz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00
SCARLET FLAME Bright scarlet.
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.10; 'oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00
CACTUS FLOWERED
BLAZE Flame orange. Flat twisted petals.
Pkt. .40; 1/8oz. .80; oz. $1.30; '/2oz. $2.10;
1 oz. $3.50
SNOW TIME White.
Pkt. .40; l/8oz. .80; oz. $1.30; '%oz. $2.10;
1 oz. $3.50
CACTUS FLOWERED MIXED Standard Mixture.
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.10; /2oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00
CALIFORNIA GIANT MIXED
Pkt. .35; oz. $1.10; 2oz. $1.80; 1 oz. $3.00


ZINNIA THUMBELINA


THUMBELINA
Mixed. Remarkable dwarf mixture, only 6 in. high in pink, red,
white, yellow, orange and scarlet.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $2.40; %oz. $4.00; V oz. $6.60;
1 oz. $11.00
LILLIPUT
Mixed colors, plants 1% ft. high.
Pkt. .35; l/8oz. $1.00; /4oz. $1.65; V2oz. $2.70;
1 oz. $4.50
HAAGEANA
PERSIAN CARPET Dwarf and compact plants. Full color
range. 6-8 in. stems.
Pkt. .35; 1/8oz. $1.10; oz. $1.80; 1/2oz. $3.00;
1 oz. $5.00


INSECTICIDES and FUNGICIDES


It is often difficult for the home gardener to get adequate control of insects and diseases in the family garden plot.
Many of the more effective pesticides are on the restricted pesticide lists and rightly so since many of them are too
dangerous for use by the ordinary homeowner. The following are a few of the pesticides which may be used in the
home garden. Even with these basically safe products the user should pay strict attention to the label on the con-
tainer as to proper use and proper interval from use to harvest time. For general insect control in the garden,
diazinon, malathion and thiodan can be used. Diazinon and malathion may not give adequate control of worms and
caterpillars, so other products such as sevin, methoxychlor, Dipel or Thuricide may be used to control these pests.
Of these products Dipel or Thuricide will give the best control of cabbage loopers or other similarly hard to kill
worms. Dipel and Thuricide are the trade names of a new extremely safe natural bacterial control of worms and
caterpillars, Bacillus thuringiensis. For soil living insects such as cutworms, mole crickets, etc. baits containing
chlordane-toxaphene combinations, kepone, dursban, dylox and others usually prove to be effective. You can use
concentrated chlordane sprays for control of most of these as well. We do not recommend the use of chlordane as a
spray on vegetable plants, however. Slugs and snails can usually be controlled by the use of baits or sprays con-
taining metaldehyde or Zectran. (Mesurol)
For disease control there are several very effective fungicides which can be used around the home. Benomyl,
Daconil, and Dithane M-45 (Fore) give good control of most diseases, but there are several older products which still
do a good job in many instances, such as captain, zineb, phaltan, liquid copper, tri-basic copper, karathane and others.
These are only suggestions for pesticides to use in the home garden. We realize there are other effective controls,
both chemical and natural which can be used. We only offer the above to help you in your selection of proper
pesticides. Let us reemphasize that strict attention be paid to label instructions on pesticides. Do not use rates higher
than those recommended. Increased dosages do not mean increased control.








COMMON GARDEN INSECTS


- /


i L


1. TOMATO HORNWORM A very large green caterpillar
that grows to a length of three to four inches. A protuberance,
horn, is to be found in the rear of the worm. Though fierce look-
ing, it is completely harmless. It eats large holes in the leaves of
tomatoes and also through the fruit itself. The easiest method of
control is to lift them off and step on them, however it may be
necessary to spray the young with Dipel, Thiodan, Sevin or
Diazinon.


7 I1
4. MOLE CRICKETS Much the same type of destruction
as the cutworm, these are identified by the "runs" found on the
surface of the ground. Control may be obtained with Chlordane-
Toxaphene, Kepone, Dursban or similar type baits or pre-
planting spraying of the area with Chlordane.


2. CABBAGE LOOPER Often called green worm, this pest
forms a definite looping motion when crawling. It is very de-
structive, eating holes in cabbage, lettuce and many other veg-
etables. Control by dusting or spraying with Dipel, Sevin,
Thiodan or Diazinon.


3. CUTWORM Usually found in the ground around the
base of plant, the cutworm feeds at night by cutting plants off
at the surface of the ground. A persistent garden marauder it is
common throughout the year. Baits, after planting, seem to do a
thorough job of control or you can spray the ground to be
planted with Chlordane prior to planting.


5. SPIDER MITES Fine webs on leaves and yellow specks
indicate the presence of these tiny, barely visible pests. Try
gently rubbing the backs of the leaves of the injured plants to
see if "rust" residue is noticeable on your fingers. Kelthane,
Malathion, or Diazinon are probably the best controls.






6. CABBAGE WORM This worm feeds on the underside
of leaves and bores into the heads producing ragged holes. It
can grow up to 14 inches long and is velvety green in color.
Control is much the same as for the cabbage looper, Dipel,
Thiodan, Diazinon or Sevin in dust or spray.








COMMON GARDEN INSECTS


7. COWPEA CURCULIO Only attacking Southern peas
(Cowpeas), the curculio punctures seed pods to lay its eggs,
these develop into larva which feed upon the seed. Thiodan or
Toxaphene in dust or spray is best for control. Treat when pods
begin to form.


10. CORN EARWORM Most damage to sweet corn occurs
when the caterpillars eat kernels from the ear. Usually beginning
to feed first on the silks, it continues from the tip downward.
It will be necessary to dust or spray when silking begins and
continue the treatment every other day to get maximum pro-
tection. Sevin, Dipel, Diazinon or Thiodan will give best results.


8. APHIDS Found mostly on new growth, these "lice"
suck plant juices and thereby distort the growth of the plant.
Especially hard to wash off greens in preparation for cooking.
Dusting or spraying with Malathion, Thiodan or Diazinon will
achieve best results.


9. BEAN LEAF ROLLER There is little doubt when
this little pest is present. The worm cuts notches in the leaves
of the bean plant and literally rolls himself up in it. This often
seems to happen overnight and it can be quite disconcerting to
the home gardener. Diazinon, sevin, dipel or thiodan will usually
bring these under control.


11. LEAF MINER The larvae make long slender, winding,
white tunnels in the leaves of many vegetables. Damage is not
usually too great but control can be obtained by dusting or
spraying with Diazinon.






ORDER BLANK


Kilgore Seed Company
1400 West First Street
Sanford, Florida 32771




Name .................................................................................................. ...
P.O. Box, Street,
or R.F.D. No............................................. ......................................

City.......................................... .................................................

State.................................................. Zip Code ................... Telephone ..............
Ship by Parcel Post Express Truck
Ex. or F Office ... Date
Exp. or Frt. Office..................................


OFFICE USE ONLY
Order No.


Date Received


Date Shipped



Amount Enclosed
Check O M.O. ] Cash D
Other DO


BALANCE DUE

CREDIT DUE


IMPORTANTI Be sure address and shipping instructions are correct. Please write plainly.

SPECIAL NOTICE: Remittances should be made by postal money orders, checks, or cash. DO NOT SEND STAMPS.
On items not marked postpaid be sure your remittance includes the necessary amount for postage and also the "State
Sales Tax" on non-exempt merchandise.

NOTICE TO BUYER: Kilgore warrants that seeds or bulbs it sells will be labeled as required under Florida and Federal seed
laws and that they will conform to the label description. Kilgore makes no other or further warranty, expressed or implied.
No liability hereunder shall be asserted unless the buyer or user reports to Kilgore within a reasonable period after discovery
(not to exceed 10 days) any conditions that might lead to a complaint. Kilgore's liability on this warranty is limited in amount
to the purchase price of the seeds or bulbs.
Florida Statutes Section 578.26 requires as prerequisite to suit for defective seeds that sworn complaint against seller alleging
damages sustained be filed with Florida Commissioner of Agriculture, accompanied by $10.00 filing fee, within ten days after
defect becomes apparent; and copy of complaint be sent seller by registered mail.
Price
Quantity NOTICE: 50 HANDLING CHARGE ITEMS WANTED Dollars Cents
Dollar Cents


Add Fifty Cents (504) For Handling 50

Have you included postage on items not postpaid and "State Sales Tax" on non-exempt merchandise?

You may substitute the next best or most similar of any variety you cannot supply.
SUBSTITUTES:
Please do not substitute without first notifying me.
(Mark "X" in one of above spaces)

"PROMPT SERVICE" Is Our Motto




ORDER BLANK


Page 2


Kilgore Seed Co.


Price
Quantity ITEMS WANTED Dollars Cents
Dollars Cents


4 4


_ _f _


___________ =1 ________ ______


Add Fifty Cents (504) For Handling 50
Have you included postage on items not postpaid and "State Sales Tax" ?
PLEASE WRITE BELOW The names of neighbors or friends who might be interested in receiving a copy of our Planting Guide
NAMES P.O. Box, Street or R.F.D. CITY STATE ZIP CODE


We Have A GROWING Reputation







GRASSES, CLOVERS and FIELD SEED


Prices quoted are postpaid.
GRASSES
Bermuda, Hulled
(Lawns 1/2-2 lb./1,000 sq. ft.)
(Pastures 15-25 lb./acre)
Bahia, Argentine
Bahia, Pensacola
(Lawns 5-10 lb./1,000 sq. ft.)
(Pastures 20-25 lb./acre)
Carpet
(Lawns 2-4 lb./1,000 sq. ft.)
(Pastures 25 lb./acre)
Centipede
(Lawns 4-6 oz./1,000 sq. ft.)
Ryegrass, Annual (Common or Italian)
Ryegrass, Gulf Annual
(Lawns 10 lb./1,000 sq. ft.)
(Pastures 50 lb./acre)
Wintergrazer 70 Rye
(Pastures- 50-75 lb./acre)
Write for Prices & Other Varieties
ALFALFA
Florida 66
(25 lb./acre)
Write for Prices
BENNE (SESAME)
Sow in drills 3-4 feet apart thinly, 3-5 lb./acre. Seeds attract
quail and game birds, valuable for poultry feed. Plant from
March to June.
% lb. .75; 1 lb. $2.35; 2 b. $3.85
CHUFAS
Sow 10-15 lb./acre. A ground nut, easily grown, useful as hog
fattening crop. Plant from April to August.
Write for Prices.
CLOVERS
Planting rates variable.
Write for Prices & Varieties
C ROTALARIA
Sow 10-20 lb./acre, March to June. A good cover crop for all
soils except muck.
Write for Prices.
INDIGO
Sow 3-5 lb./acre in 30-inch drills or 6-10 lb. per acre broadcast.
Used as a summer cover crop, for hay and for grazing. Plant
from March through May.
Write for Prices.


Write for prices on larger quantities.
LUPINE
Sow 70-90 lb./acre broadcast or 50-60 lb./acre in drills. Makes an
excellent legume cover crop. Plant from late September to
December.
Write for Prices and Varieties,
MILLET
Sow 6-8 lb./acre in rows 2 feet apart or 20-25 lb./acre broadcast.
Plant most varieties from March to September.
Write for Prices and Varieties.

OATS
Sow 40 lb./acre in drills 11/2 feet apart or 64-80 lb./acre broad-
cast in October or November preferably.
PEANUTS
Plant 1 bushel of seed per acre in 3-foot rows one foot apart
from February to April. Seeds are all shelled and treated.
VALENCIA- 1/4 lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.00; 2 lb. $3.15
FLORUNNER 4 lb. .70; 1 lb. $2.00; 2 lb. $3.15
DWARF ESSEX RAPE
Sow 4 lb./acre in drills or 8-10 lb./acre broadcast. Planted in
fall, winter or early spring for forage or grazing for hogs, poultry,
and cattle.
1/lb. .60; lb. $1.65; 2 b. $2.45

SESBANIA
Sow 30-40 lb./acre. A valuable summer cover crop to grow on
land that is more or less covered with water. Plant in May, June
or July.
Write for Prices.

SORGHUM
Sow 8-10 lb./acre in drills of 50 lb./acre broadcast. Plant from
March to September for grain, green feed, hay, pasturage,
silage, etc.
Write for Prices and Varieties.

SUNFLOWER
Sow 6 lb./acre. Plant from March to September.
GREYSTRIPE lb. .65; 1 lb. $1.80; 2 lb. $2.85
VELVET BEANS
Sow 30 lb./acre. Plant from March to August. Good for building
up humus for pasturage for cattle and hogs.
Write for Prices. Seed has been scarce.


PEA SHELLER
Shells peas the easy way
by the pound or by the
bushel.
Saves sore fingers or
broken nails, saves time.
Ideal for family use,
so simple a child can
use it.
Made of durable
red-Styron Plastic,
it never wears
out.
Spring Alumi-
S nurn guide
3 i11 not rust.
Changeable
single-edge
razor blade.


Seeder
Lightweight, corrosion-resistant, easy to
use planter for sowing most vegetable
seeds. Opens furrows, drops the seed,
closes furrow and packs it, all in one
operation. Comes with six seed plates
and a row marker.


$37.95


(Price subject to
change without
notice.)


THESE ARE TAXABLE ITEMS


Precision Garden


$1.70
(includes postage)



































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