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Group Title: Research report
Title: Biennial school district election, 1961
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 Material Information
Title: Biennial school district election, 1961
Series Title: Research report
Physical Description: 19 p. : ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- State Dept. of Education. -- Division of Research
Publisher: State Dept. of Education,
State Dept. of Education
Place of Publication: Tallahassee Fla
Publication Date: 1962
Copyright Date: 1962
 Subjects
Subject: School districts -- Elections -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
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General Note: Cover title.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00082797
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 27916606

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        Front Cover 1
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        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
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        Page 13
        Page 14
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        Page 18
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BIENNIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTION, 1961


The cost of biennial elections to elect school district trustees and

establish district millare levies is of mounting concern to school officials

and taxpayers.

The County Superintendents' Association requested the Division of

Research of the State Department of Education to make a study of the bienni-

al election held November 7, 1961. This is a summary, report of that study.

Specifically, answers were sought to the following questions:

1. How much did this election cost in each county and in the
state as a whole?

2. What was the cost per vote in each county and in the state
as a whole?

3. How many citizens voted in each county and in the state as
a whole?

4. What percent of those eligible to vote voted in each county
and in the state as a whole?

Additionally, a summary of the legal provisions related to this elec-

tion is presented for convenient reference along with a copy of instruc-

tions sent to County Superintendents prior to the election.

County School Boards paid out a total of $201,367.85 for this election.

The cost ranged from $115.35 in Calhoun County to $25,290.64 in Broward County.

This expenditure covered such items as poll workers, building rental, machine

rental and transportation, legal advertising and printing. It does not in-

clude the salaries of regular Board of Public Instruction employees unless

extra compensation was paid for work in connection with the election.

State-wide, the expenditure per vote amounted to $1.11. The range in

cost was from $.29 in Manatee County to $7.73 per vote in Glades County.






A total of 181,7h0 voters went to the polls. In cases where counties

reported a different number of votes for village and for trustees, the larger

figure is used.

Of the 1,163,201 citizens eligible to participate in this election, 15.621

percent actually voted. The percent of eligible voters voting ranged from

h.05 percent in Leon County to 58.47 percent in Dixie County.

The millage recommended by the School Board was approved by the voters

in all but six counties although additional earmarked levies were defeated

in one county. The voters in forty-four counties voted the maximum millage

(10 mills) permitted by the Constitution of Florida.

State Superintendent Bailey treated the question of biennial school dis-

trict and trustee elections in a speech at the County Superintendents' confer-

ence in Gainesville on January 18.

Fifteen counties have by local referendum eliminated school
trustees, and the trend is definitely in the direction of placing
full responsibility for the operation and control of county schools
in the hands of the county school boards, unhampered by division
of authority between two local boards. Laws enacted over the past
fifteen years and certain court decisions have almost entirely
eliminated any power formerly held by school trustees, so that to-
day most of their duties are advisory in nature, Though trustees
are usually conscientious, devoted citizens who often render valu-
able service, you well know that two elected boards each dealing
with the same schools of a community offer the opportunity for a
division of responsibility. Such a situation leads to what is
commonly known as "buck passing'" on issues where community pressures&
are involved, usually to the detriment of the schools.

Progress along these lines leads to the hope that the antiquated
system of voting district millages, which has been allowed to contin-
ue since the beginning of public education in Florida, may be modern-
ized. As you know, every two years the freeholders of a county must
vote a district millage (with a limit of 10 mills) and must elect
trustees in those counties where thA office has not been eliminated.
This system was needed many years ago when there were thousands of
small special tax districts in the state and each district was re-
quired to expend the funds raised from district taxes on the schools
within that district. Those were the days before good roads and
modern transportation, and district trustees had responsibilities for
the operation of district schools. With the passage of the Minimum
Foundation Program in 1947', these numerous special tax districts
were consolidated and the district was made to coincide with county
lines so that today there exists only sixty-seven districts, each
county a district unto itself.






There is also some dissension today over the ballots and re-
lated procedures used to vote on district millages. It is possible
for a minority of freeholders in a county to disrupt the entire
normal operation of a county school system by failing to approve
sufficient millage to allow a county to meet full requirements for
participation in the Minimum Foundation Program. In the Hills-
borough County district election last fall only 3,205 voters out
of more than 140,000 eligible voters cast their ballots. The cost
to the Hillsborough County school board for holding this election
was over $11,000, or $3.5h per vote. State-wide, according to
State Department of Education survey, only a little over fifteen
percent of the eligible voters went to the polls to vote, and
this is a higher percent than usual, because in several of the
larger counties there were other issues on the ballot which
attracted voter interest. In several counties, only four percent
of the voters took the time to go to the polls. In one county,
the cost per vote amounted to $7.73, almost $8 per ballot. State-
wide, it cost Florida schools over $200,000 to hold these elections.
Certainly, this money could be used to better advantage in support
of quality education.

The county school board is the only important agency of local
government that must operate under a constitutional restriction on
its ability to finance its responsiblity--a constitutional ceiling
limit of 10 mills--and which must submit part of its financial re-
sponsibility, also restricted by a constitutional limit of 10 mills,
to the freeholders every two years for their approval or disapproval.
If the constitutional limit on total millages for schools is to be
retained at 20 mills, (and I am not recommending a change), then,
certainly, the district milla:e concept should be eliminated and
the school board should be granted the same privileges which other
local government agencies possess, that is, to levy the millages
necessary to operate county schools, within the twenty-mill limit.
There is no danger of irresponsibility in this, since school board
members are elected by the people and are responsible to them. If
the members abuse their authority, the people have the same recourse
at the polls that they do with other officials. In addition, in
instances of property re-evaluation it should be easier to lower
millages to compensate for increased assessments if all the author-
ity is vested in the school board, than under the present t"hodge-
podge" system where the district rmillage is established for a two
year period and there is uncertainty as to what the freeholders will
or will not vote every two years.

The following extracts from the Constitution and Florida Stati.tes refer

to the election of school district trusteesand to the district tax levy.

ARTICLE XII, Section 8, Constitution of the State of Florida:

County school tax. Each county shall be required to assess
and collect annually for the support of the public free schools
therein, a tax of not less than three (3) mills, not more than
ten (10) mills on the dollar on all taxable property in the same,


-3-






ARTICLE XII, Section 10, Constitution of the State of Florida:

County school districts; trustees; tax. The Legislature may pro-
vide for the division of any county or counties into convenient
school districts; and for the election biennially of three school
trustees, who shall hold their office for two years, and who shall
have the supervision of all the schools within the district; and
for the levying and collection of a district school tax, for the
exclusive use of public free schools within the district, whenever
a majority of the qualified electors thereof that pay a tax on real,
or personal property shall vote in favor of such levy; Provided,
that any tax authorized by this section shall not exceed ten mills
on the dollar in any one year on the taxable property of the district.

ARTICLE XII, Section 10A, Constitution of the State of Florida:

Abolition of county school district trustees. (1) From and after
January 1, 1957, the office of county special tax school district
trustees shall be abolished and all duties of district trustees
shall be vested in the county board of public instruction, includ-
ing levying taxes provided by article XII of the constitution, in
all counties wherein the proposition is affirmed by a majority vote
of the qualified electors of any such county.
(2) To submit the proposition contained in subsection (1)
above to the electors a special election shall be called by the
county commissioners of any county upon the request of the County
Board of Public Instruction therein, which election may be held
at the same time as the next general election and the result there-
of shall determine whether subsection (1) shall be effective in
such county.
(3) Any county adopting the provisions of subsection (1)
hereof may after four years return to its former status and reject
the provisions of this section by the same procedure outlined in
subsection (2) hereof for adopting the provisions thereof in the
beginning.

The general procedures for registration of electors and the conduct of

elections are covered under Sections 97 101, Florida Statutes. Unless

covered by special legislation, these general election laws prevail.

Section 230.34, Florida Statutes reads in parts

(3) Three trustees for said "Special Tax School District
Number 1" shall be elected by the qualified electors of said
county at the time and place prescribed by or fixed pursuant to
law, but not more than one trustee shall come from any one resi-
dence district for which a county board member is provided for by
law. The persons qualified to hold such office and who receive
the greatest number of votes cast for election of trustees, subject
to the limitation prescribed above, shall serve for the ensuing two
years as trustees for said school district.
(4) The millage for the ensuing biennium for said "Special
Tax School District lumber 1" shall also be voted on and determined
at the same time, as prescribed by law.






The date for the biennial election of school district trustees and for

the voting of school district millage and the procedure for conducting the

election are set forth in Sections 230.38 and 230.39, Florida Statutes.

230.38 Biennial election at time biennial school election. -
The biennial election for trustees of any school district shall be
held the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of odd
numbered years, at which time the school district tax levy is to be
voted on as set forth in chapters 236 and 237; provided, that in
counties in which another election is scheduled by law to be held
on that date, the county board may prescribe another date on which
the biennial school district election shall be held, such date to
be within six weeks of the date herein prescribed.

230.39 Procedure for conducting biennial school district elections.
The manner and method for conducting the biennial school district
elections shall be as prescribed in chapter 236; provided, that the
county board shall publish once each week for four successive weeks,
beginning not more than forty-five days nor less than thirty days
prior to the date set for the election, in some newspaper published
in the county and with general circulation throughout the county, a
notice of the election; and, provided further, that persons whose
names are to be printed on the ballot for approval of trustees as
prescribed in section 236.32 (1) may be nominated at any time up to
fifteen days preceding the date of the election. One notice of the
election shall be sufficient for all districts in the county. In
case there shall be no newspaper published in the county, the notice
of election shall be posted at least thirty days prior to the election
in each of the districts in the county.

Section 236.31, Florida Statutes, provides that if for any unavoidable

reason the biennial election is not held at the time specified that the mill-

age last approved continues and the trustees continue in office until the

next election is held.

236.31 Election biennially. Elections shall be held biennially
in each school district in the state under the direction of the
county board. These elections shall be held at the special school
district election date on the first Tuesday after the first Monday
in November of odd numbered years, as prescribed in chapter 230;
provided, that if for any unavoidable cause the biennial election
shall not be held on this date in any school district of any county,
then the millage last approved in and by such school district shall
remain and be in effect, and the trustees of the district shall con-
tinue to hold office until the next election shall be held.

Section 236.32, Florida Statutes, sets forth the procedure for holding

and conducting school district elections. This section prescribes the form

of ballot, qualifications of electors, and establishes the responsibility of





the county for paying the expenses of the election.


236.32 Procedure for holding and conducting school district
.elections. The procedure for holding and conducting school dis-
trict elections shall be:

(1) HOLDING ELECTIONS.-All school district elections shall
be held and conducted in the manner prescribed by law for holding
general elections, except as provided in this chapter. The county
board shall appoint inspectors and clerks for said election, whose
duties shall be the same as those of similar officers in general
elections, except as herein stated.

(2) LIST OF QUALIFIED ELECTORS. The supervisor of regis-
tration of any county shall furnish, upon payment for such service
to the county board, on demand, a certified list of the qualified
electors, residing in a school district.

(3) FORM OF BALLOT. The county board shall provide substan-
tially the following form of ballot to be used for election of
trustees and for voting the levy in each school district in the
county:

SPECIAL TAX SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTION FOR COUNTY, FLORIDA,
HELD ,19 .
1. Ballot for election of trustees.
INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS: Indicate your choice by marking an "X" after
the name of the person or persons of your choice for the office of
trustee, or by writing in the name of the person or persons of your
choice for the office and marking an "X" thereafter. Vote for three
persons:
FOR TRUSTEE OF THE DISTRICT:
John Smith .... o o ____
Fred Brown . .0 0 0 o
Henry Jones. .o ... __




2. Ballot for school tax district millage levy. -
DjSTRiU'TION TO VOTERS: Indicate by marking an "X't in the space
after line one whether you. favor the proposed millage levy which
is necessary for the approved school term. If you favor a different
millage levy, write the levy you favor after line twos
1. Estimated millage levy required for regular term
(10 mills) 0 . . . . .
2. Other millage levy o ,.. o o

On the ballot for approval of trustees for the district shall be
printed the names of all persons who have been nominated by petition
of five or more persons qualified to vote in the election, filed
with the county board at least fifteen days prior to the holding of
the election and requesting that the names of such persons be placed
on the ballot to be voted upon as trustees of that school district;
on the ballot for the proposed school district millage levy shall be
printed the millage found necessary by the county board.


-6-






(4) 'HA.LIFICATIONS OF ELECTO'h3. All qualified electors
residing within any school district in the state whose voting
registration is in that district, who pay a tax on real or person-
al property within the district, shall be entitled to vote in this
election.

($) CANVASS OF RETUJRJS. The county board shall canvass the
returns of the election as made to it by the inspectors and clerks
of the election and shall declare the results at the next regular
meeting of said board or at a special meeting called for that pur-
pose.

(6) RESULTS OF ELECTION. The tax levy receiving the majority
of all votes for tax levies cast by qualified electors, or, in case
no one levy receives a majority, that levy for which, together with
the votes cast for higher levies, a majority of the votes are cast,
shall become the levy for the district for the next ensuing two years.
The three persons receiving the highest number of votes cast on the
ballot for the election of trustees, as prescribed herein, shall
serve for the ensuing two years as trustees of the district.

(7) EXFE113ES OF ELECTIOII. The cost of the publication of
the notice of the election and all expenses of the election in the
school district shall be included in the budget and paid by the
county board out of any balances on hand which are placed to the
credit of the district, or out of the first moneys collected from
the school district.

To assist in preparing for the November 7, 1961 school district trustee

and millage election, Mr. J. L. Graham, Director, Division of Administration

and Finance, State Department of Education, issued the following memorandum

dated September 18, 1961 to all County Superintendents.

Since there are certain measures in preparing for the 1961 Bienni-
al Election which have to be taken in advance as required by law,
I think it well to give you an up-to-date summary of these proce-
dures as we see them.

Date of Election:

i-ovember 7, 1961; first Tuesday after first Monday in November.
(Section 230.38, Florida Statutes)

HIotice of Election:

Publish once a week for four successive weeks in a newspaper
with general county circulation beginning not more than 45
days and not less than 30 days prior to date of election.
(Section 230.39, Florida Statutes)

Petition for Persons omriinf.ted for Trustees in Counties Having
Trustees:

Originates with nomination by five or more persons qualified
-7-






to vote in election; petition must be filed with County Board
of-Public Instruction requesting names of persons so nominated
to be placed on ballot. Period for filing petition prior to
election date is 15 days. (Sections 236.32(3) and 230.39,
Florida Statutes)

Millage:

Ballot shall show the proposed school district village found
necessary by the County School.Board for the biennium.
(Section 236.32(3), Florida Statutes)

Form of Ballot to be Provided by County Boards2

1. See suggested form in Section 236.32(3), Florida Statutes,
which should be substantially followed.

2. B & B Millage: See instructions and additions to ballot
to insert under '2. other millage levy.'* These are found
in section 109.21 under section 109.2 of Revised State
Board Regulations, 1960 Edition.

List of Qualified Electors:

Furnish on demand upon payment of such service by supervisor
of registration in county. (Section 236.32(2), Florida Statutes)

Qualifications of Electors:

1. Must be residents of district; in State one year, in county
six months.

2. Must be properly registered or furnished legal evidence
of registration in accordance with Chapter 97, Florida
Statutes.

3. Must pay tax on real or personal property.

Polling Places:

Must be one in each election precinct in the county. (Section
107.71(1), Florida Statutes). The County Commissioners, how-
ever, may make certain adjustments, if expeditious, due to in-
adequacy of polling places. (Section 101.72(2), Florida Statutes)

Canvass of Returns:

The County Board shall canvass the returns of the election as
made to it by the inspectors and clerks and shall declare the
results at either the next regular meeting or a special meeting
called for that purpose. (Section 236.32(5), Florida Statutes)

Expenses of Election:

The cost of the publication of the notice of the election and
all other expenses of the election are to be paid by the County






Board out of district school funds. It is customary to pay
inspectors and clerks at the same rate used by County Com-
missioners in other elections. (Section 236.32 (7), Florida
Statutes)

SPECIAL NOTE:

Bond elections may be held on the same date as the Biennial
District Election. (Section 100.261, Florida Statutes)

Also, see Section 100.251, Florida Statutes, for freeholders
proof, since only freeholders may participate in a bond
election, unlike the Biennial Election for which qualifica-
tions are given above.

Table 1 gives a county by county breakdown of the results of the 1961

Biennial School District Election. (See Exhibit A)

Column 1 gives the total direct expenditure of the County Board in con-
nection with this election.

Column 2 gives the number of votes cast. In cases where a different
number of votes was reported for millage and trustees, the
larger number is used.

Column 3 gives the number of voters eligible to vote. In many instances
this is an estimate.

Column 4 gives the cost per vote. This was found by dividing the cost
of the election by the number of votes cast.

Column 5 gives the percent of eligible voters who voted. This was found
by dividing the number of votes cast by the number of voters
eligible to vote.

Column 6 indicates whether or not the millage recommended by the School
Board was approved by the voters.






TABLE 1


BIENNIAL SCHOOL DISTRICT ELECTION, 1961


(1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)
County Total Number of Number of Cost Percent Recommended
Cost of Votes Eligible Per Voting Millage
Election Cast Voters Vote Approved
Alachua $ 2,500.00 889 6,000o 82.81 14,82% Yes
Baker 390.12 110 1,926 .3.55 5.71 Yes
Bay 5,124.14 1,009 17,129 5.08 5.89 Yes
Bradford 460.00 196 3,300E 2.35 5.94 Yes
Brevard 6,164.31 4,1146 29,111A 1.49 11.214 Yes


Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Plagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes


25,290.64
115.35
934.36**
993.99
611.26


1,058.83
23,848.80
890.00
1,015.59
23,043.40
5,575.90G-
6214.92
237.25
770.85
595.21
463.95
167.57
1,000.00
698 .43
820.83
814.12
929.26
11,357.29
542.60


36,078
92
1,184
491
297


355
9,236
275
390*
12,715"-
13,170
221
2714
365
115
60
173-
177
208
153
411
950
3,205
217


93,069
2,200
5,354
2,500
5,040E
No election held
14,530
172,036E
1,366
667
112,650
466,261
1,121
2,104
3,788
1,038
255
2,517
892
2,000E
1,210
3,643
7,v448
55, 000E
1,800E


.70
1.25
.79
2.02
2.06


2.98
2.58
3.24
2.60
1.81
.42
2.83
.87
2.11
5.18
7.73-4
.97
5.65
3.36
5.36
1.98
.98
3.54
2.50


4.18
22.11
19.614
5.89


7.814
5.37
20.13
58.47
11.29
28.147
19.71
13.02
9.614
11.08
23.53
6.87
19.814
10.140
12.614
11.28
12.76
6.41
12.06


No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes


Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes


__


II


I


--I-- I I-~I----


I





Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach


Pasco
Pine]
Polk
Putna
St. J
St. I
Santa
Saras
Semir
Sumte
Suwar
Taylo
Junior
VoluE
Wakul
Walto
Wash
TOTAL


1,328.83
1,289.94
303.43
417.ho
2,841.58
2,705.5)4
1,301.08
1,079.25
492.00
993.62
2,793.52
2,786.87
1,076.90
1,163.25
1,603.00
1,020.90
416.00
6,519.61
1,714.21
8.351.32


711-*
706
143
200
1,240
3,407
681
386
156
221
9,515
2,387
425
1,314
381
725
84
5,476
837*
8.347


9,098
7,00OE
1,690
709
17,093
19,320
16,802
1,OOOE
1,180E
1,291
28, OO0E
15,500E
6,OOOE
8,475
5,o27
17,500E
1,752
68,000tE
7,137
87.848


1.87
1.83
2.12
2.09
2.29
.99
1.91
2.80
3.15
4.50
.29
1.17
2.53
.89
4.21
1.40
4.95
1.19
2.05
1.00


7.81
10.09
8.46
28.21
7.25
17.63
4.05
38.60
13.22
17.12
33.98
15.40
7.08
15.50
7.58
4.16
4.79
8.05
11.73
9.50


Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No


1,512.61 761 13,133 1.99 5.79 Yes
las 9,589.84-*- 32,019 68,087E .30 47.03 Yes
6,210.39 7,701 56,115 .81 13.72 No
'nm No election held
[ohns 4,012.39 932 7,200E 4.31 12.94 Yes
ucie No election held
Rosa 2,300.00 526 7,756 4.37 6.78 Yes
ota 2,891.43 7,830 18,536E .37 42.24 No
lole I1,504.59 1,208 13,990 1.25 8.63 Yes
r 1,017.30 303 3,8845 3.36 7.88 Yes
nee 1,628.55 536 3,989 3.04 13.14 Yes
r 1,026.71 350 5,000 2.93 7.00 Yes
298.12 80 750K 3.73 10.67 Yes
;ia 9,500.00 14,302 48,603 2.21 8.85 Yes
la 605.60 199 1,,50OE 3.04 13.27 Yes
n 1,171.00 331 4,000 3.54 B.28 Yes
ngton 862.10 155 3,500 5.56 4.43 Yes
$201,367.85 191,740 1,163,201 $1.11 15.62%


E Estimated by county.
* In cases where a different number of votes cast was given for millage election and trustee election,
the larger number is used.
** Election costs shared with other governmental agency.


I_


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I


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I







Exhibit A


REPORT ON BIENNIAL MILLAGE AND TRUSTEE ELECTION, 1961


Prepared by


County


1., What was the total cost to your County Board
of Public Instruction for the biennial village
and/or trustee election this fall?

Include here the total cost of such items as
poll workers, building rental, machine rental
and moving, advertising, and printing. Do
not include salaries of regular Board of
Public Instruction employees unless extra
compensation was paid for work in connection
with the election.

2. What was the total number of votes cast in this
election?

Include here a total of votes both for and
against the millage recommended by the Board.
This is the total number who voted.

3. What was the total number of voters eligible
to vote in your county in this election?

If the exact number cannot be determined, a
good estimate will suffice. If an estimate
is used, indicate by an (E).

4. Was the millage recommended by the County
Board approved?


YES ( ) NO ( )


REMARKS:


Return to:


State Department of Education
Attentions Mitchell Wade


StDept.Ed.AcF
nRS 11/29/61


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--*-r






Each county was given an opportunity to make explanatory remarks or

comments on the instrument (See Exhibit A) used to obtain data for this

report. Some of the remarks offered follow:

Brevard "The 1961 Biennial election for trustees and village in
Brevard County had the highest number of voters in the
history of the county .... The reason for the high turn-
out was the vote taken on the bond issue in the county
at the same time."'

Charlotte "We only paid one-half the expenses of this election
because the County Commissioners held an election at
the same time and shared one-half the expenses.:

Collier No 1961 District Millage election was held since it was
not considered necessary for a district millage levy to
be made. Collier County does not have district trustees.

Duval Only about half of those recorded as voting in this election
voted on the millage question.

Escambia "Voters rejected a special two mill Building and Bus
Reserve levy. Election cost was borne jointly by the
Board of Public Instruction and the Board of County
Commissioners."

Glades "This County does not have school trustees and this
election should be abolished or held during a general
election. The taxpayers were almost unanimous in their
support of the millage recommended by the Board. Many
of the people who actually voted expressed themselves to
me (County Superintendent) as being very much opposed to
the requirement that this election be held."'

Gulf Election costs in Gulf County were held down because only
two of ten precincts were used in this election.

Hillsborough "For those counties which have eliminated Trustees, it
seems that this is a needless expense that should be
eliminated. The power to levy the tax could be shifted
to the County Board."

Holmes (This election is a) "Waste of Time and Money, since we
are electing two boards to do the same services."

Lake "Had voting machines been used in this election the cost
would have been about .2000.00 more for handling of ma-
chines and servicing same."

Manatee "I (County Superintendent) am strongly in favor of elimi-
nating the school District Millage Election excepting up-
on petition of ten percent of the qualified electors be-
cause the elections require an unnecessary expense. It
seems unwise to restrict the fiscal authority of the


-13-






School Board since they are required to adequately support
the school operation with local taxes. The caliber of the
men serving on the School Board; the restrictions of the
statutes and constitution; the approval of the budgets by
the State Department of Education and the State Auditors
give adequate protection to the taxpayer."

Marion "Held in conjunction with County Bond Election. Usual
vote when not held with another election has been approxi-
mately 500,"

Monroe "By means of a Special Legislative Act, we have cut our
polling places from 20 to 5 thus saving at least $2,000
on each of our biennial trustee and district millage elec-
tions. Both trustees and district millage were vital
to schools in the past, but their value for us has now
been largely dissipated. Possibly the Board should as-
sume all duties of the trustees and should be allowed to
levy up to 20 mills for Support and Maintenance."

Osceola "Total voters for Trustee Election 837 reflects greater
voter interest due bo opposition to one trustee."

Palm Beach "Five mills for Support and Maintenance approved. Three
mills for Building and Bus defeated.1t

Pinellaq "Seventy-three of the 147 County precincts are located in
the City of St. Petersburg. Our Board cooperated with the
City in a combined election, in which certain expenses
could be shared, namely poll workers and rent of polling
places. This resulted in a saving of approximately $1000.00.*

Polk The Millage recommended by the County School Board was
defeated 4,751 to 2,950.

Putnam "We operate under a special act. Our millage election was
at the same time as the last general election." (Putnam
County Special Act Chapter 29465 1953, House Bill 1044.)

St. Lucie No 1961 District Millage election was held since it was
not considered necessary for a district millage levy to be
made. St. Lucie County does not have district trustees.

Union "The people here do not like millage 61 voted ten mills
in 1961 others none. Election of trustees and millages
should be abolished. We must follow law in elections and
costs are heavy but very few people vote."'

Table 2 gives the school, county, and district, millage levied for the

1961-62 school year and the district school millage voted forthe suceeding

two years, 1962-63 and 1963-64. Column 5 is the millage levied for servicing

Special Tax School District Number One bonds. This millage does not come
under the twenty mill constitutional ceiling.







Table 3 gives miscellaneous tax information.

Column 1 is the assessed value of non-exempt real and personal property.

Column 2 gives the county assessment level as computed by the Railroad
Assessment Board.

Column 3 is the total rrilla.:e levied for public schools on a county-wide
basis. This includes millage r-quired to service bond issues
Special Tax School District Number One but does not include mill-
age in old school districts to retire bonds.

Column 4 is the total county millage (including district school millage)
as reported by the Railroad Assessment Board.

Column 5 shows how the total school millage compares to the total county
millage.




TABLE 2


SCHOOL MLLAGE


County


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard


I -- - ---- - -- -


(1)


Millage Levied
During 1961-62 School Year


(6) (7)
District Millage voted in 1961
Election (Maximum that can be
levied in 1962-63 and 1963-64
school years )


10 10 2.50 10
10 6 4 6 4
10 10 5.50 10
10 8 2 3.00 9 1
10 1. 1.00* 6


Broward 9.99 .01 .61 .97* -0-
Calhoun 10 10 10
Charlotte 3 1.92 1.00 2
Citrus 9 5 6
Clay 10 10 10
Collier h.29 1 2.08 No Election
Columbia 10 1.5*-* 10 10.00 10
Dade 10 10 1.00* 10
DeSoto 10 10 10
Dixie 10 9 2.00 10
Duval 10 10 5.30* 10
Escambia 6 4.75 1.00* 6
Flagler 8.5 10 10
Franklin 10 10 10
Gadsden 6 10 10
Gilchrist 10 7 3 1.00 10
Glades 10 10 10
Gulf 10 10 2.00 10
Hamilton 10 10 10
Hardee II10 10
Hendry 10 9 9


Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes


1.40*





Indian River 10 10 3.00 10
Jackson 10 10 10
Jefferson 8 2 5 5
Lafayette 5 2 2 2 2
Lake 6.8 .1 1.70* .1
Lee 10 2.85 2-45* 3
Leon 10 10 10
Levy 5 5 3 5 3
Liberty 7 3 8
Madison 10 10 10
Manatee 7.82 4 2. 20 2
Marion 10 10 1.25 10
Martin 3 2.125 2 2 2
Monroe 10 10 3.00 10
Nassau 10 10 10
Okaloosa 10 10 10
Okeechobee 7 10 .25 10
Orange 8.2 8 2 1.00 10
Osceola 6 2 2
Palm Beach 7.06 2.75 1.6 1.20 5
Pasco 5 10 lo
Pinellas 10 7 2 .058 1
Polk 3.37 6.843 .539 1
Putnam 10 10 7***- 3
St. Johns 10 10 6.00 10
St. Lucie 4.5 3 .65 No Election
Santa Rosa 8.5 1.5 10 10.00 10
Sarasota 10 2 1.94 2
Seminole 3 2.75 1 .50 2.75 1
Sumter 5.85 .06 .06
Suwannee 10 10 10
Taylor 9 1 7 1 4.0 10
Union 10 10 10
Volusia 10 4.75 3 2.75 10
Wakulla 10 3.5 10
alton 10 10 10
Washington 10 9 1 9 1

Also has small levy for old bond issues by former districts not included in Special Tax School District
Number One.
-* Includes debt service.
X- Includes .5 mill for University of Florida Ranger School and 1 mill for Junior College (Special Act).
;*;* Includes 1 mill levy for band building (Special Act).
**HH* Millage voted in 1960 general election under Special Act.





TABLE 3


MISCELLANEOUS TAX INFORMATION


(1)
Non-Exempt
Assessed Valuation


County


Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Escambia
Flagler
Franklin
Gadsden
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Holmes


(Comptroller)

1961
$ 87,212,185
6,098,192
47,913,197
10,030,872
278,281,120
1,532,211,691
3,238,261
128,750,997
27,212,017
21,452,414
152,900,132
15,013,3521
2,097,396,783
9,318,908
7,715,654
457,936,277
357,31.,961
8,182,667
8,142,809
37,160,969
3,933,492
4,947,982
14,945,968
3,790,1409
14,287,306
17,806,621
18,017,917
37,201,272
515,996,70o4
5,868,766


(2)
County Assess-
ment Level
(Railroad Assess-
ment Board)

1961
48.72%
38.75.
43.74
4k700
74.00
75.00
29.78
80.00
84.69
51.00
75.00
54.20
47.27
40.30
84.14
41.6-4
70.00
28.21
30.79
67.90
32.d8
39.35
32.91
35.42
50.00
40.07
41.18
41.33
53.47
63.69


(3)
Total
School Millageo
(County and
District )**

1961 2
22.50
20
25,50
23
12.50
11.58
20
5.92
14
20
7.37
31.50
21
20
21
25-30
11.75
18.50
20-
16
21
20
22
20
20
19
20
20
21.140
20


(4)
Approximate
Total County
Millage All
Purpose *
(Railroad Assess-
ment Board)
1961
3980
40.00
4.0oo
37.87
21.17
15.64
55.00
11.72
33.40
31.35
11.15
50.10
Lo.97
47.00
36.25
49.13
20.01
21450
33.00
23.60
33.00
34.35
35.90
54.0oo
48.00
34.25
38.148
40.140
44.70
39.00


I


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~


- ----


(5)
Percent of Total
County Millage
Levied for School
Purposes

1961
56-.53%.
50.00 ,
57.95
60.73
59.05
74.04
36.36
50.51
41.92
63.80
66.10
62.87
51.26
42.55
57.93
51.50
58.72
75.51
60.61
67.80
63.64
58.22
61.28
37.04
41.67
55.47
51.98
149.50
47.87
51.28


I


I--






Indian River
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Lee
Leon
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Marion
Martin
Monroe
Nassau
Okaloosa
Okeechobee
Orange
Osceola
Palm Beach
Pasco
Pinellas
Polk
Putnam
St. Johns
St. Lucie
Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Seminole
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Wakulla
Walton
Washington
TOTAL


36,904,153
14,840,787
9,776,545
4,267,659
268,785 136
146,766,81i
78,303,581
15,801,887
4,835,830
8,993,120
-243,301,081
57,088,600
109,668,604
70,589,332
20,874,488
21,167,215
10,363,257
484,978,959
108,905,069
852,149,959
66,158,000
735,255,380
701,470,498
46,784,186
25,156,111
17h,165,736
13,940,772
249,773,739
183,226,420
I1,631,940
16,115,787
17,284,729
3,257,831
193,702,574
3,369,304
8,577,882
5,873,924
$10,984,386,811


43.47
32.45
4o.1o
40.00
4o.oo
80,00
67.14
43.27
40.66
60.00
39.00
80.00
43.50
75.00
47.19
43.58
42.28
57.00
54.00
100.00
60.00
60.00
60.07
80.00
57.34
30.32
80.00
36.59
69.99
90.00
100.00
46.80
46.78
32.35
42.02
38.59
38.92
27.44


23
20
15
9
8.60

20
13
10
20
14.02
21.25
7.125
23
20
20
17.25
19.2
7
12.41
15
19.05
10.752
20
26
8.15
30
13.94
7.25
5.91
20
22.50
20
20.50
13.50
20
20


41.62
51.50
27.50
18.00
12.49
21.50
35.00
27.50
27.00
35.18
25. 1
37.29
16.02
37.40
37.55
47.50
36.90
31.80
9.30
19.50
24.38
31.81
19.35
38.68
48.00
12.77
73.60
26,30
13.25
11.08
44.40
37.16
35.00
31.60
23.50
47.00
46.00


55.26
38.83
54.55
50.00
68.86
71.16
57.14
47.27
37.04
56.85
55.77
56.99
44.48
61.50
53.26
42.11
46.75
60.38
75.27
63.64
61.53
59.89
55.57
51.71
54.17
63.82
40.76
53.00
54.72
53.34
45.05
60.55
57.14
64.87
57.45
42.5548
43.48


Does not include municipal village but does include district school millage.
"- Includes county-wide debt service and Special Tax School District Number One Millage.


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