The model orator, or, Young folks' speaker : containing the choicest recitations and readings from the best authors for ...

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The model orator, or, Young folks' speaker : containing the choicest recitations and readings from the best authors for schools, public entertainments, social gatherings, Sunday schools, etc. : including recitals in prose and verse ...
Alternate Title:
Young folks' speaker
Physical Description:
xii, 17-516 p., 40 p. of plates : ill. (some col.), music ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Northrop, Henry Davenport, 1836-1909 ( Editor )
World Bible House. ( Contributor )
Publisher:
World Bible House
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories.
Children's poetry.
Recitations -- Juvenile literature
Elocution -- Juvenile literature
Baldwin -- 1895.
Genre:
Children's stories -- 1895.
Children's poetry -- 1895.
Readers -- 1895.
Textbooks -- 1895.
Dialogues -- 1895.

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in red and black, and some illustrations printed in red.
General Note:
Contains photos of many well known actors: Ellen Terry, Edwin Booth, Joseph Jefferson, Modjeska, Mr. and Mrs. Kendall, and Henry Irving.
Statement of Responsibility:
"compiled and edited by Henry Davenport Northrop author of "crown Jewels", "four Centuries of Progress", "Beautiful Gems" etc. ; embellished with superb phototype engravings and line drawings."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002234427
oclc - 227209852
notis - ALH4847
System ID:
UF00082990:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text





























ii lil















'p



L'.


:'9.':C.


HARKI THE WEDDING BELLS ARE RINGING,
OVER THE HILLS THEIR ECHOES FLINGING.'


































'C
It:'~


MR. SIDNEY EBY.
lWHATI JACK ENGAGED TO THAT GIRL, AND I NOT CONSULTED!"








THE MODEL ORATOR
OR

YOUNG FOLKS SPEAKER

CONTAINING THE

CHOICEST RECITATIONS AND READINGS FROM THE BEST AUTHORS
FOR SCHOOLS, PUBLIC ENTERTAINMENTS, SOCIAL
GATHERINGS, SUNDAY SCHOOLS, ETC.,
INCLUDING

RECITALS IN PROSE AND VERSE
SELECTIONS WITH MUSICAL ACCOMPANIMENTS, DIALOGUES,
DRAMAS, TABLEAUX, ETC., TOGETHER WITH RULES AND
INSTRUCTIONS FOR GESTURE, EXPRESSION AND
CULTIVATION OF THE VOICE


COMPILED AND EDITED BY
HENRY DAVENPORT NORTHROP
Author of Crown Jewels," "Four Centuries of Progress," Beautiful Gems," etc.



EMBELLISHED WITH SUPERB PROTOTYPE ENGRAVINGS
AND LINE DRAWINGS


WORLD BIBLE HOUSE,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.





























Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1895, by

J. R. JONES,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

All Rights Reserved.











PREFACE.
T HERE is an immense and constantly growing demand for the
very best selections from the best authors for readings and
recitations. No form of entertainment is more universally
popular than this for Schools, Social Gatherings, Lyceums, Lodges,
Church and Sunday-school Anniversaries, Christmas Exhibitions and
many other public occasions. The cultured voice and magnetic
personality of the successful reader are always charming and welcome.
This demand is fully supplied by this work which is a rich casket
of gems in Prose and Poetry, all strikingly adapted to instruct and
entertain. They are suited to every conceivable occasion where
a reading is in order, and are the best afforded by the whole range
of literature, comprising Eloquence and Sentiment; Pathos and
HL.nor; Dramatic and Descriptive Selections; Juvenile Readings;
Readings with Lesson Talks; Readings with Accompaniments oi
Music, Dialogues, Tableaux, etc., etc.
PART FIRST: The Mind Speaking through the Body, contains
Important Principles and Rules. In a very concise form it points out
the best methods for strengthening and cultivating the voice and
teaches the manner to be observed, the most effective attitudes and
gestures to be employed, and the rules for emphasis and pauses.
This part is rendered attractive and valuable by helpful object
lessons. It contains all the typical and most important gestures
in outline drawings, to which frequent references are made throughout
the work, showing the exact gesture that should be made.
PART SECOND: Readings with Lesson Talks, contains charming
selections to which are added valuable suggestions as to the best
manner of rendering them. These Talks are brief, pithy and right to
the point. Verse by verse and line by line the reader is told how to
deliver the thought and sentiment to the very best advantage.








PREFACE.


PART THIRD: Readings with Musical Accompaniments, contains
selections in which snatches of songs and instrumental music are
introduced. No readings are more popular or more eagerly sought
than these. The skillful recitationist of either sex, who can express
some part of the sentiment by appropriate strains of music never fails
to captivate the hearers and meet with hearty applause.
For this reason a number of well chosen recitals have been inserted
accompanied by suitable musical scores. These are both sprightly
and pathetic. In some instances thrilling scenes are depicted by the
text, and the music, properly rendered, adds greatly to the effect.
PART FOURTH: Descriptive and Dramatic Readings, is a vast
collection of gems in Prose and Poetry, all chosen from the very best
authors. They are such, and such only, as are remarkably adapted
to illustrate the power and fascination of the reader's consummate art.
Descriptions of startling incidents, feats of heroic courage, manly
achievements, daring exploits, thrilling adventures and noble deeds,
combine to give an unrivalled charm to this part of the work.
PART FIFTH: Grave and Pathetic Readings, embraces a rare
collection of recitals that touch the heart and arouse its deepest
emotions. The great masters of pathos are here fully represented,
and the scenes they depict with graphic power are among the choicest
jewels the English language affords.
PART SIXTH : Humorous Readings, is without a peer in those
fascinating selections of satire, wit and humor which are absolutely
indispensable to all public entertainments. These are the brightest
flashes of wit and drollery from authors of world-wide fame.
PART SEVENTH : Readings for Juveniles, is a charming collection of
sprightly and beautiful recitations for the little folks, suited admirably
to every occasion on which the boys and girls are expected to appear.
The grave, the gay, the beautiful, the serious, the fascinating, are all
mingled here in a manner that delights all young people.
PART EIGHTH: Dialogues and Tableaux, furnishes a wide and varied
collection of pieces containing several parts for as many reciters.
These have been written and selected with great care.















CONTENTS.



PART I.-THE MIND SPEAKING THROUGH THE BODY.
PAGE
Important Principles and Rules.......................... .................................. 17
The Book-How to Use It......................................... ......................... 17
The M anner....................................... ..... ......................... 17
Cultivation of the Voice........................................................................... 17
Distinct Enunciation....................... .... ... ..... ......................... 18
Rules for Expression............................. ...... ........ ...................... 18
Rules for Gesture........................ .......................................... 18
Use of the Hands and Arms............................ ............................... 18
Facial Expression............................................................. 18
Correct Attitude ........................................................ ..................... 18
Rules for Emphasis................................ .... .......................... 1
Rules for Pauses................................................................. ....... 18
Outline Drawings Showing Typical Gestures .........................................19-24


PART II.-READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.

The Wreck of an Ocean Steamship................................ Hen Davenport 25
Lesson Talk ..................................... ......... ............................... 27
Echo Dell............................................. ..... ............ M rs. H AL. iller 28
L essor T alk ....................... .................................. .. 30
The Foot-Ball Game...........................................................Robert Coland 31
L esson T alk ............................................................. 34
The Race of the Boomers....................................................Richard Buron 35
Lesson Talk ..................... ...................................................... ................ 3'7
The Inventor's W ife............................ .......................... rs. E. T. Corbett 38
Lesson Talk ................................ ...... ............................ 39
True Patriotism .................................. ..............................Fisher A mes. 40
Lesson Talk ....................................................................... ... 40








vi CONTENTS.


PART III.-READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.

Sandy's Romance................................ .........................Henry Davenport 41
The Drowning Singer............................................Marianne Firningham 43
The Soldier's Cradle Hymn........... ................................... Mary McGuire 45
The Cradle Song........................... .................................. ................... 47
M ilking Time.....................................................................Philip M orse 47


PART IV.-DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

Wedding Bells............................. ..... ..................Charlotle l. (, 49
The Drummer Boy..................... ... ....................... 52
The Old Man in the Palace Car............................................John H. Yates 56
The Battle of Waterloo.................................. .............. .. Victor Hugo 57
Asleep at the Switch............................ ...................George Hoey 58
Brier-Rose................................. ....................... Hjalar Hjorth Boyseen 61
The Black Horse and his Rider.......................................George Lippard 66
Echo and the Perry........................ .................................Jean Ingelow 67
Andre and Hale........................................................... Chauncey Mf. Depew 71
Orange and Green...................................... .......................Gerald Grifin 73
To a Skeleton...... ................................................................ .............. 76
The Majesty of Trifles....................... ... ...... ........ ..... Victor Hugo 77
The Fire........................................ ........................ Hugh F. McDermott 78
Heroes of the Land of Penn............................................George Lipfard 80
K ate Shelly...................................................................... E ugeneJ. H all 84
Independence Bell-July 4, 1776................. .............. ............ 86
Mary Queen of Scots...................................... ......................... G. Bell 89
One Niche the Highest.............................. ......................... Eli Burrilt 92
The Charcoal Man................................... ........................ T T. rowbridge 95
To-Day and To-Morrow.............................. ....................... Gerald Massey 97
Washington.......................................... ..........................Charles Phillips 98
The Love-Knot......................................... ........................ Nora Perry 100
Lookout Mountain............................. ..... ...............George L. Catlin 101
The Burning of Chicago...............................................Benjamin Taylor 104
Bill the Engineer...................................... ...........................Bellersworth 105
The Actor's Story..................................... ...................... George R. Sims 109
Zarafi...,,,.... ............. ... ............. ................................Lam arline 113








CONTENTS. vii


M y Hero...... .............................. ............................... ohn Preston True 115
The Destruction of Troy............................................. Publils V. M. Virgil 117
The Triumph of Hector..................................................................Homer 121
The Besieged Castle.........................................................Sir Walter Scott 122
Boadicea..................................................... William Cowper 126
rhe Race..... ....................... ..... ...................Lyof Tolstoi 127
the King's Tragedy................................................Dante Gabriel Rossetti 131
the New South............................................... ................... W. H. Grady 136
Love Lightens Labor................... .............. ........................................ 138
A Schoolroom Idyl................................. ........................ Charles B. Going 139
One of the Heroes................................. ......................... Ebe E. Rexford 140
The Grave............................. .................................H en y Davenport 142
A Battery in Hot Action ........................................ .................... 144
Sam............................................................ .....................Albert Hardy 147
A Tribute to Columbus............................... ....................... Joaqin Miller 143
My Lover.................... ..................... Emma M1orlimer While 150
The Ride of Paul Venarez............................................ 151
La Tour D'auvergne.................................... ............ ............. aida Buon 153
The Prairie M irage.......................... .............. .......................... 157
Hunting a M adman......................................... ................John F. N icholls 158
The Drummer Boy................................................. .. 160
John Maynard....................................... ...................... oratio Alger, Jr 164(
A Race for Life.................................... ......... .............. W M arsh 167
The Swan-Song........................................................Kaharine iller Brooks 169
A Romance of the Revolution ....................................... ................... 174
The Engineer's Story...................................... ................................. 9
Johnny Bartholomew................................................ Thomas Dunn EnglisL i79
The Lifeboat....................... ............................... George R. Sims 181
The Spanish Mother......................................Sir Francis Hastings Doyle 185
In the Signal Box......................................... ....................Geoge Sims 189
Men Who Never Die................................ .....................E. dward Everett 192
A Laughing Chorus........................... ........... .. 193
Wrongs of Ireland....................................................................... Heny Grallan 194
A Ballad of Brave Women...................................... Philip Bouarkc Alarslon 195
Influence of American Freedom.........................................Reverdyohnson 199
On the Rappahannock ................................................ Charles H. Tiffany 200







viii CONTENTS.


The Last Charge of Marshal Ney........................................... J. T. Headley 203
Lasca................... ...........................................................Frank Desprez 205
The Tea-Kettle and the Cricket......................................... Charles Dickens 208
What is a Minority?...................................................John B. Gough 211
St. Valentine's Day..............................................Helen Whitney Clark 212
A R ace for L ife.................. ....................... .... .............. ............... 214
Sacrilege.......................................... ................... Thomas Stephens Collier 215


PART V.-GRAVE AND PATHETIC READINGS.

A. Child's Dream of a Star............................................ Charles Dickens 217
H ilda, Spinning............................................. .......... 220
The Old School Clock.......................... ...................... ohn Boyle O'Reilly 223
Little Bo) Blue............................................ .....................Eugene Field 225
The Puritans......................................... ....................... Lord Macaulay 226
The Auctioneer's Gift........................................................ S. W. Foss 228
Rhymes for Hard Times........................ ........................ Norman MfcLeod 229
The W eight of a W ord ................................ ............. ........................... 230
An Old Valentine................................... .........................George Birdseye 231
The Song of the Spinning Wheel...................................................... 232
Looking into the Future............................... .............. Gerald Massey 234
Poor Little Joe..................... ........................... David L. Proudfit 235
"Kiss Me, Mamma "............................................ 237
W hisperin' Bill....................................... ...................... rving Bacheller 239
Out at Sea............................................................................ S. Fletcher 241
No Saloons Up There.......................... ............................ .................... 242
The Tides ............................... ..................................... ..................... 245
A Child Once M ore ............................................ ................... 246
The Irish W oman's Lament...................... .................... ....................... 248
The Last Hours of Little Paul Dombey................................ Charles Dickens 249
Death of Hope........................................... ........................Mary Evered 253
The Old Homestead.................................................Henry Davenport 254
Somebody's Mother................................................... 256
A White Lily...........................................................Mary L. Wright 258
Jack................. ............................F. M. Stanley 259
The Old Wife......................................... ........................ Theron Brown 262









CONTENTS. ix


Born Dumb......................................................................Norman Gale 264
Old Jack Watts's Christmas....................... .................................. 265
The Organist...................................................... .........Matthias Barr 268
If W e K new ............................................ ................... ..................... 270
Small Beginnings..................... .............................h..... Carles MacKay 271
Nellie's Prayer........................... .............. .................George R Sims 272
Brought Back...................................................... ..John F. Nicholls 278
Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep...................................... .................. 279


PaRT VI.-HUMOROUS READINGS.

Barney O'Linn and the Leeches ......................... ................................. 281
How we Hunted a Mouse................................................ Joshua Jenkins 283
A Lover Without Arms........................ ........................... Henry Davenport 285
Baby in Church....................................... ............... innie if. Govw 287
Where the Mince Pie Grows................................................................ 89
the Pickwickians on Ice................................................. Charles Dickens 291
A Tuexdo Romance.................................. .........................Albert Hardy 297
Booh !.......................................................................Eugene Field 299
Awfully Lovely Philosophy....................... ....................................... 300
W ash Dolly Up Like That................................................ ....... ................ 302
Proof Positive.... ...................................................... ............ .............. 303
The Song of the Printing Press.......................................Heny Davenport 304
Pomona Describes Her Bridal Trip....................................Frank Sockton 306
Cause and Effect............................ .......................... .......................... 308
The Puzzled Dutchman.......................... ........................C.Charles F Adams 309
Mrs. Smart Learns How to Skate..........................................Clara A -tgusta 310
A Boy's Poem on Washington................. ............................Henry Davenport 315
How Three Were Made One...........................................Edward H. Peale 316
The Goat and the Swing................................ John Townsend Trowbridge 317
The McSwats Swear Off....................................................... 319
The Telltale ................................ ............................ 321
The Knight and the Lady.......................................Richad arris Barham 323
Jimmy Brown's Sister's Wedding ....................................................8. 332
The Old Tyme Tayle of ye Knight, etc................................... Jack Bennet 335
The Soft Guitar ............................... .............................P. H. Bowne 340








x CONTENTS.


A Receipt for a Racket............ ................. ............................. .......... ... 842
Shacob's Lament......................................................... Charles F. Adams 343
Be Brave......................................... ....................................M ay Cooper 345
He Tried to Tell His Wife....................................... ....... ............. 346
A Russian Courtship .......................... ..... ..... ...... ........ ... ............. 348
,Pat's Love Letter ............................. ........... ............. 349
My Neighbor's Call................................ ......................... Georgia Peck 351
A W oman's W atch............ .................. .. ......................................... 352
An Incomplete Revelation............ ..... ......................Ricard A. Jackson 353
When Sam'wel Led the Singin'.................................................... .... 354
Observations of Rev. Gabe Tucker............................ .............. A. Alason 356
Mr. Eisseldorff and the Water Pipe............................ ...... ................. 356
The W aterm illion......... ................. ........................ .... ................. 357
An All-Round Intellectual Man............................................... Tom Masson 358
Wakin' the Young Uns.............................................................ohn Boss 359
Naming the Chickens..... .............................. ..Mrs. L. B. Bacon 361
N eedles and Pins ..................................................................................... 362
Too Progressive for Him................ .. ......................Luran W. Sheldon 363
The Low-Backed Car............................................................Samuel Lover 364
The Old Fisherm an... ............ ............................................................. 36?
K ittens and Babies ........................... .................................................... 361
A Sim ilar Case............. ........................................................................... 368
A Fly's Cogitations .................................................................................. 369
The Charge on Old H undred................................................................... 371
A M arrived Love-Letter........................ ................. .... .............. ............ 372
The Ruling Passion...................................................... William H. Swiler 373
A Complaint....................................................... ......... B. A. Pennypacker 375
Sunday Talk in the Horse Sheds.............................. Robert J. Burdelte 377
We All Know Her.............................. ......... Tom MAasson 379
Too Bad.................... ............... ................. ..................... ............. ... 37b
The W rong Train.............................. .................... ........ ......... l. Quad 380
H ow Father Carves the Duck........................................................ 384
The Men who Do Not Lift....................... ......... ........ ................... 385
Going on an Errand............................................... 386
Her Excuse............................. .. ........... .................. 387
Asking Mother.......,....,,,..................... ....................... Henry Davenport 388








CONTENTS. 3


rit for Tat .................... .......... ..... ....................................................... 389
The Glorious Fourth........................... ....... .......................... ... 390
Mr. Maloney's Account of the Ball................ William Makepeace Thackeray 392
"There Was a Crooked Man "............................. William Edward Pcnney 394
The Noble Stranger................... ......................................... ............... 396
Mickey Coaches his Father...................... .......... Ernest Jarrold 398
Aunt Tabitha...................................................................... W. Holmes 401
Gossip ............................................................................. May Cooper 402
Farmer John.......... ................................................................................. 403
The Witness.......................... ...... ... ..................................... 404
Socrates Snooks.......................... ....... ........... ..................................... 406
How Girls Study.............................................................Belle McDonald 407

VII.-READINGS FOR JUVENILES.
Kris Kringle's Surprise ...............................................Henry Davenport 409
Little Dora's Soliloquy ....................................... ................................... 410
"Little Jack .................. ............... ..............................Eugene J. Hall 411
The Little A ngel..................................................................... ............... 412
A Mercantile Transaction .............. ..................... Francis A. Humphrey 413
Planting Wheat ................................. ................... Mrs. A. A. Anderson 4!3
The Brave Little Maid....................... ................................................... 414
Take up the Collection........................................................................... 415
Better Whistle than Whine ....................................................................... 416
The Little Sunbeam ............................................ .... ............................. 417
I W would if I Could .......................... ........................................................ 418
Measuring the Baby............................................................................... 419
A Thanksgiving Dinner ................................................. Lesbia Bryant 421
M r. N obody ........................................................................... ................. 422
Is It You?.................................. .......... ........... Mrs. AMary Goodwin 423
Lulu's Complaint.................................. ................. ..................... 424
Little Tommie's First Smoke ......... ....................................................... 425
The Robin-Redbreasts ..............................................Aunt Effie's ]Rhymes 426
They Say ".............................................................. ..................... ...... 427
Suppose................... ........................... .......................... Phoebe Carey 428
The Speckled Hen............................................................ .W. Deniison 429
No Stockings to Wear........ ..... ............................................. 431








xii CONTENTS.


Santa's Secret................................................................. ........................ 432
That's Baby....................................................................................... 433
Johnny's Pocket................................................................................... 433
How He Does It..................................................................... 434
Our Christmas.....................................................ulia Anna Wolcott 435
What Might Happen ...................................................Eva Lovett Carson 438
Our Dog............................................... ....................... Henry Davenport 439
I Wish I Was a Grown-Up............................................... Mrs. M. F Butts 441
Going After the Cows....................... .................... ............................. 443
The Road to Yesterday................................ ................................ 444
Charley's Opinion of the Baby............................................ ...................... 445
The True Story of Little Boy Blue............................................................ 446
Running a Race................................. .............................................. ......... 448

PART VIII.-DIALOGUES, COLLOQUIES AND TABLEAUX.
The Model Lesson. .......................... ....................... .................................................. 449
A Consensus of the Competent...............................................Dorothea Lummis 457
Fox and Geese........................................................................ Anna M. Ford 458
The Portrait..................................................................... Isabel B. Bowman 461
The Competing Railroads........ .................................. ................................. 465
Romeo and Juliet................................................................... William Shakespeare 466
How Mrs. Gaskell Did Not Hire a Cook............................................................. 472
The Excitement at Kettleville........................................................Epes Sargent 479
Corporal Punishment................... ... ........................ Young Folks' Rural 488
The Frog Hollow Lyceum...........................................H. Elliott McBride 490
Little Helpers.......................................................................E. L. Brown 497
A School-Girl's Troubles.....................................................Annette Marsh 499
Tableaux ............................................... ........... ........... ....................... 501
Old King Cole........................... ........ ... .... ............................. 501
Little Miss Muffett........... .................... ........................................... 501
Little Jack Horner............................. .................................................. 502
Simple Simon .................... ...... .. ......................... ............................... 502
Jack and Jill............................................. .............. ... .................. 503
The Old Woman in the Shoe...................................... ................ ...... 503
Cinderella's Slipper............................................ ........................... ..... 503
Listeners Hear no Good of Themselves-,. ; .............................. ..... .... ... 504






































































































THE GLADNESS OF A NEWBORN HOPE AWAKES MY HEART TO SONG."


C










II1 .~


1


r l


L


SOME MISCHIEF LURKS WITHIN THOSE LAUGHING EYES."


* *- rf













PART I.

The Mind Speaking Through the Body.



IMPORTANT PRINCIPLES AND RULES.
THE BOOK.-Hold the book in your left hand, and keep the place open with
the thumb and little finger, supporting the book with three fingers placed on the
under side. Let your eyes glance frequently from the page to your audience. Be
so familiar with the selection that your eyes will not be bound to the book, and
will be left free to act their very important part in the expression, of the thought
and sentiment. Your reading will be more effective if you he re the selection
committed to memory, and can lay aside the book entirely.
THE MANNER.-Be perfectly natural. Get into touch witt your hearers.
Stand or sit among them, as it were, and talk with them; do noc place a cold
distance between yourself and them, and then speak at them. Do not be stiff
or stilted. Have all your powers under command. Take possession of yourself,
as in this way only can you take possession of your audience. If you are ill at ease,
your listeners will be also. Keep the body erect, yet not rigid or defiant unless the
sentiment calls for it.
'HE VOICE.-To have a full, rich, flexible voice, capable of easy modula-
tions, is one of the necessary accomplishments of a successful reader. This,
as a rule, must be the result of patient training.
Practice breathing. Stand erect, with the shoulders thrown back, and take
in a full breath, filling the lungs to their utmost capacity. The breath should
be emitted at times slowly; again, more rapidly; again, with quick, explosive
force.
The human voice is capable of great cultivation, yet always within certain
limits. It should not be strained or overworked. With a full breath give a
prolonged sound, as you would in calling to some one at a distance. Do this
on different keys, from the lowest to the highest. Practice quick, explosive
sounds. You should know how to whisper; a forcible whisper can be heard
by every person in the largest audience.
Your voice should have what, for want of a better term, may be called
volume. It should have a certain carrying power that will enable it to reach the
farthest listener without rising to a shout. A loud voice is not always the most
effective, nor can it always be heard at the greatest distance. A voice compara-








18 THE MIND SPEAKING THROUGH THE BODY.

tively weak can press its tones forward and prolong them, thereby doing very
effective work. Do not spoil your reading by shouting or ranting.
Do not mouth your words, nor jumble them together. You should enunciate
distinctly, for the reason that you are trying to say something and wish your
audience to understand what it is.
EXPRESSION.-The body. with voice, eyes, hands, arms, head, in short, with
all its members that were made to talk, should express the exact thought and
sentiment of the reading. How can this be done unless you make the selection
your own ? It is your high work to bring the thought and sentiment home to the
minds and hearts of others. The selection is yours for the time being, a part of
yourself, and you are communicating it. The eccentric, celebrated Dr. Emmons,
was once asked by a student to give him some rules for public speaking. The
Doctor gave him two: ist-Have something to say; 2nd-Say it. You are
supposed to have something to express, and you are to summon all your powers and
energies of mind and body to give effect to the expression.
Make gestures only where they are required. A few, well placed and suited to
the thought. are better than many given at random. Let the hand take any shape
that is appropriate-the open palm-the pointing finger-the clenched fist-and do
it all in an easy, natural way. In gestures requiring only one hand, make use of
the right. Ordinarily the hand should be lifted from the side with a slight curve
of motion. Do not let one gesture contradict another; all should be in harmony.
Remember that your arms are arms, not sticks. The angular, ungainly thrust
is a common fault. Let your arms be supple, easily bent. Do not use merely
a part of the arm, as if your elbow had suddenly become your shoulder. Let the
gesture rest on the emphatic word. It should not follow, but rather precede, the
sentiment it is intended to aid in expressing.
Human emotions write themselves upon the face. The eyes and other features
should express joy, sorrow, wonderment, fear, merriment, hope, despair, anger,
etc., according as these are conveyed in language. Here, especially, the proficient
reader shows his consummate art, and here is large opportunity for painstaking
study.
Stand, as a rule, with one foot slightly in advance of the other, resting the
weight of the body on the one farther back.
EMPHASES AND PAUSES.-There is a world of meaning sometimes in a word
emphasized. Where the thought is intended to be emphatic there should be an
emphatic expression of it. Emphasis is the life of antithesis.
The sentiment of nearly every recital requires pauses ; silence is often the most
eloquent speech. Do not make the pause too lengthy, else a dreadful solemnity
and dullness will result.
Take note hatl the cuts in Part I are intended to show only typical gestures.
It would be impossible in this Volume to represent all the gestures required in
reading.



































Fig. I.-Declaring.


Fig. 2.-Announcing.


Fig. S.-Revealing.


Fig. 4.-Denying-ReJectlng.

































Fig. S.-Defending.


Fig. 6.-Protecting-Soothlng


Fig. 7.-Presenting or Receiving.


Fig. 8.-Signalllng.































Fig. 9.-Deslgnating.


Fig. 11.-Seorecy.


Fig. 10.--81lnco


Fig. 12.-Medltatlon.
































Fig. 13.-Indeclsion.


Fig. 15.-Repulsion.


Fig. 16.-Exaftaton.



































Fig. 17.-Wonderment.


fig. 18.-Gladness.


Fig. 19.-Anguish.


Fig. 20.-Remorse.



































Fig. 21.-Awe-Appeal.


Fig. 23.-Dispersion.


Fig. 22.-Terror.


Fig. 24.-Dlirocrning.













PART II.

Readings with Lesson Talks.


THE WRECK OF AN OCEAN STEAMSHIP.
[Written expressly for this Volume.]
S A LL READY! Off with the ropes! We move out from the
dock. Farewells are exchanged and fluttering handkerchiefs
wave us a happy voyage. Down the bay we glide and the
crowd we have left behind rapidly disappears in the distance. One by
one the white signals vanish: now only one remains. I see it! There
it is again! Now it is gone!
An ocean steamship! White-winged bird of the sea! Majestic
conqueror of winds and waves, one of the grandest works of man!
Swift shuttle flying from shore to shore, weaving continents together!
Her machinery has the precision of that of a watch. With ribs of iron,
strength of a thousand Titans, and heart of fire, she seems a thing
of life, at once a monster and a sylph. Swiftly she cuts the water:
onward she plunges; she pants and leaps like the Arab's steed dashing
over the plains. The waters splash and curl around her prow. The
dark clouds issue from her smokestacks and float away on the hurrying
winds. She rocks as gracefully as a cradle on the gentle swell of the
ocean, or mounts the great waves as easily as the sea-gull rises on the
crest of the bounding billows.
There stands the Captain on the bridge, his cheeks bronzed by the
blasts of a hundred voyages. The sturdy quartermasters are at the
wheel, and the man on the lookout peers into the mist, ready to give
the signal if there is danger ahead. A thousand souls are on board,
and from hundreds of homes on land prayers and good wishes are
25







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


wafted toward the gallant ship with its precious freight of human lives.
Now the mist thickens. A curtain like the night is spread over the
deep and we are sailing into mystery. Hark! The fog-horn gives its
warning sound, which floats away over the sea, yet no echo comes
back. Again and again, boom! boom! goes. the fog-horn, and the
low, long, hollow sound dies away in silence. And now the breath
of the ocean stirs. See The thick veil around is rent, the dense fog
is torn to shreds, bright gleams of light flash across the waters, the
clouds of mist roll upward, the white crests of the waves sparkle in the
sunlight. The ship, no longer timid, takes a fresh start. Her great
engines throb;
"She seems to feel
The thrill of life along her keel:"
she trembles in every fibre; swiftly she leaves the long white wake
behind her; she is eager for the shore.
Now, the faint yet certain signs of a storm are in the sky. The sun
is wrapped in a haze and the great Atlantic rolls in thickening gloom.
Long, compact clouds skirt the horizon, and hour by hour they climb
the sky higher and grow darker. The breeze is livelier now. Look !
The white-caps fling up their gleaming crests, the gallant ship grows
more uneasy, storm-blasts sweep through the whistling rigging, and
the passengers crawl below deck.
Night comes on and the gale increases. The elements have broken
their chains and their startling fury is unrestrained. Great waves
in quick succession beat against the ship and now and then sweep
in swift torrents over her deck. She rears and plunges like a wild
horse without a rider. The cries of women and children add to the
terrible scene. Bang! Thump! Another huge wave strikes the ship,
and she staggers like a drunken man. Now she rises and topples
on the crest of the awful billows, and now dives down into the hollow
gulf as if about to be swallowed up by the jaws of the devouring deep!
Night, dark and terrible, closes around us again. Fast we drive
before the fury of the gale. Through the roar of the mad hurricane
and the noise of the angry waters we hear the loud, hoarse voices







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


of the officers on deck giving orders to the brave sailors. Hark!
Sharp and quick, a cry, a startling cry, rings out: "Man overboard!
The rope! The rope!" One wild shriek, choked by the raging
waters, and he is gone. It is the work of a moment. On we plunge.
The Captain looks careworn and anxious; he has not slept for two
days and nights. We must be near the rocky shore; he will stand
off and run no risks.
O treacherous winds and sea We are nearer danger than we think.
The engines give us only motion enough to steady our rolling,
plunging vessel. Thump! Crash! She strikes! The sudden jar
makes her quiver from bow to stern. For an instant she seems
to have been shattered into a million fragments. Hurriedly, frightened,
screaming, the passengers rush on deck. High above the tumult
rings the stern voice of the Captain: Back Be quiet! Ready the
boats!"
In wild excitement the boats are lowered, but the staunch ship clings
to the grim rock and holds her own. No lives are lost, yet, Merciful
Heaven, save these thousand souls from ever facing death again
by storm and shipwreck !-HENRY DAVENPORT.

LESSON TALK.
This selection requires intense feeling and animation. You are aboard the.
ship; you see all that is described ; you are awed, thrilled, terrified as the events
move on in rapid succession. You are to impart your own feeling to your
audience.
In full tones imply a certain admiration of the great vessel, and a sense of awe
inspired by the storm-lashed ocean. Nerves and muscles are tense, and the whole
body is to speak. With right hand over the eyes look away to see the last signal
in the crowd on the dock.
In subdued tones speak of the thousand souls on board, and the prayers offered
for their safety. Speak the word "boom with a prolonged sound on a low key,
thus suggesting the sound of the fog-horn. As the mist breaks and the sunlight
gleams let your manner be more animated and joyous.
Locate the coming storm in the sky, and in subdued yet intense manner indi-
cate its gathering gloom. With voice, more than by any attempt at gesture,
describe the rolling and plunging of the ship. Cry out, Man overboard! just
as you would if you saw the man swept from the deck. Point to him, and start
forward as if about to attempt to save him. Never overdo dramatic action; let







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


there be no straining for effect. But you are wrought up by the scene, and by
rapid utterance, animated gestures and appropriate tones of voice you are to make
the scene a present reality to the imaginations of the hearers.
The selection comes to a natural climax in the wreck of the ship. With
quick breath and fast utterance the sudden shock, the fright, the confusion on
board are to be expressed. The Captain's call is loud and stern. A reaction
comes as you assert that no lives are lost ; the intense strain is over, yet the
deep feeling appears again in the earnest prayer at the close.
The entire selection should be read at a brisk rate, and this should be increased
to rapidity in the exciting passages.



ECHO DELL.
[A good reading for voice culture.]
I. \H, listen, friends, and hear me tell
Of a spot I've found in the farmer's dell;
'Tis a place where fairy echoes glide,
A spot where the twilight loves to hide;
For, when noontide glories gild the hill,
This rock-walled spot is shaded still;
And the echoes shout, shout-ring, ring-bound, bound,
In and out with a merry shout.


Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha!-Ha! Ha! Ha! IAt
Follow,follow, follow, follow-follow, followw.


2. Away from the town and the dusty street,
From the clatter of hoofs and the patter of feet
Cushioned with moss and o'erhung with vines,
'Tis a holy place, and a spire of pines
With tapering fingers, green and high,
Points to that home beyond the sky;
And below in the dell, if listening there,
You seem to hear the voice of prayer,
And you murmur, surely God is there.







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


Around, around-above, above,
In air, in air-everywhere, everywhere.

3. 'Tis a charming place, this farmer's dell,
Where the busy echoes faint and swell;
Even the birds have learned their notes
Are answered back from fairy throats.
The rocks so bare, and brown and still,
Resound with the notes of the whippo"'rwill;
And even the sombre hemlock tree
Repeats the song of the chick-a-dee.

4. Oi hie to the place where the echoes meet,
Down in the farmer's sylvan retreat;
The melody there you never have heard;
Sing but a line, or even a word,
And the mimicking rogues repeat the strain,
And a chorus answers back again.

5. But the pleasantest hours are soonest sped,
And the midday sun is overhead.
Just now, while listening down in the dell,
Far away the sound of the old church-bell
With its iron tongue chimed the hour of noon;

Bell, bell-bell, bell-bell, bcll,
Bell, bell-bell, cbll-bell, bell.

Oh the echoes! how they shout!
Merrily, merrily in and out;

Shout, siout !-bound, boundlf-hollo-hollo!
Ha! Hal Ha! Ha /-follow,follow.
MRs. H. M. MILLER.








READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


LESSON TALK.

The power of a reader to hold the audience in descriptive selections like this
depends almost altogether upon his ability to make the scenes described vivid to the
imagination of the hearers. To make this especial selection suggestive depends
largely upon the power to suggest distance and simulate an echo.
i. Assume a bright, expectant attitude. The physical attitude has a subtle but
positive reflex upon the voice. Extend the right arm as in Figure 2, thus calling
the hearers' attention at once to your story. Let the arm sink naturally and
gracefully to the side while you are absorbed in the description of the dell.
Seek to feel the influence of the spot and the time yourself. You do not feel
the same influence from twilight that you do from the noon-tide glory" of the
sun, hence you will naturally soften the voice in referring to the former, and will
give a more glowing description of the latter Send the voice out full, rich and
free with every call, just as you would call in the forest to companionsatadistance.
Throw up the arm and hand in glad exultation. Then resound the echo in a tone
one key higher and resounded in the cavity of the mouth rather than sent freely
forth, all the while maintaining a listening attitude and looking expectantly
towards your audience.
2. Have all localities definitely fixed in your own mind-the direction in
which the farm and its dell lie, the direction of the town. In the first line of this
verse sweep the right hand out freely to point towards the distant farm, then
indicate the cushion of moss," then the overhanging vines Let the hand fall
freely and gently open in these gestures. Take care never to have gesture in easy
descriptive or conversational pieces, either abrupt or angular. In 4th line, let the
attitude indicate the uplifted mind and soul, sinking the voice to express reverent
emotion. In the last three lines make the silence, the hush, a positive one, by your
own attitude and stilled, hushed tones, taking care however to keep the mind on
the farthest of your audience, so as to influence your softest tones to reach them.
3. Assume again the bright animated attitude expressive of bounding life and
joy in nature. No gestures are necessary here. Too many gestures are always
to be avoided They are in good taste only when absolutely needed to make vivid
the pictures. Speak in an easy, conversational tone here, the more conversational
the better. Talk wilk your audience, not over their heads or at them.
4. Use again the gesture of signalling (Figure 8), beckon your audience with
you. Then let that gesture glide easily into one pointing towards the farm, letting
the hand fall easily to the side as you tell in joyous tones of the musical treat in
that dell.
5. Again, the interested, conversational tone. In third line, assume again the
listening attitude but. looking expectantly towards your audience, point far away
to the church, and read the line in a tone indicating that you are now hearing the
bell far away and the very spell of the sound causes you to speak in a similar tone.
This is no trick ; we do it constantly in everyday life. We naturally seek to imi-
tate sounds in the effort to describe them.







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


THE FOOT-BALL GAME.
I. I-OR weeks an impatient crowd of admirers had followed the
F various reports of the condition of the two teams. They
were old rivals, though for years the opposing college had
held the championship and Tucker's college the second place. This!
year McIlvaine and Plummer felt that they must win the game and
everything had been done to strengthen the men.
As the teams came out of the club-house at a run when the great
game was called, a roar went up from the 20,000 spectators who
gathered about the arena. Public opinion was so evenly divided
between the two teams that when one shout went for the boys in scarlet
an equally loud one came from the other side of the field to cheer on
the lads in gold. While the teams met in the centre of the field and
-2ceived their last warnings from the umpire, Tucker's eyes roved
over the vast audience. Countless pretty faces and bright bonnets
were clustered in the grand stand commingling the scarlet and the gold
of the contending forces. Some such thought as this half flashed
through Tucker's mind:
"If we win I will send that little Puritan the biggest bunch of the
yellowest chrysanthemums in the market. If we don't win-well,
I will let some other fellow send her red ones."
2. The wearers of the scarlet jackets took the ball and as the wind
was so light as to be almost imperceptible the choice of goals was not
of much importance. The teams lined up in the centre of the field and
then with heads down and in compact shape the scarlet V started up
the field as though shot from a catapult. The first half passed without
a point for either side and so evenly were they matched and so fiercely
did each side dispute the ground that neither had come nearer than
the twenty-five yard line of either goal.
3. When they came forward for the second half each player seemed
to lose his individuality and feel himself a mere portion of a huge
engine which at a given signal would be hurled with fearful force
at another engine of equal weight and size. Owing to his place at -full







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


back Tucker remained cooler than the majority, and for the first thirty
minutes of the second half he simply played a careful, conservative
game. Then as he siw the time pass and still no score, his temper
began to rise and twice he took desperate chances in going round the
end for small gains. When forty minutes had passed the golden line
had pushed the ball close up to the opponents' fifteen yard line and
there they lost it after some hard play.
4. A light breeze started at the moment from behind the goal posts
and Tucker saw the big scarlet full-back prepare for a long kick down
the field and he retired almost to the centre. His captain saw hrn- and
signalled for him to come up closer. It was in vain. The next
moment the leather oval was swinging through the air, and, borne by
the breeze, swept toward the southern goal.
5. Calculating its descent with unerring accuracy Tucker paused
and then dashing forward caught it as it fell, and at top speed made
for the two tall posts where the scarlet veterans were. The field was
scattered, but at twenty-five yards he found himself hemmed in on the
left and front, by a solid mass of red. With a quick turn that did not
diminish his speed, he swerved to the right and sprang ahead, shaking
off the huge guard and agile end of the opposing team. The goalwas
not five yards away now, but could he reach it? Between him and the
goal stood one man-the wiry and terrible scarlet half-back, who was
poised forward, prepared for the shock.
6. Gathering every effort of his muscles together, Tucker stamped
one foot on the ground and with a mighty spring, threw himself head-
first over his opponent's head. Taken by surprise the man in scarlet
missed his hold upon the waist and clasped him by the feet instead.
The impetus of his spring carried him to the edge of the white goal
line, and with a wrench he dragged himself over it-and then half
a ton of yelling humanity fell on top of him. The crowd on the
eastern stand, where a blaze of golden ribbons and flags told of their
sympathies, let loose a yell. Yet even amidst the pandemonium every
eye was on the little heap of players at the goal posts.
7. When,at last, as one by one the men in scarlet picked themselves







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


from off the pile, there was found at the bottom a bloody, disheveled
figure clad in yellow with the pig skin clasped tightly to his breast.
With a quick movement four men picked him up and carried him
towards the club house at the other end of the field.
8. To do this they had to pass the entire length of the grandstand.
The cortege went slowly, and as soon as the spectators realized the
nature of the case, a wave of silence flew over them and not a sound
could be heard. Suddenly there was a slight scream and a half hysteri-
cal cry, and a young girl clad in dark gray with a huge pompon
of scarlet ribbon at her throat darted hurriedly through the gates under
the ropes, and before the men had reached the club house she was
beside them. Tucker's head all bloody and bruised was falling back.
She placed her hand under it and supported it until the men laid
their burden on a little canvas cot which was there for emergencies
such as this. Then while the doctor made his examination she paced
up and down the club house porch, an aching sensation of grief and
agony gnawing at her heart.
9. It is a mere trifle," said the doctor, looking down with pity
into her white, drawn face when he came out. "Some ribs and the
collar bone are broken and he has been kicked in the head, but I do
not think, Miss Lea, that it will result fatally."
"May-may I go in to see him," she said nervously.
"Why, of course," cried the doctor, quickly drawing her into the
shaded room and routing the crowd of curious onlookers.
10. Amy said nothing but sank beside Cecil and began to wash the
blood stains from his face. The doctor regarded her for a moment
half gently, half quizzically and then set to work to bring his patient
to consciousness. Restoratives were applied and gradually a faint
color stole up to the cheeks of the young giant. Then came a flutter-
ing of an eyelid and a long, quivering sigh. Tucker opened his eyes
languidly.
"Now you will be all right in a minute," cried the doctor cheerily,
as he gave him a. glass of cordial. The patient drank it hurriedly, his
eyes fixed the whole while on the girl who knelt beside him. He
8







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


started to say something but Amy put her fingers on his lips, saying
" Not now. When you are stronger."
In a few minutes the doctor left them and the wounded man turned
toward her.
"Amy!" he whispered weakly.
"Yes, dear, you are doing nicely," she whispered back. Then
glancing around to see that no one was looking she bent over him and
kissed him tenderly on the lips. "That's to pay you back now that I
am stronger than you."
Then Tucker said a strange thing.
"Amy," he whispered, "do you know how the score stands?"
"Six to nothing, in our favor," she replied, and Tucker as though
overwhelmed by joy-fainted.-Ro BERT COPLAND.

LESSON TALK.
In a presenting a selection like this, where physical powers and skill are the
dominant theme, the reader's body must speak eloquently as well as the brain and
tongue, and therefore must be alive in every part. Let there be no heaviness,
ieadness anywhere. Come to your audience brimming full of enthusiasm for your
theme. Let attitude and voice express expectancy. Remember, the whole body
gestures, and no parts so subtly and effectively as the eyes, the face about the lips,
and the chest. Unless the speaker personifies and thus vivifies his theme, he is a
mere repeater of words.
I. Begin easily, so as to allow for increasing action and intensity. Have all
points of localizing fixed definitely in your own mind, so as not to confuse the
audience-the club house, the spectators, the arena, etc. Give Tucker's soliloquy
in an undertone, taking care to have it distinct enough to reach all your hearers.
2. Point out definitely each player or group you mention, or when necessary
the position of the ball.
3. Follow the game with a concise, rapid, concentrated utterance-in fact suit
your mental action, and thus your voice to the action of the players. Play the
game as you talk about it. Live over the scenes yourself and you will have no
difficulty in making them live in the imagination of your hearers.
4. Here is a critical point. Let voice and your own facial expression show
plainly the increasing intensity. In rapid succession stand for Tucker, then the
captain ; sweep out the right arm and trace the course of the ball.
5. Let there be a constantly progressing gain of intensity and momentum.
Show Tucker's dash; indicate, with rapid right hand, the position of the field.
Suggest his quick turn and definitely indicate the "wiry and terrible scarlet half-
back"' and his poise.








READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


6. Stand yourself for Tucker, taking a strong poise. Indicate the spring with
a gesture of the arm rather than any attempt at a realistic picturing.
7 and 8. Here is a chance for a good breathing spell, so to speak, and by this
very let-up in the tension of voice and action, make sharp and distinct the antithe-
sis of the preceding scene and this. The doctor will speak in cool, calm, profess-
ional tones ; the young girl, timidly, brokenly, nervously.
10. Make the last scene as delicately suggestive as possible-suggestive is the
highest form of art, not the realistic-and expression oratory is the highest of the
fine arts. In this, and for that matter in all selections, original with yourself or
from authors interpreted by you, take care to make your points of thought clear,
definite, sharp. It is the keenly analytical speaker who holds the minds of others.
No glow of enthusiasm or flow of words can make up for brilliancy and keenness
of intellectual action.

THE RACE OF THE BOOMERS.
[When the Government opens a new section, or strip, of territory to settlers,
none can enter until a certain day and hour, in order that all may have an equal
chance to stake out and secure the best claims. The wild rush that follows the
signal for the settlers to enter is described in this graphic reading.]

T HE break o' the dawn, and the plain is a-smoke with the breath
of the frost,
And the murmur of bearded men is an ominous sound in the ear ;
The white tents liken the ground to a flower-meadow embossed
By the bloom of the daisy sweet, for a sign that June is here.

They are faring from countless camps, afoot or ahorse, may be,
The blood of many a folk may flow in their bounding veins,
But, stung by the age-old lust for land and for liberty,
They have ridden or run or rolled in the mile-engulfing trains.

More than the love of loot, mightier than woman's lure,
The passion that speeds them on, the hope that is in their breast;
They think to possess the soil, to have and to hold it sure,
To make it give forth of fruit in this garden wide of the West.

But see! It is sun-up now, and six hours hence is noon;
The crowd grows thick as the dust that muffles the roads this way;
The blackleg stays from his cards, the song-man ceases his tune.
And the gray-haired parson deems it is idle to preach and pray.







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


Now thirst is a present pain and hunger a coming dread,
Water is dear as gold, as the heat grows fierce apace;
Theft is a common deed for the price of a bit of bread,
And poison has played its part to sully the morning's face.

T. ~hours reel on, and tense as a bow-cord drawn full taut
Is the thought of the Boomers all; a sight that is touched with awe;
A huddle of men and horse to the frenzy pitch upwrought,
A welter of human-kind in the viewless grip of the Law.

to women are in the press, by scores they are yonder come
To find a footing in front-ah, how can they gain a place?
Nay, softly, even here in the rabble are harbored some
Who think of their mothers, wives, who remember a fairer face.

For the black mass yawns to let these weak ones into the line,
While as many men fall back : 'tis knighthood nameless and great,
Since it means goodbye to a claim-yea, the end of a dream divine,
To be lord of the land, and free for to follow a larger fate.

High noon with a fusilade of guns and a deep, hoarse roar,
With a -. ti, of short, sharp breaths in the mad desire to win,
Over the mystic mark the seething thousands pour,
As the zenith sun glares down on the rush and the demon's din.

God what a race; all life merged in the arrowy flight;
Trample the brother down, murder, if need be so,
Ride like the wind and reach the Promised Land ere night,
The Strip is open, is ours, to build on, harrow and sow.

7 i, .-: cones a horror of flame, for look, the grass is afire!
On, or it licks our feet, on, or it chokes our breath !
Swift :1 .. the cactus fly, swift, for it kindles higher;
Home and love and life-or the hell of an awful death.

So, spent and bruised and scorched, down trails thick-strewn with hopes
A wreck, did the Boomers race to the place they would attain:














C~ ~
y-: iS- 1 -
4i.- '
i'r
;'j r
I: ''' "
''I~
~l~~r

t\i,' ''
"'


!k;
t~j r
~"'pl:
P~. 4rC ~U~L, YkSJ~1'~ZS:Ti)S
.i


CANST THOU NOT MINISTER TO A MIND DISEASED?"
MACBETH.











WELCOME THE COMING GUEST."


I








READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


Seizing it, scot and lot, ringing it round with ropes,
The homes they had straitly won through fire and blood and pain


While ever up from the eaith, or fallen far through the air,
Goes a shuddering ethnic moan, the saddest of all sad sounds;
The cry of an outraged race that is driven otherwhere,
The Indian's heart-wrung wail for his hapless Hunting Grounds.
RICHARD BURTON.

LESSON TALK.

The first line gives the key-note of this selection. It istragedy-commonplace
and homely, but nevertheless tragic and pathetic in its own way. There is an
ominous undertone running through it from beginning to end.
The reader must be in sympathetic relation to his story. His attitude, facial
expression and every gesture must give a trend to the thoughts of his hearers
before he speaks a word. If he realizes keenly and sympathetically what a tragedy
it all is, his voice will readily report attitude, both of body and of mind.
Assume an attitude as if seeing afar, at the moment, the terrible scene. The
voice should be low-pitched and filled with sympathetic dread.
Bring out the pictures-word-pictures-as vividly as possible. Do not hurry-
do not hurry ever in presenting thoughts. It takes time, infinitessimal though it
seem to human powers of measurement, for the voice to travel to the ears of the
hearers and then for the thought to travel to their consciousness. Let the mind
poise on the salient points, thus making them definite and in sharp relief against
the general background of the theme. This does not mean a dragging of the
reading-it is poising of mind, time for intense thought, not a stopping of mental
action.
Let the recitation gain constantly in intensity and force.
Wherever a bit of beautiful description occurs, as for instance in the latter part
of the first verse, lighten the voice and soften the expression to make the relief
positive and sharpen the antitheses. Bring out in full, generous tones the tribute
Lo innate chivalric manhood in the eighth and ninth verses.
It is the lights and shadows that bring out the oil-painting and make a great
work of art so tar as technique is concerned. The laws of art are universal and
thus are as true of word-painting as of that by the brush.
The verse next to the last marks the climax. Pause long after it to let the
effect deepen, of what has gone before and of what is to come, and then tellthelast
of the sad story in subdued, sympathetic tones. If the interpretation of this poem
fails to hold up the brotherhood of man and incite greater realization of the tragedy
of every day, homely life all about us, it has failed utterly of its true intent. The
reader who fails to elevate and inspire his hearers, falls short of his high calling.







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


THE INVENTOR'S WIFE.

TT'S easy to talk of the patience of Job. Humph! Job hed nothing
1 to try him !
Ef ke'd been married to 'Bijah Brown, folks wouldn't have dared
come nigh him.
Trials, indeed Now I'll tell you what-ef you want to be sick of
your life,
Jest come and change places with me a spell-for I'm an inventor's
wife.

And sech inventions I'm never sure, when I take up my coffee-pot,
That 'Bijah hain't been improving it, and it mayn't go off like a shot.
Why, didn't he make me a cradle once, that would keep itself a-rockin';
And .. 't it pitch the baby out, and wasn't his head bruised shocking' ?

And there was"'is "Patent Peeler," too-a wonderful thing, I'll say:
But it hed one fault-it never stopped till the apple was peeled away.
As for locks, and clocks, and mowin' machines, and reapers, and all
sech trash,
Why, 'Bijah's invented heaps of 'em, but they don't bring in no cash.

Law that don't worry him-not at all; he's the aggravatin'est man-
He'll set in his little workshop there, and whistle, and think, and plan,
Inventin' a jew's-harp to go by steam, or a new-fangled powder-horn,
While the children's goil' barefoot to school and the weeds is chokin'
our corn.

When I've been forced to chop the wood, and tend to the farm beside,
And look at 'Bijah a-settin there, I've jest dropped down and cried.
We lost the hull of our turnip crop while he was invention' a gun;,
But I counted it one of my marcies when it bu'st before 'twas done.

So he turned it into a burglar alarm." It ought to give thieves a
fright-
'Twould scare an honest man out of his wits, ef he sot it off at night.







READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


Sometimes I wonder ef 'Bijah's crazy, he does such cur'ous things.
Hev I told you about his bedstead yit ?-' Twas full of wheels and
springs;

It had a key to wind it up, and a clock face at the head;
All you did was to turn them hands, and at any hour you said,
That bed got up and shook itself, and bounced you on the floor,
And then shet up, jest like a box, so you couldn't sleep any more.

Wa'al 'Bijah he fixed it all complete, and he sot it at half-past five,
But he hadn't more'n got into it when-dear me! sakes alive!
Them wheels began to whiz and whir I heerd a fearful snap!
And there was that bedstead, with 'Bijah inside, shet up jest like a trap!

I screamed, of course, but 'twan't no use; then I worked that hull
long night
A-tryin' to open the pesky thing. At last I got in a fright;
I couldn't hear his voice inside, and I thought he might be dyin;
So I took a crow-bar and smashed it in.-There was 'Bijah, peacefully
lyin',
Inventin' a way to git out again. That was all very well to say,
But I don't believe he'd have found it out if I'd left him in all day.
Now, sence I've told you my story, do you wonder I'm tired of life?
Or think it strange I often wish I warn't an inventor's wife?
MRs. E. T. CORBETT.
LESSON TALK.
It is plain that Mrs. 'Bijah Brown is very much vexed with Mr. Brown. The
tone and manner should show this and give expression to the contempt she feels
for a man who does not even chop the wood, but wastes his time invention' a jews-
harp to go by steam." There is also a vein of ridicule in this selection which you
should show by an occasional half-sneering laugh, a toss of the head, and a gesture
of the arm downward and back, shown in Figure 4, Part I.
This reading affords an excellent opportunity to produce effect by emphasis
on words and clauses, for example, the word "'him in the first line, and me"
in the fourth. The character of 'Bijah should be personified by a slow, drawling
utterance. When you reach the part where lie is pictured as shut inside his bed-
stead, let there be a marked increase of animation and dramatic expression. Emplr-
the easy, conversational tone throughout.








READINGS WITH LESSON TALKS.


TRUE PATRIOTISM.

W HAT is patriotism? Is it a narrow affection for the spot where
a man was born? Are the very clods where we tread
entitled to this ardent preference because they are greener?
No, sir: this is not the character of the virtue, and it soars higher for
its object. It is an extended self-love, mingling with all the enjoyments
of life, and twisting itself with the minutest filaments of the heart. It
is thus we obey the laws of society, because they are the laws of virtue.
In their authority we see, not the array of force and terror, but the
venerable image of our country's honor.
Every good citizen makes that honor his own, and cherishes it not
only as precious, but as sacred. Hle is willing to risk his life in its
defence, and is conscious that he gains protection while he gives it;
for what rights of a citizen will be deemed inviolable when a State
renounces the principles that constitute their security? Or, if his life
should not be invaded, what would its enjoyments be in a country
odious in the eyes of strangers and dishonored in his own ? Could he
look with affection and veneration to such a country as his parent ?
The sense of having one would die within him ; he would blush for his
patriotism, if he retained any, and justly, for it would be a vice. He
would be a banished man in his native land.--FISHER AMES.

LESSON TALK.
This reading, you observe, is different from any of the preceding. It affords
no opportunity for strong dramatic expression. The sentiment is elevated, grave
and earnest. It appeals strongly to the emotion of patriotism, and the selection
is a fine example of oratorical composition.
Read it with full round tones and in a manly way. Let your manner show
that you appreciate the noble virtue here commended. You are speaking of
palriolism, not of some trivial, unimportant matter. Make free use of the gesture
shown in Figure 'Part I, first elevating the hand, then bringing it down, and
letting the gesture rest on the emphatic word, or on the climax of the thought.
With body erect, head elevated, and every nerve and muscle in active play,
show that you have confidence in your theme and fully expect to carry conviction
to the hearers. Let your manner be frank, your tones bold and decisive, your
interrogations sharp, and the rising slides clearly defined. Pause a moment after
the questions as if you expected an answer. Put strong force into the last sentence.














PART III.

Readings with Accompaniments of Music.

[The words in this Part printed in italics are to be sung by the reader, or an assist.
ant, to the accompanying music, or to other selections that may be preferred.]



SANDY'S ROMANCE.
[Written expressly for this Volume.]

O NE summer day a country youth, arrayed in kilt and plaid.
Known well among his neighbors as an honest, manly lad,
Was sauntering among the fields, as one might say, by chance,
And met with an adventure that was tinctured with romance.

To all appearance Sandy-for by this name was he known-
To his present fine proportions had industriously grown
Without once intimating, by a single look or word,
That he knew there was a thing like love-of which you must h~ve
heard.

A oft and hazy lustre filled the cloudless summer sky,
And bird to bird within its nest was chirping on the sly,
When he began to wonder, as he rambled on alone,
If ever lie would have a mate and cottage of his own.

Just then a maiden's merry voice rang out upon the air,
From one not tir away he knew, but could not tell just where,
And this sweet snatch of music on the zephyrs seemed to fly
If a body meet a body coming' tro' t/he rye.







42 READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.


.- s- -_e- -- *. . -- _y ,
-01

If a bod-y meet a bod-y, Comin' thro'the rye, If a bod-y

S"---,-i-, ...-^- _-i- -----f-.-- rf--- --



7--

kiss a bod-y, Need a bod-y cry? Ev-'ry las-sie has her laddie;




II -

e was r
,-iv---- -- F=v





Nane,they say,ha'e I; Yet a' the lads they smile on me, \Vhen comin'thro' the rye.



ld al ... lih o - tar.. e l Ih k
-0 io
Now Sandy paused in silence and he listened with a will-
If a body kiss a body-then a nameless thrill
Ran through him as the singer he attempted to espy,
While low and softly did she warble-need a body cry ?

Ah, in the field of waving rye was pretty Jenny Burns,
Her hat bedecked with heather and with gaily-woven ferns;
Her cheeks were fresh as roses, and the lustre of her eyes
Would pale the light of evening stars, effulgent in the skies.

Quoth S-lndy with a merry 1 ,, ih and twinkle in his eye,
You asked the question in your .._, if one would need to cry;
That 'tis easy to determine, I am sure you'll not deny;
I am not much used to I- -;i,, but this time I'd like to try."







READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.


Though Jenny blushed and chided, yet she didn't shed a tear,
But sang again her pretty song in accents loud and clear-
Amang the train there is a swain I dearly love myself ,
But what's his name, or where's his hame, I dinna choose to tell.

Said Sandy, If I guessed my name, would that be guessing wrong ? "
And Jenny with a look of pride thus ended her sweet song-
" Ev'ry lassie has her laddie, nane they say ha'e I,
Yet I have found my lad to-day, when coming' thro' the rye! "
HENRY DAVENPORT.

THE DROWNING SINGER.

T HE Sabbath day was ending in a village by the sea,
The uttered benediction touched the people tenderly.
And they rose to face the sunset in the glowing, lighted west,
And then hastened to their dwellings for God's blessed boon of
rest.

But they looked across the waters, and a storm was raging there;
A fierce spirit moved above them-the wild spirit of the air-
And it lashed and shook and tore them, till they thundered, groaned
and boomed,
And alas for any vessel in their yawning gulfs entombed

Very anxious were the people on that rocky coast of Wales,
Lest the dawns of coming morrows should be telling awful tales,
When the sea had spent its passion, and should cast upon the shore
Bits of wreck and swollen victims, as it had done heretofore.

With the rough winds blowing round her, a brave woman strained her
eyes,
And she saw along the billows a large vessel fall and rise.
Oh! it did not need a prophet to tell what the end must be,
For no ship could ride in safety near that shore on such a sea.







44 READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.

Then the pitying people hurried from their homes and thronged the
beach,
Oh! for power to cross the waters and the perishing to reach!
Helpless hands were wrung for sorrow, tender hearts grew cold with
dread,
And the ship, urged by the tempest, to the fatal rock shore sped.

"' She has parted in the middle! Oh, the half of her goes down!
God have mercy! Is heaven far to seek for those who drown?"
Lo! when next the white, shocked faces looked with terror on the sea,
Only one last clinging figure on the spar was seen to be.

Nearer the trembling watchers came the wreck, tossed by the wave,
And the man still clung and floated, though no power on earth could
save.
"Could we send him a short message? Here's a trumpet. Shout
away!"
'Twas the preacher's hand that took it, and he wondered what to say.

Any memory of his sermon? Firstly? Secondly? Ah, no !
There was but one thing to utter in the awful hour of woe;
So he shouted through the trumpet. Look to Jesus! Can you hear?"
And Aye, aye, sir rang the answer o'er the waters loud and clear.

FINE.







I-.:..






































































OH FOR THE TOUCH OF A VANISHED HAND,
AND THE SOUND OF A VOICE THAT IS STILL.
LORD TENNYSON.


1
























-

















10 ,




I; -
BLIND NIDIA.
BULWER LYTTON'S "LAST DAYS OF POMPEII."








READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.


Then they listened. He is singing, "Jesus, lover of my soul! "
And the winds brought back the echo, While the nearer waters roll;"
Strange, indeed, it was to hear him, Till the ,torm of life is past,"
Singing bravely from the waters, Oh, receive my soul at. s !"

He could have no other refuge! "Hangs my helpless soul on thee,
Leave, ah, leave me not!" The singer dropped at last into the sea,
And the watchers, looking homeward through their eyes with te?'-s
made dim,
Said, He passed to be with Jesus in the singing of that hymn."
MARIANNE FARNINGHAM.


THE SOLDIER'S CRADLE=HYMN.

ROM a field of death and carnage
To the hospital was borne,
One May morn a youthful soldier,
With a face all white and worn.

Day by day he pined and wasted,
And 'twas pitiful to hear
Through the dreary long night-watches,
That sad call of" Mother, dear."

Weary sufferers, moaning, tossing,
Turned their sad eyes towards his cot;
But that cry was still incessant,
The young soldier heeded not.

It was night; the lights burned dimly;
O'er the couch his mother bent
Lovingly; with soft caresses
Through his hair her fingers went







46 READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.

But he tossed in wild delirium,
From his pale lips still the cry,
With that same sad, plaintive moaning,
Mother-come-before-I-die."





Then in song her voice rose sweetly,
On her breast she laid his head,
Husk, my dear, lic still and slumber,
Holy angels guard thy bed."


While she sang his moans grew fainter,
And she watched the white lids creey
O'er his eyes, till calm and peaceful
In her arms he lay asleep.


Dimmer burned the lights, and silence
Reigned within the white-washed walls;
Bearded cheeks were wet with tear-stains,
All forgot were cannon balls.

Far off scenes rose up to memory,
Tender thoughts-repelled so long-
Crept into the hearts of soldiers,
With that soothing cradle-song.

Morning dawned; but in the night-time
One tired soul had upward sped-
Iusk, my dear, lie still and slumber,
Holy angels guard thy bed."
MARY McGUIRE.







READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.


THE CRADLE SONG.
(Tle words of this selection can be recited while an assistant plays the music softly,
Make a swinging motion of the hand, keeping time to the music.]
S-oothly.


I. Ba by is a sail- or boy, Swing, cradle, swing; Sailing is the sailor's joy, Swing, cradle.
2. Snowy sails and precious freight, Swing, cradle, swing; Baby'scaptain,mother'smate, Swing,cralle,
3. Never fear, the watch is set, Swing, cradle, swing; Stonny gales are never met, Swing, cradle,
4. Litte eyelids downward creep, Swing, cradle, swing; Now he's in the cove of!eep, S.wing, cradle,






swing. Swing, cradle, Swing, cradle, Swing, cradle, swing; Swing, cradle, Swing, cradle,Swing, cradle,
A* A* *- .aa A. f- l"'j"c.



MILKING-TIME.
'This selection admits of recital while an assistant plays the accompanying music.]
T TELL you, Kate, that Lovejoy cow
S Is worth her weight in gold;
She gives a good eight quarts o' milk,
And isn't yet five years old.

"Here comes Dick White. Please step right in;"
"I guess I couldn't, sir,
I've just come down"-" I know it, Dick,
You've took a shine to her.

"She's kind an' gentle as a lamb,
Jest where I go she follers;
And though it's cheap I'll let her go;
She's your'n for thirty dollars.

"You'll know her clear across the farm,
By them two milk-white stars;







4h READINGS WITH ACCOMPANIMENTS OF MUSIC.

You needn't drive her home at night,
But jest le' down the bars.






Tan h I I!

















There, Kate, don't drop that pan.
"The'sn, when you've owned her, say a more;nth,
And learnt her, as it were,
IS'll folbewhy, wh the manhole world ro
"Taint her I want-it's-her!"

"What? not the girl well, I'll b blestlove.
There, Kate, don't drop that pan.
You've took m e mightily aback,
But then a man's a man.

"She's your'n, my boy, but one word more;
Kate's gentle as a dove;
She'll roller you the whole world round,
For nothing' else but love.
But never try to drive the lass,
Her nature's like her ma's.
I've allus found it worked the best,
To jest le' down the bars." PHILIP MORSI!












PART IV.

Descriptive and Dramatic Readings.


WEDDING BELLS.

SANDERING away on tired feet,
Away from the close and crowded street,
Faded shawl and faded gown,
Unsmoothed hair of a golden brown,
Eyes once bright
With joyous light,
Away from the city's smoke and din,
Trying to flee from it and sin;
In shame cast down,
'Neath the scorn and frown
Of those who had known her in days that were flown;
The same blue eyes-the abode of tears,
The once light heart-the abode of fears,
While dark despair came creeping in,
As she fled from the city's smoke an6 diA.,
With a yearning sigh,
And a heart-sick cry-
Oh, to wander away and die !
God, let me die on my mother's grav&,
'Tis the only boon I dare to crave!'
And she struggled on,
With a weary moan,
In the noon-day heat,
From the dusty street:







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

And they turned to gaze on the fair young face
And marveled much at her beauty and grace.
What cared they if her heart was aching?
How knew they that her heart was breaking?

Forth from the West the red light glowed,
And the weary feet still kept on their road,
Wand'ring on in the golden sheen,
Where the country lanes were fresh and gree
The red light gleamed on the village tuower,
And lit up the clock at the sunset hour;
And still her cry
Was, Oh, to die !
God, let me die on my mother's grave,
'Tis the only boon I care to crave!"
The sun uprose, and the light of day
Brightly scattered the clouds of gray
And the village was gay
For a holiday.
Merrily echoed the old church bells,
Peal on peal, o'er the hills and dells;
Borne away on the morning breeze
Over the moorland, over the leas;
Back again with a joyous clang!
Merrily, cheerily, on they rang !
But they woke her not, she slumbered on,
With her head laid down on the cold gray stone.

The village was bright
In the gladsome light,
And the village maidens were clad in white,
As side by side
They merrily hied,
In gay procession, to meet the bride:







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

Strewing the path of the village street
With choicest flowers for her dainty feet.
A joyful chime of the bells again,
To proclaim the return of the bridal train;
A louder peal from the old church-tower
(As the bride passes on through the floral bower,
With the bridegroom happy, tender and gay),
And the echoes are carried away, away;
But they linger awhile o'er the tombstones gray;
And the sleeper awakes with a yearning cry-
"Oh, to die! oh, to die!
God let me die on my mother's grave,
'Tis all my broken heart can crave! "
And she lays her head again on the stone,
With a long-drawn breath-and a sobbing moan;
While the bridal train (with many a thought
Unspoken of omens with evil fraught)
Sweeps down the path from the old church door,
And the bells' glad music is wafted once more
Over the moorland, over the heath-
But they wake her not, for her sleep is death !

Why does the bridegroom's cheek turn pale ?
Why in his eyes such a look of bale ?
Why does he totter, then quicken his pace
As he catches a glimpse of the poor dead face ?
Oh, woe betide,
That so fair a bride
As she who steps with such grace by his side,
Should have faced grim death on her wedding-day!
Did this thought trouble the bridegroom gay,
And dash from his eye the glad light away?
I wist not; for never a word he spoke,
And soon from his face the troubled look







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

Was gone, and he turned to his beautiful bride
With a radiant smile and a glance of pride:
And his eye was bright,
And his step was light,
As would beseem with her by his side.
Oh, his smile is glad, and his heart is brave !
What cares he for the dead on the grave?
The faded shawl, and faded gown,
And unsmoothed hair of golden brown ?
Why should the face on the tombstone gray
Trouble him on his wedding-day?
Forgotten words that were long since spoken,
Thoughts of vows that were made to be broken ?
Fling them away!
Be joyous and gay !
Death will never a secret betray.
Quaff the red wine, the glasses ring;
Drink! till the gloomy thoughts take wing;
Drink and be merry, merry and glad !
With a bride so lovely, who would be sad ?

Hark the wedding bells are ringing,
Over the hills their echoes flinging;
Carried away on the morning breeze
Over the moorland, over the leas,
Riding back on the zephyr's wing,
Joyously, merrily, on they ring!
But she will not wake, her sleep is deep,
And death can ever a secret keep.
Ah thy smile may be glad and thy heart may be brave,
And the secret be kept betwixt thee and the grave;
But shouldst thou forget it for one short day,
In the gloom of night, from the tombstone gray,
Will come the sound of a wailing cry-























:I


~p i,


ADA REHAN.
IHENCEI BEGONE! AND IN BLANK OBLIVION
MAY YOUR FOUL IMAGE DIEI"


..

..\s












%


CYRIL SCOTT.
THAT WAS THE CLIMAX OF THE WHOLE AFFAIR,
WHAT SHE DID AND HE DID NOT-HA, HA!
AND YOU SAW NOTHING OF IT?"







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

"Oh, to die! oh, to die!"
And the bride at thy bosom will raise her head
In affright, as she hears thee call on the dead
In a ghastly dream, on whose wings are borne
The memories of thy wedding morn !

Oh, the woeful sight of the pale, dead face,
With the cold, dank stone for its resting-place!
Oh, the mocking chime of the old church bell!
It shall seem to peal from the mouth of hell;
Into thy dreams its echoes bringing,
Merrily, madly, ceaselessly ringing!
The white face shall haunt thee!
The bells they shall taunt thee!
Echoed and tossed on the withering breath
Of a curse that shall cling round thy soul till death.
CHARLOTTE M. GRIFFITHb.



THE DRUMMER BOY.
AN INCIDENT OF THE CRIMEAN WAR.


, C APTAIN GRAHAM, the men were sayirn
Ye would want a drummer lad,
So I've brought my boy Sandie,
Tho' my heart is woeful sad;
But nae bread is left to feed us,
And no siller to buy more,
For the gudeman sleeps forever,
Where the heather blossoms o'er.

"Sandie, make your manners quickly,
Play yoar blithest measure true-








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

Give us 'Flowers of Edinboro',
While yon fifer plays it too.
Captain, heard ye e'er a player
Strike in truer time than he ? "
"Nay, in truth, brave Sandie Murray
Drummer of our corps shall be."

"I give ye thanks-but, Captain, maybe
Ye will hae a kindly care
For the friendless, lonely laddie,
When the battle wark is sair;
For Sandie's eye been good and gentle,
And I've nothing else to love,
Nothing-but the grave off yonder,
And the Father up above."

Then, her rough hand gently laying
On the curl-encircled head,
She blessed her boy. The tent was silent,
And not another word was said;
For Captain Graham was sadly dreaming
Of a benison, long ago,
Breathed above his head, then golden,
Bending now, and touched with snow.

Good-bye, Sandie." "Good-bye, mother,
I'll come back some summer day;
Don't you fear-they don't shoot drummers
Ever. Do they, Captain Gra- ?
One more kiss-watch for me, mother,
You will know 'tis surely me
Coming home-for you will hear me
Playing soft the reveille."







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READiLANGS.

After battle. Moonbeams ghastly
Seemed to link in strange affiight,
As the scudding clouds before them
Shadowed faces dead and white;
And the night-wind softly whispered,
When low moans its light wing bore-
Moans that ferried spirits over
Death's dark wave to yonder shore.

Wandering where a footstep careless
Might go splashing down in blood,
Or a helpless hand lie grasping
Death and daisies from the sod-
Captain Graham walked swift onward,
While a faintly-beaten drum
Quickened heart and step together;
"Sandie Murray See, I come!

"It is thus I find you, laddie?
Wounded, lonely, lying here,
Playing thus the reveille ?
Sec-the morning is not near."
A moment paused the drummer boy,
And lifted up his drooping head:
"Oh, Captain Graham, the light is coming,
'Tis morning, and my prayers are said.

"Morning See the plains grow brighter-
Morning-and I'm going home;
That is why I play the measure,
Mother will not see me come;
But you'll tell her, won't you, Captain-"
Hush, the boy has spoken true;
To him the day has dawned forever,
Unbroken by the night's tattoo.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


THE OLD MAN IN THE PALACE CAR.

ELL, Betsey, this beats everything our eyes have ever seen!
SWe're ridin' in a palace fit for any king or queen
We didn't go as fast as this, nor on such cushions rest,
Whenwe left New England years ago to seek a home out West.

We rode through this same country, but not as we now ride-
You sat within a stage coach, while I trudged on by your side
Instead of riding on a rail, I carried one you know,
To pry the old coach from the mire through which we had to go.

Let's see; that's fifty years ago-just arter we were wed;
Your eyes were then like diamonds bright, your cheeks like roses red,
Now, Betsey, people call us old, and push us off one side,
Just as they have the old slow coach in which we used to ride.

I wonder if young married folks to-day would condescend
To take a weddin' tour like ours, with a log house at the end?
Much of the sentimental love that sets young cheeks aglow
Would die to meet the hardships cf fifty years ago.

Our love grew stronger as we toiled; though food and clothes were
coarse,
None ever saw us in the courts a huntin' a divorce;
Love levelled down the mountains and made low places high;
Love sang a song to cheer us when clouds and winds were nigh.

I'm glad to see the world move on, to hear the engine's roar,
And all about the cables stretchin' now from shore to shore.
Our mission is accomplished; with toil we both are through;
The Lord just let us live awhile to see how young folks do.

Whew Betsey, how we're flyin' See the farms and towns go by !
It makes my gray hair stand on end; it dims my failin' eye.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Soon we'll be through our journey and in the house so good
That stands within a dozen rods of where the log one stood.

How slow-like old-time coaches-our youthful years went by-
The years when we were livin' neath a bright New England sky;
Swifter than palace cars now fly our later years have flown,
Till now we journey hand in hand down to the grave alone.

I hear the whistle blowin' on life's fast flyin' train;
Only a few more stations in the valley now remain.
Soon we'll reach the home eternal, with its glories all untold,
And stop at the best station in the city built of gold.
JOHN H. YATES.

THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO.

T HAD rained all night. Water lay here and there in the hollows
of the plain, as in basins. At some points the wheels sank to the
axles. The horses' girths dripped with liquid mud. The affair
opened late. The plan of the battle which had been conceived was
indeed admirable. Ney drew his sword, placed himself at the head,
and the immense squadrons began to move. Then was seen a fearful
sight. Nothing like it had been seen since the taking of the grand
redoubt at La Moscana by the heavy cavalry. Murat was not there;
but Ney was there. It seemed as if this mass had become a monster,
and had but a single mind. Each squadron undulated and swelled
like the ring of a polyp. They could be seen through the thick smoke
as it was broken here and there. It was one pell-mell of casques,
cries, sabres; a furious bounding of horses among the canon ; a terri-
ble, disciplined tumult. Something like this vision appeared in the old
Orphic Epics which tell of certain antique hippanthropes, those Titans
with human faces and chests like horses, whose gallop scaled Olympus,
horrible, invulnerable, sublime-at once gods and beasts.
All at once, at the left of the English, and on the French right, the







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


head of the column of cuirassiers reared with frightful clamor, and there
appeared three thousand faces with gray mustaches, crying, ive
/' EmP/rcr.! Unmanageable, full of fury and bent on extermination
of the square and cannon, the cuirassiers saw between them and the
Sa ditch-a grave It was the sunken road of Ohain. It
was a frightful moment. There was a ravine, unlocked for, yawning
at the ve f-eet of the horses, two fathoms deep between its double
I-le. The second rank pushed in the first. The horses reared;
threw the:rse.-es over ; fell upon their backs; struggled with their
Iret -i the air, piling up and overturning their riders. Without power
- rt:e:.r. the vwole column was nothing but a projectile. The force
acquired to., crush the English crushed the French. The inexorable
r-i-r could not yield until it was filled with riders and horses rolled
in together, grinding one another, making common flesh in this dread-
f-l g- f;: and when this grave was full of living men, the rest marched
ov-er and passed on.
as, it possible that Napoleon should win the battle of Waterloo ?
e ns'A\-cr, No ? Why? Because of Wellington? Because of
B ;cher ? No. Because of God! For Bonaparte to conquer at
'a.t roo was not in the law of the nineteenth century. It was time
at ti vat man should fall. lie had been impeached before the
Infinite He had vexed God Waterloo was not a battle. It was
th- of front of the Universe.-VIcTOR HUGO.


ASLEEP AT THE SWITCH.


IIHE first tling that I remember was Carlo tin .Ih away,
With t0he slcve of my coat fast in his teeth, pulling as much as
to sy :
" Corn:, rnfttrr, awake, and tend to the switch, lives now depend upon

Think of the souls in the coming train and the graves .you're sending
them to,








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Think of the mother, and babe at her breast, think of the father and
son,
Think of the lover, and the loved one, too, think of them, doomed
every one
To fall, as it were, by your very hand, into yon fathomless ditch,
Murdered by one who should guard them from harm, who now lies
asleep at the switch."

I sprang up amazed, scarce knew where I stood, sleep had o'ermas-
tered me so ;
I could hear the wind hollowly howling and the deep river dashing
below;
I could hear the forest leaves rustling as the trees by the tempest were
fanned,
But what was that noise at a distance? That-I could not under-
stand !
I heard it at first indistinctly, like the rolling of some muffled drum,
Then nearer and near it came to me, and made my very ears hum;
What is this light that surrounds me and seems to set fire to my brain ?
What whistle's that yelling so shrilly? Oh, God I know now-it's
the train.

We often stand facing some danger, and seem to take root to the
place;
So I stood with this demon before me, its heated breath scorching my
face,
Its headlight made day of the darkness, and glared like the eyes of
some witch;
The train was almost upon me before I remembered the switch.
I sprang to it, seizing it wildly, the train dashing fast down the track,
The switch resisted my efforts, some devil seemed holding it back;
On, on came the fiery-eyed monster, and shot by my face like a flash;
I swooned to the earth the next moment, and knew nothing after the
crash.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


How long I laid there unconscious were impossible for me to tell
My stupor was almost a heaven, my waking almost a hell-
For I then heard the piteous moaning and shrieking of husbands and
wives,
And I thought of the day we all shrink from, when I must account
for their lives;
Mothers rushed by me like maniacs, their eyes staring madly and wild;
Fathers, losing their courage, gave way to their grief like a child;
Children searching for parents, I noticed, as by me they sped,
And lips that could form naught but "mamma" were calling for one
perhaps dead.

My mind was made up in a second-the river should hide me away;
When, under the still burning rafters, I suddenly noticed there lay
A little white hand; she who owned it was doubtless an object of love
To one whom her loss would drive frantic, tho' she guarded him now
from above;
I tenderly lifted the rafters and quietly laid them one side;
How little she thought of her journey when she left for this last fatal
ride;
I lifted the last log from off her, and while searching for some spark of
life,
Turned her little face up in the starlight, and recognized-Maggie, my
wife !

Oh, Lord! Thy scourge is a hard one! At a blow Thou hast shat-
tered my pride;
My life will be one endless night-time with Maggie away from my side;
How often we've sat down and pictured the scenes in our long happy
life;
How I'd strive through all of my life-time to build up a home for my
wife.
How people would envy us always in our cozy and neat little nest,
When I would do all of the labor and Maggie should all the day rest;










r


MODJESKA.
.AND HERE'S SOME FOR ME; WE MAY CALL IT HERB OF GRACE O' SUNDAYS.
OPHELIA.















fr'


Q


JOSEPH JEFFERSON

WHERE IS MY DOG SCHNEIDER?
RIP VAN WINKLE







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


How one of God's blessings might cheer us when some day I p'r'aps
should be rich-
But all of my dreams have been shattered while I lay there asleep at
the switch.

I fancied I stood on my trial; the jury and judge I could see,
And every eye in the court-room was steadfastly fixed upon me;
And fingers were pointed in scorn, till I felt my face blushing blood-
red,
And the next thing I heard were the words, Hung by the neck until
dead."
Then I felt myself pulled once again, and my hand caught tight hold
of a dress,
And I heard, "What's the matter, dear Jinm? You've had a bad
night-mare, I guess."
And there stood Maggie, my wife, with never a scar from the ditch-
I'd been taking a nap in my bed, and had not been asleep at the switch.
GEORGE HOEY.


BRIER-ROSE.

I.
SAID Brier-Rose's mother to the naughty Brier-Rose:
"What will become of you, my child, the Lord Almighty knows;
You will not scrub the kettles, and you will not touch the broom,
You never sit a minute still at spinning-wheel or loom."

Thus grumbled in the morning, and grumbled late at eve,
The good-wife as she bustled with pot and tray and sieve;
But Brier-Rose she laughed, and she cocked her dainty head,
"Why, I shall marry, mother, dear," full merrily she said.

" You marry, saucy Brier-Rose! The man he is not found.
To marry such a worthless wench, these seven leagues around."







62 DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

But Brier-Rose she laughed and she trilled a merry lay:
" Perhaps he'll come, my mother dear, from eight leagues away."

The good-wife with a humph and a sigh forsook the battle,
And flung the pots and pails about with much vindictive rattle;
" 0 Lord, what sin did I commit in youthful days, and wild,
That thou hast punished me in age with such a wayward child?"

Up stole the girl on tip-toe, so that none her step could hear,
And, laughing, pressed an airy kiss behind the good-wife's ear.
And she, as e'er, relenting, sighed: Oh Heaven only knows
Whatever will become of you, my naughty Brier-Rose! "

The sun was high, and summer sounds were teeming in the air;
The clank of scythes, the cricket's whirr, and swelling wood-notes rare,
From field, and copse, and meadow; and through the open door
Sweet, fragrant whiffs of new-mown hay the idle breezes bore.

Then Brier-Rose grew pensive, like a bird of thoughtful mien,
Whose little life has problems among the branches green.
She heard the river brawling where the tide was swift and strong,
She heard the summer singing its strange, alluring song.

And out she skipped the meadows o'er and gazed into the sky,
Her heart o'er-brimmed with gladness, she scarce herself knew why,
And to a merry tune she hummed, 0 Heaven only knows
Whatever will become of the naughty Brier-Rose! "

Whene'er a thrifty matron this idle maid espied
She shook her head in warning, and scarce her wrath could hide;
For girls were made for housewives, for spinning-wheel and loom,
And not to drink the sunshine, and the wild-flowers' sweet perfume.

And oft the maidens cried, when Brier-Rose went by,
" You cannot knit a stocking, and you cannot make a pie."







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


But Brier-Rose, as was her won't, she cocked her curly head:
"But I can sing a pretty song," full merrily she said.

And oft the young lads shouted, when they saw the maid at play:
Ho, good-for-nothing Brier-Rose, how do you do to-day? "
Then she shook her tiny fist, to her cheek the color flew :
" However much you coax me, I'll never dance with you."

II.

Thus flew the years light-winged over Brier-Rose's head,
Till she was twenty summers old and yet remained unwed.
And all the parish wondered: The Lord Almighty knows
Whatever will become of that naughty Brier-Rose "

Anid while they wondered, came the Spring a-dancing o'er the hills;
Her breath was warmer than of yore, and all the mountain rills,
With their tinkling and their rippling and their rushing, filled the air,
And the misty sounds of water forth-welling everywhere.

And in the valley's depth, like a lusty beast of prey,
The river leaped and roared aloud and tossed its mane of spray;
Then hushed again its voice to a softly plashing croon,
As dark it rolled beneath the sun and white beneath the moon.

It was a merry sight to see the lumber as it whirled
Adown the tawny eddies that hissed and seethed and swirled,
Now shooting through the rapids and, with a reeling swing,
Into the foam-crests diving like an animated thing.

But in the narrows of the rocks, where, o'er a steep incline,
The waters plunged and wreathed in foam the dark boughs of the pine,
The lads kept watch with shout and song, and sent each straggling beam
A-spinning down the rapids, lest it should lock the stream.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


III.
And yet-methinks I hear it now-wild voices in the night,
A rush of feet, a dog's harsh bark, a torch's flaring light,
And wandering gusts of dampness, and 'round us, far and nigh,
A throbbing boom of water, like a pulse-beat in the sky.

The dawn just pierced the pallid east with spears of gold and red
As we, with boat-hooks in our hands, towards the narrows sped,
And terror smote us, for we heard the mighty tree-tops sway,
And thunder, as of chariots, and hissing showers of spray.

" Now, lads," the sheriff shouted, you are strong like Norway's rock;
A hundred crowns I give to him who breaks the lumber-lock !
For if another hour go by, the angry waters' spoil
Our homes will be, and fields, and our weary years of toil."

We looked each at the other; each hoped his neighbor would
Brave death and danger for his home, as valiant Norsemen should;
But at our feet the brawling tide expanded like a lake,
And whirling beams came shooting on, and made the firm rock quake.

"Two hundred crowns! the sheriff cried, and breathless stood the
crowd.
"Two hundred crowns, my bonny lads in anxious tones and loud.
But not a man came forward, and no one spoke or stirred,
And nothing but the thunder of the cataract was heard.

But as with trembling hands and with fainting hearts we stood
We spied a little curly head emerging from the wood;
We heard a little snatch of a merry little song,
And saw the dainty Brier-Rose come dancing through the throng.

An angry murmur rose from the people 'round about.
" Fling her into the river we heard the matrons shout;
" Chase her away, the silly thing; for God himself scarce knows
Why ever he created that worthless Brier-Rose."







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Sweet Brier-Rose she heard their cries; a little pensive smile
Across her fair face flitted that might a stone beguile;
And then she gave her pretty head a roguish little cock.
" Hand me a boat-hook, lads," she said; I think I'll break the lock."

Derisive shouts of laughter broke from throats of young and old:
" Ho good-for-nothing Brier-Rose, your tongue was ever bold! "
And, mockingly, a boat-hook into her hands was flung,
When, lo! into the river's midst with daring leaps she sprung!

We saw her dimly through a mist of dense and blinding spray;
From beam to beam she skipped, like a water-sprite at play;
And now and then faint gleams we caught of color through the mist-
A crimson waist, a golden head, a little dainty wrist.

In terror pressed the people to the margin of the hill,
A hundred breaths were bated, a hundred hearts stood still,
For hark! from out the rapids came a strange and creaking sound,
and then a crash of thunder which shook the very ground.

The waters hurled the lumber mass down o'er the rocky steep;
We heard a muffled rumbling and a rolling in the deep;
We saw a tiny form which the torrent swiftly bore
And flung into the wild abyss, where it was seen no more.

Ah, little naughty Brier-Rose, thou couldst not weave nor spin,
Yet thou couldst do a nobler deed than all thy mocking kin;
For thou hadst courage e'en to die, and by thy death to save
A thousand farms and lives from the fury of the wave.

And yet the adage lives, in the valley of thy birth,
When wayward children spend their days in heedless play and mirth,
Oft mothers say, half smiling, half sighing, Heaven knows
Whatever will become of the naughty Brier-Rose! "
HJALMAR HJORTH BOYSEEN.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


THE BLACK HORSE AND HIS RIDER.

IT WAS the seventh of October, 1777. Horatio Gates stood betf-
his tent, gazing upon the two armies now arrayed in orde; :
battle. It was a clear, bracing day, mellow with the richness
of autumn. The sky was clou less, the foliage of the woods scarc-ly
tinged with purple and gold. But the tread of legions shook t ie
ground, from every bush shot the glimmer of rifle-barrels; on every
hillside blazed the sharpened bayonet. Gates was sad and thoughtful
as he watched the evolutions of the two armies. All at once a smc ke
arose, a thunder shook the ground, and a chorus of shouts and groans
yelled along the darkened air. The play of death had begun. The
two flags, this of the stars, that of the red cross, tossed amid the
smoke of battle while the earth throbbed as with the pulsations of a
nightyy heart. Suddenly along the heights, on which Gates and his
staff stood, came a rider upon a black horse, rushing towards th"
distant battle. Look! He draws his sword. The sharp blade qui.rers
through the air; and now he is gone, gone through those clouds,
while his shout echoes over the plains. Wherever the fight is thickest.
there, through the intervals of cannon-smoke, you may see riding
madly forward, that strange soldier mounted on his steed black as
death. Look at him, as, with face red with British blood, he waves his
sword and shouts to his legions. Now you may see him fighting in
that cannon's glare; and the next moment he is away off yonder,
leading the forlorn hope up that steep cliff.
Thus it was all the day long; and wherever that black horse and
his rider went, there followed victory. At last, towards the setting of
the sun, the crisis of the conflict came. That fortress yonder, on
Bemus Heights, must be won, or the American cause is lost. That
cliff is too steep. That death is too certain. The officers cannot
persuade the men to advance. The Americans have lost the field.
Kven Morgan, that iron man among iron men, leans on his rifl- and
despairs. But look yonder! In this moment, when all is di:may,
here crashing on, comes the black horse and his rider. That '-der








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


bends upon his steed, his frenzied face covered with sweat, and dust,
and blood. He lays his hand on that bold rifleman's shoulder; and
as though living fire had been poured into his veins, he seizes his rifle
and starts toward the rock. Now look as that black steed crashes up
the steep cliff! That steed quivers! he totters he falls! No! no
still on, still up the cliff, still on towards the fortress The rider turns
his face and shouts, Come on! men of Quebec come on !" That
call is needless. Already the riflemen are on the rock. Now,
British cannon, pour your fires, and lay your dead upon the rock in
tens and twenties. Now, red-coat hirelings, shout your battle-cry it
you can; for look there, in the gate of the fortress, as the smoke
clears away, stands the black horse and his rider. That steed falls
dead, pierced by a hundred balls. But his rider, as the British cry for
quarter, lifts up his voice, and shouts to Horatio Gates, sitting yonder
in his tent, "Saratoga is won!" As that cry goes up to heaven he
falls, his leg shattered by a cannon ball.
Who was the rider of that black horse? Do you not guess his
name? Then bend down and gaze on that shattered limb, and you
will see that it bears the mark of a former wound. That wound was
received at the storming of Quebec. That rider of the black horse
was Benedict Arnold.-GEORGE LIPPARD.



ECHO AND THE FERRY.

[The reader should imitate the echoes in this selection.]
AY, OLIVER I was but seven, and he was eleven;
He looked at me pouting and rosy. I blushed where I stood.
They had told us to play in the orchard (and I only seven !
A small guest at the farm); but he said, Oh a girl is no good !"
So he whistled and went, he went over the stile to the wood.
It "-a- sad, it was sorrowful! Only a girl-only seven!
At c-ne in the dark London smoke I had not found it out.
The pear-trees looked on in their white, and blue-birds flashed about.








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


And they, too, were angry as Oliver. Were they eleven ?
I thought so. Yes, every one else was eleven-eleven !

So Oliver went, but the cowslips were tall at my feet,
And all the white orchard with fast-falling blossom was littered;
And under and over the branches those little birds twittered,
While hanging head downward they scolded because I was seven.
A pity--a very great pity! One should be eleven.
But soon I was happy, the smell of the world was so sweet,
And I saw a round hole in an apple-tree rosy and old.
Then I knew, for I peeped, and I felt it was right they should scold.
Eggs small and eggs many. For gladness I broke into laughter;
And then some one else-oh how softly !-came after, came after,
With laughter-with laughter came after.

And no one was near us to utter that sweet mocking call,
That soon very tired sank low with a mystical fall.
*ut this was the country-perhaps it was close under heaven;
)h nothing so likely; the voice might have come from it even.
I knew about heaven. But this was the country, of this
Light, blossom, and piping, and -1. ,-1,;1 of wings, not at all,
Not at all. No. But one little bird was an easy forgiver :
She peeped, she drew near as I moved from her domicile small,
Then flashed down her hole like a dart-like a dart from the quiver.
And I waded atween the long grasses, and felt it was bliss.

-So this was the country; clear dazzle of azure and shiver
And whisper of leaves, and a humming all over the tall
White branches, a humming of bees. And I came to the wall-
A little low wall-and looked over, and there was the river,
The lane that led on to the village, and then the sweet river,
Clear shining and slow, she had far, far to go from her snow;
But each rush gleamed a sword in the sunlight to guard her long flow,
And she murmured, methought, with a speech very soft, very low.































IdA


. r..' -LvW
4. (-. -


EDWIN BOOTH.

THE STATUES OF OUR STATELY FORTUNES
ARE SCULPT iD BY THE CHISEL-NOT THE AXEI
BENEATH THE RULE OF MEN ENTIRELY GREAT,
THE PEN IS MIGHTIER THAN THE SWORD.
RICHELIEU.






































































ALEXANDER SALVINI.

THERE BRING MY LOVE THE SHATTERED GLASS-
CHARGE ON THE FOE! NO JOYS SURPASS
SUCH DYING!-THE TROOPER'S DEATH







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


" f'he ways will be long, but the days will be long," quoth the river,
'To me a long liver, long, long quoth the river-the river.

I dreamed of the country that night, of the orchard, the sky,
The voice that had mocked coming after and over and under.
But at last-in a day or two namely-Eleven and I
Were very fast friends, and to him I confided the wonder.
He said that was Echo. "Was Echo a wise kind of bee
That had learned how to laugh; could it laugh in on- ear and thenfly,
And laugh again yonder ? No; Echo "--he whispered it low-
"Was a woman, they said, but a woman whom no one could see,
And no one could find; and he did not believe it, not he;
But he could not get near for the river that held us asunder.

Yet I that had money-a shilling, a whole silver shilling-
We might cross if I thought I could spend it." "Oh yes 1 was
willing-
And we ran hand in hand, we ran down to the ferry, the ferry,
And we heard how she mocked at the folk with a voice clear an,
merry
When they called for the ferry ; but, oh she was very-was very
Swift-footed. She spoke and was gone; and when Oliver cried,
"Hie over! hic over! you man of the ferry-the ferry! "
By the still water's side she was heard far and wide-she replied,
And she mocked in her voice sweet and merry, "You man of the
ferry,
You man of-you man of the ferry!"

" Hie over he shouted. The ferry man came at his calling;
Across the clear reed-bordered river he ferried us fast.
Such a chase! Hand in hand, foot to foot, we ran on ; it surpassed
All measure her doubling-so close, then so far away falling,
Then gone, and no more. Oh! to see her but once unaware,
And the mouth that had mocked, but we might not (yet sure she
was there),






DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Nor behold her wild eyes, and her mystical countenance fair.
We sought in the wood, and we found the wood-wren in her stead;
In the field, and we found but the cuckoo that talked overhead;
By the brook, and we found the reed-sparrow, deep-nested in brown;
Not Echo, fair Echo, for Echo, sweet Echo, was flown.

So we came to the place where the dead people wait till God call.
Fhe church was among them, gray moss over roof, over wall.
Very silent, so low. And we stood on a green, grassy mound
And looked in at the window, for Echo perhaps, in her round
Might have come in to hide there. But, no; every oak-carven seat
Was empty. We saw the great Bible-old, old, very old.
And the parson's great prayer book beside it; we heard the slow beat
Of the pendulum swing in the tower; we saw the clear gold
Of a sunbeam float down to the aisle, and then waver and play
On the low chancel step and the railing; and Oliver said,
" Look, Katie look, Katie when Lettice came here to be wed
She stood where that sunbeam drops down, and all white was her
gown;
And she stepped upon flowers they strewed for her."

Then quoth small Seven:
"Shall I wear a white gown and have flowers to walk upon ever ? "
All doubtful: It takes a long time to grow up," quoth Eleven;
"You're so little, you know, and the church is so old, it can never
Last on till you're tall." And in whispers-because it was old
And holy, and fraught with strange meaning, half felt, but not told,
Full of old parsons' prayers, who were dead, of old days, of old folk.
Neither heard or beheld, but about us-in whispers we spoke.
Then we went from it softly, and ran hand in hand to the strand,
While bleating of flocks and birds' piping made sweeter the land.

And Echo came back e'en as Oliver drew to the ferry,
"0 Katie! "0 Katie!" "Come on, then!" Come on, then "
For see,







DESCRIPT'riVE ANvt DRAMATIC READINGs.


The round sun, all red, lying low by the tree "-" by'the tree."
By the tree." Ay, she mocked him again, with her voice sweet and
merry;
Hie over " Hie over! " You man of the ferry "-" the ferry."
You man of the ferry--
You man of-you man of-the ferry."

Ay, here-it was here that we woke her, the Echo of old;
All life of that clay seems an echo, and many times told.
Shall I cross by the ferry to-morrow, and come in my white
To that little low church ? and will Oliver meet me anon ?
Will it all seem an echo from childhood passed over-passed on ?
Will the grave parson bless us ? Hark hark in the dim failing
light
I hear her! As then the child's voice clear and high, sweet and
merry,
Now she mocks the man's tone with Hie over Hie over the ferry!'
"And, Katie." "And, Katie." "Art out with the glow-worms
to-night,
My Katie? My Katie For gladness I break into laughter.
And tears. Then it all comes again as from far-away years;
Again, some one else-oh, how softly !-with laughter comes after,
Comes after-with laughter comes after.
JEAN INGELOW.


ANDRE AND HALE.

SNDRE'S story is the one overmastering romance of the Revolu-
tion. American and English literature are full of eloquence
and poetry in tribute to his memory and sympathy for his fate.
After a lapse of a hundred years there is no abatement of absorbing
interest. What had this young man done to merit immortality ? The
mission whose tragic issue lifted him out of the oblivion of other minof
British officers, in its inception was free from peril or daring, and s?







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


object and purposes were utterly infamous. Had he succeeded by the
desecration of the honorable uses of passes and flags of truce, his name
would have been held in everlasting execration. In his failure, the
infant republic escaped the dagger with which he was feeling for its
heart, and the crime was drowned in tears for his untimely end.
His youth and beauty, his skill with pen and pencil, his effervescing
spirits and magnetic disposition, the brightness of his life, the caln-
courage in the gloom of his death, his early love and disappointment
and the image of his lost Honora hid in his mouth when captured
in Canada with the exclamation, "That saved, I care not for the loss
of all the rest," and nestling in his bosom when he was slain,
surrounded him with a halo of poetry and pity which have secured for
him what he most sought and could never have won in battles and sieges
-a fame and recognition which have outlived that of all the generals
under whom he served.
Are kings only grateful, and do republics forget ? Is fame a travesty,
and the j 7. of mankind a farce? America had a parallel case
in Captain ; ..! i Hale. Of the same age as Andre, he graduated
at Yale college with high honors, enlisted in the patriot cause at the
- ii -' of the contest, and secured the love and confidence of all
about him. When none else would go on a most important and
perilous mission, he volunteered, and was captured by the British.
WVhile Andre received every kindness, courtesy and attention, and was
fed from Washington's table, Hale was thrust into a noisome dungeon
in the sugar-house. While Andre was tried by a board of officers and
had ample time and every facility for defence, Hale was summarily
ordered to execution the next morning. While Andre's last wishes
and '. ., were sacredly followed, the infamous Cunningham tore
from Hale his letters to his mother and sister, and asked him what
he had to say.
"All I have to say," was Hale's reply, is that I regret I have but
one to le for mry country." His death was concealed for months,
because Cunningham said he did not want the rebels to know they had
a man who could die so bravely. And yet, wlhle Andre rests in that







DESCRIPTIVE AND DiRAVMATIC READINGS.


grandest of mausoleums, where the proudest of nations garners the
remains and perpetuates the memories of its most eminent and honored,
the name and deeds of Nathan Hale have passed into oblivion, and
only a simple tomb in a village churchyard marks his resting-place.
The dying declarations of Andre and Hale express the animating
spirit of their several armies, and teach why, with all their power,
England could not conquer America. I call upon you to witness
that I die like a brave man," said Andre, and he spoke from British
and Hessian surroundings, seeking only glory and pay. I regret that
I have only one life to lose for mi country," said Hale; and with him
and his comrades self was forgotten in that absorbing, passionate
patriotism which pledges fortune, honor and life to the sacred cause.
CHAUNCEY M. DEPEW.


ORANGE AND GREEN.


HE night was falling dreary, in merry Bandon town,
When in his cottage, weary, an Orangeman lay down.
The summer sun in splendor had set upon the vale,
And shouts of "No surrender!" arose upon the gale.

Beside the waters, laving the feet of aged trees,
The Orange banners, waving, flew boldly in the breeze-
In mighty chorus meeting, a hundred voices join,
And fife and drum were beating the Battle of the Boyne.

Ha! tow'rd his cottage hieing, what form is speeding now,
From yonder thicket flying, with blood upon his brow?
Hide-hide me, worthy stranger, though green my color be,
And in the day of danger may Heaven remember thee!

"In yonder va.it contending alone against that crew,
My life and limbs defending, an Orangeman I slew,








DESCRIPTIVE AND DR .i\A i i C READINGS.


Hark! hear that fearful warning, there's death in every tone-
Oh save my life till morning, and Heaven prolong your own!"

The Orange heart was melted in pity to the Green;
He heard the tale, and felt it his very soul within.
"Dread not that angry warning, though death be in its tone-
I'll save your life till morning, or I will lose my oxn."

Now, round his lowly dwelling the angry torrent press'd,
A hundred voices ..1m; the Orangeman addressed-
"Arise, arise and follow the chase along the plain !
In yonder stony hollow your only son is slain !"

With rising shouts they gather upon the track amain,
And leave the childless father agast with sudden pain.
He seeks the frighted stranger, in covert where he lay--
"Arise !" he said, "all danger is gone and passed away !

"I had a son-one only, one loved as very life,
Thy hand has left me lonely, in that accursed strife.
I pledged my word to save thee until the storm should cease,
I kept the pledge I gave thee-arise, and go in peace; "

The stranger soon departed from that unhappy vale;
The father, broken hearted, lay brooding o'er that tale.
Full twenty summers after to silver turned his beard;
And yet the sound of laughter from him was never heard.

The night was falling dreary, in merry Wexford town,
When in his cabin, weary, a peasant laid him down.
And many a voice was singing along the summer vale,
And Wexford town was ringing with shouts of Granua Uile."

Beside the waters, leaving the feet of aged tices,
The green flag, gayly waving, was spread against the breeze-
In might chorus meeting, loud voices filled the town,
And fife and drum were beating, Down, Orangemen, lie down! "








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Hark! 'mid the stirring clangor that woke the echoes there,
Loud voices, high in anger, rife on the evening air.
Like billows of the ocean he sees them hurry on-
And, 'mid the wild commotion, an Orangeman alone.

" My hair," he said, "is hoary, and feeble is my hand,
And I could tell a story would shame your cruel band.
Full twenty years and over have changed my heart and brow,
And I am grown a lover of peace and concord now.

' It was not thus I greeted your brothel of the Green,
When, fainting and defeated, I freely took him in.
I pledged my word to save him from vengeance rushing on,-
I kept the pledge I gave him, though he had killed my son."

That aged peasant heard him, and knew him as he stood;
Remembrance kindly stirred him, and tender gratitude.
With gushing tears of pleasure, he pierced the listening train,
"I'm here to pay the measure of kindness back again!"

Upon his bosom falling, that old man's tears came down;
Deep memory recalling that cot and fatal town.
"The hand that would ,.T.n. I thee my being first shall end;
I'm living to defend thee, my savior and my friend!"

He said, and slowly turning, addressed the wondering crowd;
With fervent spirit bui .ing, he told the tale aloud.
Now pressed the warm beholders their aged foe to greet;
They raised him on their shoulders and chaired him, through the
street.

As he had saved that stranger from peril scowling dim,
So in his day of danger did Heaven remember him.
By joyous crowds attended, the worthy pair were seen,
And their flags that day were blended of Orange ;.nd of Green.
G H"A~) GlH l-'^







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


TO A SKELETON.

The MSS. of this poem, which appeared during the first quarter of the present
century, was said to have been found in the Museum of the Royal College of
Surgeons, in London, near a perfect hunlan skeleton, and to have been sent by the
curator to the Ilorni: g Chronic'' for publication. -It excited so much attention
that every effort was made to discover the au'ihor, n'd a responsible party went so
far as to offer a reward of fifty guineac for information that would discover its
origin. The author preserved hi- incrgni'o, and, we believe, has never beer
discovered.
SEHOLD this ruin! 'Twas a skull
Once of ethereal spirit full:
This narrow cell wa. Life's retreat,
This space was Thought's mysterious seat.
What beauteous visions filled this spot,
What dreams of pleasure long forgot ?
Nor hope, nor joy, nor love, nor fear,
Have left one trace of record here.

Beneath this smouldering canopy
Once shone the bright and busy eye,
But start not at the dismal void,-
If social love that eye employed,
If with no lawless fire it gleamed,
But through the dews of kindness beamed,
That eye shall be forever bright
When stars and sun are sunk in night.

Within this hollow cavern hung
The ready, swift, and tuneful tongue;
If Falsehood's honey it disdained,
And when it could not praise was chained,
If bold in Virtue's cause it spoke,
Yet gentle concord never broke,-
This silent tongue shall plead for thee
When Time unveils Eternity!







































































MR. KENDALL.

ONCE, THE CHALDEAN FROM THE TOPMOST TOWER
DID WATCH THE STARS. AND THEN ASSERT THEIR POWER
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.-THE FALCON.

















































MRS KENDALL.
SOMET MES A VAGRANT FANTASY
FLITS LIKE A WANDERING FIRE-FLY,
AE FAIN WOULD SEIZE IT, 'TIS SO NEAR-
1.0' wIt v DOES IT DISAPPEAR!"


f., S:


'''








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


Say, did these fingers delve the mine,
Or with the envied rubies shine?
To hew the rock or wear a gem
Can little now avail to them,
But if the page of Truth they sought,
Or comfort to the mourner brought,
These hands a richer meed shall claim
Than all that wait on Wealth and Fame.

Avails it whether bare or shod
These feet the paths of duty trod ?
If from the bowers of Ease they fled,
To seek Affliction's humble shed;
If Grandeur's guilty bribe they spurned,
And home to Virtue's cot returned,-
These feet with arigel wings shall vie,
And tread the palace of the sky !


THE MAJESTY OF TRIFLES.

OTHING, in fact, is small, and any one who is affected by the
profound penetrations of nature is aware of this fact. Although
no absolute satisfaction is granted to philosophy, and though it
can no more circumscribe the cause than limit the effect, the contem-
plator falls into unfathomable ecstasy when he watches all those
decompositions of force which result in a beauteous unity. Everything
labors for everything; algebra is applied to the clouds, the irradiation
of the planet benefits the rose, and no thinker would dare to say that
the perfume of the hawthorn is useless to the constellations.
Who can calculate the passage of a molecule? Who among us
knows whether the creations of worlds are not determined by the fall
of grains of sand ? Who is acquainted with the reciprocal ebb and
i1 of the infinitely great and the infinitely little ? A maggot is of
importance, the little is great and the great little, all is in a state







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


of equilibrium in nature. This is a terrific vision for the mind. There
are prodigious relations between beings and things; and in this inex-
haustible total, from the flea to the sun, nothing despises the other, for
all have need of each other.
Light does not bear into the sky terrestrial perfumes without know-
ing what to do with them, and night distributes the planetary essence
to the s!cepy flowers. Every bird that flies has round its foot the
thread of infinity; germination is equally displayed in the outburst
of a meteor and the peck of the swallow breaking the egg, and it places
the birth of a worm and the advent of Socrates in the same parallel.
Where the telescope ends the microscope begins, and which of the t o
has the grandest sight ? You can choose. A patch of green mold is
a pleiad of flowers, and a nebula is an ant-hill of stars,-VICTOR HUGO,


THE FIRE.

[An M-cellent reading for rapid modulations of voice, and dramatic effect.]
H USH, hark, that knell!
What means that bell-
That rousing swell ?
It dies, it sinks in parted links.

Again it thrills Again it fills!
Waking, 1, 1 IJ leaping higher,
Hoarse and deep with embodied fire.

See that smoke! See that cloud!
Darker, denser, wider growing,
Rising, falling, searching, blowing.

Again that stroke See that crowd I
Rushing, pushing, shouting, yelling,
Love to save, each bosom sweling-.
Swelling, swelling, swelling.








DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.

Place the engine! Seize the hose!
Let the water boldly float
On the fiendish fiery foes,
And the engine puff her throat.

O the flames 0 the flames !
Winding, wafting, twisting, turning,
Cracking, scorching, blazing, burning
Burning, burning, burning I

Hear those names Hear those calnimn
Save me, father! Save me, mother !
Sister, save me Save me, brother !
O hear our angel baby's cry!
No more. Its lips in ashes lie.

Hush! that clash Gods, that crash!
Madly rising, tearing, dashing!
Wildly flouncing, flaring, flashing !
Red flames lash the broken sash.

Hark, hark, within-a breath, a din !
Groaning, moaning, clinging, grasping,
Life on fire, a fireman clasping !
Clasping, clasping, clasping
Such love of kin should glory win.

Now, now you see the flames are free!
Sprouting, spreading, waving, soaring,
Plunging, tossing, raging, roaring,
In one hot sea of dread decree.

The high-raised throws from spurting hose,
Tending, bending, warping, winding,
Seeking, chasing, meeting, blinding,
Each blast that blows from fiery foes.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


O God, that wail! That prayer, that fall I
Ruin, wreck and desolation,
Ravage, waste and devastation,
Spread Death's sad pall dark over all.
That lurid glare! That ghastly stare)
Bruised, maimed, and gashed,
Soiled, stained, and broken,
Of former looks scare left a token
Could those lips speak, how they could teh
Of direful woe and fortune fell !
For mother's grief those eyes have shed;
For brother's pain that still heart bled,
What now is light, or gloom, or earth, or air,
To that wild stare?
Or friend or foe, or joy or woe,
Or frown or smile, or trust or guile,
To that dead glare?
Truth rests but in the tomb.
HUGH F. MCDERMOTT.

HEROES OF THE LAND OF PENN.
tA good combination of vivid word-painting and dramatic passages.]
T EAUTIFUL in her solitary grandeur-fair as a green island in a
) desert waste, proud as a lonely column, reared in the wilder-
ness-rises the land of Penn, in the history of America.
Here, beneath the Elm of Shackamaxon, was first reared the holy
altar of Toleration. Here, from the halls of the old State House,
was first proclaimed the Bible of the rights of man-the Declaration
of Independence.
Here, William Penn asserted the mild teachings of the Gospel,
whose every word was Love. Here Franklin drew down lightning
from the sky, and bent the science of ages to the good of toiling man.
Here Jefferson stood forth, the consecrated Prophet of Freedom,







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


proclaiming from Independence Hall the destiny of a Continent, the
l-eCdoni of a people.
She has no orator to celebrate her glories, to point to her past; she
has no Pierpont to hymn her illustrious dead: no Jared Sparks to
chronicle her Revolutionary grandeur.
And yet the green fields of Germantown, the twilight vale of the
Brandywine, the blood-nurtured soil of Paoli, all have their memories
of the past, all are stored with their sacred treasure of whitened bone;.
From the far North, old \Wyoming sends forth her voice-from her
hills of grandeur and her valleys of beauty, she sends her voice, and
at the sound the mighty Dead of the land of Penn sweep by, a solemn
pageant of the Past.
Pennsylvanians, remember that though the Land of Penn has no
history, yet is her story written on her battle-fields.
Let us go to the battle of Germantown, in the dread hour of the
retreat, and see how the children of Penn died. Let us go there, in
the moment when WVashington and his Generals came back from the
fight.
A pause in the din of battle The denizens of Mount Airy and
Chestnut IIill come crowding to their doors and windows; the hilly
streets are occupied by anxious groups of people, who converse in low
and whispered tones, with hurried gestures, and looks of surprise and
fear. See yonder group clustered by the roadside: the gray-haired
man, with his ear inclined intently toward Germantown, his hands
outspread, and his trembling form bent with age; the maiden, fair-
cheeked, red-lipped, and blooming, clad in the peasant costume; the
matron, calm, self-possessed and placid ; the boy, with the light flaxen
hair, the ruddy cheeks, the merry blue eyes;-all standing silent and
motionless, and listening, as with a common impulse, for the first news
of the battle.
There is a strange silence upon the air. A moment ago, and far off
shouts broke upon the ear, mingling with tile thunder of cannon, and
the shrieks of the terrible musketry; the earth seems to tremble, and
far around, the wide horizon is agitated by a thousand echoes, Now
l r;)






DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READ INGS.


the scene is still as midnight. Not a sound, not a shout, not a distant
hurrah. The anxiety of the group upon the hill becomes absorbing
and painful. Looks of wonder, at the sudden pause of the battle,
flit from face to face, and then low whispers are heard, and then comes
another moment of fearful suspense. It is followed by a wild, rushing
sound to the south, like the shrieks of the ocean waves, as they fill the
hold of the foundering ship, while it sinks far into the loneliness of the
seas.
Then a pause, and again that unknown sound, and then the tramp
of ten thousand footsteps mingled with a wild and indistinct murmur.
Tramp, tramp, tramp, the air is filled with a sound, and then distinct
voices break upon the air, and the clatter is borne upon the breeze.
The boy turns to his mother, and asks her who has gained the day.
Every heart feels vividly that the battle is now over, that the account
of blood is near its close, that the appeal to the God of battles has
been made. The mother turns her tearful eyes to the south; she
cannot answer the question. The old man, awakened from a reverie,
turns suddenly to the maiden, and clasps her arm with his trembling
hands. His lips move, but his tongue is unable to syllable a sound,
He !;r,-. a trembling hand southward, and speaks his question w ith
the gesture of age. The battle-the battle-how goes the battle ?
As he makes the gesture, the figure of a soldier is seen rushing from
the mist in the valley below; he comes speeding round the bend of
the road, he ascends the hill, but his steps totter and he i _- .-i to
and fro like a drunken man. He bears a burden on his shoulders-
is it the plunder of the fight? Is it the spoil gathered from the ranks
of the dead ? No !-no He bears an aged man on his shoulders.
Both are clad in the blue hunting shirt, torn and tattered and
stained with blood, it is true, but still you can recognize the uniform
of the Revolution. The tottering soldier nears the group, he lays the
aged veteran clown by the roadside, and then looks around with a
ghastly face and a rolling eye. There is blood dripping from his attire,
his face is begrimed with powder and spotted with crimson drops. He
glances wildly around, and then, kneeling on the sod, he takes the







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


hand of the aged man in his own, and raises his head upon his knee.
The battle-the battle-how goes the battle? The group cluster
around as they ask the question. The young Continental makes no
reply, but, gazing upon the face of the dying veteran, wipes the beaded
drops of blood from his forehead.
Comrade!" shrieks the veteran, "raise me on my feet, and wipe
the blood from my eyes. I would see him once again." He is raised
upon his feet, and the blood is wiped from his eyes. I see-it is he
S-it is Washington! Yonder-yonder I see his sword-and Anthony
Wayne-raise me higher, comrade-all is getting dark-I would see
-Mad Anthony Lift me, comrade-higher, higher-I see him-I
see Mad Anthony! Wipe the blood from my eyes, comrade, for it
darkens my sight; it is dark-it is dark!"
And the young soldier held in his arms a lifeless corpse. The old
veteran was dead. He had fought his last fight, fired his last shot,
shouted the name of Mad Anthony for the last time; and yet his
withered hand clenched, with the tightness of death, the broken bayonet.
The battle-the battle-how goes the battle? As the thrilling
question again rung in his ears, the young Continental turned to the
group, smiled ghastly, and then flung his wounded arm to the south.
"Lost!" he shrieked, and rushed on his way like one bereft of his
senses. He had not gone ten steps, when he bit the dust of the road-
side, and lay extended in the face of day, a lifeless corpse.
So they died; the young hero and the aged veteran, children of the
Land of Penn So died thousands of their brethren throughout the
Continent-Quebec and Saratoga, Camden and Bunker Hill, to this
hour, retain their bones !
Nameless and unhonored, the Poor Men Heroes of Pennsyl-
vania sleep the last slumber on every battle-field of the Revolution.
The incident which we have pictured is but a solitary page among ten
thousand. In every spear of the grass that grows on our battle-fields,
in every wild flower that blooms above the dead of the Revolution,
you read the quiet heroism of the children of the Land of Penn.
GEORGE LIPPARD.







DESCRIPTIVE AND DRAMATIC READINGS.


KATE SHELLY.

AVE you heard how a girl saved the lightning express,-
Of Kate Shelly, whose father was killed on the road?
Were he living to-day, he'd be proud to possess
Such a daughter as Kate. Ah 'twas grit that she showed
On that terrible evening when Donahue's train
Jumped the bridge and went down, in the darkness and rain.
She was only eighteen, but a woman in size,
With a figure as graceful and lithe as a doe;
With peach-blossom cheeks, and with violet eyes,
And teeth and complexion like new-fallen snow;
With a nature unspoiled and unblemished by art-
With a generous soul, and a warm, noble heart!

'Tis evening-the darkness is dense and profound;
Men linger at home by their bright-blazing fires;
The wind wildly howls with a horrible sound,
And shrieks through the vibrating telegraph wires;
The fierce lightning flashes along the dark sky;
The rain falls in torrents ; the river rolls by.

The scream of a whistle the rush of a train !
The sound of a bell! a mysterious light
That flashes and flares through the fast falling rain!
A rumble! a roar shrieks of human affright!
The falling of timbers the space of a breath!
A splash in the river! then darkness and death !

Kate Shelly recoils at the terrible crash;
The sounds of destruction she happens to hear;
She springs to the window-she throws up the sash,
And listens and looks with a feeling of fear.
The tall tree-tops groan, and she hears the faint cry
Of a drowning man down in the river near by.