• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Half Title
 The minuet
 A dear little goose
 The bee-charmer
 Christmas
 The call of the sea
 A plump little girl and a thin...
 The poet who couldn't write...
 The well-read hunter
 Poor Marionette
 Consider, now, a painter-man
 Northerly
 A ball's a ball
 The naughty little Egyptian
 Seeing is believing
 Tell me, Daisy
 An ocean notion
 Aramantha Mehitabel Brown
 Coming home
 School-boy troubles
 Fans
 Easy expectations
 A new year
 The elf and the spider
 Dancing
 A dear little schemer
 The road to learning
 There's a ship on the sea
 Making it skip
 The fancy-dress ball
 Billy Buttercup
 The sweet, red rose
 An April girl
 The zealless xylographer
 The little girl who tried...
 The fair-minded men who walked...
 A brown study
 "A miss is as good as a mile"
 Out of the sky
 My dog
 I know a little maiden
 A new song to an old tune
 In a breeze
 International
 Surprise
 Mother
 "Philopena!"
 Confusion
 Puzzled fairy-folk
 Mild farmer Jones and the naughty...
 Alarmed
 What happened to Nelly
 The secret
 Thistles!
 Jeannette and Jo
 Midsummer frolics
 Little squirrels, crack your...
 Down by the sea
 The tale of a tub
 The sad story of little Jane
 Mother's arm
 A suggestion for a Happy New...
 Unsettled
 The letters at school
 Four little birds
 Dressing Mary Ann
 The frog, the crab and the limpsy...
 New-year's day
 To a young girl
 Cat's-cradle
 Signs of May
 Johnny and Meg
 On the lagoon
 The pensive cricket
 Poor Jack-in-the-box
 Why
 Sunny days
 Alice in Wonderland
 To W. F. C.
 The little big woman and the big...
 Nanny Ann
 The four little imps
 The smiling dolly
 How do birds first learn to...
 Christmas Eve
 The circus clown's dream
 An appeal
 Robby's span
 His report
 Eight-day clocks
 Tinsel without, but metal...
 Berry-time
 The three tigers
 A terrible tiger
 Far away
 Hans Christian Andersen
 Troubled
 The farmer who became drum-maj...
 Courtesy
 May blossoms
 Eight good things about Dobbin
 Side by side
 A smart boy
 Seven little pussy-cats
 Eleven little pussy-cats
 Jack and Jill
 In haste
 Soap-bubbles
 The pampered poodle
 Master Theodore
 Forbidden
 Ten little dolls
 Jack's wish
 A Dutch family
 Little Miss Kitty
 "The worthy poor"
 Jingle
 After tea
 The sprint runner
 Fun at Grandmama's
 The knowing little fish
 The bees that went to the sky
 Little Charley
 The windmill
 Happy Johnny; or, taking life...
 A Santa Claus messenger-boy
 Snowflakes
 Calling the flowers
 A Philopena
 The man who didn't know when to...
 The Oregon Express
 How Willy's ship came back
 A stir among the daisies
 The little kindergarten girl
 How shocking!
 "Little pot soon hot"
 The bicycle boys
 Little Rosy red-cheek
 Now the noisy winds are still
 Not only in the Christmas tide
 In trust
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: When life is young : a collection of verse for boys and girls
Title: When life is young
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082763/00001
 Material Information
Title: When life is young a collection of verse for boys and girls
Physical Description: xiv, 255 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Century Company ( Publisher )
De Vinne Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Manufacturer: De Vinne Press
Publication Date: 1894
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's poetry
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Mapes Dodge.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082763
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225451
notis - ALG5726
oclc - 03392075
lccn - 04013819

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
    Advertising
        Page iv
    Half Title
        Page v
        Page vi
    Frontispiece
        Page vii
    Title Page
        Page viii
        Page ix
    Foreword
        Page x
    Table of Contents
        Page xi
        Page xii
        Page xiii
        Page xiv
    Half Title
        Page xv
    The minuet
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    A dear little goose
        Page 7
    The bee-charmer
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Christmas
        Page 11
    The call of the sea
        Page 12
        Page 13
    A plump little girl and a thin little bird
        Page 14
    The poet who couldn't write poetry
        Page 15
    The well-read hunter
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Poor Marionette
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Consider, now, a painter-man
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Northerly
        Page 25
    A ball's a ball
        Page 26
    The naughty little Egyptian
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Seeing is believing
        Page 33
    Tell me, Daisy
        Page 34
    An ocean notion
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Aramantha Mehitabel Brown
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Coming home
        Page 41
        Page 42
    School-boy troubles
        Page 43
    Fans
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Easy expectations
        Page 46
    A new year
        Page 47
    The elf and the spider
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Dancing
        Page 51
    A dear little schemer
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The road to learning
        Page 55
    There's a ship on the sea
        Page 56
    Making it skip
        Page 57
    The fancy-dress ball
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Billy Buttercup
        Page 60
    The sweet, red rose
        Page 61
    An April girl
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The zealless xylographer
        Page 65
    The little girl who tried to mind
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The fair-minded men who walked to Donahan
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    A brown study
        Page 73
        Page 74
    "A miss is as good as a mile"
        Page 75
    Out of the sky
        Page 76
        Page 77
    My dog
        Page 78
        Page 79
    I know a little maiden
        Page 80
        Page 81
    A new song to an old tune
        Page 82
    In a breeze
        Page 83
    International
        Page 84
    Surprise
        Page 85
    Mother
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
    "Philopena!"
        Page 89
    Confusion
        Page 90
        Page 91
    Puzzled fairy-folk
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Mild farmer Jones and the naughty boy
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Alarmed
        Page 99
    What happened to Nelly
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The secret
        Page 106
    Thistles!
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Jeannette and Jo
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Midsummer frolics
        Page 111
    Little squirrels, crack your nuts
        Page 112
    Down by the sea
        Page 113
    The tale of a tub
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
    The sad story of little Jane
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Mother's arm
        Page 119
    A suggestion for a Happy New Year
        Page 119
    Unsettled
        Page 120
        Page 121
    The letters at school
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
    Four little birds
        Page 125
    Dressing Mary Ann
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
    The frog, the crab and the limpsy eel
        Page 131
    New-year's day
        Page 132
    To a young girl
        Page 133
    Cat's-cradle
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Signs of May
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Johnny and Meg
        Page 138
    On the lagoon
        Page 138
        Page 139
    The pensive cricket
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
    Poor Jack-in-the-box
        Page 143
    Why
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Sunny days
        Page 146
        Page 147
    Alice in Wonderland
        Page 148
        Page 149
    To W. F. C.
        Page 150
    The little big woman and the big little girl
        Page 151
    Nanny Ann
        Page 152
        Page 153
    The four little imps
        Page 154
        Page 155
    The smiling dolly
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
    How do birds first learn to sing?
        Page 159
    Christmas Eve
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
    The circus clown's dream
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
    An appeal
        Page 167
        Page 168
    Robby's span
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
    His report
        Page 172
    Eight-day clocks
        Page 173
        Page 174
    Tinsel without, but metal within
        Page 175
    Berry-time
        Page 176
        Page 177
    The three tigers
        Page 178
    A terrible tiger
        Page 179
    Far away
        Page 180
        Page 181
    Hans Christian Andersen
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
    Troubled
        Page 185
    The farmer who became drum-major
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
    Courtesy
        Page 191
    May blossoms
        Page 192
    Eight good things about Dobbin
        Page 193
    Side by side
        Page 194
    A smart boy
        Page 195
    Seven little pussy-cats
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
    Eleven little pussy-cats
        Page 199
    Jack and Jill
        Page 200
        Page 201
    In haste
        Page 202
    Soap-bubbles
        Page 203
    The pampered poodle
        Page 204
        Page 205
    Master Theodore
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
    Forbidden
        Page 209
    Ten little dolls
        Page 210
    Jack's wish
        Page 211
    A Dutch family
        Page 212
    Little Miss Kitty
        Page 213
    "The worthy poor"
        Page 214
        Page 215
    Jingle
        Page 216
    After tea
        Page 217
        Page 218
    The sprint runner
        Page 219
        Page 220
    Fun at Grandmama's
        Page 221
    The knowing little fish
        Page 222
        Page 223
    The bees that went to the sky
        Page 224
    Little Charley
        Page 225
    The windmill
        Page 226
        Page 227
    Happy Johnny; or, taking life cheerfully
        Page 228
        Page 229
    A Santa Claus messenger-boy
        Page 230
    Snowflakes
        Page 231
    Calling the flowers
        Page 232
        Page 233
    A Philopena
        Page 234
        Page 235
    The man who didn't know when to stop
        Page 236
        Page 237
    The Oregon Express
        Page 238
    How Willy's ship came back
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
    A stir among the daisies
        Page 243
    The little kindergarten girl
        Page 244
        Page 245
    How shocking!
        Page 246
    "Little pot soon hot"
        Page 247
    The bicycle boys
        Page 248
        Page 249
    Little Rosy red-cheek
        Page 250
        Page 251
    Now the noisy winds are still
        Page 252
        Page 253
    Not only in the Christmas tide
        Page 254
    In trust
        Page 255
    Back Cover
        Page 256
        Page 257
    Spine
        Page 258
Full Text



















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@tber 5ooks bp

Sflarp ;fape DoTge



DONALD AND DOROTHY.

HANS BRINKER, OR THE
SILVER SKATES.
THEOPHILUS AND OTHERS.

ALONG THE WAY.

RHYMES AND JINGLES FOR
LITTLE FOLK.

THE LAND OF PLUCK.





















WHEN LIFE IS YOUNG


















.1


-I, '% :.-
VI










WHEN LIFE IS YOUNG



A COLLECTION OF VERSE
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS





BY

MARY MAPES DODGE
AUTHOR OF HANS BRINKER"
"DONALD AND DOROTHY"
L RHYMES AND JINGLES"
ETC., ETC.






'i *










NEW YORK
THE CENTURY CO.
1894

































Copyright, 1894, by
THE CENTURY CO.


























THE DEVINNE PRESS.























AUTHOR'S NOTE


Many of the verses brought together in this book

originally appeared in "St. Nicholas,"- some of

them unsigned, some under various pen-names,

and others under the initials M. M. D. The rest

are now printed, for the first time.

Acknowledgment is due to Mr. Frank French,

and to his publisher, Mr. C. Klackncr, for the

frontispiece, which so fitly illustrates the happy days

when life is young.

















CONTENTS

PAGE
THE MINUET .................. ....................... 1
A DEAR LITTLE GOOSE ............................. 7
THE BEE-CHARMER. ................................... 8
CHRISTMAS............. .............. ........ .. .. 11
THE CALL OF THE SEA ................................ 12
A PLUMP LITTLE GIRL AND A THIN LITTLE BIRD ..... 14
THE POET WHO COULD N'T WRITE POETRY ........... 15
THE WELL-READ HUNTER .................. ...... ... 16
POOR M ARIONETTE ............... .................. 20
CONSIDER, NOW, A PAINTER-MAN .... ... ............. 22
NORTHERLY ....... ....................... .......... 25
A BALL BALLLLS B ................................... 26
THE NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN ................ .... 27
SEEING IS BELIEVING ................................ 33
TELL M E, DAISY ................. ................... 34
AN OCEAN NOTION ................ .......... ......... 35
ARAaMANTHA MlEHITABEL BROWN ...................... 38
COMING HOME ............. ...... .. ........... ...... 41
SCHOOL-BOY TROUBLES............................... 43
F A N S ................................ ........ .... .. 44
EASY EXPECTATIONS ................................. 46
A NEW YEAR ............................. ........ 47
THE ELF AND TIE SPIDER .......... .................. 48
DANCING ......................... ....... ........... 51
A DEAR LITTLE SCHEMER .................. ......... 52
THE ROAD TO LEARNING .................. ......... 55
THERE 'S A SHIP ON THE SEA ......................... 56
MAKING IT SKIP ................................. 57
THE FANCY-DRESS BALL. .............................. 58
xi







xii CONTENTS
PAGE
BILLY BUTTERCUP ................. .................. 60
THE SWEET, RED ROSE ............................. 61
AN APRIL GIRL .................................... 62
THE ZEALLESS XYLOGRAPHER ........................ 65
THE LITTLE GIRL WHO TRIED TO MIND ............... 66
THE FAIR-MINDED MEN WHO WALKED TO DONAHAN ... 70
A BROWN STUDY .......... .......................... 73
"A MIss Is AS GOOD AS A MILE" ..................... 75
OUT OF THE SKY ............ ........................ 76
M Y DOG ............................................. 78
I KNOW A LITTLE MAIDEN ........................... 80
A NEW SONG TO AN OLD TUNE ........................ 82
IN A BREEZE ................... ..................... 83
INTERNATIONAL .. ... ......... ............ ... 84
SURPRISE ..... .. .. ................................. 85
MOTHER ............... ......................... 86
" PHILOPENA !" ................... ........ ........... 89
CO FUSION........................... ............. 90
PUZZLED FAIRY-FOLK .................. .............. 92
MILD FARMER JONES AND T.I[I NAUGHTY BOY ....... 94
ALARMED .......... ....... .......... .......... 99
WHAIIT HAPPENED TO NELLY ...................... ... 100
THE SECRET ................ ............. ........ 106
THISTLES ......... ....... .................... ... 106
JEANNETTE AND Jo........................ .. ... 109
MIDSUMMER FROLICS ................... ........... 111
LITTLE SQUIRRELS, CRACK YOUR NUTS ................ 112
DOWN BY THE SEA ................................... 113
THE TALE OF A TUB ................................. 114
THE SAD STORY OF LITTLE JANE ..................... 117
MOTHER'S ARM .............. ..... ................ 119
A SUGGESTION FOR A HAPPY NEW YEAR .............. 119
UNSETTLED ......... .......................... ....... 120
INFORM ED ................. ....... ......... ...... .. 121
THE LETTERS AT SCHOOL ............ ............... 122
FOUR LITTLE BIRDS ................................... 125
DRESSING MIARY ANN................. ............... 126
THE FROG, THE CRAB AND THE LIMPSY EEL .......... 131







CONTENTS xiii
PAGE
NEW-YEAR'S DAY. ............................... 132
To A YOUNG GIRL ................................... 133
CAT'S-CRADLE ........................................ 134
SIGNS OP MAY ........... .............. ............ 136
JOHNNY AND MEG.. ............... ................. 138
ON THE LAGOON ............................. ..... 138
THE PENSIVE CRICKET ............... ................ 140
PooR JACK-IN-THE-BOX .............................. 143
WHY ................................................. 144
SUNNY DAYS .................. ....................... 146
ALICE IN W ONDERLAND ............................... 148
To W F. C...... ................................... 150
THE LITTLE BIG WOMAN AND THE BIG LITTLE GIRL.. 151
NANNY ANN ................. ........... ............ 152
THE FOUR LITTLE IMPS ............................... 154
THE SMILING DOLLY.................................. 156
How DO BIRDS FIRST LEARN TO SING ................ 159
CHRISTMAS EVE ....... .............................. 160
THE CIRCUS CLOWN'S DREAM .......................... 163
AN APPEAL ................................... ...... 167
ROBBY'S SPAN............... ......................... 169
HIs REPORT .................................... .... 172
EIGIT-DAY CLOCKS .................................... 173
TINSEL WITHOUT, BUT METAL WITHIN ................ 175
BERRY-TIMi E .......... ............................... 176
THE THREE TIGERS ...... .. ................. ..... 178
A T aRRIBLE TIGER ............................ ..... 179
FAR AWAY................................. ......... 180
HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN .................... ........ 182
TROUBLED .................................. .. ....... 185
THE FARMER WHO BECAME DRUM-MAJOR ............. 186
COURTESY ........... ..................... .. 191
MAY-BLOSSOMS ......................................... 192
EIGHT GOOD THINGS ABOUT DOBBIN .................. 193
SIDE BY SIDE .............................. .......... 194
A SMART BOY ................ ........................ 195
SEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS ............................ 196
ELEVEN LITTLE PUSSY-CATS ......................... 199







xiv CONTENTS
PAGE
JACK AND JILL......... ....... ......... .. .......... 200
IN HASTE............... .... ........................ 202
SOAP-BUBBLES ....................................... 203
THE PAMPERED POODLE .............................. 204
MASTER THEODORE .. ........... ........ ..... 206
FORBIDDEN ................ ...................... 209
TEN LITTLE DOLLS ............. ................... .210
JACK'S W ISH ............. .... ...................... 211
A DUTCH FAMILY.... ............ ............ ..... 212
LITTLE MISS KITTY ................................. 213
"THE WORTHY POOR"............................... .214
JINGLE .......... ................. ....... ..... ...... 216
A FTER TEA ........ ...... ....... ....... .......... 217
THE SPRINT-RUNNER .. ..... ............ .. 219
FUN AT GRANDMAMIA'S ............................... 221
THE KNOWING LITTLE FISH ..................... .... 222
THE BEES THAT WENT TO THE SKY .................. 224
LITTLE CHARLEY ..... .............................. 225
THE W INDMILL ............ ................... 226
HAPPY JOHNNY; OR, TAKING LIFE CHEERFULLY ..... 228'
A SANTA CLAUS MESSENGER-BOY ..................... 230
SNOWFLAKES ........................... .. .... 231
CALLING THE FLOWERS ................. ... ........ 232
A PHILOPENA......... ................. ............ 234
THE MAN WHO DID N'T KNOW WHEN TO STOP ........ 236
THE OREGON EXPRESS .................. ............... 238
How WILLY'S SHIP CAME BACK ...................... 239
A STIR AMONG THE DAISIES ....................... 243
THE LITTLE KINDERGARTEN GIRL ................... 244
H ow SHOCKING! ..... ....... .......................... 246
"LITTLE POT SOON HOT "......................... 247
THE BICYCLE BOYS ................................... 248
LITTLE ROSY RED-CHEEK ............................. 250
NOW THE NOISY WINDS ARE STILL ................... 252
NOT ONLY IN THE CHRISTMAS-TIDE .................. 254
IN TRUST ......................... ...... ........... 255




















WHEN LIFE IS YOUNG



































THE MINUET

GRANDMA told me all about it,
Told me, so I could n't doubt it,
How she danced my grandma danced!-
Long ago.
How she held her pretty head,
How her dainty skirt she spread,
Turning out her little toes;
How she slowly leaned and rose--
Long ago.
1






THE MINUET


Grandma's hair was bright and sunny;
Dimpled cheeks, too ah, how funny! -
Really quite a pretty girl,
Long ago.
Bless her! why, she wears a cap,
Grandma does, and takes a nap
Every single day; and yet
Grandma danced the minuet
Long ago.


Now she sits there, rocking, rocking,
Always knitting Grandpa's stocking;-
Every girl was taught to knit,
Long ago-
Yet her il-,". is so neat,
And her way so staid and sweet,
I can almost see her now
Bending to her partner's bow,
Long ago.


Modern ways are quite alarming,
Grandma says; but boys were charming--
Girls and boys, I mean, of course--
Long ago.
Bravely modest, grandly shy.
What if all of us should try
Just to feel like those who met
In the graceful minuet
Long ago ?






THE MINUET


^r^4 --o .. ,^I' w










"IN THE GRACEFUL MINUET."

Grandma says our modern jumping,
Hopping, rushing, whirling, bumping,
Would have shocked the gentle folk
Long ago;







THE MINUET


YI-W .


we.-


No; they moved with stately grace,
Everything in proper place,
Gliding slowly forward, then
Slowly courtesying back again,
Long ago.

With the minuet in fashion,
Who could fly into a passion?







THE MINUET


All would wear the calm they wore
Long ago.
In time to come, if I, perchance,
Should tell my grandchild of our dance,
I should really like to say,
"We did it, dear, in stately way,
Long ago."


GEORGE WASHINGTON DANCING TIIE MINUET WITH SALLY FAIRFAX.
1*

















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"I 'LL WEAR THE SWEETEST DRESSES,-AND, MAYBE, HAVE A BEAU! "


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A DEAR LITTLE GOOSE


WHILE I 'm in the ones, I can frolic all the day;
I can laugh, I can jump, I can run about and play.
But when I 'm in the tens, I must get up with the lark,
And sew, and read, and practise, from early morn till dark.

When I 'm in the twenties, I '11 be like Sister Jo;
I '11 wear the sweetest dresses (and, maybe, have a beau!),
I '11 go to balls and parties, and wear my hair up high,
And not a girl in all the town shall be as gay as I.

When I 'm in the thirties, I '11 be just like Mama;
And, maybe, I '11 be married to a splendid big papa.
I '11 order things, and go to teas, and grow a little fat,
(But, Mother is so sweet and nice, I '11 not object to that).

Oh, what comes after thirty? The forties Mercy, my!
When I grow as old as forty, I think I '11 have to die.
But like enough the world won't last until we see that
day; -
It 's so very, very, very, very, VERY far away!





























THE BEE-CHARMER

A FPRSKY little faun of old
Once came to charm the bees -
A frisky little faun and bold,
With very funny knees:
You '11 read in old mythology
Of just such folk as these,
Who haunted dusky woodlands
And sported neathh the trees.

Well, there he sat and waited
And played upon his pipe,
Till all the air grew fated
And the hour was warm and ripe,-
8







THE BEE-CHARMER


When, through the woodland glooming
Out to the meadow clear,
A few great bees came booming,
And hovered grandly near.

Then others, all a-listening,
Came, one by one, intent,
Their gauzy wings a-glistening,
Their velvet bodies bent.
Filled was the meadow sunny
With music-laden bees,
Forgetful of their honey
Stored in the gnarled old trees;
Heedless of sweets that waited
In myriad blossoms bright,
They crowded, dumb and sated
And heavy with delight;
When, presto with quick laughter
Gone was the piping faun!
And never came he after,
By noon or night or dawn.

Never the bees recovered;
The spell was on them still,-
Where'er they flew or hovered
They knew not their own will;
The wondrous music filled them,
As dazed they sought the bloom;
The cadences that thrilled them
Had dealt them mystic doom.






1 o THE BEE-CHARMER

And people called them lazy -
Knowing their wondrous skill-
While others thought them crazy,
And strove to do them ill;
Their velvet coats a-fuzzing
They darted, bounded, flew,
And filled the air witl buzzing
And riotous ado.

Now, when in summer season
We hear their noise and stir,
Full well we know the reason
Of buzz and boom and whir-
As, browsing on the clover
Or darting at the flower,
They hum it o'er and over,
That charm of elfin power.
Dire, with a purpose musical
Jarring the sultry noon,
They make their sounds confusical,
And try to catch the tune.
It baffles them, it rouses them,
It wearies them and drowses them,
It puzzles them and saddens them.
It worries them and maddens them;-
Ah, wicked faun, with funny knees,
To bring such trouble on the bees!















i..I-- O-FZZI--~- .r
;5; --~ 7


CHRISTMAS

THEY put me in the great spare bed and there they
bade me sleep;
I must not stir; I must not wake; I must not even
peep!
Right opposite that lonely bed my Christmas stocking
hung;
And in the big bay window a funny shadow swung.

I counted softly, to myself, to ten, and ten times ten,
And went through all the alphabet, and then began
again;
I repeated that Fifth Reader piece--a poem called
Repose,"-
And tried a dozen other ways to fall into a doze;
11






CHRISTMAS


When suddenly the room grew light. I heard a soft,
strong bound--
'T was Santa Claus, I felt quite sure, but dared not
look around.
'T was nice to know that he was there, and things were
going rightly,
And so I took a little nap, and tried to smile politely.

"Ho! Merry Christmas!" cried a voice; I felt the
bed a-rocking;
'T was daylight Brother Rob was up! and oh,
that splendid stocking!













THE CALL OF THE SEA
IT is all very well to be good, I agree,-
To be gentle, and patient, and that sort of thing;
But there 's something that suits my taste to a T
In 11h thought of a i .,'l Pirate King.

































































THE CALL OF THE SEA.


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A PLUMP LITTLE GIRL AND A THIN
LITTLE BIRD
A PLUMP little girl and a thin little bird
Were out in the meadow together.
"IIow cold that poor little bird must be
Without any clothes like mine," said she,
"Although it is sunshiny weather!"

"A nice little girl is that," piped he,
"But oh, how cold she must be! For, see,
'-!.- has 'nt a single feather!"
So each shivered to think of the other poor thing,
Although it was sunshiny weather.


V K;"


L1





























THE POET WHO COULD N'T WRITE POETRY

MR. TENNYSON TINKLETON TUPPER VON BURNS
Was no poet, as every one knew;
But the fact that he had his poetical turns
Was well understood by a few.

"I long, I aspire, and I suffer and sigh
When the fever is on," he confessed;
"Yet never a line have I writ,- and for why?
My fancies can not be expressed!

"Ah, what avail language, ink, paper, and quill,
When the soul of a gifted one yearns?
Could I write what I feel, all creation would thrill,"
Said Tennyson Tupper von Burns.
15


















THE WELL-READ HUNTER


Vr

7


A LION MET A LITTLE BOY
WELL VERSED IN HUNTERS' LORE.
THEN SPAKE HE TO THAT WELL-READ BOY:
WOULDST LIKE TO HEAR ME ROAR?''







THE WELL-READ HUNTER 17



































THE LION ROARED; THEN ASKED THE BOY
WOULDST LIKE TO SEE ME BITE
'' --.-J









-"' -I .^1^'^ --- '






"YES, THANK YOU,- SAID T.E LITTLE BOY,


THE LION ROARED; THEN ASKED THE BOY:
SWOULDST LIKE TO SEE ME BITE?,,








THE WELL-READ HUNTER


"OH YES," REPLIED THAT PLUCKY BOY,
WHO COOLLY EYED HIS GUN;
' BUT FIRST I'D LIKE TO TRY THIS TOY;-

WOULDST LIKE TO SEE SOME FUN ?'


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THE WELL-READ HUNTER


'' [ --
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- --- .: '? 1 --- .. .


THEN FLED THAT LION FROM THE BOY,
AS BEAST NE'ER RAN BEFORE ;-
AND TO THIS DAY THAT LITTLE BOY
ENJOYS HIS HUNTERS' LORE.


4/!











POOR MARIONETTE


Poon Marionette! She worked so hard,
And did her part with snch precision!
But one cold day, when off her guard,
She tumbled on the cruel floor
And broke herself for evermore.
Then worthless quite -
Poor wooden mite!-
i,.- met with scorn and cold derision.

"Throw her away!" the showman cried;
Throw her away. We '11 have a new one."
And so, despised and cast aside,
She lay all winter in the snow,
Unmourned, forgotten long ago
By human folk;
And never woke,-
So can a cruel fate undo one!

Poor Marionette! In course of time
Sweet May came, bringing balmy weather.
'Then fii.. ...1 summer in her prime;
And softly, on fair moonlight nights,
('oae mourning elves and gentle sprites,
Whlo, weeping much,
With tender touch
Soon hid her in the warm, sweet heather
20













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CONSIDER, NOW,
A PAINTER-MAN

l IONSIDER, now, a painter-
Sman who thought him-
self divine,-
Correggio Dehnonico del
Michael Angeline;
"Fine portrait-painting done
within," was printed on
his sign,
I And all around his studio
his works hung on the
line.
When lie painted little boys, he said: How plainly I
calln see,
I amn such a mighty lion that they 're afraid of me!"
And when lie painted little girls,-" Dear little things!"
said he,
"They 're shy because I awe them with my grace and
dignity."






CONSIDER, NOW, A PAINTER-MAN 23

"'T is wonderful," he oft remarked, "the colors that I
know;
The sky is blue, the grass is green, and red the roses
blow;
And yet the people look amazed whenever I paint them so,
And seem to think that higher yet an artist ought to go!"

Well, strange to say, it came to pass that he took down
the sign;
For never came a customer to buy his pictures fine.
And that is all I know of one who thought himself
divine,--
Correggio Delmonico del Michael Angeline.




















NORTHERLY


WHEN the wind is east, they say,
We may have a rainy day;
When it travels from the west
Waving fields have little rest.
Warm and soft it is, we know,
When the southern breezes blow;
But this north wind puzzles me,-
Who knows what the weather '11 be!













A BALL 'S A BALL


A BALL 'S a ball, and nothing more,
When it lies upon the floor
See how grave and still its air!
Not a bit of frolic there.

What is this ? Can Pussy's touch
Change the quiet thing so much?
See it start, and turn, and hop!
Pussy cannot make it stop!

See them scurry! See them leap!
See the two fall in a heap!
Now they roll! and now they run!
Bless me! balls are full of fun!














26
















THE NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN

LONG, long ago, in Egypt land,
Where the lazy lotus grew,
And the pyramids, though vast and grand,
Were rather fresh and new,
There dwelt an honored family,
Called ScarabBus Phlat,
Whose duty 't was all faithfully
To tend The Sacred Cat.

They brought the water of the Nile
To bathe its honored feet;
They gave it oil and camomile
Whene'er it deigned to eat.
With gold and precious emeralds
Its temple sparkled o'er,
And golden mats lay thick upon
The consecrated floor.

And Scarab6us Phlat himself -
A man of cheerful mood-
Held not his trust from love of pelf,
For he was very good.
27







































































D FA HE WORE A OOK OF GLEE.
LEV\'ER ON HIS BRONZED FACE HE \VORE A LOOK OF GLEE."






THE NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN

He thought the Cat a catamount
In strength and majesty;
And ever on his bronzed face
He wore a look of glee.

And Mrs. Scarabens Phlat
Was smiling, bright, and good;
For she, too, loved The Sacred Cat,
As it was meet she should.
Never a grumpy syllable
Came from this joyous pair;
And all the neighbors envied them
Their very jolly air.

When Scarabens went to find
The Sacred Cat its store,
The pretty wife he left behind
Stood smiling at the door.
He knew that quite as smilingly
She 'd welcome his return,
And brightly on the altar stone
The tended flame would burn.

The Sacred Cat was different quite;
No jollity he knew;
But, spoiled and petted day and night,
Only the crosser grew.
Yet still they served him faithfully,
And thought his snarling sweet;
And still they fed him lusciously,
And bathed his sacred feet.







30 THE NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN

So far, so good. But hear the rest:
This couple had a child,
A little boy, not of the best,-
Rameses, he was styled.
This little boy was beautiful,
But soon he grew to be
So like The Cat in manners,- oh!
'T was wonderful to see!

He might have copied Papa Phlat,
Or Mama Phlat, as well;
And why he did n't think of that
No mortal soul could tell.
It was n't want of discipline,
Nor lack of good advice,
But just because he did n't care
To be the least bit nice.

Besides, he noticed day by day
How ill The Cat behaved,
And how (whatever they might say)
His parents were enslaved;
And how they worshiped silently
The naughty Sacred Cat.
Said he, They '11 do the same by me,
If I but act like that."


At first the parents said: "How blest
Are we, to find The Cat






THE NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN


Glow, humanized, within the breast
Of a Scarabeus Phlat!"
But soon the neighbors, pitying,
Whispered: "'T is very sad!
There 's no mistake,-that little one
Of Phlat's is very bad!"

He snarled, he squalled from night till morn,
And scratched his mother's eyes,
The Sacred Cat, himself, looked on
In envious surprise.
And here the record suddenly
Breaks off. No more we know,
Excepting this: That happy pair
Soon wore a look of woe.

Yes, then, and ever afterward,
A look of pain they wore.
No more the wife stood smilingly
A-waiting at the door.
No more did ScarabBus Phlat
Display a jolly face;
But on his brow such sadness sat
It gloomied all the place.


So, children, take the lesson in,
And due attention give:
No matter when, or where, or how,
Mothers and fathers live,







32 THE1 NAUGHTY LITTLE EGYPTIAN

No matter be they Brown or Jones,
Or Scarablus Phlat,
It grieves their hearts to see their child
Act like a naughty cat.
And Sacred Cats are well enough
To those who hold them so;
But--oh, take warning of the boy
In Egypt long ago!


















SEEING IS BELIEVING


ILLING Kitty McHost was
deaf as a post,
AndWellington Stowe could
n't speak;
7 \ / "So, you see, 't were as
,,.& well," said Miss Kitty
S /, McHost,
"For a man to come courting' in Greek!
If it 's me you are after, dear Wellington Stowe,
Just bring in a bit of a trumpet and blow."

So he blew and he blew, his dear lady to win;
But she cried in despair: Will he never begin "
And then in the trumpet he silently sighed,
Whilst fondly and sweetly his lady he eyed; -
"Would you deafen a body!" she cried, "Mr. Stowe;
If you blow loud as that, all the neighbors '11 know! "'

And so it was settled. And long may they thrive,-
The quietest, happiest couple alive!
3 33




































TELL ME, DAISY

TELL me, Daisy, ere I go,
Whether my love is true or no
One leaf off: He loves me. What?
One more leaf, and he loves me not.
Three leaves: Will he? Four leaves: So,
He never will love me? oh no, no !
I don't care what a daisy says;
I 'm sure to get married one of these days!
34





















AN OCEAN NOTION

WERE I old Neptune's son, you 'd see
How soon the waves would bow to me;
And how the fish would gather round, .
And wag their tails with joy profound.
I 'd bid the sea-gull tidings bring
Of sunny lands where linnets sing;
I 'd roam the icebergs wild, and find
A summer suited to my mind;
Or in the gulf-stream warm I 'd play
And on my Nautilus sail away;
I 'd turn the billows inside out;
Play leap-frog with the waterspout;
Swing on the cable, out of sight,
Or leap with dolphins to the light.
All this I 'd do and more beside,
Were I old Neptune's joy and pride.
His wreathed horn I 'd lightly blow,
And swing his trident to and fro; .
35







AN OCEAN NOTION


And when I tired of ocean's roar,
I 'd take a little turn on shore.
If Neptune feared to trust on land
















-














AND ON MY NAUTILUS SAIL AWAY."
His fine aquatic four-in-hand,-
Why, what of that? I 'd laugh and go
Upon a charger sure and slow -






AN OCEAN NOTION 37

My turtle-steed so fine and grand
Ready for trip on sea or land.
Ah, but I 'd have right lordly fun,
If I were only Neptune's son!










S --
/' '' *- l




--- --_



















ARAMANTHA MEHITABEL BROWN


OH, Miss Aramantha Mehitabel Brown
Was known as the prettiest girl in the town,
In the days of King George, number Three.
Her hat was a wonder
Of feathers and bows;
The pretty face under
Was sweet as a rose;
And her sleeves were so full they could tickle her
nose!
Her dimity gown was a marvel to see;
So short in the waist!
And not a bit laced-
" Oh, mercy! I never would do it!" said she.
No cumbering train hid her dear little feet,
Yet the skirt that revealed them was ample and
neat,-
Indeed all the modistes declared it was sweet";
And the bag that she swung from her plump little
arm
Held a kerchief, a purse, and a luck-penny charm.
38






ARAMANTHA MEHITABEL BROWN


Ah, the maiden was fair,
And dainty and rare!
And the neighbors would sigh,
As she tripped lightly by:
Sure, the pride of our town
And its fittest renown
Is sweet Aramantha Mehitabel Brown!"











































































"I CANNOT THINK WHAT KEEPS HIM SO."


.-*-'-

'e
























COMING HOME


"COME, Kitty, come !" I said:
But still she waited--waited,
Nodding oft her pretty head
With, "I 'm coming soon.
Father 's rowing home, I know,
I cannot think what keeps him so,
Unless he 's just belated;
I 'm coming soon."

" Come, Kate !" her mother called,
"The supper 's almost ready."
But Kitty, in her place installed,
Said, "I 'm coming soon.
Do let me wait. He 's sure to come;
By this time Father 's always home--
He rows so fast and steady;
I 'm coming soon."
41







COMING HOME


"Come, Kit!" her brothers cried;
But Kitty by the water
Still eagerly the distance eyed,
With "I 'm coming soon.
Why, what would evening be," said she,
"Without dear father home to tea?
Without his 'Ho, my daughter'?
I 'm coming soon."

"Come, dear! plead one and all,
But Kitty 's softly humming;
She hears a cheery distant call,-
"And he 's coming soon"
Is in her heart; for, far from shore,
Gliding the happy waters o'er,
She sees the boat, and cries, "He 's coming !
WTe 're coming soon !"









SCHOOL-BOY TROUBLES


HE witches hide in my books,
I know,
Or else it 's fairy elves;
For when I study, they plague
me so
I feel like one of themselves.
Often they whisper: Come and
play,
The sun is shining bright!"
And when I fling the book away
They flutter with delight.
They dance among the stupid words,
And twist the "rules" awry;
And fly across the page like birds,
Though I can't see them fly.
They twitch my feet, they blur my eyes,
They make me drowsy, too;
In fact, the more a fellow tries
To study, the worse they do.
They can't be heard, they can't be seen--
I know not how they look-
And yet they always lurk between
The leaves of a lesson-book.
Whatever they are I cannot tell,
But this is plain as day:
I '11 never be able to study well,
Till the book-elves go away.
43




























FANS


MY sister Kitty has lovely fans,-
Oh, ten times finer than sister Nan's!
Kitty's are beautiful--satin and pearl
(Kitty was always a dressy girl!)
Ebony, tortoise-shell, lace, and gold;
Shimmering, shining in every fold;
Bedecked and trimmed with fur and feather,-
And she needs them even in winter weather!

Nan's (ah, how many she has !) are plain,
Clean, and cool as the sumner rain;
Paper and palm-leaf fans are they,
Three for a dime, I have heard her say;
44







FANS


Strong and firm, yet light to bear,
And laden with cool, refreshing air,
As bound on errands of help and pity,
She carries them through the scorching city.

To-day she is sitting by tiny beds
Cooling poor little, suffering heads;
Fanning lightly softly slow
Till the little ones far into dreamland go.

I often think of these different fans,
Kitty's, so lovely and sister Nan's.


.~1.-













EASY EXPECTATIONS

V'RY little grape, dear, that clings unto a vine,
Expects some day to ripen its little drop of wine.
Ev'ry little girl, I think, expects in time to be
Exactly like her own mama-as grand and sweet and free.
Ev'ry little boy who has a pocket of his own,
Expects to be the biggest man the world has ever known.
Ev'ry little piggy-wig that makes its little wail,
Expects to be a great big pig with a very curly tail.
Ev'ry little fluffy chick, in downy yellow drest,
Expects some day to crow and strut, or cackle at its best.
Ev'ry little kitten pet, so tender and so nice,
Expects to be a grown-up cat, and live on rats and mice.
Ev'ry little baby-bird that peeps from out its nest,
Expects some day to cross the sky from glowing east to west.
Ev'ry hope I 've mentioned here will bring its sure event,
Excepting something happens; dear, to hinder or prevent.











A NEW YEAR


ING, dong! ding, dong!
This old year will soon be gone,
But a new one 's coming on,-
Ding, dong! ding, dong!

Tell us, Year, before you go,-
Ding, dong! ding, dong!
Why at last you hurry so,
Though at first so very slow?
Ding, dong!
Can't you wait until we see
S What the new year means to be ?
S Ding, dong! ding, dong!

I wish years would never change;
No one wants a year that 's strange.
Ding, dong ding, dong !
Big folk say 't would never do,
None would live the past anew;
But I 'd like it,--would n't you?
Ding, dong! ding, dong!

Just the same? No, I must be
Better with each year, you see.
Old Year, don't you pity me?
Ding, dong! ding, dong!
Ding!
47


*y_















THE ELF AND THE SPIDER


PERCHED on a stool of the fairy style,
An elf-boy worked with a mischievous smile.
" That careless spider! said he, "to leave
His web unfinished! But I can sew:
I '11 spin, or sew, or darn, or weave -
Whatever they call it- so none will know
That his spidership didn't complete it himself,
Or I 'm a very mistaken young elf."

Well, the wee sprite sewed, or wove, or spun,
Plying his brier and gossamer thread;
And, quick as a ripple, the web, all done,
Was softly swaying against his head
As he laughed and nodded in joyful pride.
Ho! ho! it's done!
Ha! ha! what fun!
And then he felt himself slowly slide-
lil and tumble--stool and all-
In the prettiest sort of a fairy fall!

Up ihe jumped, as light as air;
But oh, what a sight,
What a sorry plight--
48
















I'.. -Zi::


"PLYING HIS DRIER AND GOSSAMER THREAD,"


~':R

r,.








..






THE ELF AND THE SPIDER


The web was caught in his sunny hair!
When, presto on sudden invisible track,
That horrible spider came lumbering back:
" WlIO S BEEN AT MY WEB? WHAT HO! COME ON!
And lie knotted for fight,
The horrid fright!
But the elf was gone-
Poor, frightened fay!
Nothing was seen but a tattered sheen,
Ti 1l's1 and shining upon the green.

But all that night, with dainty care,
An elf sat tugging away at his hair.
And 't is whispered in Elf-land to this day
That .any spider under the sun
May go and leave his web undone,
With its filmy thread-end swinging free
Or tied to the tip of a distant tree,
With never a fear that elfin-men
Will meddle with spider-work again.




























DANCING

MASTER FITZ-EUSTACE DE PERCIVAL JONES
Went dancing with Polly McLever;
And he asked her that night, in the sweetest of tones,
To dance with him only,- forever.

"Indeed I will, Eustace de Percival Jones,"
Said dear little Polly McLever.
So he whispered her softly: "Delay is for drones-
Let 's take the step now, Love, if ever."

To-day they are gray, and their weary old bones
Feel keenly each turn of the weather;
But dancing, at heart still are Polly and Jones,
As they tread to-day's measure together.
51















A DEAR LITTLE SCHEMER

THERE was a little daughter once, whose stockings
were so small
That when the Christmas Eve came round they
would n't do at all.
At least she said they would n't do, and so she tried
another's,
And folding her wee stocking up, she slyly took her
mother's.

I '11 pin this big one here," she said,- then sat before
the fire,
Watching the supple, dancing flames, and shadows
darting by her,
Till silently she drifted off to that queer land, you
know,
Of Nowhere in particular," where sleepy children go.

She never knew the tumult rare that came upon the
roof !
She never heard the patter of a single reindeer hoof;
She never knew how Some One came and looked his
shrewd surprise
At the wee foot and the stocking--so different in
size !
52



















































































TIHE WEE FOOT AND THE STOCKING-SO DIFFERENT IN SIZE!"


<'. -. g







5i A DEAR LITTLE SCHEMER

She only knew, when morning dawned, that she was
safe in bed.
"It 's (.'In i-in.i..! Hio!" and merrily she raised her
pretty head;
Then, wild with glee, she saw what "dear Old Santa
Clans had done,
And ran to tell the joyful news to each and every
one:

"Mama! Papa! Please come and look! a lovely doll,
and all!"
And "See how full the stocking is! Mine would have
been too small.
I borrowed this for Santa Clans. It is n't fair, you
know,
To make him wait forever for a little girl to grow."

















THE ROAD TO LEARNING


SWISH I knew my letters well,
So I might learn to read and spell;
I 'd find them on my pretty card,
If they were not so very hard.

Now S is crooked--don't yon see ?
And G is making mouths at me,
--_ And 0 is something like a ball,-
S It has n't any end at all.

And all the rest are--my! so queer!
They look like crooked sticks -oh dear!
Nurse counted six, and twenty more;
What do they have so many for?


































THERE 'S A SHIP ON THE SEA

THERE 'S a ship on the sea. It is sailing to-night,
Sailing to-night!
And father 's aboard, and the moon is all bright,
Shining and bright!
Dear moon, he 'll be sailing for many a night-
Sailing from mother and me.
Oh, follow the ship with your silvery light,
As father sails over the sea!


-----
;---;
-~-~- --~-ri=--l-
---'














MAKING IT SKIP

I 'LL make it skip!"
Cried Harry, seizing a bit of stone.
And, in a trice, from our Harry's hand,
With scarce a dip,
Over the water it danced alone,
While we were watching it from the land-
Skip! skip! skip!

"I 'lI make it skip !"
Now, somehow, that is our Harry's way:
He takes little troubles that vex one so,
Not worth a flip,
And makes them seem to frolic and play
Just by his way of making them go
Skip! skip! skip!




-__ .- : Zh





































THE FANCY-DRESS BALL


THEY dressed me, one day, for a juvenile ball,
In a long-tailed coat and a chapea't tall,
And ruffles and bows and an eye-glass, too,
And a wig finished off with an odd little queue:
But what I was meant for I hardly knew.

"You belong to Directory days, my dear,"
They said, which struck me at least as queer,
58






THE FANCY-DRESS BALL


For I knew that the mass of the people in town,
From De Lancy and Astor to Jenkins and Brown,
Were in the Directory all set down.

My sisters tried hard my attention to fix,-
I heard, No, in France," and In ninety-six,"
And Turbulent days," and "Yes, there were five ';
And each to out-rattle the other would strive -
They buzzed in my ear till I felt like a hive.

" Oh, is n't he perfect ?" they cried in delight
(And, really, I was n't a very bad sight),
But every youngster, I '11 venture to say,
At the ball, whether peasant or clown or fay,
Had been praised at home in the selfsame way.

Well, all but me were as plain as your hat;
At once you could say, they are this or they 're that;
I even knew good little George with his hatchet,
(Without, I must own, any sapling to match it);
And you felt, at a glance, he expected to catch it."

I recognized Tell by his high Swiss hat,
His boy with the apple a-top, and all that;
But all of the characters stared at me,
As if to say, "What on earth can he be?"
And what was the use of my saying, you see,
"Why, I? I am from the Directory!"
MORAL.

When you 're booked for a fancy-dress party, take care
To learn all about the queer costume you wear!


































BILLY BUTTERCUP

BoNNY Billy Buttercup! Pretty little fay.
Riding on the blossoms in the breeze;
Deep in the clover-bloom hiding him away,
Startled at the murmur of the trees.

('lhil'.,i have you seen him? shy is he and gay,
Sunny as the butterflies and bees,
Bonny Billy Buttercup! Pretty little fay!
Riding on the blossoms in the breeze.
60











THE SWEET, RED ROSE

"GOOD MORRow, little rose-bush!
Now prithee tell me true:
To be as sweet as a sweet, red rose
What must a body do "

" To be as sweet as a sweet, red rose
A little girl like you
Just grows and grows and grows and grows-
And that 's what she must do."














AN APRIL GIRL


THE girl that is born on an April day
Has a right to be merry, lightsome, gay;
And that is the reason I dance and play
And frisk like a mote in a sunny ray,-
Would n't you
Do it, too,
If you had been born on an April day ?

The girl that is born on an April day
Has also a right to cry, they say;
And so I sometimes do give way
When things get crooked or all astray,-
Would n't you
Do it, too,
If you had been born on an April .1 .

The girls of March love noise and fray;
And sweet as blossoms are girls of May;
But I belong to the time midway,
And so I 1. ..i.. in a sunny spray
Oif smiles and tears and hap-a-day,-
Would n't you
Do it, too,
If you had been born on an April day?






04 AN APRIL GIRL

Ileigh-ho! and hurrah! for an April day,
Its cloud, its sparkle, its skip and stay!
I mean to be happy whenever I may,
And cry when I must; for that 's my way.
Would nt yon
Do it, too,
If you had been born on an April day ?


i; i
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''I'';











THE ZEALLESS XYLOGRAPHER

S(Dedicated to the End of the Dictionary.)

XYLOGRAPHER started to cross the sea
By means of a Xanthic Xebec;
But, alasl he sighed for the Zuyder Zee,
And feared he was in for a wreck.
He tried to smile, but all in vain,
Because of a Zygomatic pain;
And as for singing, his cheeriest tone
Reminded him of a Xylophone--
Or else, when the pain would sharper grow,
His notes were as keen as a Zuffolo.
And so, it is likely, he did not find
On board, Xenodochy to his mind.
The fare was poor, and he was sure
Xerophagy he could not endure;
Zoophagous surely he was, I aver,
This dainty and starving Xylographer.
Xylophagous truly he could not be -
No sickly vegetarian he!
He 'd have blubbered like any old Zeuglodon
Had Xerophthalmia not come on.
And the end of it was he never again
In a Xanthic Xebec went sailing the main.













THE LITTLE GIRL WHO TRIED TO MIND

PRUDENCE good sister Prudence !-was a gentle girl
of eight,
And Totty was but four years old, when what I now
relate
Came to the happy little pair, one bright November
day -
A Sunday, too -while good Papa was many miles.
away.

" Good-by, my darlings! don't forget." The little ones
went forth,
Their hearts all in a sunny glow, their faces to the
north -
Their faces to the chilling north, but not a whit cared
they,
Though the pretty church before them stood full
half a mile away.

For Mother, with her smiling face and cheery voice,
had said:
I cannot go to church to-day, but you may go instead.
Baby will need me here at home--the precious little
pet!
But babies grow in time, you know. She 'll go to
meeting yet."
66






THE LITTLE GIRL WHO TRIED TO MIND


"Take care of sister, Prue!" she said, while tying
Totty's hood,-
"And, Tottykins, I 'm sure yon '11 be, oh, very still and
good!
Good-by, my darlings! Don't forget. Prudence, you
know the pew;
And, Tot, be Mama's little mouse, and sit up close to
Prue."







68 THE LITTLE GIRL WHO TRIED TO MIND

In truth it was a pretty sight, to see the rosy pair
Walk down the aisle and take their seats, with sweetly
solemn air.
And Prudence soon was listening, her manner all
intent,
While little Tot sat prim and stiff, and wondered
what it meant.

The quaint, old-fashioned meeting-house had pew-
seats low and bare,
With backs that reached above the heads when they
were bowed in prayer.
And thus it was when suddenly a squeaking sound
was heard,
Faint at the first, then almost loud even the deacon
stirred!

All heads were bowed; again it came-that tiny
puzzling sound,
The staidest members rolled their eyes and tried to
look around;
Till Prudence, anxious little maid! felt, with a pang
of fear,
That, whatsoever its cause might be, the noise was
strangely near.

Out went her slyly warning hand, to reach for Totty
there;
When, oh, the squeaking rose above the closing words
of prayer!






THE LITTLE GIRL WHO TRIED TO MIND 69

An empty mitten on the seat was all that Prudence
felt,
While on the floor, in wondrous style, the earnest
Totty knelt!

Poor Prudence leaned and signaled, and beckoned,
all in vain; -
Totty was very. much engaged and would not heed,
't was plain.
When suddenly a childish voice rang through the
crowded house: -
" DON'T, Prudy! 'cause I 've dot to be my Mama's littlee
mouse!"

Many a worshiper looked shocked, and many smiled
outright,
While others mourned in sympathy with Prudy's"
sorry plight;
And Totty, wild with wrath because she could be
mouse no more,
Was carried soon, a sobbing child, out through the
wide church-door.


Now parents ponder while ye may upon this sad
mishap;
The mother, not the mouse, you see, was caught
within the trap.
And when your little listening ones you send beyond
your reach,
Be chary of your metaphors and figurative speech.
5*
















THE FAIR-MINDED MEN WHO WALKED
TO DONAHAN

Two wise nmen walked to Donahan
Upon a rainy day,-
Heigh-ho!
With one umbrell' between them.
They hit upon an honest plan
For both to have fair play,-
Heigh-ho!
I wish you cold have seen them.

Said one: "I'11 hold it half the way,
And you the other half,-
Heigh-ho!
And safely we 'll go skipping."
But soon his neighbor said: "Nay, nay,
You're dry, and have your laugh,-
Heigh-ho!
While I catch all the dripping.

"Now this we'll try : Your head poke through,
And I will do the same,-
Heigh-iho!
There nothing could be better;
70






THE FAIR-MINDED MEN WHO WALKED TO DONAHAN 71

Now one umbrella' will serve for two,
And neither 'll be to blame,-
Heigh-ho!
If t' other gets the wetter."

And so they walked to Donahan,
Nor found the journey long,-
Heigh-ho!
Until they fell a-wheezing;
"The bargain 's honest, man to man,"
They said; "but something's wi'sr _.'"
Heigh-ho!
As on they went a-sneezing.





'/
'/ // '

































*-I


I '


A BROWN-STUDY.
















A BROWN STUDY

MOTHER said: "That 's all, dear. Now run outdoors and
play."
Father said the same;
And so I came.
But, somehow, they forget that I 'm growing every day.

A girl can't always frolic. Why, lambs are sometimes
still,
Though whenever they feel like it, they caper with a
will.
And birds may stop their singing while their hearts are
full of song.
I 've seen them look so solemn! And when the day is
long
They often hide among the boughs and think,-I 'in
sure they do;
I 've peered between the twitching leaves, and seen
them at it, too!

But if a girl stands still and thinks, the people always
say:
" As you 've nothing else to do, dear, why don't you go
and play?"
73






74 A BROWN STUDY

Well, all I know is this: It 's nice
To jumpl the rope, and skip and swing, or skate on
winter ice;
It 's nice to romp with other girls and laugh as well
as they,-
But not to-day.

Dear me! How sweet and bright it is, this lovely,
lovely Earth!
And not a thing upon it dreams how much it 's really
worth.
Except the folks. They calculate and set themselves
quite high;
Oh, my !

You dear, good sky, to bend so soft and kind above
us all!
It's queer to think this great wide world is nothing
but a ball
,..1..1?, they say, through space;-
(How does it keep its place"?
None of my business, I suppose.)--I wonder if the
brook
Is full to-day. It 's early yet; I guess I '11 go and
look.









"A MISS IS AS GOOD AS A MILE"


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''Z


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OUT OF THE SKY


"0 BIRD of the sky,
How far you can fly,-
And all in a minute!
You 've been to the sky,
Away up so high,
And know all that 's in it;
You 've pierced with your flight
Its wonderful light -
What makes it so blne?
Now tell me, oh do,
Little singer!"

The bird stopped a while
To rest on a stile,
With mosses upon it;
76






OUT OF THE SKY


And ere very long,
He poured forth a song
As sweet as a sonnet.
But never a word
My waiting ear heard,
Why the sky was so blue,
Though he told all he knew-
Stupid singer!

I went in to look
For the facts in a book,
All told to a letter;
Yet somehow it seemed
(Though maybe I dreamed)
The bird told it better.
Oh, never a word
My willing ear heard,
Why the sky was so blue,
Yet lie told me quite true
Knowing singer !













MY DOG


I LOVE my dog a beautiful dog,
Brave and alert for a race;
Ready to frolic with baby or man;
Dignified, too, in his place.

I like his bark,--a resonant bark,
Musical, honest and deep;
And his swirling tail and his shaggy coat
And his sudden, powerful leap.

Never a smug little pug for me,
Nor a Spitz with treacherous snap!
Never a trembling, pattering hound,
Nor a poodle to live on my lap!

No soft-lined basket for bed has Jack,
Nor bib, nor luxurious plate;
But our open door, that he guards so well,
And the lawn are his royal state.

No dainty leading-ribbon of silk
My grand, good dog shall fret;
No golden collar needs he to show
He 's a very expensive pet;







MY DOG


But just my *-i voice :. i a .'11
His bound at my .-1 _I- -i ._,.
And the faith when we ]iJ,,: iu each othel's eyes
Proclaim that ny 1. is mine.

Hie never was carried in arms -. a bhale,
Nor *.h .'._ like a '. all 1,
For he .' ,- U nows he s a k1. .I ,i ;--
And I 'm nnot that sort of a -'.








: *'-; 1 ,, .
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:t~""L'Wd~Jak


















I KNOW A LITTLE MAIDEN


I KNow a little maiden who
can knit and who can
sew;
C 'i Who can tuck her little
Spetticoat, and tie a
S'pretty bow;
Si She can give the thirsty
window-plants a cool-
ing drink each day,
And dust the pretty sit-
:. ting-room, and drive
the flies away.
She can bring Papa his dressing-gown, and warm his
slippers well,
And lay the plates and knives and forks, and ring the
supper-bell;
Sh'. can learn her lessons carefully, and say them with
a smile,
Then put away her books and slate and atlas, in a
pile;







I KNOW A LITTLE MAIDEN


She can feed the bright canary, and put water in his
cage;
And soothe her little brother when he flies into a 1 ,-..
She can dress and tend her dollies like a mother, day
or night,-
Indeed, one half the good she does I cannot now recite.
And yet there are some tli;.-, I 'in told, this maiden
cannot do.
She cannot say an ugly word, or one that is not true;-
Who can this little maiden be ? I wonder if it 's you.














A NEW SONG TO
AN OLD TUNE

"You are old, my dear dea-
con," the schoolma'am re-
marked,
"And studies with youth pass
away;
Yet you' 're quite in ad-
vance of the books, I am
sure,-
Now tell me the reason, I
pray."

"In the days of my youth,"
the good deacon replied,
"I was fleetest of foot in
my set;
And I ran on ahead of my
studies so fast
That they 've never caught
up with me yet."











IN A BREEZE


S-..


THERE once was a man with a sneeze,
Who always would sit in a breeze.
When begged to take shelter
He'd cry: I should swelter!"
And straightway go on with his sneeze.






83

















>7)


!'<> /






INTERNATIONAL
SHE came from a round black dot on the map,-
This dear little girl, and she 's called a Jap.
Maybe my sister will show it to you: -
The very place where this little girl grew.






INT'RNATIONIAL


I w>sh she knew some American v.<.r1-.
Saeh as "'tHow ido ', do ? and '" -," and birds."
I .i ilke to .'._ \.,.:, her ever so nuchli-
But she ean't --; a 'lilmi that I -.iv from Dutch.

,- 1, o lr dilfies will get us acquainted to-day
If shle "1, come out in the Park to play!
If it waere not for i.. i:'.-" and taking their hands,
We i.1 never know people from foreign lands.










SURPRISE

WTHAT was the moon a-spying
Out of her half-shut eye"?
One of her stt.rs went flying
Across the broad bluo sky.




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