• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The little ladie of the sedan...
 A story of olden times
 Learning to spin
 "All on a winter's day"
 A doll's great-grandmother
 A colonial red riding hood
 Back Cover






Title: Rhymes and stories of olden times
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082772/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rhymes and stories of olden times
Physical Description: 18 leaves : col. ill. ; 31 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Tucker, Elizabeth S
Moran, Percy, 1862-1935 ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick A. Stokes Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's literature -- Juvenile literature -- 19th century   ( lcsh )
Picture books for children -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Social life and customs -- Juvenile literature -- United States -- To 1775   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with numerous full-page color plates after paintings in water colors by E. Percy Moran ; and with decorative borders and other designs, together with new stories and verses, by Elizabeth S. Tucker.
General Note: Decorated borders and text printed in color.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082772
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223575
notis - ALG3825
oclc - 26783571

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    The little ladie of the sedan chair
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    A story of olden times
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Learning to spin
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    "All on a winter's day"
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    A doll's great-grandmother
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    A colonial red riding hood
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text
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RHYMES AND STORIES
OF

OLDEN TIMES

WITH NUMEROUS FULL-PAGE COLOR-PLATES
AFTER PAINTINGS IN WATER COLORS BY
.E. Ipcrc. flDoranl

AND WIl'H DECORATIVE BORDERS AND OTHER DESIGNS, TOGETHER
WITH NEW STORIES AND VERSES BY
Elisabcth Z. iuckir '




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PFOnFEY AfiND S HAVE SANRO'MT WHTA CAWTRE

MY LAbME I HiE SEL-iAH CrH1AIR,

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or FRKOIK ANb QoWNS a BRAVE fiRAY

TO BECK MY LLI il EVERY btfY,

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WITi WELcOiHE WARKn, WE KIKEET YOM, DEAR,

WHAT CAN WE bO TO KIEEF TOM I IEAR,

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R !torq of @lben
S;imes.

IT down here by me, my little Alice, and you shall
hear me read a story,-yes, a true story about
your own Great-Grandmother. She has written it here in
this little book for us to read, the story of how she left
her dear old home in sunny England to come across the
wide ocean in a poor little boat, not at all like the wonder-
ful steamers of nowadays.
Your Grandmother, dear Alice, was a little girl, and
well remembers the tiresome voyage over those long, long
miles of tossing waves. There were many delights and
novelties for her, as the sailors of the ship were very kind
to her, and loved to toss her up in their strong arms, for
she was never sick, and would stay up on the deck as
long as she would be allowed to, looking out over the
waves when others were down below in their berths.
These sailors would tell her stories, and they grew very
fond of seeing the little figure in her red cloak, watching
them with her bright eyes, and listening to their songs.
But her mother, with many other mothers, was ill
all the long dreary way, and a sorry time they had, all
crowded together in the stuffy little cabin down below.










2a torr of 0lben ltmes.

Many times Grandmother has told me of it all, and of how at last they got to the new, strange land which
was our America, where they found such cold and rocky shores, and where their fathers had to build houses
out of logs for them to live in, and had to build them strongly to keep out Indians and wolves. Everybody
helped : even the little children carried things to help in the building. How glad they were for every little
thing they had brought with them from England !-pins and all such things,-for there was none at all in
this new country. Oh, those were hard, hard times, little Dorothy, and they were brave people, your grand-
parents, to do it all for freedom for us !


"And freedom we will have some day in this America, for even now thine own father, whose portrait
hangs beside you, and all the fathers in the land are determined that we shall be free from English rule,
even if there must be a war."

Long, long ago these words were spoken, and this story, told to listening little Alice who is a Great-
Grandmother now herself, and long ago gone away,-and see how the words of the gentle lady came true !
The war she told about did come. Alice's father, and the fathers of her little friends, had the war that we
celebrate on our Fourth of July, and to-day, in this dear land of ours, we are having the freedom they
fought for.
Be glad of those true-hearted, brave Great-Great-GREAT-Grandfathers of yours, children dear.



































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learning to spin.


SWEET little Prudence Wilson was learning how to
Spin. It was rather hard work for the tiny arms to
reach the spindle and draw the thread-and for the little
toes to reach the ground from the tall stool she sat
on, was quite impossible. Still Prudence had to learn.
The day was bright and sunny, and dear Sister Ruth
and Prudence took embroidery frame and spinning-wheel
out in front of the wide hall doors. It was very dis-
tracting to hear the birds singing overhead, and to want
so much to watch Wilfred at his fencing lesson on the
lawn, with the other boys. But Prudence had to learn,
for all little girls then were taught to spin, and to sew,
and to embroider the stitches on samplers, that they
would want to know how to do when they were young
ladies. So Sister Ruth sang over her embroidery frame,
and little Prudence listened, and they talked.
Prudence said, When I grow to be a big young
lady like you, Sister Ruth, I shall wear a lovely pink
gown and have a tall lover like yours."
And what will you do for him, little Prudence," asked
SSister Ruth, smiling quietly over her work.









learning to spin.

"Oh, I will make him a beautiful, beautiful watch chain, all spun on the
spinning-wheel, of my own, own hair, which shall all be cut off to make the -/
thread. And if I am a prisoner in a castle tower, he will take the long, long chain /s1
spun from my hair, which I will throw him down from my window, and he will
climb up it hand over hand, and take me in his arms, and climb down again, and
away we will go, and live happily ever after."
"Very well," said Sister Ruth, "then, Mistress Prudence, you must take ,
,your arms down from behind your head, and not stop to dream now, but learn to
spin a strong thread, with no knots in it." i
Then Prudence would go on spinning a long thread, while the kittens played
with the other end of it. "l
Then she would say, Sister Ruth, why does Wilfred have play in the open < '/
air, while I have to sit and sew, and embroider, and spin?"
Then Sister Ruth smiled again, and answered, It has ever been the way, (
dear Prudence, for men to do the out-of-door things, and manly sports, and .x
for maidens to do the gentle things, those that keep us quiet in the house, and are
useful to both men and maids. So tend to your quiet work, my dear, and stitch upon stitch is the only way."
So the sunny day came to a close, and many more of them also came and went. And many years of
days have gone since then; and to-day from a box, with a musty smell, I take an old sampler and read in all
the stitches this story of long ago.
It is all there is left-it, and an old spinning-wheel, which little girls to-day do not know how to use at
all. Wilfred's play and his sword are long ago done and over, yet here is the small bit of stitching that has
lasted all the long years, to tell a great-grandchild the story of a little girl's fingers patiently going in and
out, while her small feet ached to run, and it seems to me a rather great thing to have done something that
tells such a sweet story, and has lasted so very, very long.





































































































































































































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6 ALL ON A WIHnTERS MAY"


OFF 0ES5 i-TTi-L FOLLY, ALL ON A WINTERS IbY,
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Im i'.- :J .ALL L AINI EYES I LL 1'.i ,
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ALL ABOUT TIHE i J tl ,' J.-'i CUI STG, ..-ii- 1AND
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"Ell on a Winter's 2aW."


BMT THE wFL M-C AKJ UIMST UIJ IHA, LITTLE SKATE1J FINDb,
SLIFFERY, JO SLIFFERYT IF YOM D0 NOT nINb,
4I1 THE BEST AND SAYEJT WAY
UI TO FMsnH BEHINri JLEIH.l

JACK IFKIOT LIKES TO AiilF I MOJE., WHIiE IT FAJT lAND IbEEF,
IN YSOIR K, WafiK AND JHnM, ILL YOiK Al HFLEJA KEEF.
PACK SHE COES WIITH KfFb %LIb>E,
WAS N'T THAT JOLLY TFILE~ ?











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SFOUND her in a garret one day, tucked away in the
bottom of an old chest,-this old, old dollie She was
such a funny-looking dear, and I took her out and smoothed .
her wrinkled and quaint gown of brocaded silk, wonder-
ing how a little girl could have loved a doll with such ugly
hands and queer hair. But a real little girl had loved her,
and she was my own great-grandmother. For I found,
pinned to her gown, a note, yellow with age, which told
me all about her. This is what it said:
Written by my mother for me, to my dear grand-
child who will first find this doll. Keep her always as
I 've left her, for it is with tears I put her away, having
b grown too great a girl to play with her any more, as I am
nine years old! She was sent to me from London, and
( cost 4 guineas, and her clothing, made by a fashionable
j'.. 2, dress-maker, cost /4,4s., a great price for a doll! I never | \\
',. ); shall forget the day I got her. I stood her in a chair and (
danced before her in my great pleasure. I loved her very .
\ / much, and will tell you how I always thought she saved ---
my life.
,. i :1 m'y-. I was playing alone on the beach, and, tripping my \
toe, I fell into a deep hole by the roots of a tree, and a



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2 Toll's Great=~ranbmotber.

great heap of sand falling in with me nearly covered me up, and made it impossible for me to get out. I
called, but no one heard, and my ankle, which I had twisted, becoming very painful, I fainted, and I surely
should have been drowned by the tide which was coming in, while insensible, had it not been that my dear
doll Florinda lay in such a manner that her foot and part of her gown were outside the sand in the hole,
where I was buried, and Jim, the black boy, coming by, saw her lying there. He dug her out, and so dis-
covered me and saved me. He was so excited that he left my poor dear doll behind, and the tide had
already wet her, when I, waking up in my mother's arms, called out for my Florinda, and Jim was hurried off
to fetch her. The stain on her gown was caused by the salt water, and I hope you will love her very much,
and keep her with care as I did.
"YOUR LOVING GRANDMOTHER,
In the 9th year of her age-i 775."
Was n't that the loveliest thing to find ? And she is my very own Great-Grandma, for her dollie was
so hidden away that I was the first little girl to find it after all those years. We keep her as a great treasure,
and my dolls respect her very much, for she is their Great-Grandmother, I suppose.


















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R Colonial 1Reb 1Ribing lboob.


I T was the day before Christmas, many years ago.
Everybody was busy preparing for the happy day, in
the way they used to do in those Colonial days. The
Christmas had to be just as much like the Christmases in
Old England as they could have it in the New England,
for the sake of the old folks who had spent the holidays
of their childhood in the Old England. The house was
all trimmed with greens from top to bottom, and even the
S great Yule Log was carried in on Xmas Eve, decked with
wreaths of holly. Only here it was carried in by grinning
Sambo and Pompey-the jolly servants of the new country.
Little Red Riding Hood went all alone that day clear all
the way to Grandmother Pennyhurst's. It was a mile away
and over the snowy country. Everybody was busy
putting up greens, and Cousin Althea even had a bunch of
mistletoe which she hung high in a rather conspicuous
place in the hall. It came in a box from England, with
some holly from the dear old homestead there, and Little
Red Riding Hood thought of how dearly Grandma
Pennyhurst would love to have in her Christmas decora-
tions a bit of the real old holly from her own home. So


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she picked out a nice big spray, and putting on her cloak, like the other Red Riding Hood, set off across the
road all by herself.
It seemed a very long way, and it began to grow dark sooner than she had thought it would, and as
she trudged along she felt a bit lonely. Suddenly, out of the bushes beside the road, she saw two fiery
eyes, and out stepped a great gray dog, who had a fierce red mouth and who snarled at her when she spoke
kindly to him, and did not seem a bit friendly. He slouched along beside her a few steps, sniffing at her
cloak, and then throwing up his head he .gave a long queer howl, and trotted off into the woods across
the road.
Then the little girl was frightened indeed, for she knew that howl was the howl of a wolf! She was
very glad to look up and find the house so near, just across the field now. And as she ran quickly towards
it over the snow by the shortest cut, she realized it all. This, she was sure, was the Real Wolf in the story
of Little Red Riding Hood, who seeing her red cloak had thought her to be that same little girl going to
Grandmother's with her basket; but when he sniffed at her cloak, he knew it was not the same, and so
he ran away again.
When she reached the house, and told them about her adventure, her Grandmother clasped her Little
Red Riding Hood closely in her arms and said: My darling child, you have escaped a great danger! That
was the wolf that has lately carried off Farmer Black's lambs from his fold, and he only ran away because he
saw the house was so near!"
This was what Grandma thought of it. Which do you think was the true version-hers or the
little girl's ?













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