• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse
 The story of Mr. Vinegar
 The story of Chicken-licken
 Lazy Jack
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Banbury Cross series
Title: Fireside stories
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082986/00001
 Material Information
Title: Fireside stories
Series Title: Banbury Cross series
Physical Description: 60, 3 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rhys, Grace Little, 1865-1929
Mitchell, Alice M ( Illustrator )
Bell, Robert Anning, 1863-1933 ( Engraver )
J. M. Dent & Co ( Publisher )
Turnbull & Spears ( Printer )
Publisher: J.M. Dent & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Turnbull and Spears
Publication Date: 1895
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1895   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated by Alice M. Mitchell.
General Note: "Banbury cross series. Prepared for children by Grace Rhys"--half title.
General Note: Pictorial endpapers signed R.A.B., i.e. Robert Anning Bell.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082986
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221825
notis - ALG2055
oclc - 154295715

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Half Title
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Dedication
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The story of Mr. Vinegar
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The story of Chicken-licken
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Lazy Jack
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Back Matter
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text





















' TheBaldwin Library
Rmn -.--.Ev





THE
BANBURY CROSS
SERIES


PREPARED FOR CHILDREN BY GRACE RHYS










FIRESIDE STORIES






FIRMIDE $TORIEP
rLLV$TRATED
BY
ALWfE M.
MrTCHELL.


LONDON
PUBL15HED BY
J.M. DENT & Co
AT ALDINE HOUSE IN
CREAT EASTERN STREET.
189..











To Hope and Grace.

--4AAA---

When you all sit round the fire, and
Christmas time comes back,
You may read many a worse tale than
that of Lazy Jack!
And here are Chicken-Licken and other
old friends,
And Lazy Jack begins where Chicken-
Licken ends !
G. R.















Titty Mouse and
Tatty Mouse.



T ITTY Mouse and Tatty Mouse both
lived in a house,
Titty Mouse went a-gleaning, and Tatty
Mouse went a-gleaning,
So they both went a-gleaning.

Titty Mouse gleaned an ear of corn, and
Tatty Mouse gleaned an ear of corn,
So they both gleaned an ear of corn.




10 TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE.


Titty Mouse made a pudding, and Tatty
Mouse made a pudding,
So they both made a pudding.

And Tatty Mouse put her pudding into
the pot to boil,
But when Titty went to put hers in the
pot, it tumbled over, and scalded her
to death.

Then Tatty sat down and wept. Then
a three-legged stool said, Tatty, why
do you weep?" Titty's dead," said




TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE. I I


Tatty, "and so I weep." Then said
the stool, "I'll hop;" so the stool
hopped. Then a besom in the corner
of the room said, Stool, why do you
hop ?" Oh said the stool, Titty's
dead, and Tatty weeps, and so I hop."
Then said the besom, "I'll sweep;"
so the besom began to sweep. Then
said the door, "Besom, why do you
sweep ?" "Oh! said the besom,
"Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and
the stool hops, and so I sweep." Then
said the door, "I'll jar;" so the door




12 TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE.


jarred. Then said the window, "Door,
why do you jar?" "Oh!" said the
door, "Titty's dead and Tatty weeps,
and the stool hops, and the besom sweeps,
and so I jar." Then said the window,
"I'll creak;" so the window creaked.
Now there was an old form outside the
house, and when the window creaked,
the form said, "Window, why do you
creak ?" "Oh !" said the window,
"Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps, and the
stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the
door jars, and so I creak." Then said




TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE. 13


the old form, "I'll run round the house;"
then the old form ran round the house.
Now, there was a fine large walnut-tree
growing. by the cottage, and the tree
said to the form, "Form, why do you
run round the house ? "Oh!" said
the form, "Titty's dead, and Tatty weeps,
and the stool hops, and the besom sweeps,
the door jars, and the window creaks,
and so I run round the house." Then
said the walnut-tree, "I'll shed my
leaves;" so the walnut-tree shed all
its beautiful green leaves. Now there




14 TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE.

was a little bird perched on one of the
boughs of the tree, and when all the
leaves fell, it said, "Walnut-tree, why
do you shed your leaves?" "Oh!"
said the tree, "Titty's dead, and Tatty
weeps, the stool hops, and the besom
sweeps, the door jars, and the window
creaks, the old form runs round the
house, and so I shed my leaves." Then
said the little bird, "I'll moult all my
feathers;" so he moulted all his pretty
feathers. Now there was a little girl
walking below, carrying a jug of milk
for her brothers' and sisters' supper, and
when she saw the poor little bird moult
all its feathers, she said, Little bird,
why do you moult all your feathers?"
" Oh! said the little bird, "Titty's
dead, and Tatty weeps, the stool hops,
and the besom sweeps, the door jars,
and the window creaks, the old form
runs round the house, the walnut-tree
sheds its .leaves, and so I moult all my




16 TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE.


feathers." Then said the little girl,
"I'11 spill the milk;" so she dropped
the pitcher and spilt the milk. Now
there was an old man just by on the
top of a ladder thatching a rick, and
when he saw the little girl spill the
milk, he said, "Little girl, what do you
mean by spilling the milk? Your little
brothers and sisters must go without
their supper." Then said the little girl,
" Titty's dead and Tatty weeps, the
stool hops, and the besom sweeps, the
door jars, and the window creaks, the




18 TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE.


old farm runs round the house, the
walnut-tree sheds all its leaves, the little
bird moults all its feathers, and so I
spill the milk." "Oh!" said the old
man, then I'll tumble off the ladder and
break my neck;" so he tumbled off the
ladder and broke his neck. And when
the old man broke his neck, the great
walnut-tree fell down with a crash, and
upset the old form and house, and the
house falling knocked the window out,




TITTY MOUSE AND TATTY MOUSE. 19

and the window knocked the door down,
and the door upset the besom, the besom
upset the stool, and poor little Tatty
Mouse was buried beneath the ruins.





The Story
of Mr. Vinegar.



















MR and Mrs Vinegar lived in a
vinegar-bottle. Now one day,
when Mr Vinegar was from home, Mrs
Vinegar, who was a very good house-
wife, was busily sweeping her house,
when an unlucky thump of the broom
brought the whole house clitter-clatter,
clitter-clatter about her ears. In floods
of tears she rushed forth to meet her
husband. On seeing him she exclaimed,
" Oh, Mr Vinegar, Mr Vinegar, we are
ruined, we are ruined I have knocked




24 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.

the house down, and it is all to pieces "
Mr Vinegar then said, "My dear, let
us see what can be done. Here is the
door; I will take it on my back, and
we will go forth to seek our fortune."
They walked all that day, and at
nightfall entered a thick forest. They
were both very tired, and Mr Vinegar
said, "My love, I will climb up into
a tree, drag up the door, and you shall
follow." This he did, and they both
stretched their weary limbs upon the
door, and fell fast asleep. In the middle
of the night Mr Vinegar was disturbed
by the sound of voices beneath, and to
his great dismay perceived that a party
of thieves were met to divide their booty.
" Here, Jack," said one, here's five
pounds for you; here, Bill, here's ten
pounds for you; here, Bob, here's three
pounds for you." Mr Vinegar could
listen no longer; his terror was so in-
tense that he trembled most violently,




26 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.


and shook down the door on their heads.
Away scampered the thieves, but Mr
Vinegar dared not quit his retreat till
broad daylight.
He then scrambled out of the tree,
and went to lift up the door. What
did he behold but a number of golden
guineas! Come down, Mrs Vinegar,"
he cried, come down, I say; our
fortune's made, our fortune's made!
come down, I say." Mrs Vinegar got




THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR. 27


down as fast as she could, and saw the
money with equal delight. Now, my
dear," said she, "I'll tell you what you
shall do. There is a fair at the town
hard by; you shall take these forty
guineas and buy a cow. I can make
butter and cheese, which you shall sell
at market, and we shall then be able
to live very comfortably." Mr Vinegar
joyfully agrees, takes the money, and
goes off to the fair. When he arrived,
he walked up and down, and at length
saw a beautiful red cow. Oh thought
Mr Vinegar, if I had but that cow I




28 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.

should be the happiest man alive. So
he offers the forty guineas for the cow,
and the owner declaring that, as he was
a friend, he'd oblige him, the bargain
was made. Proud of his purchase, he
drove the cow backwards and forwards
to show it. By-and-bye he saw a man
playing the bagpipes, tweedledum,
tweedledee; the children followed him
about, and he appeared to be pocket-
ing money on all sides. Well, thought
Mr Vinegar, if I had but that beautiful
instrument I should be the happiest man
alive-my fortune would be made.
So he went up to the man. "Friend,"
says he, what a beautiful instrument
that is, and what a deal of money you
must make." "Why, yes," said the
man, "I make a great deal of money,
to be sure, and it is a wonderful instru-
ment." "Oh cried Mr Vinegar,
"how I should like to possess it!"
"Well," said the man, "as you are a




THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.


friend, I don't much mind parting with
it; you shall have it for that red cow."
"Done," said the delighted Mr Vinegar;
so the beautiful red cow was given for
the bagpipes. He walked up and down
with his purchase, but in vain he at-
tempted to play a tune, and instead of




30 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.


pocketing pence, the boys followed him
hooting, laughing, and pelting.
Poor Mr Vinegar, his fingers grew
very cold, and, heartily ashamed and
mortified, he was leaving the town,
when he met a man with a fine thick
pair of gloves. Oh, my fingers are
so very cold," said Mr Vinegar to him-
self; "if I had but those beautiful
gloves I should be the happiest man
alive." He went up to the man, and




THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR. 31


said to him, Friend, you seem to have
a capital pair of gloves there." "Yes,
truly," cried the man; and my hands
are as warm as possible this cold
November day." Well," said Mr
Vinegar, I should like to have them."
"What will you give ? said the man;
"as you are a friend, I don't much
mind letting you have them for those
bagpipes." "Done," cried Mr Vinegar.
He put on the gloves, and felt perfectly
happy as he trudged homewards.
At last he grew very tired, when he
saw a man coming towards him with a




32 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.

good stout stick in his hand. Oh,"
said Mr Vinegar, that I had but that
stick! I should then be the happiest
man alive." He accosted the man-
" Friend, what a rare good stick you
have got." Yes," said the man, I
have used it for many a long mile, and
a good friend it has been; but if you
have a fancy for it, as you are a friend,
I don't mind giving it to you for that
pair of gloves." Mr Vinegar's hands
were so warm, and his legs so tired,
that he gladly exchanged.
As he drew near to the wood where
he had left his wife, he heard a parrot
on a tree calling out his name-" Mr
Vinegar, you foolish man, you blockhead,
you simpleton! you went to the fair,
and laid out all your money in buying
a cow; not content with that, you
changed it for bagpipes, on which you
could not play, and which were not
worth one-tenth of the money. You




THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.


fool, you! You had no sooner got the
bagpipes than you changed them for
the gloves, which were not worth one-
quarter of the money; and when you
had got the gloves, you changed them for
a poor, miserable stick, and now for your
7C




34 THE STORY OF MR VINEGAR.
forty guineas, cow, bagpipes, and gloves,
you have nothing to show but that poor
miserable stick, which you might have
cut in any hedge." On this the bird
laughed immoderately, and Mr Vinegar,
falling into a violent rage, threw the
stick at its head. The stick lodged
in the tree, and he returned to his
wife without money, cow, bagpipes,
gloves, or stick, and she instantly gave
him such a sound cudgelling that she
almost broke every bone in his skin.





The Story
of Chicken-Licken.



















AS Chicken-licken went one day to
the wood, an acorn fell upon her
poor bald pate, and she thought the sky
had fallen. So she said she would go
and tell the King the sky had fallen.
So Chicken-licken turned back, and met
Hen-len. "Well, Hen-len, where are
you going ? And Hen-len said, I'm
going to the wood for some meat." And
Chicken-licken said, Oh! Hen-len, don't
go, for I was going, and the sky fell
upon my poor bald pate, and I'm going to




40 THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN.


tell the King." So Hen-len turned back
with Chicken-licken, and met Cock-lock.
" Oh! Cock-lock, where are you going ?"'
And Cock-lock said, "I'm going to the
wood for some meat." Then Hen-len
said, "Oh! Cock-lock, don't go, for I
was going, and I met Chicken-licken, and
Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and
the sky had fallen on her poor bald pate,
and we are going to tell the King."




THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN. 41


-"--




So Cock-lock turned back, and met
Duck-luck. "Well, Duck-luck, where
are you going?" And Duck-luck said,
"I'm going to the wood for some meat."
Then Cock-lock said, "Oh! Duck-luck,
don't go, for I was going, and I met Hen-
len, and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and
Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and
the sky had fallen on her poor bald pate,
and we are going to tell the King."




42 THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN.


So Duck-luck turned back, and met
Drake-lake. "Well, Drake-lake, where
are you going ?" And Drake-lake said,
" I'm going to the wood for some meat."
Then Duck-luck said, "Oh! Drake-lake,
don't go, for I was going, and I met
Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met Hen-len,
and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and
Chicken-licken had been at the wood,




THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN. 43


I r- .1
and the sky had fallen on her poor bald
pate, and we are going to tell the King."
So Drake-lake turned back, and met




44 THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN.


Goose-loose. "Well, Goose-loose, where
are you going ?" And Goose-loose said,
"I'm going to the wood for some meat."




THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN. 45

Then Drake-lake said, Oh! Goose-
loose, don't go, for I was going, and I
met Duck-luck, and Duck-luck met Cock-
lock, and Cock-lock met Hen-len, and
Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and Chicken-
licken had been at the wood, and the sky
had fallen on her poor bald pate, and we
are going to tell the King."
So Goose-loose turned back, and met
Gander-lander. "Well, Gander-lander,
where are you going ?" And Gander-
lander said, "I'm going to the wood for
some meat." Then Goose-loose said,
"Oh! Gander-lander, don't go, for I was
going, and I met Drake-lake, and Drake-
lake met Duck-luck, and Duck-luck met
Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met Hen-len,
and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and
Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and
the sky had fallen on her poor bald pate,
and we are going to tell the King."
So Gander-lander turned back, and
met Turkey-lurkey. "Well, Turkey-




46 THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN.


lurkey, where are you going ?" And
Turkey-lurkey said, "I'm going to the




THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN. 47

wood for some meat." Then Gander-
lander said, "Oh! Turkey-lurkey, don't
go, for I was going, and I met Goose-
loose, and Goose-loose met Drake-lake,
and Drake-lake met Duck-luck, and
Duck-luck met Cock-lock, and Cock-lock
met Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-
licken, and Chicken-licken had been at
the wood, and the sky had fallen on her
poor bald pate, and we are going to tell
the King."
So Turkey-lurkey turned back, and
walked with Gander-lander, Goose-loose,
Drake-lake, Duck-luck, Cock-lock, Hen-
len, and Chicken-licken. And as they
were going along, they met Fox-lox.
And Fox-lox said, Where are you
going, my pretty maids?" And they
said, "Chicken-licken went to the wood,
and the sky fell upon her poor bald pate,
and we are going to tell the King."
And Fox-lox said, "Come along with
me, and I will show you the way." But




THE STORY OF CHICKEN-LICKEN. 49

Fox-lox took them into the fox's hole,
and he and his young ones soon ate up
poor Chicken-licken, Hen-len, Cock-lock,
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose,
Gander-lander, and Turkey-lurkey, and
they never saw the King to tell him that
the sky had fallen.




Lazy Jack.


















A STORY WITHOUT A MORAL.


ONCE upon a time there was a boy
whose name was Jack, and he
lived with his mother upon a dreary
common. They were very poor, and the
old woman got her living by spinning;
but Jack was so lazy that he would do
nothing but bask in the sun in the hot
weather, and sit by the corner of the
hearth in the winter-time. His mother
could not persuade him to do anything
for her, and was obliged at last to tell




LAZY JACK.


him that if he did not begin to work for
his porridge, she would turn him out to
get his living as he could.
This threat at length roused Jack, and
he went out and hired himself for the day
to a farmer for a penny; but as he was
coming home, never having had any
money before, he lost it in passing over
a brook. "You stupid boy'" said his
mother, "you should have put it in your
pocket." "I'll do so another time,"
replied Jack.
The next day Jack went out again,
and hired himself to a cowkeeper, who
gave him a jar of milk for his day's work.
Jack took the jar and put it into the large
pocket of his jacket, spilling it all long
before he got home. "Dear me !" said
the old woman, you should have carried
it on your head." I'll do so another
time," replied Jack.
The following day Jack hired himself
again to a farmer, who agreed to give




LAZY JACK.


him a cream cheese for his services. In
the evening Jack took the cheese, and
went home with it on his head. By the
time he got home the cheese was com-
pletely spoilt, part of it being lost and
part melted in his hair. "You stupid
lout," said his mother, you should have
carried it very carefully in your hands."
"I'll do so another time," replied Jack.
The day after this Jack again went




LAZY JACK.


out, and hired himself to a baker, who
would give him nothing for his work but
a large tom cat. Jack took the cat, and
began carrying it very carefully in his
hands, but in a short time Pussy scratched
him so much that he was compelled to let
it go. When he got home his mother
said to him, "You silly fellow, you
should have tied it with a string and
dragged it along after you." "I'll do so
another time," said Jack.
The next day Jack hired himself to a
butcher, who rewarded his labours with
a handsome present of a shoulder of
mutton. Jack took the mutton, tied it to
a string, and trailed it along after him in
the dirt, so that by the time he got home
the meat was completely spoilt. His
mother was this time quite out of patience
with him, for the next day was Sunday,
and she was obliged to content herself
with cabbage for her dinner. "You
ninnyhammer," said she to her son, "you




LAZY JACK.


should have carried it on your shoulder."
"I'll do so another time," replied Jack.
On the Monday Jack went once more,
and hired himself to a cattle-keeper,
who gave him a donkey for his trouble.
Although Jack was very strong, he found
some difficulty in hoisting the donkey on
his shoulders, but at last he managed it,
and began walking home with his prize.
Now, it happened that in the course of
his journey there lived a rich man with




LAZY JACK.


his only daughter, a beautiful girl, but
unfortunately deaf and dumb. She had
never laughed in her life, and the doctors
said she would never recover till some-
body made her laugh. Many tried with-
out success, and at last the father, in
despair, offered to marry her to the first
man who could make her laugh. This
young lady happened to be looking out
of the window when Jack was passing
with the donkey on his shoulders, the
legs sticking up in the air, and the sight
was so comical and strange, that she
burst out into a great fit of laughter, and
immediately recovered her speech and
hearing. Her father was overjoyed, and
fulfilled his promise by marrying her to
Jack, who was thus made a rich man for
life. They lived in a large house, and
Jack's mother lived with them in great
happiness until she died.
















Fh cj



































PRINTED BY
TURNBULL AND SPEARS
EDINBURGH







University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs