• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Uncle Dick's boy
 Baby-land
 Who is she?
 Niddlety Noddy
 Little frogs at school
 Pictures that tell their own...
 Nep and the baby
 Baby Bo-Peep and Little Jack...
 A practical joke
 Blowing bubbles
 Back Cover














Title: Gee whoa!
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082778/00001
 Material Information
Title: Gee whoa!
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill., music ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: W.B. Conkey Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: W.B. Conkey Company
Place of Publication: Chicago
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories, American   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: illustrated.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082778
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223470
notis - ALG3719
oclc - 42949383

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Uncle Dick's boy
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Baby-land
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Who is she?
        Page 6
    Niddlety Noddy
        Page 6
    Little frogs at school
        Page 7
    Pictures that tell their own story
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Nep and the baby
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Baby Bo-Peep and Little Jack Horner
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A practical joke
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Blowing bubbles
        Page 16
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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The BudAin Lihrt n
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GEE e WHOA I


ILLUSTRATED.


COPYRIGHTED 1894, BY ROBERT O. LAW.

CHICAGO:
W. B. CONKEY COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.





























LUn-cle Dick's '3oy. G


" HE boy that lives at Un-cle Dick's has a great deal. of laugh-
ing to do when Jack-y and Joe are at the farm.
Fun-ni-est lit-tle fel-lows you ev-er saw I says the boy. "A-pick-
ing out the big-gest straw-ber-ries for each oth-er, and a-giv-ing up to
each oth-er, and a-sit-ting down to-geth-er on the door-step to hold the
cat, her head on Joe's knee, and her tail and hind paws on Jack's knee
- and yes-ter-day they took their dog to ride, in-stead of his draw-
ing the cart his-self. Lov-in'-est lit-tle fel-lows you ev-er saw! Di-clare,
Pd like some broth-ers like 'em my-self!"
















1tyr

4


SPLAYING HORSE.










































BPBY-CPflD.


What do. they say in Ba by-land? Why the odd cst things;























































A- u-


What


a bir die sings I


Might


well try


to tell






"Zho .s She?


T ERE is a little maiden,
Who is she, do you know?
She always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird's;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lithesome words.


Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun;
And she is sought and cherished
And loved by everyone-

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low;
Who is this little maiden,
Does anybody know?


You surely must have met her;
You certainly can guess;
What! I must introduce her?
Her name is Cheerfulness.


iddletty 2 o(My.

" Dear Niddlety Noddy,

All head and no body,

I'm sure I can't tell

Why I love you so well.

/ I love you in summer,

SAnd in winter so cold,

I don't think I'd sell you


For silver or gold 1"






"Zho .s She?


T ERE is a little maiden,
Who is she, do you know?
She always has a welcome,
Wherever she may go.

Her face is like the May-time,
Her voice is like a bird's;
The sweetest of all music
Is in her lithesome words.


Each spot she makes the brighter,
As if she were the sun;
And she is sought and cherished
And loved by everyone-

By old folks and by children,
By lofty and by low;
Who is this little maiden,
Does anybody know?


You surely must have met her;
You certainly can guess;
What! I must introduce her?
Her name is Cheerfulness.


iddletty 2 o(My.

" Dear Niddlety Noddy,

All head and no body,

I'm sure I can't tell

Why I love you so well.

/ I love you in summer,

SAnd in winter so cold,

I don't think I'd sell you


For silver or gold 1"



















Little Frogs at $0ooI.
From "Songs for the Wee Ones," by per. of 8. H. Pftle.


4-9
I. Twen-ty frog-gies went to school Down be side. a rush y pool;
2. Mas ter Bull-frog, grave and stern, Called the class es in their turn;
3. Twen-ty frog-gies grew up fast; Bull-frogs they be-came at last;



Tweh ty lit tie coats : of greenTwen-ty vests all white and clean.
Taught them how to no bly strive, Like-wise how to leap and dive.
Not one dunce a-mong the lot, Not one les son they for got.



"We must be in time," said they, "First we stud y, then we play;
From his seat up on the log Showed them how to say "Ker-chogi"
Pol ished in a high de gree, As each frog gie ought to be.

S, _, 1 -. -


to keep the
to dodge a
on oth er


rule, When we frog gies
blow From the sticks which
logs, Teach-ing oth er


go to school.
bad boys throw.
lit te frogs.


That is
Al so
Now they


how
how
sit






Picmurp't Ttij


TeLL


THrlu Own


5rTOI.


AL#r


PLvarTHE irmPrAox,


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-Ir














































A SUOOESSPFUI RAID.


klo$ so EASY AF'rER AEL%.







*. Nep and the Baby.
.-"- *


EPTUNE lives next door

to our house. I mean
Nep, Dr. Lane's
dog. He is half Saint
Bernard, and is eight
years old. Some one *
gave him to the doctor a few months ago, and he soon made himself
at home.
The butcher comes three times a week with meat, and Nep found
out about this in a very few days. When meat day comes, he trots down
to the corner of the road and waits for the butcher. Other days he
stays at home.
He is very fond of the doctor's baby, who is two years old. He
takes care of him almost as well as a nurse.
One day Mrs. Lane was roasting oysters in the kitchen. The baby
was playing about the floor, and Nep was looking on. Just for sport,
Mrs. Lane snapped the tongs at the baby. Nep sprang up at once with
a deep growl, and showed all his teeth to Mrs. Lane. He seemed to say,
" You shall not harm this baby, if he is yours! "
The baby's mamma feels sure now that the baby is safe when he is
in Nep's care.


















S .. I: %,
11',', j.R, !


. r I


THE FIRST SNOW-STORM.


I'


- !illi' ,
' ,l ih : lil,,'


,:

it


y
^


SII' ,',






~Baby ~3o-Peejp and Lrttle jasCk( Htomer.








r _





~5

~ eT~








f practical Joke.
NOT only boys, but some animals as well, are fond of practical jokes. The monkey is
never so happy as when he is playing some prank. Here we see the old bear has lain down
in his hammock to read the "Market Review." The day is very warm, and as it is too early
to go out to catch a lamb or a pig for his supper, he thinks he will read the news and, maybe,
take a nap. He has placed his hat under the hammock where he thinks it will be safe. He ij
S.,l~H ~_
bd ma 01011


I P
I


so busy reading that he does not see the two monkeys in the tree above his head. The mon-
keys think it will be fine fun to play a joke on Mr. Bear, so the larger one takes his knife and
-creeps out on the branch on which the hammock is tied. When he sees Mr. Bear laugh at
some funny thing he has read, he cuts the rope, and poor bear and the hammock fall to the
ground.







A PRACTICAL JOKE.


--7
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L' Ii Ii


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Mr. Bear falls on his new hat and crushes it. He is so angry that he cannot get up for
a time. He scolds, and says, I'll eat you up for this but the monkeys only laugh'ad
clatter. The little monkey is so pleased that he holds his sides and laughs. When the old
bear gets up he will try to catch the monkeys, but they can jump from tree to tree, and the
bear cannot get them. When they get home they will tell their mamma what fun thly kdl.


Ii -.


r~w
s
--







Blowing Bubbles.



RIGHT and ready, little. Eddy,
On a stool sits blowing. bubbles;
Round his mouth his laughter runs,
Like the ripples over stones,-
For he is a merry fellow,
Very free from baby troubles.

Like a tattered rainbow, scattered
On a globe as thin as air is,
The bright colors glide and swim
Round the glowing bubble's rim,
Till it seems a wee world peopled
With gay troops of dancing fairies.

Hoity-toities! how his bright eyes
Laugh to see it-" Tee it, muzzer! '
(" See it, mother,"- the words 'trip
Sweet as kisses on his lip),
I Then, at that world's sudden bursting,
Laughs he, "I tan make anuzzer."

Ever ready, darling Eddie
Blows again his broken bubbles,
Never wasting any tears
When a bright one disappears,
----But as happy in their breaking
As the making, blows "anuzzer,",
And laughs down his baby troubles.
WHAT BABY DOES. GEORGE S. BURLEIGH.




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