• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 A curious fish
 A gallant craft
 A resting place
 May-day
 The fox and the hen
 Trot's breakfast
 Kitty and Dill at home
 Kitty and Dill abroad
 A silly child fish
 The cut hand
 Daisy
 Some Spanish children
 The field mouse
 Peacemaking
 Nina
 Dick's pictures
 Three tiny ones
 Mischief
 Advertising
 Back Cover














Group Title: Charterhouse toy books
Title: Do you hear my drum?
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082779/00001
 Material Information
Title: Do you hear my drum?
Series Title: Charterhouse toy books
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Miles & Miles ( Publisher )
Publisher: Miles & Miles
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1894?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Advertisements -- 1894   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance) -- 1894   ( rbprov )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Prize books (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Advertisements for soaps, patent medicines, and Borvil precede and follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082779
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223341
notis - ALG3590
oclc - 226307852

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Advertising
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Front Matter
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
    Title Page
        Page 7
        Page 8
    A curious fish
        Page 9
    A gallant craft
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A resting place
        Page 13
    May-day
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The fox and the hen
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Trot's breakfast
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Kitty and Dill at home
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Kitty and Dill abroad
        Page 25
        Page 26
    A silly child fish
        Page 27
        Page 28
    The cut hand
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Daisy
        Page 31
    Some Spanish children
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
    The field mouse
        Page 35
    Peacemaking
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Nina
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Dick's pictures
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Three tiny ones
        Page 45
    Mischief
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Advertising
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    Back Cover
        Page 56
Full Text




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A HUGE TOWER


more than six times the height of the

highest building in the world could be

made in THREE HOURS by placing

on each other as rapidly as manufactured

the card boxes of SUNLIGHT SOAP,

each of which would contain three tablets.


A
te


The quantity of soap made in this short

space of time reaching the large figure of

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-


NINE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED


tablets of


SUNLIGHT SOAP.


__ _








BOY VI LGIYS STRENGTH


JOHN STRANGE WINTER (Mrs. Standard) writes:-
I always keep Bovril in the house, and when dinner is such that one or all of them do
not fancy it, a cup- of Bovril is made in five minutes, and with the addition of a bit of
toast makes a thoroughly good meal for any small child. My youngest girl scarcely touches
meat at all, dislikes hot meat very much, but she will take Bovril at almost any time, and
in her case I have to thank that easily prepared article of food for what is now quite a
long immunity from illness for her. She has not been ill, beyond a cold now and then,
since last June twelve-month, when she had diphtheria. I don't think that many house-
mothers at present recognize the importance and utility of this not long discovered Bovril.









THE MOTHER'S FAVOURITE REMEDY.
For all the Common Complaints of Infancy and
SE H t Childhood.
The "Family Doctor" of These Powders by their gentle action
Jan 21s, says- on the bowels and valuable cooling
Jan, 21st, says:- properties allay all feverish restlessness
PRITCHARD'S TEETHING POWDERS and pain during Teething, prevent Fits,
Convulsions, Worms, &o.; are tasteless
DO NOT CONTAIN MORPHIA and eaily given, perfectly safe and
OR NARCOTICS of any kind, and reliable.
we can with confidence recommend
them to mothers. When the children are feverish and restless, parents will do
well to give them one of the Teething Powders and they will find them
exceedingly beneficial.
Sold by all Chemists, etc., at is. 1id. and 2s. 9d., or post free
for 14 or 34 stamps, from Yy*
J. PRITCHARD, Chemist, CHEADLE, MATCHES rER (Late of Chorlton Road).

MANUFACTURERS TO HER MAJESTY.
FoRHOME BAKING



REQUIRES BAKING
NO YEAST POWDER

SANEW PREPARATION-PURE and WHOLESOME-to be used
DISTINGUISHED FOR with ordinary flour for IMPROVING Scones. Cakes. Pastries
and Household Bread. MAKES BREAD DIGESTIBLE EVEN
UNIFORMLY SUPERIOR QUALITY. WHEN NEW. Please write fop a sample to
99, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET. LONDON, E.G.

DofitCough-justuse WOODWARD'S "GRIPE WATER"
They at once check the cough "THE FAMILY DOrC- Eit ADA BALLIt
and remove the cause-without TOR" tor of "' BI h iteP:-
any after effect. lhad, your 'G RIPE
y after eect MA ,"--" It is tile WATER' nalyed on the
only medicine of Its kind occasion of TOhe Bkine Ex
I would feel justified in hbit ion a I was req l ted
U 1 ommending, owing to tomention it In my lectures.
l eU-dle its freedom from nar- The result of the analysis
*One gives relief they will cure, c was such that I had pleasur
and they will tot injure your inrecommendingit."
health. Used by doctors in their own families.
S. AFEST AND BEST REMEDY FOR ALL DISORDERS OF
INFANTS AND CHILDREN.
AIDS TEETHING. PREVENTS CONVULSIONS.
Imitations are InjuArimu. Be surI you get the genuine.
Sold by Chemists, Grocers, Stores. In. lid. Sample bottle, post free, 12 stamps.
SOLD IN TINS, 183I each W. WOODWARD, Chancer Street, Nottingham.

WHELPTON'S PILLS Should always be kept at hand.
WIH ELPTON'S PILLS Have enjoyed 60 Years' Suooess.
WHE LPTON'S PILLS The Best General Family Medicine.
WHEI PTON'S PILLS Cure Headache at once.
WHELP TON'S PILLS set your Liver in order.
WHELPT'ON'S PILLS will keep good in all Climates.
WHELPTO N'S STOMACH PILLS The Best Dinner Pill.
WHELPTON'S OINTMENT Cures Eczema.
WHELPTON'S OINTMENT Heals Guts, Burns, etc., like magic.
Ask for WHEELPTO1N'S PILLB and see that you get them.
Sold by all Chemists, 7li., Is. I4., and 2S. 9d. per box, or of the Proprietors,
G. WHELPTON & SON, 3, ORANE COURT, FLEET STREET, LONDON, E.O.
Free by pest in the United laplem for 8, 14, or 38 stamps. 4s45 q











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The excitement was intense.





A CURIOUS FISH.


7-\ UFIoup FIPH.
J UST look at that fish that with the dreadful
mouth--so large, and with such a row of
sharp teeth.
See how curiously it catches its food. On
the front of its head there is a long thin up-
right thing, bent at the top, like a fishing rod









THE BROo-MBNfLER.
and line. At the end of the line grows a piece
of red flesh.
When the frog angler is hungry it sinks to
the bottom of the water, and holds out this
fishing rod.
A fish sees the bait and darts at it, when
suddenly the frog angler opens his big mouth
Sand swallows its victim.




A GALLANT CRAFT.


pA qALLAJIT


F9AFT.


ISN'T it too bad!" pouted
Minnie, as she looked out of
the window, and saw heavy
rain-clouds driven by a high
wind over a dull grey sea.
Our very first day at,
Brightsea, and it blows a gale,
and rains like I don't know
what !
"We can't possibly go out," said Hugh.
Mother had taken a house at Brightsea for a
month, and was busy, with nurse, unpacking.
The house stood close by the sea, and if the
day had been fine, the children would have
gone on the beach. As it was, they were tired
of looking out of the window, and began to
wonder what next.
I don't like this old nursery," grumbled
Hugh. It isn't half so nice as ours at home.
There isn't a thing to play with."
"There is a table," laughed Gerald. You
rarely see Gerald cross.
Let's make a boat," he said. "We'll rig up
handkerchiefs for sails."








A GALLANT CRAFT.


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A GALLANT CRAFT.


"And-Yes, Hugh! That broom handle with
a walking-stick tied across it with Minnie's
skipping-rope, will make a capital mast. Get
in, Minnie! In with you, Bessie, and Jessie.
You shall be passengers, and we boys will be
the crew."
What fun it was! Gerald brought out his
tennis racket for an oar, and Minnie put her
sailor doll in a box to tow astern." All
entered into the fun.
"Wait a minute," cried Hugh, as he opened
the window. "We'll let in a jolly breeze to fill
our sails, and then we shall be all right."
Luff! Belay there Let go the jib "
shouted the boys merrily.
"What good contented children! said
mother, when she came at last. So sorry
you could not go on the beach and play."
"Oh, our ship is splendid, mamma," cried
Bessie and Jessie. '] Do get in! Minnie and
me is pattinders, and Hugh and Gerald is the
screw! "





A RESTING PLACE.


A AEj ETINq


bLACE.


HAVE you ever wondered where that delicious
fruit the date comes from ? The date is the
fruit of the palm tree. Palm trees grow in the
Holy Land and most countries of the East.
They grow very tall, and some are as high as a


church steeple. The palm tree has no branches.
Very long leaves grow out at the top of the
stem. Some of the leaves are more than
twenty feet long.
These trees are to be found near sweet water-
springs, and therefore travellers in deserts are





MA Y-DA Y.


glad to see a cluster of palm trees, and however
far it is out of their way, they willingly make
for it, to find there a place at which to drink,
and camp and rest. The Children of Israel
pitched their camp at Elim, because there were
there three score and ten palms, and twelve
fountains of water.


A Y-DAY

THE sun shone, and the birds
sang gaily their joy that
winter had gone at last, and
that sweet flowers had begun
to show themselves again in
every field and wood. Jacky,
Rose, and Sophy, were glad
too. They brought in posies
of blossoms to show poor
father, who could not get out to see them for
himself.
Father slipped on some ice at Christmas,
and hurt himself so badly that he could not go
to work yet, though to-morrow was the first of
May-









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Mother worked hard, and the children did all
they could to help her.
Jacky! said Rose, as they went to bed.
"I'm going to tell you a big secret. Don't you
say a word about it!" And Jacky promised.
"Well, said Rose. Let's get up ever so
softly, and ever so early to-morrow morning
while mother is asleep, and make pretty
garlands to take round to the farms. Then, if
we show them, and sing May-day carols,
perhaps we'll get a lot of money to help mother
pay the rent."
The sun gets up early on May-day, but the
children were out first.
Oh, how surprised mother was, when they
brought her home three whole shillings to go
towards the rent.
"What a nice help!" she said, tears
springing to her eyes as she gave them each a
kiss.
Rose thinked of it! cried Jacky. She
thinked of it all her own self! "





THE FOX AND THE .HEN.


THE FOX AND THE J-LEN
THE sly, cunning fox was softly creeping about
in the long grass of the wood; he heard the
hen clucking to her chickens.
Now, there was a stone wall between the
wood where the fox was and the yard where the
hen and chickens were.




RON




"RUNNING AND FLYING AND SCREAMING.'
So the sly fox crept softly close up to this
wall. Then he listened and again heard the
hen go cluck, cluck," and the chickens chirp.
At the thought of the good breakfast he was
going to have his mouth watered. But there
was still the wall to leap. Once on the top of
that, he could pounce down on his prize.





THE FOX AND THE HEN.


Till now the hen had no idea that danger to
her and her little ones was so near, the fox had
moved about so slyly and softly. Slyly and
softly he now got ready to jump, took a good
spring, and reached the top of the wall.
Poor mother and chicks!
But they are not pounced on yet!
Before more than the point of the fox's nose
was up above the wall, the hen caught sight of
him, called to her chickens, and ran as fast as
her legs could carry her. And the chickens
ran as fast as their legs could carry them.
There they go, running and flying and
screaming away. They had a sad fright, and
will not soon forget the peep of that ugly face
over the top of the wall.
But they all got into a safe place. Then
the frightened mother gathered her frightened
chickens under her wings, and she took a rest,
and her chickens went to sleep.










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W E cordially recommend our young readers to take in SUNSHINE either in the Monthly
Parts at Id. or in the volume form at Is. 6d. Both the illustrations and the letterpress
are of a high order. The volume just issued, contains intensely interesting stories. Buy the
volume and we predict for you a delightful treat. All booksellers sell SUNSHINE."


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TROT'S BREAKFAST.


TROT' PREAKYAPT.
TROT is asleep! That's good! said
mother. "I'll run off, and take
,- father his breakfast. Trot walks
so slow, and he is getting such
a heavy boy to carry. Bless
him!"
Mother put a nice bowl of bread and milk on
the table for Trot. Then off she went, as fast as
she could.
Muv-ver said Trot, when he woke. But
he was all alone. At first Trot was going to
cry, but then he thought he wouldn't. Trot is
no cry-baby. Get up, and get my brekbus !"
he said, and up he got. At least out of bed.
He did not even try to dress himself Down-
stairs went Trot, in his little shirt, found the
bread and milk, and took it out on the door step.
"Then Trot see Muv-ver come back!" he
said. Trot saw something else first. A stray
dog thought that breakfast looked good. Up
he came, poked his nose into the basin, pushed
it on the ground, and began to eat.
Bad dog! bad dog! cried Trot, waving his
spoon. "Trot tell Muv-ver! Trot will !"

B





TROT'S BREAKFAST.


But the dog finished it all, and then ran away.
"Muv-ver! said Trot, when she came back,
" I got up, and got my brekbus, all my owjn self,
and then a naughty dog ate it all up, and broke
my pretty basin, and didn't leave me a bit."


Mother picked Trot up, and kissed him.
Mother is glad the dog did not bite you, pet!
Stay in bed another time, till mother comes to
dress you."





KITTY AND DILL AT HOME.


JITTY AND PILL AT j4oME.
I DORA has two pets of her very
own, Kitty the kitten, and
Dill the duck. Kitty likes to
... play with Dill, and the duck
'.' never seems to mind. Every
morning Dora brings Kitty a
large saucer of milk, and
sprinkles plenty of corn on a board close to the
pond for Dill.
Dora left the cornbin, in the barn, open one
day. Kitty peeped in. What a funny
place!" she said, "perhaps there is a mouse
here. I'll catch it, and surprise mother."
Into the bin went Kitty, and sat so still
that she fell asleep.
How careless !" said the farmer, when he
saw the open bin. He shut the lid, and
went away.
This woke Kitty. "Mew! mew! she cried,
when she found herself shut up. "Mew I
mew! I want to get out."
But nobody heard poor Kitty, and she
mewed till she was weary; all in vain.
"Dill! Dill! Where is Kitty ?" asked Dora.
next morning, when she came to feed her pet-





KITTY AND DILL AT HOME.


"Quack! quack!" said Dill, which meant
" I don't know, I can't find her, I haven't seen
her all yesterday, I can't think what has
become of her."
"Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!" Dora called. But
there was no answer. And, though Dora
searched high and low, she could not find the
kitten.
"Well, I must feed. Dill," she said at last,
and opened the cornbin.
"Mew !" said Kitty. Out she sprang, and,
oh, how glad she was!
How glad Dora
was to find her!
And how pleased : ,
Dill seemed to be J..
to frolic with her o-
little friend!
"I was quite
loIiely without
you," said Dill,
"And, oh, Kitty!
How I wish you
would learn to -
swim and come
into the pond with
me! "






KITTY AND DILL ABROAD.


But Kitty could not do this, even to please
her dear friend Dill.



j(ITTY AND ILL ABROAD.

MOTHER says 'stay in the
barn.' Isn't it stupid?" said
.- Kitty to Dill the duck.
:" Just like my mother! "
said Dill. "I would like to
see the world, and find big
ponds with banks full of
slugs."
I'd like to find a barn full of mice," said
Kitty, "and a pond of milk. Not a skimpy
little saucerful like Dora puts for us."
"Let's go!" said Dill. And the two set off.
Oh, what a hot road!
"Quack! quack!" said poor Dill, for she
began to want water badly.
"Me-e-ew!" said Kitty, who was getting
hungry. "I wonder whether mother caught
that mouse! I left her watching at a hole."
But on they went, hoping to come to a pond
and a barn presently.





KITTY AND DILL ABROAD.


On till they were tired out.
"Oh, I wish we were home! I don't like
the world at all," said Kitty; and poor Dill
opened her dry beak, bult could not make a
sound.
Oh, how funny !" cried a boy, coming along
the road, "just see that kitten and duck! Why
it's Dora Hill's kitten! I'll catch them, and
take them back to the farm."
This was not easy, for Kitty and Dill were
frightened, and did not understand.
But when they found themselves at home
again, Dill dived into the pond, with a joyful
"quack!" and as
Kitty nestled
close to her
mother, after lap-
ping Dora's nice
saucer of milk, --
she said, "You
were quite right, .
mother! I will
mind what you .
say, and never
want to r un
away to see the
world any more.",





A SILLY CHILD FISH.


59 ILLY


THERE was once a little fish, a perch, an un-
happy little fellow, always wanting to do just
what his mother told him not to do.
"Do not swim in Danger Pool," said his wise
mother; but when the good dame's back was
turned, the silly little fish scoffed at her advice.


One afternoon the little fish swam into
danger pool.
"What a splendid place!" he exclaimed.
"How ridiculous for mother and father to keep
away. Glorious !" he cried. "Danger Pool
they call this, do they ? Give me Danger Pool,
say I," and so saying, with open watering


HILD f IPH.





A SILLY CHILD FISH,


mouth he darted at a luscious worm that
wriggled in the water.
Oh, the dreadful pain! something was stick-
ing in his throat. Then the terrified little fish
felt himself being pulled quickly through the
water. "Oh, mother! mother your poor little
child fish is in danger." Yes, the miserable
little perch had swallowed a hook that the
little village boys had baited with a worm.
Shortly the line pulled him out of the water,
and landed him struggling on the grassy bank
of the pool. And as he lay in great misery
and pain, he thought of his mother's loving
warning, of his comfortable home which he
should now see no more, and wished with a
broken heart that he had done his mother's
will. But all his regrets were now too late.
For a little while he skipped, and leaped, and
struggled, and then he died.








THE CUT HAND.


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"RUPERT'S KNIFE IS A NASTY, HORRID, SHARP ONE.





THE CUT HAND.


THE *UT JAND.
ERALD always wants to do what Rupert
[ does-forgetting that Rupert is a big
boy, while he is only a little one.
Wait till you are older," Nurse often says
to him.
Grandpa gave Rupert a knife at Christmas.
Gerald wanted one.
"No! no! my boy!" said grandpa. "You
would cut yourself I have bought a nice
drum for you."
Rupert is clever at carving. "Don't touch
my knife, Gerald," he said. I will cut out a
boat and all sorts of things for you to play with.'
Gerald found the knife one day, while
Rupert was at school.
Now I will cut out some things for myself,"
he said.
Silly boy! He had only just begun to try
when the knife slipped, and cut his hand.
Rupert's is a nasty, horrid sharp knife! he
sobbed to nurse. "I don't like it!"
"Blunt knives are no good for anything,"
said nurse. "Perhaps you will believe me now,
Master Gerald, when I tell you it is best for you
to be content, and wait till you are older, before
you try to do all that Master Rupert does."





DAISY.

PAIBY.


DAISY was to have a bun.
Grannie said so. But she
said, "Wait till I come to
get it for you, Daisy."
Daisy did not want to wait.
She wanted that bun badly.
She went to the cupboard.
There were the buns in a big
dish, on the shelf. Oh how


sweet and nice! Daisy stood on tiptoe. She
could just reach the dish. Why not take





SOME SPANISH CHILDREN.


a bun ? Grannie said she was to have one.
Daisy's foot slipped. Crash! Smash I Over
went the dish, buns and all.
"Oh, naughty child!" said Grannie, when
she saw the broken dish. "Why did you
not wait for me ?" .



>OME jPAAIPH CHILDREN.

Is there a little one, all the
world over, that is not glad
S to see the merry spring-time!
glad to know keen winds,
ice, and snow are gone away,
S that sunny days, sweet
fruits, and flowers are
coming in their stead. There
are no leaves upon the tree
in the picture, but you can
see the sun is shining, and the flowers in the
little maid's basKet tell that winter is over,
and glad spring-tide is come. Look at Carlos
as he sings, and thrums his guitar. We do
not know what it is all about. He sings in
Spanish, but we can tell by his laughing face,







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SOME SPANISH CHILDREN.


and by the way Isabella smiles at us over her
fan, that the song is a gay one.
Look at my flowers see my sweet posies !"
cries the little maid with the basket. And
Isabella flirts her fan, as she has seen ladies do,
and in her high comb, and fine sash, feels that
she is somebody.
Quite a carnival these little ones are having,
'as they go singing and dancing through the
streets to the music of Carlos' guitar.
Baby cannot quite make out what it is all
about, but he trots along as happy as anybody.
Carlos hopes to be a banderillo when he is a
man. To wear a gay dress and coloured cloak,
and fight fierce: bulls in a big crowded circus.
Perhaps, even, dressed as a knight of the olden
time, to charge the angry bulls on horseback,
while all the crowd will applaud him as a
brave Toreador,
But bull-fighting is a cruel sport, and, if he
only knew it, Carlos is surely happier now,
singing on his way through the sunny streets
without a care or a fear in the world-a merry
little Spanish child.





THE FIELD MOUSE.


THE fIELD jYOUSE.
THE harvest field is a beautiful
S sight. When the corn is cut
down, then come waggons and
horses to carry it all away to
the farmer's yard. As soon as
the men and horses have carried all the sheaves









away, the gleaners-villagers--pick up all the
stray ears of corn and take them home to
make bread.
SBut there is one little harvester, the field
mouse, who is not often seen, who reaps before
the reapers begin, and gleans long after the
villagers have done.
To feed he cleverly cuts the stalk of the





PEACEMAKING.


standing corn near the root, and the fallen ear
affords him a ready supply.
Sometimes these tiny animals assemble in
mighty hosts; nothing can impede their pro-
gress; they climb over rocks, cross extensive
marshes, and fearlessly swim the most rapid
rivers.
Each family generally consists of five or six,
and in less than fifteen days the young are
able to support themselves.
Their little houses in the ground generally
contain two rooms.

E:ACEJVAKINQ.
S' IT wasn't fair "
It was! "
Sk "You cheated!"
No, I didn't!"
Such pleasant play only a minute
ago, and now angry looks, flushed
--- faces, and hard words.
But Bessie is ready. Bessie is so fond of
the boys, and can't bear quarrels. It would be
easy indeed to make matters worse, to get up a
quarrel that would spoil all the holiday after-





PEA CEMA KING.


noon, but a few gentle words and a bright
laugh have chased away the threatening cloud
of ill-temper. Only one of Bessie's funny


little speeches, at which her brothers feel
amused, all unconscious of how much home
happiness is owing to Bessie the peacemaker.
Do you hear my Drum. C





NINA.

J INA.


NINA was not a cross child. Nina
was blithe as a bee, and bright as a
button. Then why should Father,
Mother, Grannie, Nurse, and Aunt
Kate always be so very thankful
when night came, and Nina was
safely tucked up in bed out of the
way until morning ? Why ? Take
a peep at Nina, as she lies fast asleep
in her own little bed. Two fairies
are looking at her.
"Nina is a dear little girl!" one
of them says.
said the other, "except for this sad


" I'LL PUT ON MY SOCKS."


"Yes,"





NINA.


fault that spoils her. Nina asks silly questions
all day long."
Can she be cured ?" asked the first fairy.
We'll try! said the second, hopefully.
And they both flew about Nina's room, and
then through the house, waving their silver
wands.
A golden sunbeam awoke Nina next day,
and she sat up.
"I'll put on my socks," she said.
Why ? why don't you put on your shoes
first ? What are we made of? "
Nina did not know which question to answer
first.
"People always put on socks first," she said.
"Why? What are people ?"
I'll soon stop this !" thought Nina. "I'll put
on my shoes, and then I shan't hear them."
But Nina no sooner touched her shoes than
they both began at once-
Why do you put us on ? Why were we
taken off last night ? "
Be quiet !" said Nina, "I am going to button
you."
Why ? What are buttons ? Do they grow
on shoes ? "
Nina felt bewildered.





NINA.


"I will wash myself, and go downstairs as
quick as I can."
But the soap asked, "Why do you dip me in
water ? Why don't you use me dry ? And
the soapy water asked, "What made all these
bubbles come on me?" While the towel
flapped itself against Nina's face, and asked,
"Why do you rub yourself on me?" Nina
threw it down, and ran to the dressing-table.
But she had only just touched the brush
when it cried out, "Why don't you brush your
face as well as your hair ?"
Nina rushed away downstairs. Here things
were quite as bad.
,"Why do you eat your bread and milk out
of me ?" asked the basin that held Nina's
breakfast. Why do you dip me in ?" asked
the spoon.
"'Why do you sit on me ?" asked the chair.
Nasty tiresome things! Do be quiet!"
begged poor Nina, and felt very much inclined
to cry. It was just the same all day.







































































IA


SCRIApY 'IDEA OF LCEN-RME.4;l t s~q TPM.


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BLINDMAN'S BUFF.


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" Mabel has caught Gerald I "


L





DICK'S PICTURES.


Why don't you wear me on your thumb ?"
asked her thimble.
Why do you write in your copy-book with
me, and not on your slate ? asked the ink.
Questions, like the others, that nobody heard
but Nina. "Why do you put your head on
me, and not your feet?" asked the pillow
when she went to bed quite tired out.
"Is Nina cured, do you think ?" said one
fairy to the other.
Was she? Well, Nina has quite given up
asking silly tiresome questions, and Father,
Mother, Grannie, Nurse, and Aunt Kate can't
understand it at all!


PICK 'p ICTURTp.
V I "V are you so late?" asked
Kitty.
7 "Teacher kept me in," said Dick,
S'' with a pout.
S "What had you done ?" Kitty
l knew there must be some reason.
For little boys are never kept in for nothing
at all.
"Oh !" said Dick, "I only drew him in my









DICK'S PICTURES.


'Ii.
'I I'!


,to
,ffI,,

{-,,


" LIKE THIS," SAID DICK.


I~'
~


' i ''l, i,.
,I |," 1" '
1 ,





THREE TINY ONES.


copy-book like this." And he drew on the
wall a queer figure, with a round 0 for a
head, and straight strokes for arms and legs.
" Teacher said I was a bad boy. But I don't
care. I like to draw."
"I like to see you draw," said Kitty. "Only
not in your copy-book. After school is the
time for fun. Now draw me, Dick."
Like this," said Dick, looking hard atKitty.
"This is how your mouth goes up when you
laugh."
"That's teacher," said Kitty, when father
came by presently, and stopped to look at
Dick's drawings. And that is me."
Father laughed. "Not much like you,
Kitty! But Dick, has made a smile, and a
merry face is better than a cross one any
day!"

THREE TIJY 9NEP.
THREE little tiny ones, sitting on a seat,
One sucks his fingers for something to eat,
One holds her bonnef, pink it is and gay,
One sits and watches till mother comes that
way.




MISCHIEF.


Ah, the time seems weary,
when one has to wait!
Oh, the moments dreary !
Hark, was that the gate ?
Tiny ones stretch forth
their arms. What is it
they see ?
Best of sights Why I-
mother comes to take '" '
them home to tea.


JlAICHIEF.
g M BEAR took off his hat and
coat. Pouf-f-f he said,
"How hot it is! I will hang
(, my hammock in the shade.
Not here, over there would be
better." And he went fur-
& their into the forest. "Oh,
bother! I have left my coat," said Mr. Bear.
" Well, I won't go back for it! It is too much
trouble to get out again just as I am so
comfortable." Swing, swing went the ham-
mock gently under the trees, as Mr. Bear





MISCHIEF.


lay and read. He
was warm. Quite
thought. Perhaps,


was
too
but


tired, and the day
hot for work, he
not too hot for


"LOOK OUT, CLIM."
mischief. It very seldom is.
tail and Clim-climb did not
they ought to know, for you


At least Curly-
think so, and
may find these





MISCHIEF.


two merry monkeys in mischief any day of
the week.
"Here's fun! they cried, when they found
the coat. "Hullo! Wonder whether there is
anything good in the pockets! "
"What is this ?" asked Clim-climb, pulling
out a knife.
"A knife!" cried Curly-tail Give it to
me! I'll show you something."
What is a knife? What is it good for ?"
Good for ? Why good to cut with, stupid! "
answered his brother. He opened the knife,
and followed by Clim-climb, went slyly up the
tree. "Look out, Clim! he whispered, and
began to cut the hammock ropes.
Swing! swing! gently went the hammock.
Mr. Bear was getting drowsy. Though he
still held the paper, he was half asleep, and
did not see the monkeys at all.
Swing, swing, gently went the hammock,
as Mr. Bear lay half in a dream. "I saw a
wild bee's nest," he was thinking, "full of
honey! Mrs. Bear likes honey. I'll take
some to her when I go home. Mrs. Bear is
like honey. She is very sweet, but she has
a sharp tongue. She can sting. No, that






MISCHIEF.


is not right! Hon
the bees-the bees -
Bang! Crash!


ey
1"


does not sting!


It's


The ropes were


ON,


Bump!





MISCHIEF.


cut through at last. They gave way, and
Mr. Bear fell heavily to the ground.
Why Why What! he cried. "Oh,
you young rascals!" He jumped up and
shook his fist at Clim and Curly. You
young scamps! Only wait till I catch you !
Wait till I get hold of you! "
A very long time to wait!" they cried,
scrambling away to the top of the tree
where they knew Mr. Bear could not follow
them.
Mr. Bear can climb well, but he is so fat
and heavy that he would not dare to venture
high upon slender boughs that are safe enough
for Clim and Curly.
Mr. Bear untied the. other end of the ham-
mock, and folded it up. I'll go home," he
said, and picked up the coat. "My own knife,
too!" he groaned, when he had felt in the
pockets. "I might have known it! Those
thieving, mischievous rascals! I wonder
what Mrs. Bear will say to me. I've had a
nasty fall, and lost my favourite knife. But
it is partly my own fault. Mrs. Bear will
say I ought not to have left my coat lying
about. Well! well! Lazy, untidy people





MISCHIEF.


always do get into trouble!" Mr. Bear sighed,
and went away.


"He's gone!" laughed Clim. "
right, Curly! Now give me the knife."
"Likely !" sneered Curly. Give
you, indeed! Catch me!"


[t's all


it to


"Yes, give it to me!" said Clim, hotly.
"It is mine. I found it."
What then ?" said Curly. I shall keep it.
You did not even know what it was."
With an angry cry, Clim sprang at him,
and the two monkeys fought hard for the
knife. How did it happen ? Curly struck
out his hand and thrust the knife deep into
Clim.
"Oh! Oh!" gasped Clim and fell from


the tree.
Clim!


Clim "


cried Curly


in dismay.


" Oh, Clim, I did not mean to hurt you "
But Clim lay bleeding on the ground.
Away, away ran Curly, as fast as he could,
to find old Mother Monkey. For even mis-
chievous monkeys know that mother is always
their best friend. The old monkey knew


\
/





MISCHIEF.


what to do. She plucked some leaves, chewed
them up, and put them on the wound. This
soon stopped the bleeding, and in a little while
Clim was able to sit up and eat some nice fruit.
"Oh, Clim Dear brother!" sobbed Curly,
SI thought that I had killed you! "
"We must take care of Clim till he is
well," said Mother Monkey, when she had
heard all about it. "And I hope that this
will be a lesson to you both, to keep out of
mischief, and never to quarrel with each
Mr. Bear found his knife close by his den
next morning, "My word!" he cried gladly,
"Iwonder how this came here!"
Mother Monkey knew. And so did Clim
and repentant Curly!








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Mighty Healer.
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S A DOSE WILL RELIEVE IT.
SHAVE YOU A COLD?
A DOSE AT BEDTIME WILL REMOVE IT.
ESTAB. 20 YEARS.
Try it for a Cough.
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I was advised by a friend to try your Lung Tonic. To my most agreeable surpi
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IT NEYER FAILS.
Prepared by
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Sold in Bottles, Is. lid., 2s 9d., 4s. 6d.,
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