• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Rivals
 Sensible people
 Needles and pins
 Butterfly days
 The ride
 Seven, eight, lay them straigh...
 Dollie's drive
 Father's darling
 Wake up!
 Patience
 My funny dollie
 Unless
 Over the sea
 Jumbo
 Nurse
 The tigers
 Two's company, three's trumper...
 Lion
 The monkey and the kangaroo
 Fly away
 Mary, Mary, quite contrary
 The runaway goosie
 Two kits at school
 Dr. Stork's bill
 Going to the party
 Begging
 The little gardener
 So like his Pa
 The shepherd's dog
 Too many cooks spoil the broth
 Who robbed Cock Robin?
 See-saw
 Robin and Richard and Jenny...
 Ups and downs
 Tommy Purr's hamper
 Back Cover














Group Title: Hip-pi-ty-hop : skip & jump tales in rhyme for very little people
Title: Hip-pi-ty-hop
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082903/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hip-pi-ty-hop skip & jump tales in rhyme for very little people
Alternate Title: Hippityhop
Physical Description: 54 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: DeWolfe, Fiske & Co. (Boston, Mass.) ( Publisher )
S.J. Parkhill & Co ( Printer )
Publisher: DeWolfe, Fiske & Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: S.J. Parkhill & Co.
Publication Date: [between 1884 and 1893]
 Subjects
Subject: Jump rope rhymes   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1888   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1888
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrations in color and photograveure.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082903
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223787
notis - ALG4039
oclc - 09729524

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Rivals
        Page 5
    Sensible people
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Needles and pins
        Page 8
    Butterfly days
        Page 9
    The ride
        Page 10
    Seven, eight, lay them straight
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Dollie's drive
        Page 13
    Father's darling
        Page 14
    Wake up!
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Patience
        Page 17
    My funny dollie
        Page 18
    Unless
        Page 19
    Over the sea
        Page 20
    Jumbo
        Page 21
    Nurse
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The tigers
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Two's company, three's trumpery
        Page 27
    Lion
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The monkey and the kangaroo
        Page 30
    Fly away
        Page 31
    Mary, Mary, quite contrary
        Page 32
    The runaway goosie
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Two kits at school
        Page 35
    Dr. Stork's bill
        Page 35
    Going to the party
        Page 36
    Begging
        Page 37
    The little gardener
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    So like his Pa
        Page 40
    The shepherd's dog
        Page 41
    Too many cooks spoil the broth
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Who robbed Cock Robin?
        Page 44
    See-saw
        Page 44
    Robin and Richard and Jenny Wren
        Page 45
    Ups and downs
        Page 46
    Tommy Purr's hamper
        Page 46
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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RIVALS.

OYOU lovely little beauties, you fluffy silky darlings,
There is no one else beside you half so dear to me;
Not the pigs and lambs and chickens, not the butterflies
and starlings,
Half so sweet as you, my kitties, half so sweet can be ?
"Well, really," in amazement, said Dandy, at the casement,
The taste of certain persons is astonishing to see! "


0 you pet, you pretty darling, how I doat on you and
love you,
What should I do without you, if parted we should be;
If you died I'd make a little grave, and put a stone above you,
And write Here sleeps my Kitty, the dearest dear to me!
" Well, really muttered Dandy, as the water-butt is handy,
There's no reason why that little tomb we should not quickly see!"










SENSIBLE "PEOPLE.

KITTY has a little doll
Which has not learnt to chatter,
But as she cannot talk herself,
It does not make much matter.

And Tommy is quite content
Because he has no horse, dears,
To ride upon his uncle's dog,
And likes it too, of course, dears.

So Tommy with his uncle's dog,
And Kitty with her dolly,
Through their little life will jog,
And find it very jolly;


They do not want the sun at night,
Or try to climb a steeple,
And that is why they are so bright,
And not like other people !


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NEEDLES AND PINS.


ELIZABETH Julia and Barnaby Binns
Were the real full names of these nice little twins,
But just at the time of this wonderful rhyme,
They were known by the title of Needles and Pins."

And here you may see them with dearest mamma,
And Betsy cries Coo-e," and Barnaby Ba!"
While the dicky bird sings as plain as can be,
"Why can't you two children
sing plainly like me ?

But Elizabeth Julia and Barnaby Binns
Were really determined, industrious twins;
And I've not the least doubt that they both will turn out
As sharp as their title of Needles and Pins."

























BUTTERFLY DAYS.


T HE morning has come, and the morning has past,
The terrible lessons are over at last;
And out in the meadows the little ones run,
After the butterflies under the sun.

The streamlets go dimpling along through the grass,
The motes in the sunshine so merrily pass,
While birds round and o'er them are singing of love,
With the green grass beneath,
and the blue sky above.

Bright fairies are darting and dancing in glee,
That only the eyes of the children can see ;
And the songs that the fairies are piping so clear,
It is only the hearts of the children can hear!


























THE RIDE.
HERE are little Charlie and Susie side by side,
All upon a donkey, going for a ride;
And as usual in history, the donkey has a tail,
But like many other stories
it is not of much avail.

Now, where the donkey's going, or when he will get there,
Is what I cannot tell you, I solemnly declare;
But from what the printers tell me,
quite privately you know,
I'm certain neither you nor I
can make the donkey go.

So their devoted mother may calm her anxious fears,
I do not think that any harm will hurt her little dears,
But if little Charles and Susie are anxious to arrive,
They will find it rather quicker to
get something that's ALIVE!

























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N and out the busy needle
Flashing goes;
Through the sunny, latticed window,
Soft a baby zephyr blows;
Low she bends her silken head,
Drawing out the long white thread,
While the clock ticks overhead.












All the bonny daisies, dancing
In the breeze,
/ Beckon to the sunlit meadow,
Full of birds and flowers and bees;
And a robin, blithe and gay,
Swinging on a wild-rose spray,
Trills a mellow roundelay.

But the little busy lassie
(Only eight!)
Gazes at her work sedately,
Lays her hem so long and straight;
Stitches dainty seam and band
With a deft and dimpled hand,
S Looking down demure and bland.

SLouder ticks the clock and clearer
From the wall;
On the window-sill beside her
Drifting leaves and blossoms fall;
Low she droops her drowsy head,
Quite forgets to draw the thread,
Softly into dreamland led.

Through the window then flies Robin,
Bold and gay,
Plucks the long thread from the needle,
Bears it to his nest away,
And the tired little one,
Knowing not what he has done,
Sleeps on softly in the sun.
MARGARET JOHNSON.


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DOLLIE'S
DRIVE.


LAST Sarir-Jay *'.
m o rlnm I ."' .-.- ,
took out my
dollies, ji
They hadn't been
well, and they
wanted fresh air;
They were Dorothy Jane, and Rose Anna Amelia,
And Lanty and Shady, an odd little pair.


Now Lanty and Shady my uncle Dick gave me,
They are cut out of wood, and have only one arm;
But Dorothy Jane, and Rose Anna Amelia
Are beautiful ladies with manners that charm.


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FATHER'S DARLING.


So down the long alley we quietly trotted,
I pushing the barrow, they smiling and gay,
When Bow-wow! said Towzer, and burst from the bushes -
Rose Anna Amelia fainted away.

And Dorothy Jane she went into hysterics,
But never a bit did those other two care.
They're poor penny dollies with.no proper feelings;
They shall walk by themselves when they next take the air.





FATHER'S 'DARLING.

B Y the hearth my little daughter
Laughs and listens, for, says she,
Father's coming home from hunt-
ing!"
And she dances, full of glee.

Father loves his hounds and horses,
Loves his own ancestral hall,
But his winsome little daughter, T..
She's the dearest of them all. '- -

























WAKE UP !

" 7AKE up! wake up! wake up and play;
SThe morning's quite begun;
The little stars have run away
Before the big bright sun.


There's Mother up and dressed and neat,
Making tea, you know;
And Father, in the garden sweet,
Is walking to and fro.


"The cows and lambs have all been up
At least an hour or two,
And all the rest of people drest
But only me and you."



















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PATIENCE.


'" HY do you tease me so, my dear,
S Why do you tease me so?
Give it to me and go, my dear,
Give it to me and go.

Why don't you stop when I speak, my dear?
Surely you understand,
A bit that is safe in one's beak, my dear,
Is worth two bits in your hand.

Give it to me and go, my dear,
Give it to me and go,
Or I'll stretch out my neck,
and give you a peck,
And teach you to tease me so! "

















I'VE got the funniest dolly
That ever you did see.
He came from Yokohama;
I named him Ko-Chung-Kee.


iHis eyes are small and twinkling
SHis mouth is just as sweet!
r He has cunning hands and fingers
And little fat, bare feet.

He wears a paper petticoat,
With gown of blue and red;
S. And he only has a fringe of hair
S On the top of his blue head.

He looks just as the babies
In the Japan pictures do;
And though his body's papery,
Why, maybe theirs are, too.

He squeaks just like a baby;
And he is so dear to me!
And here's a truly picture
Of Ko-Chung-Kee and me.
E. S. TUCKEI

















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UNL ESS.

WISH. I wish, I were a fish."
SSaid Tommie to, hi s sis ter.
As in lis net he chanced nc to rrt '
A little specklerbd tenister.
" PreciselNy sio." the hhh rkepdlie d.
As he kept hap tisn tr '.eeter
" Unless you nd in \our inside
A hook. mUN little master



"I wish, I wish, I were a fish,
With all my dear relations;
No need to go to school, you know,
And never do dictations,
And never have to wash or dress,
And never to be beaten "
"Quite so," the fish remarked, unless
You happen to be eaten."













OVE'7 THE SEA.

N ()\V here's a little Nautilus,
N Then say good-by to me;
The breezes blow, and I must go
Acros- the deep blue sea.




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And I shall hear the mermaids fair




The sails are all of gossamer,
The ropes are threads of gold,
And I shall hear the mermaids fair
Singing their songs of old.

I'll bring you amber for your neck,
And pearls and opals fair,
And old sea-shells and silver bells,
And coral for your hair.

Good-by! good-by! the Nautilus
Is dancing on the blue,
And ere the light in heaven is bright
I'll come again to you.











JUMBO.

" WILLIE dear, sit lightly,
SSit lightly, if you please;
Poor Jumbo's back is breaking,
He's trembling at the knees;


" I'm sure he's going to tumble,
And then what should we do
If dear old Jumbo should fall down,
And break his trunk in two ?

For if he broke it, Willie dear,
How ever would he eat,
Without a trunk to pack his food
And keep it nice and neat ? "


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NURSE.

AT little maid Marjory,
playing at nurse,
' Says she Never, oh never
did see
Such a beautiful baby as
her little boy,
SSuch a wonderful baby
Sis he "



And she carries him sturdily
all around,
s And he shouts and he crows
in his glee!
Such a queer little woman is
That little nurse,
Such a good little sister
S"P "is she.





And Sir Hugh, as he rides past the window
looks in,
And Bless their sweet faces," says he.
He thinks they're the best little bairns in the
world,
Because he's their father, you see.

















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THE TIGERS.

HERE are two tigers,
With appetites hearty;
Not quite the guests
One would like at a party!

But oh, anxious parents,
Your fears you may smother,
For the tigers are this side,
Your children the other !

Keep away from the cage
And no harm you need fear;
But be sure there is danger
If you venture too near.


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S] O O you children, do be good ;
SPlease behave as monkeys should.
One would think, to hear the noise.
'Twas a school for girls and boys,
Not a place for monkeys free,
Who've got tails like you and me.

Well! I don't know what to say !
Not a sum done right to-day,
Not one.said his lessons well,
Not a child knows how to spell,
And the writing was so bad
That it almost drove me mad.

Nip, as sure as I'm alive,
You've made two and two count five.
Jack, be still, you little wretch,
Wait till my birch-rod I fetch.
'Pon my word, I do declare,
Some one's tied me in my chair.

Oh dear me what shall I do,
Send you all unto the Zoo ?
Sell you to an organ man?
Play Aim tricks then if you can.
Now go home and have your tea,
Better monkeys learn to be.








































































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S. T4/WO'S COM'PeINY,
THREE'S T7 UMPERY.



\ 'Y OUNG Dick, the
S| keeper, met our
Sue -

".., -:. Come out and take
a walk," said he;

. ran to get my hat,
and go-

-'. No, no," said Dick,
"not you, not you ;"

: .." For two," said he,
..- -' are company,"

And three are only
trumpery."


Oh, mother dear, what did he mean ?
Why. you and Jack and I are three,
But you'd be lost without us two,
And we'd be wretched without you.
But yet I'm very sure that we
Are not a bit like trumpery!

And mother laughed and stroked my head,
And looked across the village green -
Where Dick and Sue returning came -
And Bless the children," then said she;
And not a word more did she know -
What puzzles grown-up people so!









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LION, you're a noble beast,
Of that there is no doubt,
But still I think you'd eat us up,
If only you got out.
I wonder if you'd find us nice,
Poor Little Ned and me,
As nice as all the darkey boys
You used to eat for tea! "
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THE 'MONKEY eAND THE KANGAROO.


HE was only a long-tailed monkey,
But he loved with a love so true;
She was a scornful lady,
A delicate Kangaroo.


And he laid his tail at his lady's feet,
If only that might prevail;
But she bit it in two, did the Kangaroo,
And that was the end of his tale.


And this was his epitaph when he died,
Writ by a loving friend: -
"A Kangaroo bit off
the end of his tail,"
And that is the tale of his end!


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FLY AWAY.

FLY away butterfly, fly far away,
Over the meadows this sunshiny day;
Fly to our garden, and if you should see
Mother, just tell her that you've come from me.

Dick's got the measles, that's why I've gone
Down to the country to granny's alone;
And I'm too little to write home and say
All that I want to say every day.


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dc'AR Y, JcMl'Y,
QUITE CONTRARY.

I WONDER why the sun
will shine so bright
When I don't want him to?
And why's the sky so blue?
Why will my pussy play and
jump so high;
What in the world makes the
crows caw and fly;
When I'm so cross I don't
know what to do?


Poor dolly! on the ground she
lies forlorn.
Why did I throw her down?
I've cracked her dear old
crown.
Why do I sit still here to mope
and fret?
An ugly sight, I fear, but I
forget,
I do not want to let myself be
seen.


I think I'll try a smile, and then, once more
I'll pick up my poor doll,
And mend her broken poll,
And leave off being cross, and jump, and run.
See all the flowers are joining in the fun -
They ring their bells for glee as loud I call.


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ONE d-y, tout in the clover,
That the sun 'wa glancing over,
SFrom mother aiud fiil, brother-' and from
sisters in their play.
S, h' Througih a hole or Iroken paling,
Where the pretty vines wele trailing,
S A little baby goosie in the summer-time
did stray.

It was big with thought and feeling;
And the freedom it was stealing
Sent a tingle to its wing-tips and its little yellow toes.


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It marched as brave and steady
As an army when it's ready;
And it seemed to say, Oh, come and see where little goosie goes "



Where the tallest grass is bending,
Its onward course was tending,
Leaving funny little footprints in the
yellow, dusty road. -


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It cauiQht both buo's '7 W -"
and Ie.1 tlesl ,
From weeds tlhati looked like :
steeples;
But its heart grew very heavy, as if it borp a load.



When the night-wind sighed and quivered,
The little goosie shivered,
And it said, "I want my mamma, and I want to sec them 1il."
But it could not bring them over
All the dewy grass and clover,
So it hunted till it found the hole within the garden-wall.


_ -, -










TWO KITS cAT SCHOOL.

TWO Kits at school were kept in late,
So drew a figure on a slate;
And somehow, what they drew, resembled
The master, at whose voice they trembled.

It's like him," said one kitten small;
His cap and gown and cane and all."
Then Dr. Scratch, the man who taught 'em,
Came slyly up behind and caught 'em.

What happened next ? Ah! can you guess ?
Those kittens never would confess !
But as they crept home sore and aching,
They vowed to leave off portrait-making.




DR. STORK'S BILL.

I H, Dr. Stork, though I've been ill,
0 I can't afford to pay your bill;
/ I haven't got a single penny,
The guinea-pig won't lend me any;
Besides, dear me, I think you're wrong
To make your bill so very long.
But still, I'll tell you what to do,
Please call again, kind sir. Adieu !


'"










TWO KITS cAT SCHOOL.

TWO Kits at school were kept in late,
So drew a figure on a slate;
And somehow, what they drew, resembled
The master, at whose voice they trembled.

It's like him," said one kitten small;
His cap and gown and cane and all."
Then Dr. Scratch, the man who taught 'em,
Came slyly up behind and caught 'em.

What happened next ? Ah! can you guess ?
Those kittens never would confess !
But as they crept home sore and aching,
They vowed to leave off portrait-making.




DR. STORK'S BILL.

I H, Dr. Stork, though I've been ill,
0 I can't afford to pay your bill;
/ I haven't got a single penny,
The guinea-pig won't lend me any;
Besides, dear me, I think you're wrong
To make your bill so very long.
But still, I'll tell you what to do,
Please call again, kind sir. Adieu !


'"









GOIW\G TO THE 'PARTY.


A S daylight was falling
to sleep in the west,
A mother her six little
children addressed,
Saying, Now my dear children,
be sure not to tease,
(You know what I've taught you,)
and always say 'Please.'



" Say, Yes, ma'am,' and 'No, ma'am,' and
'I thank you, indeed,'
'It's beautiful weather,' I have had all I need,'
'Yes, indeed, you're too kind, t ".
pray take half ol it back.'
Be sure you're not greedy,
now mind that, dear /a ck."











What the children said :
"Yes, mother dear, we know quite well all that we ought to do,
For every day you've shown the way, and we will copy you.
We'll be so good to every one, and kind to one another,
That every one will know we have a darling of a mother."










BEGGI7(G

EAR little Mistress, 'please be quick,
We want some sugar badly:
You see, we've learnt the begging trick,"
And though we do it gladly,
We must confess without
disguise
'Tis nicest begging for a )
prize.

One lump, one little lump for each !
Bow-wow, Bow-wow, Miss Mary! ,
Suppose you learn and we will teach,
Now don't be quite contrary; "
Give us the sugar basin, pray,
And let's begin this very day!




THE LITTLE Ge/IRDEWER.

THERE was once a little maiden,
Who was very fond of flowers;
She tended them and weeded them,
And watered them for hours;
SShe'd pansies and forget-me-nots,
And violets, white and blue,
,' With tall, proud, yellow lilies,
And little white ones too.


She'd marigolds and hollyhocks,
And daisies, white and red,
That grew in little borders
Around each flower-bed;


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BEGGI7(G

EAR little Mistress, 'please be quick,
We want some sugar badly:
You see, we've learnt the begging trick,"
And though we do it gladly,
We must confess without
disguise
'Tis nicest begging for a )
prize.

One lump, one little lump for each !
Bow-wow, Bow-wow, Miss Mary! ,
Suppose you learn and we will teach,
Now don't be quite contrary; "
Give us the sugar basin, pray,
And let's begin this very day!




THE LITTLE Ge/IRDEWER.

THERE was once a little maiden,
Who was very fond of flowers;
She tended them and weeded them,
And watered them for hours;
SShe'd pansies and forget-me-nots,
And violets, white and blue,
,' With tall, proud, yellow lilies,
And little white ones too.


She'd marigolds and hollyhocks,
And daisies, white and red,
That grew in little borders
Around each flower-bed;


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THE LITTLE GARDENER.

With wall-flowers and carnations, "
And many a royal rose; a '. /"
She must have had a little bit
Of every flower that grows.

Athrush came to the garden, .'.
And sang there every day,
And as for bees and butter-
flies,
They couldn't keep away. I

The bees made lots of honey," '"
But it was not half as sweet s /
As the pretty little maiden
Who kept the garden neat. .

4 =1























--- -------::::-



SO LIKE HIS PA.

N OW, isn't he a little dear?
The finest chick I've seen this year;
As like his pa as he can be,
A perfect little prodigy.


He's got his father's eyes and beak,
And though his voice is rather weak,
The difference you'd hardly know
When, like his pa, he tries to crow.


Oh, yes, my dear, that's brave of you !
Now try a Cock-a-doodle-doo."
Take care, my darling, don't forget
You're not as big as father yet.









THE SHEPHERD'S DOG.

I AM a shepherd's dog, and keep
Strict watch upon a flock of sheep.
To go to sleep would be a crime,
With more than one eye at a time.

This sort of life is slow, I find,
No chance to cultivate the mind.
On souls like mine it sometimes jars
*To hear no other words than ba-a-as.

Well, never mind, it is my lot;
It is the only work I've got;
And I'm content through life to jog,
A true and honest shepherd's dog.














-NMI
-- -- --














TOO MANY COOKS SPOIL THE B3ROTH.

ALL upon the smooth waters,
Dame Duck's pretty daughters
Swam splishety splashety here, as you see,
Quite happy together,
In the sweet Summer weather,
Till little Miss Flossygold chanced on a bee.


Such a big, buzzy fellow,
Brown, velvet, and yellow!
And every one tried to persuade him to stay.
They pushed and they hustled,
They scrambled and bustled,
Till, somehow or other, the bee got away!











-I)

-4


iw


iSk~n,
t~L


4A^







WHO ROBBED COCK ROBIN?
WHO robbed Cock Robin ?
I, said the Owl,
I was that naughty fowl;
And the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
When they learnt that the Owl
Had been a-robbing!



SEE-SAW.
UP and down in play we go,
Sometimes high, and sometimes low;
On the plank we slip and sprawl-
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.

Life is like the game we play,
Ups and downs from day to day.
This advice I give to all,
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.


Asia..~







WHO ROBBED COCK ROBIN?
WHO robbed Cock Robin ?
I, said the Owl,
I was that naughty fowl;
And the birds of the air
Fell a-sighing and a-sobbing,
When they learnt that the Owl
Had been a-robbing!



SEE-SAW.
UP and down in play we go,
Sometimes high, and sometimes low;
On the plank we slip and sprawl-
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.

Life is like the game we play,
Ups and downs from day to day.
This advice I give to all,
Hold on tight, or else you'll fall.


Asia..~










ROBIN cAWD RICHARD A4D JENNY WIRE.

R OBIN and Richard loved sweet Jenny Wren,
They sat on a rail as the clock struck ten;
They hummed and they ha'ed as the moon rose high,
But Robin was awkward, and Richard was shy.


Said Robin to Richard, It seems to me
Three people are very bad company "
Said Richard to Robin, Precisely so;
There will just be two if you will go."


Said Robin to Richard, I mean to stay "
Said Richard to Robin, Then fire away "
But while they quarrelled exactly like men,
Off and away flew Jenny Wren.







*, ^- .







UPS AND 7DOWAS.
OW we go up, and now we go down,
SThis is the way to London Town !
Oh, Toby and Tittums, let me say,
You'll never get so far to-day!
'Tis lucky for you (don't think me rude),
The horse you ride is a steed of wood;
For Toby fat, and a sweet pussy-cat,
Would be lost in London, I'm sure of that!


TOMMIY "PUkk'S HcAMPER
AT the school to-day there was quite a stir,
A hamper had come for young Tommy Purr.
There were nuts and apples all rosy red,
Oranges nearly as big as my head;
With almonds and raisins, and sugar and spice,
A pie that was filled with the tenderest mice,
And cakes all covered with candied peels,
And a mouse to play with that ran on wheels.
From far and near the kittens did scamper,
And shouted hurrah for Tommy Purr's hamper.







UPS AND 7DOWAS.
OW we go up, and now we go down,
SThis is the way to London Town !
Oh, Toby and Tittums, let me say,
You'll never get so far to-day!
'Tis lucky for you (don't think me rude),
The horse you ride is a steed of wood;
For Toby fat, and a sweet pussy-cat,
Would be lost in London, I'm sure of that!


TOMMIY "PUkk'S HcAMPER
AT the school to-day there was quite a stir,
A hamper had come for young Tommy Purr.
There were nuts and apples all rosy red,
Oranges nearly as big as my head;
With almonds and raisins, and sugar and spice,
A pie that was filled with the tenderest mice,
And cakes all covered with candied peels,
And a mouse to play with that ran on wheels.
From far and near the kittens did scamper,
And shouted hurrah for Tommy Purr's hamper.




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