• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 List of Illustrations
 Preface
 Who they were
 Western freaks
 At San Francisco
 At sea
 Discoveries
 Lighthouses
 Jack Bobstay spinning yarns
 Sunrise land at last
 In Yokohama
 Earthquakes and railroads
 Sight-seeing in Tokiyo (Tokyo)
 Rick's fans
 About Japanese rulers
 Japanese temple--and a story
 Children and children's sports
 A short trip
 A jinrikisha journey
 Oka and Murasaki
 Japan tea
 Mourners and religious faiths
 The cat and the fox
 The bamboo, rain-coats and blind...
 The rain
 Spreading canvas for Australia
 The antelope
 The wide sea
 Man at the wheel and man in the...
 About telescopes
 Coral islands and coral
 New Zealand
 Auckland
 The Maoris
 Through Cook's strait
 Australia, by Rick Rogers
 Sydney
 The storm
 "Gold! gold!"
 A big sheep farm
 A queer country
 The interior of Australia
 China at last
 Canton
 Old friends again
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: From golden gate through sunrise lands : a trip through California across the Pacific to Japan, China and Australia
Title: From golden gate through sunrise lands
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082887/00001
 Material Information
Title: From golden gate through sunrise lands a trip through California across the Pacific to Japan, China and Australia
Alternate Title: All aboard for sunrise lands
Physical Description: 384 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rand, Edward A ( Edward Augustus ), 1837-1903
Oriental Publishing Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Oriental Publishing Co.
Place of Publication: S.l.
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Brothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Scarlatina -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Ship captains -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Seafaring life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Youth -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
National characteristics -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- California   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Japan   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- China   ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- Australia   ( lcsh )
Fiction -- Pacific Area   ( lcshac )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1894   ( local )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Travelogue storybooks   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Edward A. Rand.
General Note: Other eds. published under title: All aboard for sunrise lands.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082887
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232698
notis - ALH3094
oclc - 84718588

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    List of Illustrations
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Preface
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Who they were
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Western freaks
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    At San Francisco
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    At sea
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Discoveries
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Lighthouses
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
    Jack Bobstay spinning yarns
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Sunrise land at last
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
    In Yokohama
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
    Earthquakes and railroads
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Sight-seeing in Tokiyo (Tokyo)
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Rick's fans
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
    About Japanese rulers
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
    Japanese temple--and a story
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
    Children and children's sports
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    A short trip
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
    A jinrikisha journey
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
    Oka and Murasaki
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
    Japan tea
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
    Mourners and religious faiths
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    The cat and the fox
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
    The bamboo, rain-coats and blind men
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    The rain
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
    Spreading canvas for Australia
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
    The antelope
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
    The wide sea
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
    Man at the wheel and man in the moon
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
    About telescopes
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
    Coral islands and coral
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
    New Zealand
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
    Auckland
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
    The Maoris
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
    Through Cook's strait
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
    Australia, by Rick Rogers
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
    Sydney
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
    The storm
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
        Page 311
        Page 312
        Page 313
        Page 314
        Page 315
        Page 316
        Page 317
        Page 318
    "Gold! gold!"
        Page 319
        Page 320
        Page 321
        Page 322
        Page 323
        Page 324
        Page 325
        Page 326
    A big sheep farm
        Page 327
        Page 328
        Page 329
        Page 330
        Page 331
        Page 332
        Page 333
        Page 334
        Page 335
        Page 336
        Page 337
        Page 338
        Page 339
        Page 340
        Page 341
    A queer country
        Page 342
        Page 343
        Page 344
        Page 345
        Page 346
        Page 347
        Page 348
        Page 349
        Page 350
        Page 351
        Page 352
    The interior of Australia
        Page 353
        Page 354
        Page 355
        Page 356
        Page 357
        Page 358
        Page 359
        Page 360
        Page 361
    China at last
        Page 362
        Page 363
        Page 364
        Page 365
        Page 366
        Page 367
        Page 368
        Page 369
        Page 370
        Page 371
        Page 372
        Page 373
    Canton
        Page 374
        Page 375
        Page 376
        Page 377
        Page 378
        Page 379
        Page 380
        Page 381
    Old friends again
        Page 382
        Page 383
        Page 384
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text

































































































I'sm








FROM


GOLDEN GATE

THROUGH


SUNRISE


LANDS.


A TRIP TEROUG I CALIFORNIA ACROSS THE PACIFIC TO
JAPAN, CHINA AND AUSTRALIA.



BY
EDWARD A. RAND.
AUTHOR OF "PUSHING AHEAD;" "ROY'S DORY;" "BARK CABIN;" "TENT IN THE NOTCH,"
ETC., ETC., ETC.


ILLUSTRATED.


THE ORIENTAL PUBLISHING CO.





































CIDPYRIGHT SRCURED

BY
B. JENKIV,
18q4




















CONTENTS.


CHAPTER. PAGE
I. WHO THEY WERE .. 13
II. WESTERN FREAKS 23
III. AT SAN FRANCISCO 42
IV. AT SEA 53
V. DISCOVERIES 60
VI. LIGHTHOUSES. 67
VII. JACK BOBSTAY SPINNING YARN .. 76
VIII. SUNRISE LAND AT LAST 94
IX. IN YOKOHAMA .. 102
X. EARTHQUAKES AND RAILROADS 110
XI. SIGHTSEEING IN TOKIO I8
XII. RICK'S FANS 132

XIII. ABOUT JAPANESE RULERS 1,38
XIV. JAPANESE TEMPLE-AND A STORY 147
XV. CHILDREN AND CHILDREN'S SPORTS 51

XVI. A SHORT TRIP 158
XVII. A JINRIKISHA JOURNEY 1,07

XVIII. OKA AND MURASAKI .
XIX. JAPAN TEA 195
XX. MOURNERS AND RELIGIOUS FAITHS 200
XXI. THE CAT AND THE FOX .. 209
XXII. THE BAMBOO, RAIN COATS, AND BLIND MEN 217
XXIII. THE RAIN 226













CONTENTS.
XXIV. SPREADING CANVAS FOR AUSTRALIA .

XXV. THE ANTELOPE .

XXVI. THE WIDE SEA .

XXVII. MAN AT THE WHEEL AND MAN IN THE MOON .
XXVIII. ABOUT TELESCOPES .

XXIX. CORAL ISLANDS AND CORAL .

XXX. NEW ZEALAND .


XXXI. AUCKLAND .

XXXII. MAORIS. .

XXXIII. THROUGH COOK'S STRAIT

XXXIV. AUSTRALIA, BY RICK ROGERS

XXXV. SYDNEY .

XXXVI. THE STORM .

XXXVII. "GOLD! GOLD!" .

XXXVIII. A BIG SHEEP FARM

XXXIX. A QUEER COUNTRY

XL. THE INTERIOR OF AUSTRALIA

XLI. CHINA AT LAST .

XLII. CANTON

XLIII. OLD FRIENDS ASAIm .


** 241

* 247

* 251

* .* 256
.262

266

. 275


S .278

S .283

. 286

.* 299

S 302

. 308

. 319

S 327

* 342

* 353

* 362

* 374
* 382
















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


PAGE.
Frontispiece. The good Woman . .


Sunrise Boys . .
All Aboard Initial . .
Concord Bridge . .
She interceded with the Major.
Nurse Fennel at home . .
The Suspension Act . .
The Barrel Act . .
Grandpa Roger's Home in Summer .
Echo Rock . . .
Lower Cafion of the Kanab .
The Grand Cation looking West from
Toro Weap . .
Gunnison's Butte at the foot of Gray
Canion . . .
Climbing the Grand Canion .
Bird's-eye View of Terrace Cafnons
Winnie's Grotto .
Interpreter and his Family .
Marble Caion . .
Gate of Lodore . .
Running a Rapid ... . .
Island Monument Glen Cafion .
Marble Cafion . .
Buttes of the Cross in the Toom-Pin
Wu-near Tur-weap .
Indian Village . ... .
Camp-Fire at Elfin Water Pocket.
Standing Rocks on the Brink of Mu-av
Cafion . . .
How the Voyage begins . .
Cape Horn . .
Woodward's Garuen .
The Minute Man . .


How the Voyage may er d ..
Joe . . .
Sunset at Golden Gate and Fort Point
The City of Tokio .. ...
In high Northern Latitude ..
Phases of the Moon .. ...
Under full Steam
Funny Ways of Making a Fire
A Bell Boat . .
First class Light Ship with steam
fog Whistle . .
Mt. Desert Lighthouse ..
Fourth order Lighthouse at Pentfield,
L. I. Sound . .
Lighthouse at the "Thimble Shoals,"
Hampton Roads, Va. .....
A modern Style of Lighthouse .
How Uncle Nat spent his leisure
H ours . . .
Walrus ....
A Vessel turning into an Icicle
A Sleeping-bag .. ....
Bound for the Ship ..
Icebergs on every Side .. ..
A Kayak . .
On Snow Shoes ...
Jack when spilled out ..
Life Basket . . .
Sending help through the Air to the
.Nancy Dee ...
Life Boat . . .
A Greenland Whale .. ...
How many Waves there seemed to be!


All-aboard Boys.











LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Ship Ahoy! . .
Fujisan, the highest Mountain in Japan
The Sun as viewed from the Planets
A View in Tokiyo .. .
Dreamland . . .
A Style of Dress.... .
On a comfortable Sofa . .
Street in Yokohama . .
Daimiyo in Court Dress . .
The Way the Mikado travelled, in
Japanese Fashion . .
New England Coasting . .
Reconnoitering for an Earthquake
The round Moon . .
The Mikado on a Journey in Euro-
pean Fashion . .
The seven-stroked Horse .
Nihon Bashi . .
The champion Oarsman . .
Grandpa's Clock . .
Pagan Temple in Japan . .
A Sintoo God- the God of Longevity
Japanese Shops . .
Storks . . .
Rick's Fans .. ....
Young America behind a Japanese
Fence . . .
Our Japanese Luxuries on a hot
August Day . .
A good Friend to Japan .
Japanese Story-Teller . .
A Group of Japanese Mothers and
Children . . .
The last of the Tycoons . .
Torii at Entrance to Shinto Temple .
Too Late . . .
A Doll Maker . .
Japanese Sport . .
A Japanese Decorator ..
A Cemetery . ..
A lonely Meal for the Japanese Woman


PAGE.
93 One of the old-time Archers
94 Japanese Woman and Child
95 Kindness to the Birds ..
98 Making Tea . . .
1oi Won't you take a Cup of Tea with us?
102 Having a social Time
103 Out for a Walk . .
104 Stretched out for the Night .
o06- A Poetess . . .
An Old Japan Scene . .
107 "The Frog Band is out serenading
1o9 Somebody". . .
i0o First Chop .. . .
112 Bond of Union . .
Japanese Mourners . .
i13 Beating the Temple Drum .
II8 The Excursion of Tengon by Water .
121 A Japanese Mischief Maker .
123 A Yankee Kitsune up to his Fun .
124 Mad because receiving Tails
128 Kitsune leading astray an innocent
129 young Creature . .
131 The Sabbath of the Foxes .
132 Japanese Boy . .
133 Rain Coat . . .
Eastern Straw Goods . .
134 Japanese Birds . .
Eleven bare-headed blind Men.
136 A handsome Object . .
138 Bob Gray laughed at her .
139 The Landlord's Daughter performing
on the Koto . .
141 Chopsticks for one . .
145 An interesting Time A Matsuri
149 Trying to get a Crab off the Rocks
152 Mark of Respect . .
153 Over the fair blue Waters of Boston
156 Harbor . . .
158 Uncle Nat's favorite Jinrikisha
159 Entrance to Suwo Nada .
163 A Celebration by the Spider Family .


RAGE
167
170
171
175
179
183
185
188
190
191


197
'95
200
201
205
206
209
210
211

213
215
217
218
219
221
223
226
227

228
230
233
237
239

240
241
244
245










LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


Bound for Australia . .
What for Dinner .......
On a Hogshead to see me off .
The Fishes taking Bumble-bee's Leav-
ings . . .
The Chronometer .. .
A volcanic Country in Winter .
On the Ocean Wave . .
Telescope at Cambridge. .. ..
Telescope at Washington .
What the Waves cover . .
Coral . . .. .
"Suthin's Comin'"-and "Suthin'
Came . . .
A Lagoon . . .
Siah's Cousin . .
The famous Planet .
Painting the Lion's Head .
A marine Flower Pot . .
A Fan handsomer than anything in
Japan . . .
Medusae or Jelly Fish . .
Young Jack Bobstay . .
Old Jack Bobstay . .
R ick . . .
A Trap for the Savages . .
One Proof that the World is round
A Song of Home . .
What occasions the Tides .
In Cook's Strait . .
Wiser than a whole Family of Owls
The aspiring Rooster . .
A Source of Wealth . .
The Calm of Sunset . .
Sydney .
Ralph leaning over the Ship's Rail
"Glorious" to be a Sailor .
Trying to carry a plate of Soup .
Not so glorious to be a Sailor .
After the Storm . .
Hobson's Bay Railway Pier .


PAGE.
247 Bourke Street, Melbourne, x880, look-
249 ing East . . .
251 Public Museum and Library .
I wonder which way Home is .
254 Group of Aborigines . .
256 A Dog ran up and barked at them
259 Prize Australian Sheep .. ..
261 Not much Wool on them ..
262 The Keeper of the Sheep fast asleep
263 A Cousin to your Boundary Rider
265 Wake up, Rick . .
266 Bees! Bees! . .
All Aboard for Sunrise Land .
267 On the jump . .
271 The Black Swan . .
272 Lyre Bird . .
273 A familiar Creature .
275 The Bower Bird . .
276 Hammock Bird . .
A big Bird stalking toward him
279 Through the Wilds of Australia
280 Trading with the Aborigines
281 Christmas in Old England .
282 Kangaroo and Baby . .
283 Christmas in Australia .
284 Chinese Artist . .
286 On and across a Sea of Silver .
289 Chinese Junk . .
293 Chinese Rick and the Lamp .
295 Out-door Scenes in China .
296 An old Citizen of the Flowery Land
298 Hong Kong Woman . .
299 A young Celestial.... .
302 Image of Confucius .
303 Image of Buddha . .
306 A cheap Umbrella .
308 Lord of the twenty-four Umbrellas
309 Umbrella Procession . .
310 Chinese Girls . .
311 Joe Pigtail . .
313 Rick's Dream .


PAGE.

3fr
318
319
321
327
329
332
335
337
341
342
343
344
345
347
348
348
349
349
352
353
355
358
359
362
363
365
366
369
371
372
373
374
376
378
379
380
381
382
384











































































GRAND CANON OF THE COLORADO. (6,200 feel deep.)















PREFACE.


ALL ABOARD! Wherever one may have a chance to take the cars for
the West, we invite them to meet us in San Francisco and join in this
proposed trip. It will cost but little; nothing for meals, or lodgings, or
extra clothing, for steamboat or railroad fare. The only thing needed is
the possession of the book itself, and a leisure hour under a garret-roof
that the rain is tapping, or by a blazing fire in winter, or out in a swinging
hammock when summer comes.
Are there not boys who like adventure, a fire and a chowder on the
beach, a climb, too, up a sand-hummock, though vicious gusts and pelting rain
may follow? Then all aboard for Sunrise Lands! Are there not some who
are shut up in sick rooms? We feel for you, and this trip is for you also.
We have spoken to the "clerk of the weather," who has promised sunny
skies. There will be, though, one storm, but not a raindrop shall reach
you. And the girls do we leave them out? They are all welcome. Plenty
of room for everybody. The Antelope is to be built in part of a new
material-iron and rubber. She will last, and yet she will swell to the
size of any desired passenger-load. All-aboard
We would here express our indebtedness to the Rev. D. Crosby Greene,
D. D. of the Japan Mission of the American Board, and one of the transla-
tors of the Japanese New Testament, for timely suggestions as to Japanese
customs, and also acknowledge the courtesy of Messrs. E. W. and L. E.
Page of New York city, whose experience in Australia and elsewhere in
the Pacific has been a valuable one. And we want to be able to thank
every one, the young and the old, for going with us. We want all to know
Uncle Nat, Ralph and Rick, Jack Bobstay -but the last bell is sounding I
All aboard I E. A. R.












ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.




CHAPTER I.

WHO THEY WERE.

?~" LL ABOARD for Sunrise Lands! All
A aboard! And wasn't it the merriest
voice in the world saying this? Then it
must have been Uncle Nat who gave the
above invitation, for he had that kind of
voice. He was calling out to his enterpris-
ing nephews, Ralph Rogers and his brother,
Rick, as they took the cars at a California
station for San Francisco. Ralph and Rick
--' were Massachusetts boys whose home was in
Concord. Their father had long been dead,
but their mother still kept up the old home. "It's good blood, what is
in you, boys," the mother would say. "You know the Concord woman
in Revolutionary times, when Major Pitcairn and his British troops came
to town. The court house had been set on fire, and it threatened to
burn her house. She interceded with the major, her water pails in her
hands, and got him to put the fire out. She belonged to our family
Blood tells, boys. Don't forget."
"No, mother, but blood won't put out fires. There has got to
13








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


be a man behind it, and mind makes the man here in America,"
said Ralph, one day, threatening to swell to the size of a Fourth of
July speech.
But it is in 'em, the blood after all," the mother said to herself.
"Their ancestors fought at Concord Bridge."
Ralph was about fourteen, and Rick three years and a half younger.
Rick was just the sort of boy to get into a scrape, enthusiastic and
impulsive, and Ralph who was a bit cooler, would sometimes prove to
be the very boy to get Rick out of a scrape. Rick had a face for-
















CONCORD BRIDGE.

ever on the smile, his blue eyes laughing, and his mouth also, except
--look out for such moments! When Rick looked sober, and talk-
ing excitedly, said, "See see, R Ralph! Look-er here Couldn't
you and I"--his mother did not need to hear the rest.
"Oh, dear, what is Rick up to now?" she would exclaim.
Rick's soberness meant that the mischievous thought laughing out
of his eyes and mouth, had shaped itself -into a plan, and would








WHO THEY WERE.


soon be heard from. Ralph's face was more quiet and subdued,
and his eyes were of a softer hazel, but there was the same kind of
family-smile -their father had it before them--making its sunny
home in the corners of both his eyes and mouth. They were gen-
erous, big-hearted boys, though inheriting from our common father,
Adam, a good share of human infirmities, liking fun and their own
way more than was always convenient for their mother.
"Oh, dear," she would sometimes say, "I don't know what Rick is
coming to, and there is Ralph who is more steady, but he surprises
me also, now and then. But there, I mean to do the best I can,
and ask God to do the rest." In all this she was very sensible.
An unwelcome guest, the scarlet fever, came into the house one
day, and when it had gone out again, it spitefully left Ralph and
Rick very "weak and mizable" as old Nurse Fennel said. Rick's
round face, whose eyes and mouth were the hiding places of con-
stant and roguish smiles, looked quite narrow and sad, while Ralph
stepped feebly as if his next request would be for a crutch.
"Yes, mizable, jest mizable
them boys are, and you jest
Need, Miss Rogers, to give
them a change of hair. A
change of hair is what will
her earlier fix 'em," triumphantly said
Nurse Fennel. She had
< thought this out one day while
busily knitting, at the same
I time offering to her tame
NURSE FENNEL AT HOME. squirrel a home in her pocket.
She had lived in England in
her earlier days, afterward coming to Yankee-land. Consequently, the









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


peculiarities of dialect of the old and the new country had fastened
themselves upon her like the barnacles encrusting the piers of an old
wharf. "A change of what?" asked Mrs. Rogers, fancying that the
old lady wanted the boys' locks to be removed. Oh, I see now But
they take the air and walk out every day."
"I mean a journey, marm."
"A journey?" thought Mrs. Rogers. "Where can it be?"
There happened along, that very week, Uncle Nat Stevens. God
bless the Uncle Nats with which he has sprinkled the world like
plums in a pudding. This Uncle Nat was a man past forty, and a
sea-captain. He had a stout body and a big head, a rosy face, brown
eyes and a brown moustache to match them. He had much energy
of manner, and he was a thorough seaman. He had helped himself and
gone up rapidly from post to post; but he was ready to help others,
and an old sailor said, "the cap'n was a regular chicken at heart if any
one might be swamped in a rough sea and need help," for his heart
matched in size his head.
The day after his arrival in Concord, the captain and Mrs. Rogers were.
talking about family-matters. The boys are pretty well, but they do
need a change," affirmed Mrs. Rogers.
"Ellen Maria," the captain replied in his brisk, rapid way, "you say
your lambs need a change, and I don't wonder, for they look thin as a
potato-skin. Now see! You know I am said to be one of those folks
always along just in time to put their foot into everything."
So he was, but it was a most excellent foot he brought with him.
"Now, let me tell you what kind of a cruise I shall be up to this
year. I am going to San Francisco, and there taking steamer, shall
run over to Japan. At a Japanese port, I expect to find my old
ship, the Antelope. She has been in other hands the past year, but
when she reaches Japan, the owners wish to make a change, and








WHO THEIR WERE.


'/-3- ,-_ want me to take her again.
Q Then I slip down through the
Pacific to New Zealand, across
the water to Australia, then up
to Hong Kong, and afterwards
I may go to India and Egypt,
:$ through the Mediterranean, home.
Look here, Ellen Maria!" Ellen
SMaria looked.
S "Now I am going to make a proposition,
i and that is, to let me take your two boys
with me."
a) Ellen Maria's eyes went up and her hands
THE SUSPENSION ACT. went down. "Massy! she ejaculated.
"I am in earnest, sister. You must see that your boys need some-
thing, for they are all pe-
tered out. They have lost
their vitality, or whatever
you call it. What a dif-
ference between to-day and I
the last time I visited you!
They are quiet as lambs
now, and so I called them I
that. There, the last time i
I was here, I remember one
of them got caught in an i
apple tree back of your l
sitting-room window. It 'li
was hardly a case of inani- -
mate suspension, but the THE BARREL ACT.








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


very reverse of it. The time before, when I was at home, one of them
tumbled into a barrel, and two of his young friends came to the
rescue and fished him out. To-day, their vitality seems all gone.
Now you let me have those boys and I will take the best care of them
while away, and bring them back to you safe and sound. Won't they
pick up while gone, and won't they learn a lot also "


GRANDPA ROGERS' HOME IN SUMMER.


That is splendid in you, Nat, but how can I spare them ? Don't
whisper a word to them."
Those enterprising boys, quiet as lambs," got hold of the plan in less
than an hour, and five minutes after knowing it, presented themselves to
their mother in their best suits, carrying an old leather trunk between








WHO THEY WERE.


them, and in each unoccupied hand a travelling-bag, saying they wanted
to bid mother good-bye before starting to find the sunrise!
That settled the matter, and in a few days, it was decided that
they might accompany Uncle Nat on his trip.
"We must go to grandpa's first," said Rick.
Dear old grandpa! Like a stream coming down from a mountain-
top and watering many fields, is the influence of loving grandparents
over the generations below them. Grandpa Rogers lived in a house
approached by one of the prettiest, and most leafy walks of summer.
The trees were bare now, but the home itself was like an old oak
covered with the foliage of many tender and beautiful associations.
When grandpa had been visited, Uncle Nat and his nephews left
New England.
The trip to California was made, and a visit also to some California
friends, the Peters. The Peters were sorry to have their Eastern
visitors leave, and the boys' departure was especially regretted by a
colored youth on the premises, Josiah, or Siah, as he was generally
called. Siah was a stout, black boy caught up by the wave of some
colored exodus from the South, and carried West by it. He had no
father or mother, but had left an old aunty behind who sent after
him the prayers she could not personally follow. She sent also her
most dearly prized earthly treasure, a little pocket Bible. Asking
her minister to pick out passages appropriate to a young person,
she then drew with her own hand a big pencil-mark about them.
They were admonitions after this style: My son, if sinners entice thee,
consent thou not."
As Siah could not read, he did not know just what precious stones
might be in these caskets, but their nature in general, he understood,
that it was something bery good fur young folks," and it had its
influence. Certain stains, too, he knew were aunty's tear-marks, and








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


this touched him. Aunty's Bible and a certain amount of self-respect
had kept Siah, amid all his migrations, from that carelessness and
coarseness so incident to such a life. He was at work now on the
farm of Mr. Peters, Uncle Nat's host, and he and the Rogers boys
were excellent friends.
"I wish I could go wid ye," said Siah. "'Pears to me as if I must."
There was no way opening itself to him, and to Siah's great re-
gret, he was not able to join in this "hunt fur de sunrise," as he
called it. He followed them though as far as the door of the train
that was to bear them away, and when the engine began to sneeze
and grunt, he joined in the start, and grinning, raced as far as he
could, beside the track. Ralph and Rick turned to look at him once
more, and they caught a glimpse of his face, the smile gone, his big,
mournful eyes watching the vanishing train.
"There, boys, we are off at last," said Uncle Nat, "and we shall
be in Oakland in three hours. San Francisco is not far from the
sea on a bay, and about half a dozen miles across the bay from San
Francisco, is Oakland. We get out at the latter place and are ferried
across the bay to San Francisco."
It was evening when they took the ferry-boat for San Francisco.
All about them stretched the waters of the bay, one mass of black-
ness, but before them flashed the lights of San Francisco, multi-
plying as they neared the city, brightening and sharpening, till they
seemed like the many camp-fires of an army resting on the slope
of a hill.











CHAPTER II.


WESTERN FREAKS.


S OME one was making a
sound like a locomotive
whistle.
Oh-h-h-h! Isn't that
steep? That's like them."
It was Rick. Hs was look-
ing at a book of pictures lying
on a table in the parlor of the
San Franciscd hotel where Uncle
Nat was stopping. When he
said, "That's like them," he
meant pictures of caiions, a fea-
ture of scenery the boys saw
ECHO ROCK.
in California.
Do you want me to tell you about the pictures? I have been all
through that country."
This interrupting voice was a very pleasant one, and it sounded
directly above Rick's head. He looked up and saw a man's face over
him.
"Oh is this your book ?" asked Rick.
Oh that is all right. Now if you would like to hear about those pio-
tures you get that boy over there in the corner, for I guess he iL
your brother, and I will tell you both about them."
23








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


The stranger meant Ralph.
"Ralph," said Rick, approaching his brother, "a man is going to
tell you and me about some pictures. It is a country that uncle said
he was sorry to skip on his way here."
"That man?" he asked. "I know him; that man's name is Greene,
for I saw him write it in the register in the office," he whispered.
SThe stranger
was very social.
"I want to tell
you about the won-
derful canons we
have in the far
West. Did you
ever see a canon ?"
"We saw one
on our way, sir,
and Uncle. Nat
promised some
time to tell us the
reason for it," re-
marked Ralph. It
was here in Cali-
fornia among the
mountains, a n d
Uncle Nat has
seen big, big ones
in the Yosemite
LOWER CANON OF THE KANAB. (3000 feei deep.)
Valley."
"Yes, and this will illustrate the whole subject. And Uncle Nat,
who is Uncle Nat?"






















i
~
--bl~~

~---~---~-~
~-:~--~-~ --~-~


---;;
i


.I~'.


THE GRAND CANON, LOOKING WEST FROM TORO WEAP.


!'--^







WESTERN FREAKS.


"He is here, and at your service, sir," said some one in the rear
of the group.
The stranger turned
and levelled a pair of
big eye-glasses at the 7
late arrival.
"Nat Stevens!"
"Bill Greene! "
"Where did you
come from?"
"And where did you
come from?"
"Boys, this is Mr.
Greene, with whom I
used to go to school
years ago.
"Didn't I say it was
Greene?" whispered
Ralph in a tone of tri-
umph.
When the two old
school-mates had ex-
pressed their mutual
pleasure at the meet-
ing, and explained to
one another their
GUNNISON'S BUTTE AT THE FOOT OF GRAY CANON. (700oofeet high.)
courses of travel, Mr.
Greene resumed his talk which had been so pleasantly inter-
rupted.
"I was going to tell the boys what caused the cautions. some of which








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


CLIMBING THE GRAND CANON.


you have seen. Either one of you
know, boys ?"
"A drop of water," promptly
replied Ralph.
"Pooh! exclaimed Rick.
"But, Rick, your brother is
nearer right than you would think
for. These rocky valleys down
through which rattle the moun-
tain streams, may have been af-
fected by convulsions of the earth's
surface, but drops of water have
certainly been at work, cutting
and wearing away.
"A stream sweeps from the
mountains down into the plains,
and as it rolls on, it cuts like a
wheel into the earth. By-and-
by, the groove becomes very deep.
The river Colorado has hollowed
out a canon o aer a thousand miles
of its way.
Here is what we term Terrace
Calions, and you can see the deep
groove back through these steps
or terraces. At the foot of the
first terrace or step, we see the
water on whose surface drift
the boats of travellers of some
kind. In the Grand Caion,














































BIRD'S-EYE VIEW OF TERRACE CANONS.


~---~-----~---------


............


II
r,

---.. .
Bi;


CcI:r








WESTERN FREAKS.


see what magnifcent amphithea-
tres have been hollowed out in the
rock. The traveller finds traces of
volcanic action, the lava pouring
into the river-bed, and the water
cutting through the lava. It is
no trifling thing to go through
the Grand Canon, where a fellow
is boxed between these high walls
of the river, and on he must go,
over bad places in the way, where
the water sweeps down and rushes
and whirls. Then you may come
to smooth water, one surface of
glass stretching from shore to
shore save as some long, wind-
ing ripple breaks it. It looks
pretty calm in the Gate of Lo-
dore, does it not?"
"Oh-h! oh-h!" broke out
Ralph.
His eyes were fixed on a deep
mountain-cut, and he began to
read: Winnie's Grotto, a side
caron, walls two thousand feet
high." Not only were the walls
high, but there were profiles cut
out in the outlines of the rocky
walls, faces that scowled at one
another over the deep, gloomy pit, .


WINNIE'S GROTTO. (2000 FEET.)









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


and the boys amused themselves by tracing their hard, stern lineaments.
"One beautiful canon is Marble Caion,' said Mr. Greene. "At
least two thousand five hundred feet high, are the lofty walls of marble.


INTERPRETER AND HIS FAMILY.


The shades of marble are varied, and where the water has rubbed and
smoothed them, they are charming. Marble Cafion is sixty-five and
a half miles long, and starting with a height of two hundred feet,
this is increased to three thousand five hundred feet."





























































































MARBLE CANON.









WESTERN FREAKS.


GATE OF LODORE.


"See that woman in black!" called out Ralph.
"That is a place," remarked Mr. Greene, "which is called Islana
Monument, and it is one of the curiously-shaped rocks you will find.









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


They irzy t -ke the form of domes, pinnacles, alcoves, sculptured cathe-
drsl jAulls."


=----;-=,, :t' n:o-- '" .- -1 j : '


RUNNING A RAPID.


It would take a pretty good climber to go up some
remarked Uncle Nat.


of those walls,"








WESTERN FREAKS.


"Yes if he will try, he had better borrow a pair of wings to scale
certain places."
Mr. Greene went on to say, ".One statement I made, I want to fill
out. I spoke of the action of
water .in the forming of canions
and referred to other agencies.
There have plainly been the lat-
ter. One day, I noticed in the
Colorado, masses of lava-rock,
some of them low, and yet others
rose up to a height of a hundred
feet and more. After a while, I
came to an old dead volcano on
the right of a fall in the river.
From the mouth of this volcano,
immense lava-streams had been
discharged into the river, and it
looked as if in all, a mass twelve
or fifteen hundred feet deep had
been poured out. Then the water
cut its way through, and you can
see in some places .a line of
basalt on either side. Here is a
question that might be asked.
In the forming of cafions, why
did not the rivers run round the
mountains rather than through
them ? Water when it meets an ISLAND MONUMENT, GLEIN CANON.
obstacle is apt to avoid it, but here the river flows through the mountain.
One might say the water found a split in the mountains and poured








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


through the split, but examination shows the water has been cutting
its channel. There is one theory which will stand till the next one
comes along, for science, as the
farmer said of his steer, is 'an
uneasy crittur.' We will suppose
the river to be running across
the country, its surface not espec-
ially broken, when one of those
changes may have taken place of
which we have evidence, a wrink-
ling of the surface through 'the
contracting or shriveling of the
earth.' The wrinkle may be a long
one but not high enough to turn
the river from its course, which
chafes against this little elevation
and rubs its way through it. What ....
now if that process goes on, the [
'wrinkle' rising, but no faster
than the water can cut its way?
At last, you have a mountain-
range going across the country, -
and a river flowing in a deep -'-
mountain-cut or caiion. Prof. Pow-
ell says.:
"'The mountains were not -. ~ ; ',:
thrust up as peaks, but a great MARBLE CANON.
block was slowly lifted, and from this the mountains were carved by the
clouds patient artists, who take what time may be necessary for
their work. We speak of mountains forming clouds about their tops;








WESTERN FREAKS.


the clouds have formed the mountains. Lift a district of granite,
or marble, into their region, and they gather about it, and hurl
their storms against it, beating the rocks into sand, and then they
carry them out into the sea, carving out cahons, gulches, and val-
leys, and leaving plateaus and mountains embossed on the surface.'
"The action of the elements in this western country is marked.
A butte is a peak or elevation too high to be a hill but too low
for a mountain. We have some fine ones among or near the Colo-


BUTTES OF TIIE CROSS IN THE TOOM-PIN WU-NEAR TUR-WEAP.


rado caions. It is thought that the meeting of two lateral or side-
canons will account for this, and the water has thus cut out these
buttes with their terraces and towers. Prof. Powell speaks of those
near Labyrinth Canon, each one 'so regular and beautiful that you
can hardly cast aside the belief that they are works of Titanic
art.
"' It seems as if a thousand battles had been fought on the plains









40 ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.

below, and on every field the giant heroes had built a monument, com-
pa'red with which the pillar on Bunker Hill is but a mile stone. But no
human hand has placed a block in all those wonderful structures. The
rain drops of unreckoned ages have cut them all from the solid rock.'"
You saw a pretty old river, Mr. Greene," said Ralph.
"Yes, that I did."
"Did you see any Indians ?" inquired Ralph.



- ;; ,-, ----_~-. ...---_ -_-- -. -- --- -- -------z 7 --- -q--





















INDIAN VILLAGE.

"Yes, we found it quite handy to have those who could interpret
for us.
Sometimes, journeying along, we found arrow-heads, or flint chips, or
Indian trails, and then we might come to an Indian garden. When
A--F


















Indian trails, and then we might come to an Indian garden. When








WESTERN FREAKS. 41

we had them in our company at our camp-fire one night, they told
us a famous story though a pretty long one."
"What was it about ? asked Rick, eagerly.


CAMP-FIRE AT ELFIN WATER POCKET.


"The name was So-kus Wai-un-ats, told by To-mor-ro-un-ti-kai, and
the first word in it was Tum-pwi-nai-ro-gwi-nump."
Oh dear me thought Rick. Guess that will do."
The others were laughing.
"Oh I know Bill Greene of old! said Uncle Nat. "He is joking."
But he was not joking.














CHAPTER III.


AT SAN FRANCISCO.


A LL his friends knew that
YUncle Nat was an intelli-
gent traveller--who read as
he travelled.
The next day after the ar-
rival in San Francisco, he said
to Ralph and Rick, "I have
bought you some books, and I
want you to read them. They
will tell you about many of
Sthe places we shall visit on your
journey."
"Do you remember, uncle,
S -f about the people coming here
for gold? asked Ralph.
STANDING ROCKS ON THE BRINK OF MU-AV CANON.
"Yes, that began in 1848.
Gold for a long time was known to be here, but what started the
great excitement was the finding of a piece of gold when they
were digging for a mill-race at Coloma. That was in January,
1848, and people began to gather here that year. It was in 1849,
in the spring, that a big wave of emigration swept over vur land
towards California. Some went over the plains, and others by the
Isthmus of Panama, and others still by the long route around Cape
42








AT SAN FRANCISCO. 43

Horn. What the Cape Horn route may be, some poor fellows have
found out to their sorrow. The vessel starting out in hope may end
a wreck. The journey over the Isthmus of Panama in those days,
was no agreeable thing,
amid summer-heat, and
the way over the plains -
was very tedious. How-
ever, many went to the b
Land of Gold.
"I was a boy then,
and I remember how
high the gold fever ran
in my New England town.
A lot went off in an old
whaler called the Ann HOW THE VOYAGE BEGINS.
Parry. I remember go-
ing down to the wharf to see the party off. All the place swarmed
with spectators, and those on board the whaler seemed thick as bees.
They had a long voyage before them, away round Cape Horn, the old
way, but who cared for that? I remember one young fellow who had
been a tailor, but
he concluded to
M- 2--- -
change the first let-
ter of his occupa-
tion, and become
sailor. He started
to go up the shrouds,
and for a while this
tyro did very well.
CAPE HORN. But he showed that








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


he was a bungler, for his foot slipped. Fortunately he did not tum-
ble. The people saw it, and laughed at the man who if a Jack Tar,
was plainly just out of the tar-pot. Well, a great many came here to
California from every quarter, and California became a famous place.
A big, fine city has grown up here."
Frequent excursions were made by Uncle Nat and his nephews from
their hotel. They visited the Presidio, Seal Rock, Woodward's Garden,
Lone Mountain Cemetery, Golden Gate Park, and climbed the sand
hills that wall off the city from the Pacific.
"0 uncle, take us to the Chinese quarter!" besought Ralph.
"Chinese quarter, Ralph ? All right, I will," and Uncle Nat took
them the very day he was asked. They saw the little shops where
the butcher sells his pork cut in such queer pieces, displaying also
his chicken and fish, where the tea dealer peddles his choice herb, and
the clothier his funny tunics or blouses.
"And what is that ?" asked Rick. My! "
That's a joss-house," said Uncle Nat.
"Joss-house ? What do they call it that for ?"
"The Portuguese for God is deos, and the imperfect pronunciation of
this by the Chinese gives the word joss."
They looked inside. It was some festival-day, for many people were
there. On the walls of the house were queer decorations, and near the
door, was a big bell that a Chinaman struck. There were ugly images
to represent the good and the evil powers, also the man cast out of
heaven, and before these, sandal-wood tapers were burning.
"The Chinese," explained Uncle Nat, believe in two powers, good
and bad. The good, they reason, will be friendly any way. It is the
Sbad that will harm them, and must receive -special attention and be
propitiated. Consequently they try to keep the latter quiet and well-
disposed. Knowing how powerful is the influence of a good dinner,

























XX~~P




-J ja~


WOODWARD'S GARDENS, CALIFORNIA.


C~
-








AT SAN FRANCISCO.


they offer food of various kinds, and this explains the dishes you will
see in a joss-house. Then they have a certain course of life which
they feel they must lead, that they may secure peace hereafter, provided
the evil one does not inter-
fere. But that they may not
be expelled from the Chinese
heaven hereafter, they keep
in the joss-house the image of
t the man that was cast out of
heaven, as a reminder."
After the visit to the joss-
houses, Uncle Nat stepped into
a store to make a purchase,
$ leaving Rick and Ralph on the
sidewalk. With their custom-
ary impulsiveness, they decided
it could do no harm to go
ahead a little way, and having
inspected the neighborhood they
could then return to Uncle
Nat.
"What's that?" asked
Ralph, as they turned a corner.
In the street was a young Chi-
naman in a blue tunic and
baggy blue trousers. He was
carrying a basket that must
have contained a heavy article,
for he often shifted the basket
THE MINU'TE MAN. from hand to hand as if it hurt








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


him. He passed a group of street urchins, who evidently began at once
to plot mischief.. Soon a boy ran up to him, and giving his tunic or
blouse an energetic pull, rushed to the other side of the street. When the
young man turned to face his aggressor, a second boy from an opposite
.quarter rushed up unnoticed and gave a second fierce pull. Like a vane
shifting about on a very squally day, and
ol.i-i"- the n.j I current that impels it, the
Cliii.: iirrifl tu mid -: "'". to notice this new invasion.
But -til- ; tld assailant came up on the
si ..f th- i 'i! attack, pulling and jostling
S -a fourth arrived and a
Fifth even-the young
S '- man struggling in their
midst like a hen with a
SI i: parcel of hawks. He did
S__ I ., not dare put down his
-basket even for a moment,
'--- ,i ," '. aware that the harpies
S--'- would have immediately
.- .. .'. clutched it, and his reten-
.., tion of his property made
resistance all the more diffi-
THE GOOD WOMAN.
cult. Ralph and Rick were
boys living in a town that had a statue of the "Minute man of revolution-
ary days ready at a moment's notice to fly to arms and resist Britain's
overshadowing power, and they were not going to see the weaker side
in a fight -be it Chinaman or freedman--crowded under foot.
Come on, Rick!" shouted Ralph.
Rick generally went off at a bound any way, but if he saw Ralph
ahead, he would spring all the quicker. And away he went after
















































































HOW THE VOYAGE MAY END. 49








AT SAN FRANCISCO.


Ralph, rushing and shouting. Ralph grabbed a boy who had seized
the basket, and repeating an old trick which he had practised on
almost every one at home till they were about crazy, he neatly inserted
his foot between the boy's legs and tripped him up. There was now
a fresh uproar. Round a street corner came a reinforcement of three
street Arabs longing for an opportunity to stretch their idle muscles.
Matters threatened to be come very seri-
ous for Ralph and Rick. Sud i'nly l ,
cle Nat appeared. His big, I.
rose above the assailants
threateningly, as a broom -
over a cloud of mosquitoes. '
Away with ye," he
shouted, seizing a couple of II
boys by the collar at once. i
Was it a giant-torpedo ex-

certainly had the effect of
one. The hornet swarm /
broke up immediately, leaving tihe y:.n A
Chinaman alone with his defi--indris.
"Look here, boys!" said Unclre Nat. to ,
his enterprising nephews. Duln't stray off
so. Just wait for me and then wh'l-n w e Ie
any of the enemy about, we will i:.nl_ '' on i-1
them all together and rout them gloriously.
There goes Joe Pigtail! JOE.
"Is that his name ?" asked Rick, looking wonderingly at the boy.
"No, Rick, but that will identify him to us. What grateful bows
he gave us Let's follow him."








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


When the newly named Joe Pigtail saw that they were following him,
he stopped and waited for them.
"We wanted to look about Chinatown," said Uncle Nat to Joe.
"Chinee-town ? Goodee. Me showee," and he kindly led them to
quarters they had not seen and to other queer shops, finally stopping
before a house that had a laundry look.
"Me -me he said, intimating that he stopped there, and beckon-
ing them in.
In the outer room. there were three men busy with laundry-work,
and through an open door a fourth could be seen occupied with some
kind of cooking in his shadowy cubby-hole. In the outer room, every-
thing was very plain, and though there was an abundance of chances
to stand up, there was none to sit down unless one literally took the
floor. A side door into a yard had been swung back and looking across
this yard the boys could see into the next house where a middle-aged
American lady was seated beside a Chinese boy teaching him out of a
book.
"She goodee woman- like you! said Joe to Uncle Nat in compli-
mentary tones.
"Uncle Nat ain't a woman," whispered Rick to Ralph.
When they left the place, turning to look back, they saw Joe stand-
ing by a laundry table and gazing thoughtfully upon the retreating
party,













CHAPTER IV.


AT SEA.

THE City of
Toldo, a
vessel belonging
to the Pacific
SMail Steamship
:T AT Co., was lying at
her wharf. Men
were hurrying
about, giving or
obeying orders.
The last trunks
were going on
SUNSET AT GOLDEN GATE AND FORT POINT. board. People

were saying good-bye, while the fizz of escaping steam that could be
heard, plainly said, that the leviathan was impatient to be off. Every-
thing was ready at last. Every fastening was released and one Sat-
urday in early spring the steamship gracefully, majestically moved
away.
Hurrah! shouted Rick enthusiastically, as he stood among the
passengers watching every movement.
"Hurrah!" shouted Ralph.
"Hurrah!" responded Uncle Nat and the other passengers, while
a group of enthusiastic boys on shore joined in three ringing cheers.
53









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


In a few moments the pilgrims for the Sunrise were moving rapidly
down the bay.
"There are some sailing craft ahead, boys. They look slow, don't
they, boys, old-fashioned and behind the times, beside this craft. This
is the nineteenth century," observed Uncle Nat.
Just then the City of Tokio blew her whistle and she seemed to
shriek, "Yes, I'm the nineteenth century and I'll beat and cross the
Pacific, see if I don't." She said this in one long breath, gasped and
said no more.
"There is the Golden Gate! exclaimed Uncle Nat. "What a
pretty sight!"
Between two ridges of land stretched the waters of the Golden
Gate, and outside was the broad and shining sea.
This is the entrance to the bay of San Francisco, boys; and there
is the Pacific we must cross. Can't you say the lines you repeated
at the hotel the other night ?"
Ralph was proud of his accurate memory, and he recited the lines
he had recently seen among Bret Harte's poems:

"Serene, indifferent of Fate
Thou sittest at the Western Gate.
Upon thy heights so lately won,
Still slant the banners of the sun,
Thou seest the white seas strike their tents,
O warder of two continents ?
And scornful of the peace that flies
Thy angry winds and sullen skies,
Thou drawest all things small or great,
To thee, beside the Western Gate."

The boys were so much interested in their new surroundings that
































I\ -
~'T~i;-i~-- -


THE CITY OF TOKIO. 55








AT SEA.


they were sorry to see the sun sinking toward the western rim of the sea.
"I would
like," said
Ralph, "t o
have that sun :
', I ,*


,, ',u'''I'
catch on soay Y;
peg in the V ,,








sa the sun
keep up above '
thnle sea andt,
'i'ii'," "1 ,



didn't gy o ,down

it as so





s t r a n g e t ou ; i ; 'j I 11
saw thave suthen
keep up above o,"r'





watch sea andy







ten, eleve ,
twelve o'clookR
at night and?


havstill see the




sun shining,
shining in the w








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


itude to accomplish the feat. In any Arctic country, it must be strange
to a person from the Southern land to see the sun day after day wheel
round the heavens. In Greenland, the sun is always above the horizon
in June and July, and then there are days where his absence is only
long enough to give him a little dip below the horizon and up he comes
again. While it is summer in Greenland, and that season exceeds four
months only in few places, vegetation makes great advances."
When night came, they were out upon the bosom of the Pacific.
The big steamer steadily made its way over the lonely, darkening waters.
The stars brought forward their tapers one by one and lighted up the
windows of the sky. The wind came in chilly breaths. The dull,
heavy swash of the waters about the vessel could be heard. Our three
pilgrims were fairly afloat, going west as Uncle Nat said, to find the
east; moving toward the sunset to search out the sunrise lands.
The boys saw the moon rise above the water.
"Uncle Nat," asked Rick, why are there so many moons, a family
of moons with different faces, and not one thing looking the same all
the time?"
Come into my state-room."
In the state-room, Uncle Nat took a book out of his trunk and
showed the boys a picture of the sun, the earth, and also the moon at
different points in its journey about the earth.
There in that outside circle is the moon as it appears to the sun,
now showing a bright surface. But in the inner circle is the moon
at different points as it appears to the earth. Take when the moon is
between the earth and the sun, and we have the moon's dark side
turned toward us, or we get no moon at all. But a little farther
along, we catch a bit of the moon's bright side like a crescent, and far-
ther along -"
"Oh, I see!" shouted Rick. t is easy enough now, after you









AT SEA.


know. And when the moon is round on the side opposite where you
started, we get the whole of the bright side, or it is full moon. Goodie,
goodie "
You have got
it now, Rick,"
said Uncle Nat,
smiling at his
nephew's enthu-
siasm.
"Ralph, do you
understand ?"
Ralph nodded
his head but
looked glum; "I
--I- don't feel
right -here,"
and he laid his
hand on his
stomach.
Ah, it is com-
ing on, I see.
Well, I will put
you right to bed,
and fix you all
nice."
The mysteri-
ous "it soon
made Rick put
his hand to his stomach. and Uncle Nat had his hands














CHAPTER V.


DISCOVERIES.

EOPLE on board a
Steamer easily be-
come acquainted, and
Sk Ralph and Rick were
disposed to know
everybody. Recover-
ing from their touch
of seasickness," as Un-
cle Nat termed it (" a
touch heavy enough
to knock a feller over," Rick thought) they were continually mak-
ing exploring expeditions. They would take a peep at the engineer, then
look at the furnaces, then at the cook's quarters, finally mounting to
the saloon. After a while, back they would go, nodding once more
at the engineer, and then fetching up near the furnaces. The third
afternoon out, Ralph had circumnavigated the steamer several times,
and finally stopped to watch the furnaces. Only one person seemed
to be at work there, and he was shoveling up the big lumps of
coal preparatory to a feeding of thrb red, angry furnace-mouths.
The shoveling ceased, and now from a dusty corner, Ralph heard a
series of noises, a rat squealing, a cat mewing as if hungry for the rat,
and then a dog growling as if hungry for cat and rat both. At the
same time, what did he see? A lump of coal that had flashing








DISCO SERIES.


eyes, open mouth and white teeth? There were several appearances
and disappearances of this kind, and Ralph thought that it went
ahead of any "magic exhibition" that the Rogers brothers had
ever given in the old barn at Concord.. "It is gone!" said Ralph.
"No, there it is!" Again, he saw the face, and heard a lion
roaring as if in full pursuit of dog, cat and rat. Ralph had seen and
heard enough in this magic-haunted spot and turned to leave it, when
a familiar and pleasant voice said, Chile, don't you know me? "
"Siah!" exclaimed Ralph. "It's Siah! It's Siah!" he shouted.
It was indeed the rollicking, laughing Siah who came out of the
shadows in the corner, at the same time that he took down his coal-shovel
screening his face. He came forward with a funny air of self-importance
as if he were the ruler of Soudan showing himself to his subjects.
"Don't you see it is your ole frien', Siah?"
"Yes, but how did you get here ?" asked Ralph.
"Well, I couldn't get here without doin' some walking sartin
sure. So much to -begin wid. You see after you left it was awful
lonesome roun' de place, an' I jes' axed Massa Peters ef he could'
spare me. An' he said, he hated to hab me fur to go, but ef I
could' be contented, I might go. So I traveled on-"
"Not all the way on foot?"
Yes, the ardent Siah had footed it to San Francisco.
"I felt like takin' a sea-viyage wid my frien's, I tole de boss
-dat's Massa Peters-an' trab'lin' here, I foun' out de steamer
dat was gwine, an' I knew from what you said which one it was,
an' I jes' hired out as one ob de han's. You know I want fur
to see de world an' ef I do I must begin early. Den it gibs me
a chance to see you and your libely bruder."
And so Siah was following his friends to Japan. What he
would do when arriving there, he had not considered.








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


"Dat question," he told Ralph,1 "am too many days off. I might
be dead 'fore den, an' de question not hab any importance. So I
won't raise de question till I get dar."
"It's Siah! Siah It's Si ah, Rick! shouted Ralph.
A hurried sound of feet was heard in a moment, and two men
came rushing up.
"Where, where?" they asked.
"Where is what?" said Ralph.
"Fi-re? Quick!"
Oh it's Si ah, I said."
"Nonsense! The next time you holler, take your dinner out of
your mouth," and the men retreated in disgust.
"Ef he had some dinner in his mouth, he'd be more pleasant.
Guess he's hungry," said Siah.
Rick now appeared, and together he and Ralph rejoiced over their
treasure found once more.
"Uncle Nat," said Ralph, "Siah told me a lot about the fire-
room and the fires there, and it was real interesting."
"Did he tell you anything so interesting as the kindling of fires
when you have nothing to light them with?"
"Nothing to light them with, Uncle!" exclaimed Rick. "That
is not very likely."
"The savages do it though. Capt. Cook found a drilling process
common among the Australians, where they took a stick of dry,
soft wood, and setting it on another piece, twirled it between their
hands, the friction producing fire in less than two minutes. The
Sandwich Island method is the same in principle, and also that
among the Gauchos of Buenos Ayres, though the last place one
end of the rubbing-stick against the breast as a carpenter would
his bit. The Esquimaux, an old navigator said, pointed his stick



























Drilling Process.


Esquimaux Method.


Iroquois Method.


Method in use among the Gauchos of
Buenos Ayres.


Sandwich Island Method. Blunt stick
run back and forth in groove.

FUNNY WAYS OF MAKING A FIRE.


Swiss pump-drill,








DISCO SERIES.


with stone, and twirled by means of a strip of leather, in this
way boring into stone even. In Switzerland, an apparatus has been
used called the 'Pump-drill,' the hand bringing a cross-piece dowa
that unwinds a cord and sends the spindle round. When the hand
is lifted, the cord is rewound and so on. The Iroquois used a sil-
ilar instrument."
When Siah was told of this, he said, "Smart folks in dis world,
honey."
It was Rick's turn to make a discovery the next day. He had
-strayed among the Chinese passengers on board, and some of these
were moving a quantity of heavy freight in that part of the
steamer.-
"A -hoo hoo!" shouted a celestial to Rick who was un-
pleasantly near a rolling barrel. Rick did not hear. His mouth
,open, a smile sweeping over his face and wrinkling it, he stood
watching one of the Chinese who was tickling the ear of a sleeping
country-man with a chip. The barrel was quite near the unconscious
Rick when a Chinaman rushed forward and seizing him drew him
aside. Then Rick's friend stood grinning and bowing as if an old
acquaintance.
"Why, Joe Pigtail!" said Rick. "You here?"
"Me-ee here," answered Joe. "You go-ee over to my
-coun tree ?"
No, I am going to Japan."
Me see you."
"Yes, I hope so, and I will tell my brother and Uncle Nat."
Siah and Joe Pigtail on board! How the attractions of steamship-
life were multiplying! Now if they could make the acquaintance of
a sailor and get him to spin some yarns," happiness for the Rogers
hrcthers would be complete. But-where could they find "him ?" They








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


investigated the merits of several candidates. One though was pro-
nounced "dirty." A second had a squeaky voice," an infirmity not
generally favorable to yarn-telling. "Crosser than pison," was the
comment on a third. The fifth day out, Rick said mysteriously to Ralph,
"I have found him; Come Rick led Ralph away and pointed out a
grizzled uma tar who was coiling up a rope, his back turned to the boys.
Ain't he chuncky ?" whispered Rick.
Suddenly, the "chuncky" sailor turned. He had a big head, or as
Ralph told Rick, "He spread a good deal of sail in his face." The
lower part of his face was fringed with a gray beard, and he carried at
the neck a black kerchief, with immense ends. Under the heavy eye-
brows of gray, there were two kindly lights that twinkled. "Blue
lights," Ralph called them, like those that a feller in trouble on the
water at night would be glad to see. Something like a lighthouse."
Hullo, boson the sailor sang out to Rick. You here again ?"
This title, bosonn," tickled Rick.
"Yes, sir; and here's my brother Ralph."
Ralph held out his hand; How do you do, Mr. -- he hesitated,
not knowing what to call this big lump of salt pork.
Bobstay! Jack Bobstay, that's my name for young folks, and Jack
is glad to see you."
And what is it for old folks ?" asked Rick.
Ah, no matter about them. In this case they are not to be taken
into account. What my name may be, don't make the difference of a
button on a mermaid's best go-to-meeting gown. Jack Bobstay at your
service!"
Here the old sailor made a low bow.
Ralph and Rick were delighted with Jack Bobstay, and they eagerly
introduced him to Uncle Nat, Siah and Joe Pigtail. The Rogers brothers
felt that their circle of acquaintance was widening.














CHAPTER VI.


LIGHTHOUSES.


SJ aB OYS," said Uncle Nat, after
i y supper one evening, "if you
Sa sp___ will come into my state-room at
Once, I will show you some pict-
f 7e ures of lighthouses, and tell you
all I know upon the subject."
The invitation was accepted
eagerly, and there were two pair
Sof bright, searching eyes turned
toward the pictures that Uncle
Nat pointed out.
"In the first place, where rocks
or shoal water may be, we have
beacons or buoys if they will an-
swer. We make beacons of stone
and then again of wood or iron.
A BELL BOAT.
A very common kind of bouy is
simply a spar anchored at one end, and that we call a spar-buoy. Buoys
may be of iron, and in that case are made hollow and will float. I know
of dangerous rocks off Boston Harbor called the Graves, and a horn-buoy
has been put there. The sea, when uneasy and moving, forces the air
into this horn, and what a solemn groan it has Then a bell-boat may
be used, and the motion of the waves will keep the bell dismally sound-
67









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


ing. We must have something in such places, for the risks are great
and a wreck is an ugly sight for the sailor.


FIRST CLASS LIGHTSHIP WITH STEAM FOG WHISTLE.


Sometimes a lightship is used as in this picture. Such a vessel must
be strongly built, one too that will swing easily at anchor, and be in
readiness to meet any emergencies arising from her perilous position.
You can see the chain-cable that moors this one, and she has a steam
fog-whistle with which she keeps piping away in the mist. The light
she shows at night is carried at the mast-head. You notice the uneasy
throw of the waters around her, showing that shoal sea is close at hand.
Off in the distance is a steamer, and a sailor with a spy glass is trying
to make her out. Now we come to the lighthouse, and this picture is
one on Mt. Desert. It is of the ordinary kind, a tower built on a





















































MT. DESERT LIGHTHOUSE. 69









LIGHZHO USES.


good strong foundation, and it is doing excellent service with its
warning beams. Near by, tossing in the angry waters, is a fragment
of a mast, and the moonlight shows a vessel away off, that looks as
if in a ticklish position. A structure like this is common, but here
is one that is simply a house on a solid base of stone-work, and in
the cupola of the house is the lantern. It is a Long Island Sound
light. Rather a lonesome home that would be for you, boys.


FOURTH ORDER LIGHTHOUSE, AT PENFIELD L. I. SOUND.


"A modern style of lighthouse is one resting on iron piles strength-
ened by braces. This is a picture of the lighthouse at Thimble
Shoal, Hampton Roads, Va. On one side, there io a ladder de-


F


-- .-.i
--- _
_ .1-.








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


scending to the sea, and on the other, they hoist and lower their
boats. In Boston Harbor is a light that makes you think of this,
called Bug Light. At a distance, you fancy it is a beetle crawling
over the water toward you. I can testify that this beetle has bright
eyes on dark nights.
"The modern style -many-legged or centipede style as I call it,


LIGHTHOUSE AT "THE THIMBLE SHOAL," HAMPTON ROADS, VA.


will do unless the sweep of the water is like that at Minot's Ledge,.
near Boston, and then they had better substitute something else.
Minot's Ledge is a few miles from the entrance of Boston Harbor,
an ugly stretch of ledge out into the sea. It is a bad place in











a gale, and the waves
thrust up their ragged
white arms as if to tear
the lighthouse down.
When I was a boy, a
structure was put up that
rested on piles of iron, and
it did very well for a time
but a fearful storm came
up that raged terribly
along the New England
coast. I remember I went
from school, my green
satchel in my hand, down
to the old wharves at
home to see the great
tide in that storm. I
never saw such tides
there, before nor since.
I remember they rose up
and swept clear over
wharves supposed to be
high enough out of water
always. In that storm,
the fancy piece of pipe-
stem on Minot's Ledge
went over, the iron piles
snapping like dry pine
twigs. The waves were
so strong that they rolled


A MODERN STYLE OF LIGHTHOUSE.


LIGHTHOUSES.








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


ashore stone weighing one or two tons. The keepers, poor fellows,
went with the wreck. When Minot's Ledge was occupied again, they
gave up the pipe-stem style and built of stone, tier upon tier, solid
and true. As you can only work upon the ledge at a certain stage
of the tide, it took several seasons to prepare the foundation .and lay
a few courses of granite. But it was finished at last, and a splendid
pile of granite it is."
"Uncle, what is it they light up the lantern with ?"
"Do you mean, Rick, how they do it ? Let me go back some way.
There is at the mouth of the river Garonne in France, a lighthouse
nigh three hundred years old, and it is a fine structure. For a light,
at first they burnt pieces of oak in a chauffer or small furnace. That
was a common mode, and long practised. It seemed a wonderful ad-
vance, when over this little bonfire up in the lighthouse tower, a
rough reflector in the shape of an inverted cone was suspended and
prevented the upward passage of the light. In 1760, Smeaton, the
famous engineer of the Eddystone lighthouse, used wax candles.
In 1789, in the old Garonne lighthouse, a Frenchman, Lenoir, put
mirrors or reflectors near Argand lamps introduced into the lantern.
The Argand lamp has a circular wick and chimney. By-and-by,
in the present century, came Fresnel who made extensive improve-
ments, introducing what is called the lens principle. A lens is any
substance that will let the light through and refract or bend it.
For instance, when a piece of glass' is convex as we say, or when
it bulges out, that will so bend the image of an object as to enlarge
it. In telescopes and microscopes, we take advantage of this mag-
nifying principle, and the 'big lens in the lighthouse tower is so
.constructed that the light of a lamp comparatively small is mag-
nified into the shining of a mammoth ball of fire, till it seems
like a new-risen sun above the dark surface of the sea. I have








LIGHTHOUSES.


gone by Minot's Light in the night, and how thankful I have been
for that big torch away out in the dangerous sea."
What a lot Uncle Nat knows!" said Rick to Ralph when they
were by themselves. Yes, said Ralph with a wise air, and I will
tell you how it happened. Mother says -when Uncle Nat went to sea,
he would spend his leisure time reading. That is the way boys ought
to do," he added, exercising an older brother's privilege and annexing a,
suggestion intended for the benefit of the careless and ignorant youth,
Rick. "That is the way to rise in this world."


HOW UNCLE NAT SPENT HIS LEISURE HOURS.














CHAPTER VII.


JACK BOBSTAY SPINNING YARNS.


- --




WALRUS.


H OW would you like to have
me unwind a skein of yarn?"
asked Jack Bobstay one day, his
"blue lights" twinkling.
"A story?" replied Ralph.
Jack nodded his head.
"0 just let me get Rick and see
if Siah can't come too," pleaded
Ralph.
There was an abundance of help


in the care of the furnaces, and Siah was granted a brief fur-
lough. Rick was always ready for any promising digression.
In a short time Ralph and Rick were curled up inside a big
coil of rope, making two round lumps, like two pumpkins in a
basket.
On one side of this coil, squat upon the deck, was Siah, and on
the right was Jack Bobstay.
Jack began: I have followed the sea more than these thirty
years, but the toughest weather that I ever saw was on a whalin'
voyage.
"You been to the North Pole?" asked Ralph.
"Pretty well up, my boy, but not jest to the peakit end. of it,"
replied Jack.


































































































IN HIGH LATITUDES.








JACK BOBSTA Y SPINNING YARN


"Did you ever see a Greenlander ?" asked Rick.
0 yes, I have seen 'em shooting seals and sea lions 'round among
blocks of ice."
"Did you use to go a-whalin' much?" asked Siah.
"Whalin'? I have seen more whales than you ever dreamed of,
boy," said Jack with an expression almost like contempt.
I don't know as I eber dreamed ob any," said Siah in a subdued
way.
"You have forgotten your dreams, maybe;" replied Joe, dis-
posing of dreams and dreamers with a wave of his hand.
"How far north did you ever go ?" asked Rick. "Did you
say you got on top of the North Pole?"
Joe disliked to own that he had not achieved anything possible or
impossible. He now merely said that he must have gone "pretty
near it," for he remarked with impressive dignity, "I went chuck into
the jaws of the ice and snow. I have been in one or two explorin'
expeditions."
You have ? said Rick in tones of positive admiration.
"Sartin! declared Joe with great dignity, thoroughly aware of
the important place he occupied in their regard. "It is a tough
position 'to be. in ; sometimes awful skittish! You see it is pretty
uncomfortable to be sailin' in a vessel where masts, rigging, shrouds
and sails may be covered with ice. The spray freezes as it falls, and a
vessel looks at last as if she was turning' into a big icicle. I was in one
ship that went after Sir John Franklin."
"What, the man that never came back?" inquired Ralph.
Yes, in one of them ships,, for though not so thick as sandpeeps on
a summer beach, still there were more than one of 'em, upward of
twenty going in eleven years. You know Sir John Franklin went off in
1845, with two vessels, the Erebus and Terror, to find that humbug-








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


place, a nor'west passage. He expected to be back in 1847, but he was
never seen after July, 1845. Well, they hunted and found traces of
Franklin's party on King William's Land. The Esquimaux had seen
:some of 'em, but what the savages had to tell, only proved that Franklin's
party was at last swept away by death. I was in one of the expeditions
that hunted for Sir John. You see his wife, Lady Jane, could not give
him up, and when it was. useless to think he could be found alive, then
she spent her money trying to get some information of his fate
.and recover his body. When I went, I thought I might never
-come back myself, and then what Lady Jane would have hunted for
poor Jack Bobstay? At one time, our cap'n concluded to send some of
his men ahead to see what the prospect was. We had two boats, and
,contrived to get ahead some way, when we were caught in the sudden
closing of the ice. There we were a number of miles from the ship, in
two open boats, with few provisions beside our water-kegs. We drew
our boats up on the ice and waited for the next thing, and that was the
dark. Luckily, we
had some sleeping
bags."
b"What are
those ?" asked Rick.
A SLEEPING-BAG.
Just what I say,
bags, to sleep in. There is a chance for you to get into them-
-and they are made nice and warm-and when inside, you button
yourself in.
"We went to sleep, and as things were no better, the next day we
,concluded to abandon one boat and drag the other over the ice to open
water, if we could find it. We began to strip one boat, and I re-
member it fell to me to roll along the water-keg. Tom Savin took
the sleeping-bags. Another man took the oars, and so on. Then








JACK BOBSTA Y SPINNING YARN.


we fell to and helped work along the other boat. It was no easy
job, but we managed to worry her along, now and then finding' a
leetle water that would help us, and finally we struck a channel


that led us down to the neighborhood of the ship. It was good
to set foot on her deck once more, but we were not out of all
trouble yet. 'We soon fell into bad company, that is, got among a
lot of icebergs and driftin' floes of ice. Them icebergs were
glorious, on both sides of you, boys, rising up like mountains and
towers, and meetin'-houses! That was one way to look at them
things, and the other was, what if their cold, white jaws should
close on you and nip you up for good? We got out two boats-and
we were 'mazin' spry, I tell you-and riggin' up a tow-line, rowed
our craft out of danger. We all took a long breath when we had
cleared that spot."








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


Jack's breath.
less auditors now
indulged in the
l. ..I. same luxury.
._ .."Did you
make any ac-
quaintances up
there ?" asked
ERick whose
social n nature
"abhorred a
vacuum" like a
-I desert place.
--N_ --i "Any ac-
-m__ quaintances? It
is not a very
social place up
there, and you
.I couldn't reason-
ably expect to
find large settled
__ B'towns up in the
"snow and ice,
and have people
row out to you in
"_-_the stream and
ICEBERGS ON EVERY SIDE. ask you ashore to
take dinner, and then pass the night," answered Jack with a laugh.
"But. some folks must be there," persisted Rick.
"Must be some Skim-mer-hose," observed Siah learnedly.








JACK BOBSTA Y SPINNING YARN.


"Esquimaux? 0 you see them now and then, but scatterin'-like
you know. You may be sailin' along and you'll see 'em paddlin'
about in their boats. They are master-hands for a boat, or kayaks
as they call 'em. A kayak is intended to carry only one person,
and is sixteen feet long say, not over a foot deep, sometimes but
nine inches, and in the middle it may measure eighteen inches or


A KAYAK.

two foot across. The frame of one that I saw was made of light
wood and was entirely covered with tanned sealskin."









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


"Cubbered all ober ?" asked Siah. "Whar do der Skim-mer-hose
get in?"
"In the centre is a hoop of bone that is big enough to let a
man's body through, and the proprietor sits there. In the boat I
inspected, he seemed to be laced in, the lower edge of his jacket
being laced to the rim of the hole. Then the water is kept out.
The feller had one oar about six feet long, broad like the blade
of a paddle at each end, and how they managed that ticklish boat
without a keel you see, I couldn't understand, but manage they
did. They would go shooting' over the waters, when the spray was
flyin' and the sea rough."
"But that is not the only kind of boat they have there," observed
Ralph. "So I have read."
"Not the only one ? Of course not," promptly replied Jack who
did not mean to be found napping on the subject of Arctic navigation.
"They have what they call an oomiak, and that is a woman's boat,
sometimes twenty-five feet long and a third as broad. It will carry
twenty people then. Sometimes they have a sail for the oomiak."
"A sail ?" inquired Siah. Where dey git de clof ?" *
"Inside the walrus, boy. The walrus is one of their factories for
furnishin' cloth. You heard me say they covered their kayaks with
seal skin, and now the walrus is another factory. I think the Esquimaux
are excellent boatmen, but I don't know as I like to see one of 'em
flyin' along over the water in a kayak, though interesting any better
than an Indian skimmin' over the ground on snow-shoes," observed
Jack skilfully changing the subject and temptingly inviting his auditors
to the consideration of another subject.
"Snow shoes!" cried Rick, his eyes steadily enlarging. "Did you
ever see an Indian on snow-shoes?"
How he envied Jack!









JACK BOBSTAY SPINNING YARN.


"Plenty of 'em," remarked Jack with the air of one used to these
wonders and taking them as a matter of course. "One winter I was
up in Canada, away up, spending' the season in a loggin' camp, and
some Indians came pretty near us. They were out huntin' and wore
snow-shoes."
"I saw a picture," said Ralph eagerly, "where an Indian was on
snow-shoes, and he had just let an arrow fly at his game and had-had-"
"Pegged it;" interposed Jack. "That is what an Indian hunter
is quite likely to ,do. Snow-shoes are simple things, the curve being


something like that of an egg. For the frame, white ash makes a good
wood, and then strips of hide make a firm 'light nettin' on which to
plant the foot. The foot is secured to the shoe at the toe, leaving
the heel free to play up and down, and that lets the snow-shoe slide
right along the ground."
Jack's knowledge of the snow-shoe was almost exhausted and he


.. ..........









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


was endeavoring to call up another subject for the delight of his
auditors, when the wondering and almost worshipping Siah spoke up;
"I 'spose you've been in de water?"
"Of course, sartin! We sailors don't make more of that than
you land folks make of stepping out on the ground," replied Jack with
an almost contemptuous air. "But," he prudently added, "we have
our preferences about the quantity of water we take and when and where
we get into it. Once I was jest home from a whalin' trip, and as I
had been through almost everything, I naturally felt that I was
equal to any water-ventur' at home, and I took a common sail-boat
intendin' to enjoy a little trip down our river, and then out to sea a
mile or two, and so home
again. I got along very
well till I reached the
mouth of the river when
one of the worst squalls
I ever knew blew for
about twenty minutes. It
blew all ways at once,
nor-west, sow-west, nor-
east, sow-east, so it seemed
to me, and the sky was
black as the bottom side of
the cook's b'ilers. Well, I
got into a place, a bad
place, where the tide and
eddy meet, and over I went !
There I was spilled over
JACK WHEN SPILLED OUT. about as entirely as a man
could be. Didn't things look dark? The waves broke lively over









JACK BOBSTA Y SPINNING YARN.


the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and jest above the water was
a strip of white light that made the sea and sky look all the blacker.
Well, bare-headed, I paddled round till I was tired, and the squall
too, and pilot-boat coming' along, they fished me up and took me
home."
"Did did you let the sail go when the squall squall struck
you--you? That's the way we do on Concord River," said Ralph
eager to impart information.
"I did it every time, every time, boy, but you see I was in a bad
place where tide and eddy meet. People joked me when I got back,
about my knowledge of the sea, but I told 'em they were welcome to
the laugh as long as I had saved my skin. Things though did not
look so bad as when I was in the Nancy Dee."
"De Nancy Dee, a woman?" inquired Siah.
"A love-scrape? Massy, boy, I hope not. Jack Bobstay has not
been captured yet. A ship, a ship, I mean, and a wreck, a true one,
a live one."
0 tell us about that ?" pleaded Ralph.
Jack's "blue-lights" twinkled, and he was evidently delighted to
unwind one more yarn.
The boys now crept closer to this magnetic son of the sea who
began the fascinating tale of Jack Bobstay and the Nancy Dee.
"We were nearin' the coast of England when a fearful storm
struck us. It howled all day and then it blew all night. What
a night that was, black and roarin', tossin' and ravin', and toward
morning we struck! What it was then, we did not know. As it
neared toward day-break, we could make out somewhat where we
were. We were not far from as ugly and black a set of coast-
rocks as I ever see, and we knew we were on some kind of a
ledge. I've been north, south, east, west, but I never see an angrier








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


sea. You know when folks are mad, they sometimes grow white in
the face, and that is the way it was with that sea, white in its
anger. Nothin' but bilin' foam between us and the shore, a kind
of immense snow-drift all broken up into feathery flakes and flying'
toward the shore! I don't know but what the light we did have
came more from that big batch of foam than from the day itself,
for the sky in the east was black as if in mournin'. We were
in a bad fix. We had been cutting' away the mainmast and the
mizzen mast, and in falling' they took away part of the foremast.
We looked ragged enough, and how the seas did sweep that deck!
What was to be done? No boat could live a minute in that sea,
and what headway could a swimmer make? Now when I was in
the river, that time I told you about, I felt tol'ably easy for I
could keep a-goin' till help came, but in this sea it seemed as it
the billers would chop a feller up less than no time. All at once,
something bright went over our heads! It was a rocket! Guns!
we couldn't hear it whizz, but we could see its trail and that was
jest as comfortin', and it went like a comit through the air! I
have seen fireworks, but never did I see any that did me so much
good. That rocket, you see, came from some people on the shore,
high up on the rocks, and at last we could
make out two men. Then by-and-by, there
were more. Another rocket came, and this
time it fetched a rope that fell right across
our ship. We knew what it meant. Finally
there came a life-basket. This is suspended
From a rope that goes from the ship to the
shore, and slides along this rope, so that it can
LIFE-BASKET. be filled at the ship and then pulled ashore.
It is sometimes very difficult to reach a wreck with a life-boat, and










































I


---- -- ~ -- -



L----
.N HEL THROUGH T AI O T N E ..- '8--




.. _--- = .



.-..... .

SENDING HELP THROUGH THE AIR TO THE NANCY DEE. 89









JACK BOBSTA Y SPINNING YARN


a life-basket when it -an be brought into play, is much better. As
for us, you may be sure that we filled our basket repeatedly, and in
this way we all escaped from the Nancy Dee, that threatened to
become a good-sized
coffin for us all."
The audience gave
an exclamation of re-
lief at the release of
their beloved i do 1
from danger. It
would have been a
congratulatory shout
if he had revealed the
fact that he was the
last man to leave the
ship and take his turn
at a basket-ride. His
modesty might have
been overcome, had
he not suddenly
looked off upon the
ocean and then toss-
ing up his head, ejac-
ulated, Whe w !
There she blows "
Saying this, he LIFE-IUAT.
sprang to his feet. What could be the matter ? "A whale, boys, a
whale Off in the distance, they saw a white mass rising into the air.
"A whale, sartin! Don't I wish I was nearer and had a good
harpoon in my hand?"









ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


A GREENLAND WHALE.


a complacent grin. Well, I guess
But all through the
steamer's voyage, that
"some day" did not ar-
rive. Either Jack was
busy, or Siah was needed
at the furnaces, or Ralph
and Rick could not come
at the appointed hour. HOW


I will, some of


They went no
nearer though,
for the steamer
went on its way
sending up a
column of black
smoke, and the
whale as if in
emulation sent
up a jet of foam-
ing water and
then pushed on
his way.
"O h, Mr.
Bobstay, do tell
us about
whales?" asked
Ralph.
Do you wish
me to ?" replied
the old salt with
these fine days."


MANY WAVES THERE SEEMED TO BE I








JACK BOBSTAY SPINNING YARN. 93

Meantime, the ocean behind them was growing bigger and the
ocean before them was growing smaller. The steamer's engines cease-
lessly panted night and day. The great hull kept rising and falling
with the sea, yet ever going forward, and the Land of the Sunrise,
so long a dream, promised .soon to become a fact before the pilgrims'
eyes. "Every wave takes us nearer," said Ralph; but how many
waves there seemed to be!













G IA FTJT V Ii.


SUNRISE LAND AT LAST.

PATIENT.
ly did the
engine of the
steamer toil
away, and every
minute, Ric k
and Ralph
were coming
nearer to the
Sunrise Land.
"We have
been out so
IUJISAN, THE HIGHEST MOUNTAIN IN JAPAN.
many days that
we have gone between four and five thousand miles, and to-morrow we
ought to see Yokohama," said Jack Bobstay.
"And all this time," moaned Ralph, "I have not seen the sun rise."
"Haven't you? Come on deck to-morrow morning early and see it."
That evening, Uncle Nat and his nephews watched the sun go
down into the sea. They saw him floating a moment upon the water,
and then gradually sinking like an immense coal of fire.
There, boys, the sun looks pretty big, but if we could stand upon
the planet Venus, he would appear larger still."
"Why?" asked Rick.








SUNJVISE LANDS AT LAST


Because Venus is nearer to the sun."
"And I have studied at school that from Mercury the sun must
be vastly more
huge."
"Yes, Ralph,
because Mercury
is still nearer the --,.. -
sun, and so _... ..
merged in the
glory of the sun, -
that without a
telescope it is no
easy thing finding ------
Mercury. The
great astronomer
Copernicus never
saw Mercury, --.-
though it is true .
he had no teles-
cope. While the
sun appears so big
from Mercur y,
from the farthest
planets he must ,,.-
shrink to a very
humble size."
Uncle Nat,
when in his state-
room, showed the boys the accompanying picture of the different sizes
of the sun when viewed from different planets.








ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


Ralph declared that the sun, big as a ginger-snap when seen from
Mercury, was only a pin-head from Neptune."
Ralph was out of his bed at an early hour, the next morning, and
came upon deck rubbing his eyes.
"Ho, there you are!" sang out Jack Bobstay. "Have you got
your sea-legs on? You may find the deck wet and slippery,
for we had a heavy dew or something else last night."
Ralph turned to the east. It was very early and the clouds were
just beginning to light up.. Between the steamer and the horizon, the
sea was one vast surface of jet, as if a fire had gone over and blackened
this prairie-like area and had then been swept beyond the rim of the
sea into a deep, deep furnace that shot a warm glow up among the
clouds. Ralph came again in a little while. The east was full of
sharper light, the clouds stretching one above another in gold and
red and orange strata, while higher up swept and towered broken,
fugitive masses of mist, like smoke from a vast. prairie-fire. The sea
had now brightened from black to gray, and stretched toward the
east like a great ashy hearth. But where was the fire itself? Was
it still beneath the sea sending up that sharp, intense light, every
moment burning sharper and intense? Suddenly, away over on the
edge of this hearth, appeared a bright, shining little coal! How pure
and golden!
"But it grows! said Ralph.
Yes, this tip of a fire-brand steadily enlarged, flashing, sparkling
dazzling, till it hung a huge ball of fire above the sea, and thousands
of little waves stirred and glittered as if consciously to lift and offer
some crown to this king of the day.
"Ain't she a beauty?" said Jack Bobstay looking silently over
Ralph's shoulder and watching the same scene. "Now turn and look
westward!"









SUNRISE LANDS AT LAST


Ralph swung round and what did he see ? On the edge of the sea
was a glorious pyramid of snow. Was the earth rising up to do early
honor to this king of gold, and holding up a fair, white crown for his
wearing ?
"What is that? asked Ralph in tones of surprise and admiration.
That is a famous mountain on this side of the Pacific," said Jack
gently patting Ralph's shoulder, "grand old Fujisan, and it is the
pride of all Japan."
"Then we are near Japan ?"
"Sartin'. Run and tell Boson."
Ralph hurried away and speedily brought Rick who finished dressing
himself as he came along. The two boys were in ecstasy.
"Let's have Uncle Nat up," said Rick.
Uncle Nat was forced to leave his warm nest and come up to
see the sights. One excellent thing about Uncle Nat was, that he
could enter thoroughly into a boy's feelings, and he said "My !" and
"Pshaw!" and "Look-er-there !" as many times as his enthusiastic
nephews desired.
"It will take us some time yet to get to harbor, boys, for you
can see old Fuji some way off."
"But we shall get there to-day. We are coming, Sunrise Land!"
.said Ralph.
And the steamer's engines groaning all the way across the Pacific,
now seemed to change their tune, and said with every piston-stroke,
" Con ing! com ing! com ing, Sun rise Land! "
At last Jack Bobstay could say to the boys, "We are passing
Cape King, and that is at the entrance of the bay leading to
Yokohama."
"And is it Japan on both sides of us?" asked Rick, eagerly
looking around.










ALL ABOARD FOR SUNRISE LANDS.


"Yes, Boson. We are going by the pint, and there is the light-
house. We are about a dozen miles from Yokohama. There is a
big city, To-
kiyo, the capi-
tal, up the
bay."
The morn-
ing breeze
went like a
broom o ver
the bay, stir-
ring it into lit-
tle ripples.
Now and then
the steamer
rushed by an
island, and
again it shot
past an odd-
looking Jap-
anese junk.
This was
very high in
the stern, but
low in the
bows, and car-
ried wide sails
wollen by the
wind. Some-
times these sails were made of matting or bamboo. Amidships, it




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