• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Sunday morning a hundred years...
 Battledore and shuttlecock in a...
 The harpsichord lesson
 The minuet
 Dreaming before the old fire-p...
 The fencing lesson
 Back Cover






Title: Tales and verses of long ago
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082890/00001
 Material Information
Title: Tales and verses of long ago
Physical Description: 19 leaves : col. ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tucker, Elizabeth S
Moran, Percy, 1862-1935 ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick A. Stokes Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Children in literature -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children in art -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's literature -- Juvenile literature -- 19th century   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature -- United States -- To 1775   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Baldwin Library.
Statement of Responsibility: with numerous full-page color-plates after paintings in water colors by E. Percy Moran ; and with decorative borders and other designs, together with new stories and verses by Elizabeth S. Tucker.
General Note: Illustrated t.p.
General Note: Decorated borders and text printed in color.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082890
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223569
notis - ALG3819
oclc - 12528642
lccn - 12007706

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
    Sunday morning a hundred years ago
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Battledore and shuttlecock in a garden
        Page 6
        Page 7
    The harpsichord lesson
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The minuet
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Dreaming before the old fire-place
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The fencing lesson
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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TALES AND VERSES


LONG AGO


WITH NUMEROUS FULL-PAGE COLOR-PLATES
AFTER PAINTINGS IN WATER COLORS BY


AND WITH DECORATIVE BORDERS AND OTHER DESIGNS, TOGETHER
WITH NEW STORIES AND VERSES BY


Eli3abetb ?Co. ucher


NEW YORK
Copyrihti, 18p9, iy
gfreoerich 2f. Stoftk Companw
PUBLISHERS


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Zunba^ Mornino a Thunbreb
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11 p ..."0 NE Sunday, lovely cousin Kitty said, Dorothy //
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i) \Allen shall go to church with me." So Dorothy
was dressed in her white dimity skirt, with the blue -
S pelisse, had her freshest cap tied on, took Cousin Kitty's
-/ ,' .\.-, book, and went out of the garden gate and down the .
'!/ sunny street on the bright June day to church. The only -1r-
\ > .other time she had been she could n't remember, for it
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Swas when she wore long, long baby dresses, and was
i A carried on a lace pillow to get her name, Dorothy '
Catherine Pettigrew Allen, from the minister. Now she
'i) r-" was four years old, she was sure she was quite big enough
to go. How proud and pleased she felt as they walked
along the village street and saw all the other children
--- .-- going too; and how grand she felt as she sailed up the .'
(aisle beside Cousin Kitty.y s,
She sat up very straight and still in the high pew, ando
watched what everybody did. They sang very long andb
..__. j i' loud hymns, and everybody sang. Every lady had a sprig ... .
S of rosemary or lavender carried in her prayer-book, and "
the air had a faint perfume of it all the time. Up there
f -' in the choir were the little charity-school children, allfr


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to go. ow proud and pleased she felt as they walked
...- aisle beside Cousin Kity. ....
watched hat everybody did. They sang very long and
S loud hymns, and cz'cz)'bod sang. Every lady had a sprig K -




in the choir were the little charity-school children, all j










5unbap MN~orning a 1bunbreb pears Rgo


dressed just alike in close caps, dark cotton gowns, short sleeves, and mitts. They stood in rows, and sang
away at the hymns,-some girls as little as Dorothy,-with their rosy faces and wistful eyes. And under the
gallery was such a very cross-looking man with a long stick, who leaned over and poked the boys and people
who went to sleep, waking them up to listen to the sermon. Cousin Kitty whispered that he was the
tithing man-and Dorothy must look out or he would be having to wake her up. But Dorothy knew that
she was quite too big a girl to go to sleep,-and anyway his eyes seemed always shut, though he never
missed seeing a sleeping boy or girl.
At last, after a great many hymns and long, long
prayers, the minister climbed into a tall pulpit, and began
to talk, and talk, and talk. His voice was very solemn,
and the church was very still, for no one answered him a
word.
The air came in very hot through the open doors
and windows, and a bee came -6' in and buzzed about, and
Dorothy heard outside the horses stamping the flies away
and sneezing long wkoups." The birds were singing and
twittering in the trees and in the lanes of the church, and
a little swallow flew in and circled among the rafters over-
head, and then flew out again. Dorothy leaned back against
the high wooden pew. Then she saw Thomas Ryder across
the aisle going to sleep, and his mouth dropped wider open
as his eyes shut tighter, and the old man under the gallery
did not seem to see him. She got so interested in watching,
that she leaned forward, and crack went her white dimity
back where her warm little shoulders had been leaning
against the varnishy sticky pew. The tithing man opened
his eyes with a jerk, saw Thomas, leaned forward, and
Thomas awoke at the other end of the stick with a jump
that upset his father's book.
Dorothy blushed very much, for she wanted to be so
proper and good, but Cousin Kitty smiled kindly and
handed her a leaf of rosemary to smell. Sermons were very,
very long in the days when Dorothy Allen went to church,
and the voice went on, and THE CHARITY CHILDREN. on, and on. And the church
was still and hot. She sat up very straight, to keep
herself awake-but presently everything looked dim, and her little cap was nodding like a heavy white rose
on its stem. And the voice grew far away-and the next thing she knew was a poke, and there at her pew
was that horrid tithing man He was actually smiling, and every one else looked around and smiled at the
" child who had to be waked up in church."
Poor Dorothy It was too much for her, and she sank in a heap of bashful misery to the bottom of
the pew, burying her crimson face in the cushions, where Cousin Kitty let her stay till church was out, and
then she only took her hand and said, Never mind." But poor Dorothy was deeply humiliated to think
that so great a girl as she had gone to sleep in church the first time she went.































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Mattlebore anb %buttlecoch in a Garben



ATYEK TmHAN BIRb-IOTE CALLINM,
T-IiCiE. VOICES FMRI All ULEAR,
SOFTER THAN I0OSE -LEl1VES F-iJLLiil'i,
TEUE ACIES JWEET AND MEIAK.

IN AILL THIE FAlKiiEN'S Q9MItES,
THERE IS NOT ANYWHERE,
IN MSE OR SHELTERED FLCES,
A VIJION HiALF S0 FM11.

ALWAYJ TIHE iARDENl JMNIY
THEIR TKii-Y"i E _SJ C.LL WILL KEEF,
LilW 9EKNERE JTOKES OF HONEY,
WHEN lEEf ND> FLOWERJ JLEEF.


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hbe 1barpsichorb lesson.


SN an old manuscript we read that George Washington
.1 presented to Nellie Custis, "at Philadelphia, a fine
,; .."- / harpsichord." And then her grandmother [Mrs. Wash-, ,'
.- I ington] made her practise upon it four'or five hours a J '
day." And her brother adds : She would cry and play, ,
\ '. / and play and cry for hours!" '
S\ Out of the past comes this picture of a little girl, sitting

'. piano), and someway to my mind comes also the picture
-- ; i of that brother probably teasing a little at the parlor door,
". ''i..'. as poor Nellie sat "playing and crying"; for if brothers 1
S' .i were then what they are to-day, that is very likely just [ i I
\ what he did. i. "'/
S--.. Dear little maid! I can see her as she sat, toiling ix ,' --
/ l,.- away for hours with her warm little fingers, and with her
; ---: toes dangling down from a tall stool, in front of that old
'<"" "''i hi rpsichord.
Out of doors the sun was shining warm and soft. The I
S birds were calling to her to say how lovely it was out '
S' \ there, and the roses nodding in at the window beckoned ... ,
Sher to come and play with them.

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tbe lbarpstcborb Lesson.


Her brother, with a wild swirl on his way to the garden, stopped to laugh at her tears, and only made
them worse. She evidently did not love music; but in those days little girls, and boys, too, had to do as
the "grown-ups" told them to, and never thought of rebelling. And harpsichords were very few in this
country when it was a new country, long ago; and so it was a great treat to many people who came to
her grandfather's house, to hear one played.
Dear little Nellie Custis! I wonder how many, many little girls since her time have sat as she
did, and worked as hard to make black dots on lines of music go on white and black keys of ivory.
That very same harpsichord is still standing in the dim old room in the mansion where she lived; and
as you see it, with its tall legs, there is always a picture of a little girl, whose weary fingers wandered up and
down its key-board, learning to make music for others to enjoy.


Out of History's dusty page
Comes a little maiden,
Probably about your age,
With sweet graces laden.


Practising the long hours through,
Scales and stately measure,
Patient, learning things to do
7Just for others' pleasure.


































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tbe Mlinuet.


' W AY back in the long ago,-yes, away back when
V V George Washington was a boy, they danced the
minuet-our dear little Great-Grandmothers and manly
little Great-Grandfathers. They did n't know that they
were Great-Grandfathers and Great-Grandmothers, but we
know, for they were our own, and here we are !
In rows they stood-the billowy silken skirts of the
girls opposite the velvet coats and satin knee-breeches of
the boys. It was the loveliest dress to wear in that
stately dance. The long coats of rich colors on the
boyish figures, and rustling silken skirts on the sweet
girls swaying to and fro in the slow figures.
With a sweeping rustling curtsy, with a bend of the
satin waistcoats, with a sweet chord on the spinet and
guitar, the dance began. Back and forth went the solemn
little folks, never faster than a walk, keeping time to
the delightful one, two, three of the music-crossing
and re-crossing in the different figures, following the head
couples in a stately march-two and two. Now bending'









tbe Miinuet.

in graceful curtsys, while the little cavaliers knelt and saluted the tips of dimpled fingers, then holding
aloft silken scarfs in airy folds, entwining and interlacing all together. Soft and sweet the chords of music,
dark the shining floors, reflecting bright candle lights and dainty satin-clad feet. Rich the colors of the
beautiful gowns and coats, and sweet, oh sweet, the dimpled rosy faces of the dear little children, as they
trod the sober measures of that most graceful of dances-the minuet of the long ago!







































































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Brecaming before tbc 01b
Jfire:%Ilacc.


T HERE she sits in front of the fire, dreaming the
dreams that a little maid dreams when twilight and
bedtime are coming on, and the flames curl themselves so
easily into the long golden hair of Iloating fairies. Then
in the old mirror over the chimney are reflected all the
dear old nursery friends of tale and rhyme and Mother
Goose. Puss-in-boots is there, and princesses, stern old
knights, and helpful little fairies, who always make things
come right in the stories.
And in the centre of all, there is the enchanting Prince,
whose curls of gold float out, and who smiles down into
her eyes as she sits and dreams of him-so brave, and
gallant, and gay! The room is full of her fancies, and
they come down and take her hand, and touch her eves so
that she sees in the glowing coals castles, turrets, knights,
and burning cities.
Sit down by the big fire yourself some night, when
you 're tired of play, just before bedtime, and look for
them all in that big bed of coals, tuck-d in among the
logs and flames. See that burning bridge! There is a
galloping dragon with smoke from his eyes coming over


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!reaming before the Olt firel tace.


it, and swiftly it burns, and just as he gets to the centre, crash down it goes, burnt
through by the fire-sword of a trusty flame-fairy. Down go two ends of a burnt
brand, and the bridge becomes a burning castle, with windows all where the black
places are. Over there is a tiger with glowing eyes, coming out of the smoke, and
those little blue and yellow flames are graceful fire-fairies, waving and vanishing
up the dark old chimney. Oh, it is the best place of all to dream beside, and to
see pictures in at twilight. Try it and see for yourselves. And now-just as the
dark is curtaining the light in the windows, so that the glowing fire-fairies can come
out and fill all the, corners of the room, and just as you are having such a very good
time seeing them all and telling about them, the door opens, and somebody, nurse
perhaps, says that bedtime has come!
Here across the page you go-little figures clad in long white robes, with
very sleepy eyes, full of the dreams you are going -to have, with candles in hand,
with locks neatly tucked up, curled up,
and covered with caps for the night. With
bare feet, going across the hall and up
the stairs away you all go-into the soft
beds in the nursery, waiting like white
ships to carry you all across the sea of 4c,/
night into the Island of Dreamland, where ,I
all the fire-light stories and dreams come
true, and last for the whole night through.


















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'be fencing lesson.

W ILFRED'S father's friend, the Gentleman from
France, was Wilfred's hero in everything. He
was so brave, so handsome, so clever, and so full of
song and story of strange, interesting life across the seas,
told in his. pretty broken speech, part English, part
French.
The Gentleman from France had no other name to
Wilfred and the children, for it was the only one they
ever found out that he had. No one would tell them
any other. He was a rather mysterious gentleman, for
he came suddenly one night, and the children, finding
him at breakfast next morning, were bidden to ask no
questions, and he just stayed on in their home. They all
loved him, Wilfred especially, for he was so jolly, and so
fond of playing with them. But sometimes he used to
sit and look very sad, and then if the children spoke to
him, he would answer them in French, with a far-away
look in his eyes.
One day, when Wilfred was taking his lesson in French
from the Gentleman, he asked about those two long, thi:1
sw\,ords which hung crossed on the wall, over the picture-
of a dark-haired lady, in the Gentleman's room.









Zibe fencing Lesson.











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The Gentleman from France turned quickly away and looked out of the window, saying nothing for
a long while.
Then he turned to Wilfred standing asking there, and said, It is a long, thin, cruel sword-very
little-very thin-but it killed my friend. It is for that I came to America."
Wilfred was very much interested, and after waiting a long time, while the Gentleman from France
looked sadly far out of the window, he said, I should like to know how to use the long thin sword." The
Gentleman turned about quickly, and laughed the sadness out of his eyes, saying, Boys are all alike, of every
country. Over in France, every gentleman knows how to use these swords. Come, I will teach you." So
he took a pair of foils, and they went out on the sunny piazza, and there Wilfred had his first lesson in
fencing.
After that, this Gentleman from France taught all the boys in the neighborhood, as all their parents
were glad of so good a chance for having their sons learn this gentlemanly art ; for, in those warlike days,
it was deemed very necessary for every man to know how to use a sword in his own or his country's defence.
And what a good time they had How exciting it was to get their foils, and gloves, and masks, and
to throw off their coats, and learn to parry, and thrust, and bend, with the fascinating, long, thin steel
foils glancing in the sunshine. Of course these had little buttons on the ends, so no one could get hurt,
and the handsome Gentleman from France became very excited and jolly over it all.
And so it came about, that while poor little Prudence had to stay in the house and learn to embroider,
and spin, and sew, Wilfred, out on the lawn in the healthful sunlight, was taught to use the foils as a
gentleman should.










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