• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 The gardener's cottage
 The nest
 Sea gulls
 The ride home
 The sea-gulls' message
 Here they come
 Nutting
 The quiet pool
 Blackberrying
 The little stream
 Evening
 Yellow king cups
 The two donkeys
 The old well
 The waterlilies
 Flowers
 Flying the kite
 A rest by the way
 Our cottage
 Back Cover






Group Title: R T & S artistic series
Title: In the sweet summer-time
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082901/00001
 Material Information
Title: In the sweet summer-time illustrations after Birket Foster
Series Title: R T & S artistic series
Alternate Title: In the sweet summer-time after Birket Foster
In the sweet summertime
Physical Description: 36 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Foster, Myles Birket, 1825-1899 ( Illustrator )
Burnside, Helen Marion ( Author )
Chettle, Elizabeth M ( Author )
Walton, Ellis ( Author )
Raphael Tuck & Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: Raphael Tuck & Sons
Place of Publication: London
Paris
New York
Publication Date: c.1893
 Subjects
Subject: Summer -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Bavaria
 Notes
Restriction: FOR USE IN OSBORNE COLLECTION ONLY. NOT AVAILABLE FOR INTERLOAN.
General Note: "Designed at the Fine Art Studios in England and printed at the Fine Art Works in Bavaria."--t.p.
General Note: Undated. Date from inscription.
General Note: Includes poetry by Helen Marion Burnside, E.M. Chettle, Ellis Walton, and E.N.
Funding: Artistic series.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082901
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223949
notis - ALG4205
oclc - 63083344

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    The gardener's cottage
        Page 3
        Page 4
    The nest
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Sea gulls
        Page 7
    The ride home
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    The sea-gulls' message
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Here they come
        Page 12
    Nutting
        Page 13
    The quiet pool
        Page 14
    Blackberrying
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The little stream
        Page 17
    Evening
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Yellow king cups
        Page 21
        Page 22
    The two donkeys
        Page 23
    The old well
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The waterlilies
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Flowers
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Flying the kite
        Page 30-31
    A rest by the way
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    Our cottage
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text



















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The gardener's cottage is standing under
The trees that shadow the winding way,
(Is ought so fair in the world I wonder-
As orchard boughs in the month of May.




That swing in the fragrant air, and scatter
Rose-lit petals upon the lea;
What does the world and its riches matter
Here's riches enough, and to spare for me.




So thinks the maiden so fresh and pretty,
Resting awhile at the cottage door
Carolling blithely her tuneful ditty,
SWhen birds are a-bed, and
her tasks are over.
\~^ HELEN MARION BURNSIDE-




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Little birdies shall I take you
And my little playmates make you,
All your little wants supplying-
Till your wings are strong for flying?


I would feed you, love you dearly,
Find you food both late and early:
Ah! but could I ever find you
S Love like that you'd leave behind you.




I will reach up quick
and steady:
See! the nest is back
already;
All the wood would
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S .. ^ were taken.
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Whence have you
come, and
where do you
go,
Beautiful sea-
gulls that flit
to and fro ?
Sailing through many
a storm you've
been-
Many a troubled and
angry scene.

Wandering ones-for a mo-
ment stay-
Fair is the picture outspread
to-day;
Sunshine and peace, over sea
and land;
Children at play on a golden
sand
ELLIS WALTON.


HE IDE < OME.



0 warm shines the sun and so sweet hang the roses,
And work is over to-day.
You ride down the lane, 'mid the sweet scented posies,
To home at the end of the way.

With loving arms round you and loving words spoken,
You well may be happy and sing.
A dear little child with a dear loving mother
Is far better off than a king.


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Whence have you
come, and
where do you
go,
Beautiful sea-
gulls that flit
to and fro ?
Sailing through many
a storm you've
been-
Many a troubled and
angry scene.

Wandering ones-for a mo-
ment stay-
Fair is the picture outspread
to-day;
Sunshine and peace, over sea
and land;
Children at play on a golden
sand
ELLIS WALTON.


HE IDE < OME.



0 warm shines the sun and so sweet hang the roses,
And work is over to-day.
You ride down the lane, 'mid the sweet scented posies,
To home at the end of the way.

With loving arms round you and loving words spoken,
You well may be happy and sing.
A dear little child with a dear loving mother
Is far better off than a king.


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You'll wander afar, in the big world some day, dear;
A weary long journey I trow.
Still sing at the end of the way, little pilgrim
As cheerily as you do now. E. M. CHETTLE.


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The sea-gulls' wings in the white spray dip,
And a secret they've brought to me,.
They say they know it was father's ship,
That is sailing over the sea.


And I held a rosy shell to my ear,
This morning down in the bay,
And that too said he was surely near
He'll be coming, coming to-day.
H. M. BURNSIDE,


















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A glorious hunting day
it was,
Full hot the scent did
lie ;
For miles and miles the
huntsmen rode,
With hounds at the
full cry.


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Dear cousin Bess the
scarlet coats
Did hail with great
delight;
Old Rover, too the
chase did join,
And barked with all
his might.


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Ah! how they galloped o'er the hill
Swift as the wind they flee,
If 1 some day may ride to hounds
How happy shall I be.


E. M. CHIETTLE,
























S' There was a boy who
hazel nuts
Did wander out to pick,
.-He puill. the russet
branches down,
All with a crooked
stick.
i f, fi f-?.*..-


He spied out frisky
S / rabbits three
r That spent their lives
S"in play:
And up and down their
little tails
They whisked the live-
long day.
That greedy boy-
those rabbits gay
To shoot did much
desire.



He went to fetch his father's gun
That hung beside the fire.

He waited long with patience great
Upon his bended knee;
But not a single rabbit's tail
Did that brave sportsman see.
E. M. CHETTLr,


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QUIET-OOL.



Flowers, sweet flowers are everywhere-
'Tis the blossoming month of June,
The scent of the clover is on the air,
And the streams are singing a tune.





Flowers-sweet :1. .. i-,, a basket full
We've plucked in the meadows wide.
There are thousands for everyone we cull
Along by the water side.






The sheep are cropping ..
the grasses green,
Where shadows are
deep and cool, .
And the lazy dliilcks arc ,,
asleep I veern,
Out there oin the
quiet pool. ,
H. M. BIURNSIDE. riki -- .
















Now the brown nuts begin to fall,
And the harvest moon to rise,
And we go gathering blackberries
To make into jam and pies.
WE think most of the number we get,
But Jack thinks most about size,
Sing hey-sing ho, for the autumn skies-
Sing hey, for the jam and the pies.


I shall be glad when mother says
What a clever girl I am,
Bess will be glad when she bakes the pies,
And ties down the pots of jam.
And Jack will be glad
at dinner and tea
When he has a "royal
cram"
SSing hey-sing ho-for
.. the royal cram-
": -" The puddings, and
S'' pies, and the jam.
E. N.

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Nov, tihe laughing child-
ren bring
Fast their empty
pitchers near,
N,_. a wild bird dips
ii- wing
In the current cool
and clear.

There- the peasant from
ili cot,
Gaes where its wind-
ings gleam;
Here. the pale forget-
nic -not
Loves upon its banks
to dream.

ELLIS WALTON.


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Father will come from his work in a minute-
And Rover and Ben from the cows and the sheep,
Bringing the pail with
the sweet milk in it,
For baby to drink
ere she goes to sleep.




Then mother will sit
by the window knit-
ting,
And father willsmoke
in the ingle nook,
While Ben and I, where
the bats are flitting
Will wander awhile
by the orchard
brook.




Is ought more sweet
in the world I won- i ,7'4
der- -
Where will you find .
me a fairer spot,
Or happier folk than '
are gathered under -
The trees that shel-,
ter our garden cot I ...
H. M. BURSSILE.





















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With yellow king-cups my ship is laden
As many as it can hold,
"Come water elves," sang a little maiden -
"And turn my king-cups to gold".
"There are no elves, and my ship is coming
Home from the far blue sea,


Where ice-bergs shine,-she has been a-roaming,
And now she is bringing to me
A message perhaps, or may-be a letter,
From Willie, our sailor bold;
And mother will say that is far-far better,
Than fairy silver, or gold.


H. M. BURNSIDE.


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"I hate this life," the country donkey said,
"It's very stupid, dull, and tame, and slow,
And every ass who is, like me, well bred
To London or some seaside place should go,
Till life he's seen in crowded road and street
No donkey's education is complete."




"I have seen life" and aged ass replied
"Its kicks and cuffs and sticks and heavy roads,
And well I know because I both have tried,
The worth of green grass over dusty roads.
Stay where you are
and do not fret to
roam,
For grass and hap-
piness are found at
home. :
E. N.


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Away in the wood is a deep old well,
And squirrels and ring-doves beside it dwell,
\Vee ferns and mosses about it grow,
And trees their shadows across it throw.


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Far, far and away, below
the brink
The water sparkles as
black as ink,
But when it comes up in
the bucket you see
It is crystal clear as a
spring can be.

We go and draw it on
summer noons,
While the linnet sings
and the brown bee
croons
It is cool-so cool-
and the prettiest
sight
On the bucket's brim
are the dew beads
bright.


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0, it's sweet to be out neathh the warril
blue sky,
With the birds and the bees and the
squirrels shy-
But the loveliest place in the world to me
Is, the dear old well neathh the green
wood tree.
H. M. BURNSIDE.


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Mother's been staying with Granny-
She's coming home to-day!
We've gathered all the flowers we can find
To make the house look gay.




We've swept and dusted the parlor,
And scrubbed the kitchen floor,
And hung all the pots on their proper nails,
And put "WELCOME," on the door.




We've got out the very best china,
And the tray with the painted rose-
How glad we are she is coming home
No one but mother knows.




.. .r ve'll put the water lilies
h- in a bowl on the table at tea,
gs-s -'"- And when mother comes
in at the open door,
They'll be the first
Things she'll see.
E.N


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Flowers--sweet flowers-we've plucked to send
Toc the city that's far away,
Beauty and fragrance and grace to lend,
To those-w-\ho the live-iong day.



lMust toil and toil in the noise and heat,
WVhere never a flower is seen-
Savi, those we wsen, with a memory sweet,
.f the meadows so fair and green.

H. M. BURNSIDE.


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Oh, the wind is so fresh and the day is so bright,
That we're off the to moor for a fine piece of fun,
For Johnnie is going to fly our new kite,
And he says he will send it to call on the sun. -,


Our kite is a beauty, so lovely and new,
And so strong, Johnnie says it would fly in a gale,
It has three pretty stars-real painted ones too- ,.
And oh! such a beautiful new paper tail.


But it's never been out of the
.-...., shop until now, .
.---... :" ., it's nervous, and that's why '.
S' ", shout and we sing, '
nid e cheer and we cry and .,. .-
,Ia. ,make such a row, .
whichc h of course you all know,
i i 'es it courage poor thing. Now we're o
"ri, j r i n i1. Now we're off-Jo hnnme
says it will fly to
the sky,
.'" .tpo i And Tilly is laughing
and Timothy bawls,

Sj'"--~-~B"- But it seems after all not to ,get very high,
For it -. and waIgles and rises and falls.
It has not been accustomed to :i i,.g you see,
And it's giddy at being at such a great height,
SSo it's putting its tail where its head ought to be,
I would'nt do that now if I were a kite.
S| O if I were a kite I would rise and would rise,
Sever so high till I went out of sight,
SI would see all the wonders there are in the skies,
S i '- And make the stars tell why they twinkle at night

SThe comets and planets I'd find very soon,
~' I'd see how the sun really does go to bed,
Then I'd drop in to call on the man in the moon,
And come down to tell you whatever he said.


E. N.












A rest by the way
In the sweet summer weather-
The world is so gay,
And the birds sing together.


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'Tis pleasant awhile
To recall life's fair play-tide,
And cares to beguile
With the children of May-tide.


But here we must part-
Who have wandered together,
And talked--heart to heart,
Through the sweet summer weather.
H. M. BuRaNSn)i.


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,O- -COTTAGE:






A little cottage in a lonely lane,
A silvern brook beside the door that sings;
The quiet comfort of sweet country things,.
A peaceful life, with--neither care nor pain.



Their kindly sun that warms us with delight,
The merriment of birds and antics gay,
Of creatures that so fearlessly do play,
In fields remote, from morning until night.



To walk abroad and hear the plover cry,
To watch the dancing footsteps of the liini,
Feel on your brow, the warm rain pattering,
Or hear the autumn winds that softly sigh.






What happiness is this; if still to these
A steady round of duty done there be,
And daily deeds of love
and charity
To crown them with
the olive crown of

E. M. CIIETTT.LE. *
peace '_.u "' .




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