• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Acknowledgement
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Organization
 Teacher certification
 Vocational office education (directing...
 Vocational office education (block...
 Sample integrated units
 Forms
 Bibliography
 Back Cover














Group Title: Florida. State Dept. of Education. Bulletin
Title: Vocational office education in Florida high schools
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082740/00001
 Material Information
Title: Vocational office education in Florida high schools
Series Title: Florida. State Dept. of Education. Bulletin
Physical Description: ii, 124 p. : forms. ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Business and Distributive Education Section
Publisher: Unknown
s.n.
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1968
Copyright Date: 1968
Edition: Rev.
 Subjects
Subject: Office practice -- Study and teaching -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Bibliography: p. 111-124.
General Note: "Revision ... developed in a two-week workshop at King High School, in Tampa, Florida, June 13-24, 1966."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082740
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 00144049
lccn - 71629663

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Foreword
        Page i
    Acknowledgement
        Page ii
    Table of Contents
        Page iii
    Introduction
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    Organization
        Page 13
    Teacher certification
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Vocational office education (directing time)
        Page 15a
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Vocational office education (block time)
        Page 19a
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
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        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
    Sample integrated units
        Page 54a
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    Forms
        Page 71a
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
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        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    Bibliography
        Page 110a
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
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    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text





BULLETIN 73H-5...REVISION


JULY, 1968











VOCATIONAL

OFFICE

..o EDUCATION

in

FLORIDA

HIGH SCHOOLS


THE STATE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION


State Superintendent


TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA








BULLETIN 73H-5 ...Revised


JULY, 1968


VOCATIONAL
OFFICE
EDUCATION
in
FLORIDA
HIGH SCHOOLS


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL,
TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION

CARL W. PROEHL, Assistant Superintendent


BUSINESS and DISTRIBUTIVE
EDUCATION SECTION

JOSEPH R. BARKLEY, Director


0 sompalor









. 17r3 N-&
'7














FOREWORD

Vocational Office Education was initiated in Florida in 1961 as a
specially designed program predicated on three definitive purposes:

1. To identify and select students who have employment in
the office:occupations as a career objective

2. To guide these students through a planned and meaningful
sequence of experiences leading to their career objective

3. To provide concentrated training in a block-of-time
concept which will result in an occupational competency

The purposes.-are implemented through two separate but inter-
related approaches:

S a. Vocational Office educationn (Directing Time)

b. Vocational Office Education (Block-Time)

It is essential that the selection of one or both approaches for any
given community be based upon a carefully devised employment survey
in order to establish definite need.
The guide explains the organisatnea, administration, and operation
of the program in addition to providing suggested student experiences
and teaching techniques. Flexibility in scheduling activities and
instructional ingenuity is both permitted and encouraged.















i
A


















ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


This first revision of an administrative-teachlng guide for Vocational
Office Education in Florida High Schools was developed in a two-week work-
shop at King High School, in Taapa, Florida, Jtme 13 24, 1966.

Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following workshop participants
for invaluable assistance and cooperation:

Mrs. Irma Blankinship Hillsborough High School, Tampa

Mrs. Frederica Clark Blake High School, Tampa

Miss Sharon Coker King High School, Tampa

Mrs. Jacqueline Colson Supervisor, Business Education
Hillaborough County, Tampa

Mrs. Charlotte Cottingham Brandon High School, Brandon

Mrs. Glenn Hiers Robinson High School, Tampa

Mrs. Grace Pelaez Jefferson High School, Tampa

Miss Lucy Robinson Curriculum Specialist
Business Education
State Department of Education
Tallahassee

Mrs. Marguerite Starford King High School, Tampa

Appreciation is extended also to the vocational office education
teachers, county supervisors of business education, and others who
contributed helpful suggestions and materials.










TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

Foreword 1

Acknowledgements ii


Introduction 1
Organization 13
Teacher Certification 14


Vocational Office Education (Directing Time) 16

Responsibilities of the Directing Teacher 16
Suggested Sequences 18
Sample Schedule 19


Vocational Office Education (Block Time) 20

Objectives 21
Operation 21
Student Prerequisites and Requirements 22
Facilities 23
Office Machines and Equipment 24
Instructional Materials, Aids, References, Supplies 25
Suggested Program Outline 26


Sample Integrated Units 55

One day 59
One week 64


Forms 72


Bibliography








VOCATIONAL OFFICE EDUCATION


Introduction

The Vocational Office Education programs should be composed of
meaningful sequences of experiences which will result in an occupational
competency. The term "occupational competency" refers not only to busi-
ness skills at a level in keeping with the demands of the businessman
but also to a broad basic education and understanding of our economic
society.

Vocational Office Education should serve youth and the employment
needs in any given community. The youths who are entering the labor
market for the first time should possess the basic skills for entry-level
positions and sufficient background and knowledge to lead toward promo-
tion in an occupational family. Vocational Office Education programs
must provide for students who have chosen the office occupations as their
career objective.

The skilled, trained and vocationally certified professional busi-
ness educator shall work cooperatively with guidance counselors and school
administrators to make available and interpret a broad variety of voca-
tional and occupational information to students. Opportunities must be
provided to identify, select, and guide students through a planned and
meaningful sequence of courses and experiences.


Criteria for Secondary School Vocational Office Education

A comprehensive office education program on the high school level
should reflect:

1. Provision for efficient instruction with occupational com-
petencies as an expected outcome. Emphasis should be upon
programs designed to meet job requirements, not upon indi-
vidual courses.

2. Evidences of flexibility in the programs offered, both in
terms of ability groupings and in the time element allotted
to the learning of the occupational skills, understandings,
and knowledge.

3. Indication that the faculty is constantly studying and evalu-
ating the offerings and outcomes in terms of occupational
needs as well as educational objectives.









4. That the staff is personally acquainted with the operation
of the local business offices. This allows for examples in
the classroom of local application as well as hypothetical
ones presented in textbooks.

5. A yearly follow-up of the graduates who are employed aad the
compiled results being used for planning future progress In
addition to becoming a part of Iudividual student folders for
reference purposes.

6. Evidence of a great umber of application nad problea-solv$g
situations in which students Iplement skills and knowledge
learned. This itplies the use of an office laeratory which
allow for probl e-solving sessions ead adequate equipment
for testing the suggested solutions by coaplettg Sategrated
office projects.

7. Evidence that previously learned skills are integrated into
a realistic office situation through a simulated office org*
animation within the classroos and/or asetal work paeriaee
similar to the Work-*4Wy or Work-l-Week plusan pleyes ts
some schools.

8. Bsineses machines being used as tools il the laberatey VtIA
which practical problems we solved in profermse to rely
developing a working proficiency as to opaation.

9. Instructioa relative to the autmited office. This should
be an orentattin to the subject of electronic data processing
and its effect on the office ccupatioss.








Criteria for the selection of Stenographic Studentsl


Why Criteria?

There is an acute shortage of competent stenographic and
secretarial employees. ..These criteria provide guidelines
of minimal qualifications for potential secretarial success.

What do they provide?

Objective criteria to aid in selecting qualified students
to enter a high school stenographic-secretarial program.

Who developed them?

Professional secretaries, management personnel, and busi-
ness education teachers in cooperation with The National Secre-
taries Association. Each group consisted of approximately 200.
Responses from 37 states, 3 Canadian provinces, and the territory
of Puerto Rico.

How?

Participants were requested to rank in the order of importance
criteria they felt to be essential for the selection of prospective
students.



THESE ARE DEPENDABLE CRITERIA

CRITERIA NO. 1

The students must have the ABILITY to develop stenographic-secretarial
skills.

Ranked as most important by all groups is the realization
that a student about to enter the stenographic-secretarial
S curriculum must possess a certain ability or aptness. This
competency can be measured in part by clerical and business
aptitude tests such as the Minnesota Clerical Test. It can
also be demonstrated by the individual student's rating on
many of the following guidelines.

,CRITERION NO. 2

The student must have an INTEREST in the secretarial profession.

Ranked directly after ability is interest. All-groups are
aware that ability and interest are of prime importance.
Note, however, that interest and desire are modified by
ability. They are not enough within themselves and should


!Prepared for the World Council of Secretaries by the National
Secretaries Association (International)







not be considered before the ability to develop skills. A
recommended interest profile is the Strong Vocational
Interest Blank. Interest may also be measured by past
curriculum choices.

CRITERION NO. 3

The student must demonstrate AMBITION and INITIATIVE.

The desire to do well, the eagerness to perform efficiently,
and the faculty of self-reliance are important to the success
of the student entering the stenographic curriculum--just as
they are to the person already in the field. The student
must be able to "do things without continuously being told."
Skills must be developed-and the student must be enterprising
enough to do her part in their development.

CRITERION NO. 4

The student must be a RESPONSIBLE person.

Could you depend on the student to do a job for you?
Reliability in competing tasks entrusted,by an employer
ranks high among the factors needed in a stenographic
position. A degree of self-confidence (comparable to
the student's age) regarding her work now might prove a
measure of her self-assurance and dependability in the
future.

CRITERION NO. 5

The student must have average skills in READING,
WRITING, ARITHMETIC, and TYPEWRITING as measured by standardized
TESTS.r

Specialized skills are bes, built on a solid foundation
of basic skills! A "below average" student is already on
shaky ground. Standardized tests, such as the Iowa Tests
of Basic Skills, administered correctly, can supply valuable
information about the student's present scholastic accomplish-
ment and help predict future achievement.

CRITERION NO. 6

The student must demonstrate GOOD HUMAN RELATIONS.

Personal skills are ranked next in order after academic and
technical skills. Does the student "get along" with others?
Some employees lose their jobs because they find this aspect
of a secretarial career difficult. An office staff :wrks-as
a team.

CRITERION NO. 7

The student must have the ability to SPEAK CORRECTLY.

Thoughts and ideas expressed correctly and articulately are
important in today's business world--and will be even more










important in the future. Consider the number of contacts
and transactions done completely by telephone.

CRITERION NO. 8

The student must have GOOD GROOMING HABITS.

A person's very first impression of another is based on
personal appearance. An employee often makes that first
impression for hbi company.

CRITERION NO. 9

The student must have a GOOD ATTENDANCE RECORD.

What degree of success can be expected in school-especially
during the development of skill subjects--or on the job, if
excessive absence or tardiness is present? Good attendance
and punctuality are a necessity.

CRITERION NO. 10

The student must have a GRADE POINT AVERAGE 0F AT LEAST "C" for all
previous course work.

Results of course work in grades 7, 8, and 9 can be used to
predict senior high school success. Grades in related junior
high school courses such as typewriting and general business
should be given special attention.

Continued advancement is based on continued education. The
secretary must be a good student.


Employment Outlook

Employment in clerical occupations is expected to rise very rapidly
during the 1965-75 decade. As employment rises to meet the needs of an
expanding -economy, it is anticipated that more than 300,000 new positions
in clerical and related occupations will be added each year. Employment
opportunities will be particularly numerous for workers who handle paper-
work in the offices of private and public organizations--for secretaries
and stenographers, typists, and bookkeeping and accounting clerks, for
example. These workers will be needed particularly in banks and insurance
companies, both of which are expected to continue to expand rapidly; in
manufacturing establisbbents and in wholesale and retail Arade; and in
government offices, educational institutions, and Vprob aional service
organizations.

The number of clerical and related Jobs is expected to increase
mainly because the volume of paperwork willL undoubtedly expand as busi-
ness organizations grow in size and complexity. On the other hand, more
and more mechanical equipment will undoubtedly be used to speed the process
of keeping business records, particularly in large cities, and in some of
these offices, the number of clerical employees may be reduced.









For the economy as a whole, however, the new positions created by
growth are expected to far outnumber the clerical jobs eliminated by
mechanization. Furthermore, many types of clerical workers are in
jobs unlikely to be materially affected by mechanization, e.g. secre-
taries, receptionists, people responsible for collecting bills and
handling complaints, and others whose duties bring them into contact
with the public and require them to exercise initiative and judgment.

Some of the occupational classifications for which vocational
officeei'ducation students may be trained are:

20 STENOGRAPHY, TYPING, FILING, RtLATED OCCUPATIONS'

This division includes occupations concerned with making,
classifying, and filing records, including written communications

201 iSecretaries
This group includes occupations concerned with carrying out
minor administrative and general office duties in addition to
taking and transcribing dictation. ..

201.368 Secretary (clerical)
girl Friday--secretarial stenographer

202. Stenographers
This groop includes occupations concerned with taking shorthead
or speedwtiting notes by hand or machine and transcribing then

203, Typists
This group includes occupations concerned with recording data
by means of a typewriter.

204. Correspondence Clerks
This group Iceludes occupations concerned with composing corre-
spondence apd related items for the purpose of obtaiinig or giving
information.

206, File Clerks
This group includes occupations concerned with classifying,
Sorting, and filing corresponde0ce, records, and other data.

207. Duplicating-MNahine Operators
This gzmap includes ocOcpations concerned with making copies
of data by means of machines. Machinesefrequently used are:

207.782 Duplicating-Machine Operator (clerical) III
Dittp Machine Operator (clerical)
Mimeograph Operator (cleripal)
Offset-.)plicating-sachtie Operator (clerical)
Typewriter Operator, Automatic (clerical)

207.885 Dupliaeting-Machine Operator (clerical) IV
The'rI fak Operator (clerical)

208. Miscellaneous Office Machine Operators
This group includes occupations, not elsewhere classified,
concerned with recording data by machine.










208.138 Transcribing Operator, Head (clerical)


208.588 Transcribing-Machine Operator (clerical)
dictating-machine transcriber
dictating-machine typist

21 COMPUTING AND ACCOUNT-RECORDING OCCUPATIONS

This division includes occupations concerned with systematizing
information about transactions and activities into accounts and quanti-
tative records, and paying and receiving money.

210. Bookkeepers
This group includes occupations concerned with computing, classi-
fying, and recording numerical data to keep sets of financial records com-
plete. Occupations concerned primarily with bookkeeping machines, com-
puting machines, and account-recording machines are included in Groups 215,
216, and 217 respectively.

213. Automatic Data-Processing-Equipment Operators
This group includes occupations concerned with electronic and
electro-mechanical machines that record, store, process, and transcribe
data from punchcards, paper tape, magnetic tape, or other sources; solve
mathematical, engineering, or technical problems; keep records; or
supply information. Includes machines that transcribe data to ot from
punchcards or tape for use in automatic data-processing equipment.

213.582 Key-Punch Operator (clerical)

213.588 Data Typist (clerical)

214. Billing Machine Operators
This group includes occupations concerned with operating billing
machines with or without computing devices to keep accounts and prepare
statements, bills and invoices.

215. Bookkeeping-Machine Operators
This group includes occupations concerned with operating book-
keeping machines to copy and post data, make computations, and/or com-
pile records of transactions.

215.488 Pay Roll Clerk (clerical)

216. Computing-Machine Operators
This group includes occupations concerned with operating
adding or calculating machines to perform arithmetic operations.
Occupations concerned with computing by automatic-data processing
equipment are included in Group 213.

216.488 Adding-Machine Operator (clerical)

216.488 Calculating-Machine Operator (clerical)









DEFINITIONS OF TITLES

SECRETARY (clerical) 201.638. girl Friday; secretarial stenographer.

Schedules appoifthents, gives information to callers, takes
dictation, and otherwise relieves officials of clerical work
and minor administrative and business detail; Reads and routes
incoming mail. Locates and attaches appropriate file to corre-
spohdence to be answered by employer. Takes dictation in
shorthand. ..and transcribes notes on typewriter, or tran-
scribes from voice recordings. . .Composes and types routine
correspondence. Files correspondence and other records. Answers
telephone and gives information to callers or routes call to appro-
priate official and places outgoing calls. Schedules appoint-
ments for employer. Greets visitors, ascertains nature of busi-
ness, and conducts visitors to _emooyer or appropriate person.
May not take dictation. May arrange travel schedule and reser-
vations. May compile and type statistical reports. May super-
vise clerical workers. May keep personnel records. May record
minutes of staff meetings.

STENOGRAPHER (clerical) 202.388. clerk-stenographer.

Takes dictation in shorthand of correspondence, reports, and
other matter, and -transcribes dictated material, using type-
writer. Performs variety of clerical duties except when working
in stenographic pool.
(Clerk, General Office). May transcribe material from sound
recording
(Transcribing-Machine Operator).

TRANSCRIBING-MACHINE OPERATOR (Clerical) 208.588. dictating-machine
transcriberr; dictating-machine typist.

Transcribes letters, reports, or other recorded data, using
transcribing (voice reproducing) machine and typewriter;
Positions record or tape on machine spindle and sets needle
on record, or threads tape through machine. Depresses pedal
to rotate record or tape. Turns dials to control volume, tone,
and speed of voice reproduction. Types message heard through
earphones. Reads chart prepared by dictator to determine length
of message and c*aceetions to be made. May type unrecorded
information such as name, address, and date. May keep file of
records. .May receive and route callers (Receptionist).

CLERK-TYPIST (clerical) 209.388

Performs general clerical work requiring use of typewriter in
majority of duties; Compiles and types reports, bills, appli-
cation forms, shipping tickets, and other matter from clerical
records. Files records and reports, posts information to
records, sorts and distributes mail, answers telephone, and
performs similar duties. Computes amounts using 4ading machine.








CLERK, GENERAL (clerical) 209.388 office clerk, routine


Performs any combination of following and similar clerical tasks
not requiring knowledge of systems or procedures: Writes or
types bills, statements, receipts, checks, or other documents,
copying information from one record to another. Proofreads
records of forms. Counts, weighs, or measures material. Sorts
and files records, Receives money from customers and deposits
money in bank. Addresses envelopes or packages by hand or with
typewriter or addressograph machine. Answers telephone, conveys
messages, and runs errands. Stamps, sorts, and distributes mail.
Stamps or numbers forms by hand or machine. Operates office
duplicating equipment.

OFFICE BOY (Girl) (clerical) 230.878

Performs any combination of the following duties in business
office of workers with clerical supplies. Opens, sorts, and
distributes incoming mail, and collects, seals, and stamps out-
going mail. Delivers oral or written messages. Collects and
distributes paperwork, such as records or time cards, from one
department to another. Marks, tabulates, and files articles and
records. May use office equipment, such as envelope-sealing
machine, letter opener, record shaver, stamping machine, and
transcribing machine. May be known according to specific task
performed as Mail Boy. Feminine title: Office Girl.

FILE CLERK (clerical) I. 206.388

Files correspondence, cards, invoices, receipts, and other records
in alphabetical or numerical order, or according to subject matter,
phonetic spelling, or other system: Reads incoming material and
sorts according to file system. Places material in file cabinet,
drawers, boxes, or in special filing cases. Locates and removes
material from files when requested. Keeps records of material
removed, stamps material received, traces missing file folders,
and types indexing information on folders. May enter date on
records. May be designated .

FILE CLERK (clerical) II. 206.388

Performs essentially the same duties as File Clerk I except that
in addition to putting material in and removing it from file,
performs clerical work in searching and investigating information
contained in files, inserting additional data in file records,
making up reports, and keeping files current, which may require
making calculations and supplying written information from file
data. Classified material when classification is not readily
discernible (Classification Clerk). Disposes of obsolete files
in accordance with established retirement schedule or legal
requirements. May operate keypunch or enter data on tabulating
cards. May photograph records on microfilming devices. May
type records. May use calculating machine. May be designated. .








CLASSIFICATION CLERK (clerical) coding file clerk,
Classifies materials according to subject matter and
assigns numbers or symbols from predetermined coding
system to facilitate accurate filing and reference:
Reads or observes correspondence, reports, drawings,
and other materials to be filed to determine subject
matter. Ascertains specified number of symbol, using
code book or chart, and marks or stamps code on
material. Assigns cross-indexing numbers of subject
matter should be classified and filed under more than
one heading.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (clerical) III. 207.782

Sets up and operates duplicating machine to print typewritten
or handwritten matter directly from master copy: Places master
copy on drum of machine and blank paper in feed tray. Adjusts
machine for speed, size paper, and flow of process liquid to
moistening pad and transfers image from master copy onto copy sheet.
May type or draw diagram to prepare original copy. May be desig-
nated according to trade name of machine operated as Ditto-
Machine Operator.

DUPLICATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (clerical) IV. 207.885

Reproduces handwritten or typewritten matter using duplicating
machine: Places original copy on glass plate in machine.
Places blank paper on loading tray. Sets control switch for
number of copies. Image of original is transferred to blank paper
by photographic and static electricity process. May clean and
repair machine. May be designated according to trade name of
machine operated as Thermofax Operator; Xerox-Machine Operator.

MIMEOGRAPH OPERATOR (clerical) 207.782

Operates machine to reproduce handwritten or typewritten matter
from stencil; Pours ink into cylinder reservoir and turns cylinder
lever to distribute ink on ink pad. Attaches stencil to cylinder
of machine. Selects paper according to color, size, weight, and
quality specified, and loads paper onto feed tray. Sets gauges
and dial controls to adjust paper feed and cylinder speed, and
starts machine. Assembles and staples printed copies. Removes
stencil from machine, and cleans and files stencil for reuse.
Cleans and oils machine, replaces ink pads. May cut stencils,
using typewriter, or trace stencil by hand. May reproduce copies
on facsimile machine. May record number and kind of copies made.
May operate machine by turning cylinder manually.

CALCULATING-MACHINE OPERATOR (clerical) 216.488 calculator operator

Computes and records statistical accounting and other numerical
data, using machine that automatically performs mathematical
processes, such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, division,
and extraction of roots: Presses keys and moves levers to feed









data into machine. Posts results to records, such as inventories,
payrolls, invoices, and summary sheets. May verify computations
made by other workers. May be designated according to trade name
of machine used, as Computer Operator. May be designated according
to type of computations made as Weight Calculator (ship and boat
bid. & rep.). May be designated according to subject matter as
Extension Clerk; Formula Figurer (paint 6 yarn); Pay-Roll-Machine
Operator; Premium-Note Interest-Calculator Clerk (insurance); Toll-
Adding Clerk (tel. & tel.).

ADDING-MACHINE OPERATOR (clerical) 216.488.

Performs addition and subtraction, using electrically driven or
levet-operated machine that automatically performs computations
and records results, usually on paper tape. Copies figures onto
records or reports. May verify and record totals of items on batch
sheets and be designated Batch Clerk (banking). May sort, list,
total, and recapitulate batches of clearings for distribution to
other banks and be designated Out-Clearing Clerk (banking).

BOOKKEEPER (clerical) I. 210.388. full-charge bookkeeper; general
bookkeeper.

Keeps records of financial transactions of establishment: Verifies
and enters details of transactions as they occur or in chronological
order in account and cash journals freo items such' as sales slipp,
invoices, check stubs, inventory records, and requisitions. Suianrizes
details on separate ledgers, using adding machine, and transfers data
to general ledger. Balances books and compiles reports to show sta-
tistics, such as cash receipts and expenditures, accounts payable and
receivable, profit and loss, and other items pertinent to operation of
business. Calculates e ployee ikiEron plant records or timecards
and makes up checks or withdraws cash from bank for payment of wages.
May prepare withholding, Social Security, and other tax reports. May
compute, type, and mail monthly statements to customers. May complete
books to or through trial balance. May operate calculating and book-
keeping machines.

GENERAL-LEDGER BOOKKEEPER (clerical).
Compiles and posts in general ledgers information or summaries
concerning various business transactions that have been recorded
in separate ledgers by other ~lefks.

BOOKKEEPER (clerical) II. 210.388.

Keeps one section of set of financial records, performing duties
as described under Bookkeeper I. May be designated according to
section of bookkeeping recordaskept, such as Accounts-Payable
Bookkeeper; Accouate-Raceivable Bookkeeper.

BOOKKEEPING-MACHINE OPERATOR (clerical) I. 215.388. account clerk;
bookkeeper, machine; posting-machine operator; recording clerk.

Records complete set of recot#s of financial transactions of
establishment in same manner as Bookkeeper I, using bookkeeping









machine: Sorts documents to be posted, such as checks and
debit and credit items. Selects wnd places bookkeeping form
on writing surface of machine, and sets carriage. Depresses
keys of machine keyboard to record identifying headings and
data, and to calculate and post totals, net amounts, and other
computations. Verifies entries and summarizes and balances
totals to insure accuracy. Prepares periodic trial balances
and other statistical information as required. May operate
other office machines, such as adding and calculating machines.








































SDictionary of Occupational Titles, U. S. Department of Labor,
Volumes 1 and 2, 3rd Edition. 1965.








Organization


Counties interested in receiving a vocational instructional unit for
Vocational Office Education should follow a procedural policy adopted by
the State Board for Vocational Education.

Secure necessary forms from the Business and Distributive
Step 1 Education Section, State Department of Education, and
return to the Director for consideration.

Upon notification of tentative approval, submit on the
Step 2 appropriate form the number of vocational instructional
units desired for Vocational Office Education

Step 3 Establish the priority ranking of vocational units needed

Include in the County Planning Guide project proposals for
Step 4 the acquisition of needed equipment and instructional sup-
plies and materials

Thereafter, these proposals are studied intensively and those which appear
to have the most potential for contributing to county and state program
development may be developed into projects and submitted for funding sup-
port upon invitation from the Assistant Superintendent for Vocational,
Technical, and Adult Education.

Invitation to submit a project is not tantamount to approval, however.
Once a project has been studied, it is again reviewed and recommended by
the Assistant Superintendent for Vocational, Technical, and Adult Educa-
tion to the State Superintendent of Public Instruction for disposition.

Vocational instructional units will be granted by the state when it
has been certified that the following provisions essential to the program
have been met:

1. Minimum classroom facilities, including materials and equipment
are provided.

2. The program has met enrollment requirements of a minimum of
fifteen and a maximum of twenty students in each of two sections.

3. A well-qualified vocationally certified business education teacher
is employed to teach the courses.

4. An operating budget will be provided which includes funds for the
teacher to attend at least one out-of-county professional meeting
each year called by the State Department of Education. The budget
will also include funds to provide instructional materials, refer-
ence materials, and needed consumable supplies.

5. Provision should be made to ensure acquisition of additional
equipment indicative of community need as well as to provide
adequate maintenance and systematic equipment replacement.








Teacher Certification


The Florida State Department of Education sets up minimum requirements
for Ranks I, II, and III teaching certificates. Detailed requirements may
be found in the publication, Florida Requirements for Teacher Certification,
State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, Minimum requirements
for a Rank III certificate are:


Business Education (Broad Field)

1. A Bachelor's degree with a major in business education
(bookkeeping and stenography)

or

2. A Bachelor's degree with thirty (30) semester hours in
business education including the areas specified below:

a. Six (6) semester hours in accounting or bookkeeping
b. Six (6) semester hours in economics
c. Six (6) semester hours in shorthand
d. Four (4) semester hours in typewriting
e. Two (2) semester hours in business English
f. Two (2) semester hours in business law


Vocational Office Education

In order to qualify for the Graduate Certificate, Rank III,
covering Vocational Office Education, the applicant shall
meet the following requirements:

a. Satisfy all requirements for the Graduate
Certificate covering the broad field of secondary
business education

b. Furnish signed statements from employers or
other documentary evidence verifying specific
work experience of at least one year of full-time
employment in the same area to be taught

c. Present three (3) semester hours in principles or
philosophy of vocational education.

Vocational Office Education may be shown on a Provisional Graduate
Certificate covering secondary business education when the applicant has
satisfied the requirement for work experience and furnished documented
verification. (Section b.)4





Florida Requirements for Teacher Certification (Tallahassee: State
Department of Education, 1964), p. 119










Operation

The Florida State Plan for Vocational Education includes provisions
for three business and office education programs to operate in secondary
schools and for high school youths in area vocational-technical centers.
Two Vocational Office Education plans are identified in addition to the
Cooperative Business Education program.

This guide relates only to the two separate but interrelated approaches
through which vocational office education is implemented.

a. Vocational Office Education (Directing Time)
(Course Code # 0904)

b. Vocational Office Education (Block Time)
(Course Code # 749)
Secretarial Block (3 hours)
Clerical Block (2 hours)













---- COUNSELING -) --!


PLANNING


CHING










Vocational Office Education (Directing Time)


The high school business education curriculu must be adapted to
meet the constantly changing needs of society. Within a local com-
munity, consideration must be given to the mobility of the working
population, the expanded employment community, the rapid developments
in technological progress, and the dynamic nature of economic oppor-
tunities. In the development or modification of a business education
curriculum for a school, careful attention must be given to the fol-
lowing factors:

1. Surveys of community needs and student interests.

2. Socio-economic and vocational characteristics of
the community, including the expanded employment
community.

3. Suggestions from local advisory committees.

4. Placement records and follow-up studies of
graduates.

5. School size, teaching staff, facilities, and
equipment.

It is unwise for any school to follow a business education
curriculum developed in another school merely because of its appar-
ent success in that school.

The Vocational Office Education (Directing Time) Plan enables a
school to designate a directing teacher who, through released time
planning and conference periods, may assume responsibility for the
development of an efficient, realistic, and practical program geared
to the career objective of vocational office education students.


Responsibilities of the Directing Teacher

1. The directing teacher should work cooperatively with the
guidance department and school administration by providing
them with occupational information and educational require-
ments for clerical and stenographic workers, by helping each
student to recognize his special interests and aptitudes
through an interpretation of his school records, background,
and his inventory and test profile.

2. The directing teacher should work closely ith the guidance
department and school administration in the identification,
selection, and tracking of students for the vocational office
-"/ education program.










3. The directing teacher should know the factors which deter-
mine student identification, selection, and placement and
be able to define and explain the enrollment procedure to
all concerned.

4. The directing teacher should identify early the number of
students with a stated career objective in the office occu-
pations and the grade level of each.

5. The directing teacher should confer with parents about the
factors relating to vocational choice and career planning.

6, The directing teacher should identify the sequence of ex-
periences to be followed by vocational office education
students which lead to their stated career objective.

7. The directing teacher should review periodically with the
students their (a) career objectives, (b) achievement in
relationship to aptitude and ability, (c) personal and
social development, and (d) job performance record.

8. The directing teacher should confer with other business
education teachers about the purposes of the program,
identification and selection of students, any proposed
changes in planned sequences and/or course outlines,
standards of achievement, evaluation procedures and
the like, and progress of vocational office education
students.

9. The directing teacher should be responsible for equipment,
and instructional materials purchased with Federal funds
for use in the vocational office education program.

10. The directing teacher is responsible for maintaining accu-
rate and current student personnel records containing the
information listed for reporting, placement, and follow-up
purposes:

a. personal data b. scholastic information
c. test results d. career objectives
e. work experience f. extra-curricular activities

11, The directing teacher should maintain a current file of job
opportunities available to graduates.

12. The directing teacher should maintain a follow-up file of the
graduates from the vocational office education programs.










Suggested Sequences


To be classified as a Vocational Office Education student, it is
essential for that student to enroll in a minimum of two business educa-
tion classes daily in the planned sequence leading to his career object-
ive.

The Secretarial Sequence


Grade
12
12
12
11
11
10 or 11
9 or 10


Suggested Courses
Business English
Secretarial Office Practice
Shorthand II
Bookkeeping I
Shorthand I
Typewriting I
General Business


Length
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year


The Clerical Sequence


Suggested Courses
Clerical Office Practice
Office Machines (if not included in
Clerical Office Practice)
Introduction to Data Processing
Data Recording Devices
Business English

Bookkeeping I or Recordkeeping
Typewriting I
Business Mathematics


9 or 10 General Business


Length
1 Year

1 Year
Semester
Semester
1 Year


1 Year
1 Year
1 Semester or
1 Year
1 Year


The Bookkeeping Sequence


Suggested Courses
Bookkeeping
Office Practice, Clerical
Introduction to Data Processing


11 or 12 Business Law

11 or 12 Economics


Bookkeeping I
Typewriting I
Business Mathematics
General Business


Length
1 Year
1 Year
1 Semester or
1 Year
1 Semester or
1 Year
1 Semester or
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year


Grade


12
12
12
10, 11,
or 12
10 or 11
10 or 11


Grade


11 or
10 or
9 or
9 or












Automation and Data Processing Sequence


Grade Suggested Courses Length
12 Data Recording Devices 1 Semester
12 Introduction to Data Processing 1 Semester
11-12 Bookkeeping I 1 Year
11-12 Office Practice, Clerical (office
machines should be included in the course) 1 Year
10-11 Typewriting I 1 Year
10 Business Mathematics* 1 Year
9-10 General Business 1 Year

*The talented or above average students should elect an advanced
mathematics course if arithmetic skills are superior.



The Directing Teacher's Schedule (Example)

The following illustrates a high school directing teacher's sched-
ule in the business education department:

Period Subject
1 Clerical Office Practice
2 Shorthand II
3 Planning Period
4 Clerical Office Practice
5 VOE Directing Time
6 Shorthand II

It is conceivable that a directing teacher might work in a team teaching
situation with the Vocational Office Education (Block Time) instructor,
plus utilizing the released time periods, in lieu of the above schedule.
The following schedule illustrates such utilization of periods:

Period Subject
1 VOE Clerical
2 II 11
3 Planning Period
.4, Bookkeeping
5 VOE Directing Time
6 Shorthand



For more complete and detailed information pertaining to planned
sequences for the high school business education curriculum refer to
Bulletin 72: A Guide to Business Education in Florida Schools,
(Tallahassee: State Department of Education, 1967), Chapter 2,
pp. 27 45.



















CAPACITY



\ECRETARIAL Block (3 hrs.)
CLERICAL Block (2hrs)


CAPITAL









Vocational Office Education (Block Time)


Historical Development of Block Programming

Although the comprehensive study eo the use of block-tiam classes
by Grac Vright -~adicates that this trend is more widely fol4wed ti
junior high schools, there is a 4deCflte increase in the use of the
block time programs at the senior high school level. These programs
are alike in that they are designed to have classes meet for two or
more consecutive periods. But this is their only similar character-
istic. For eonpIe, Nelson tossifg at te 1058 convention of the
National Assoeiatile of Secondary Pri Sisls listed tfie different
ways of defining block scheduling. These are:5

1. Classes meeting for .-p br mere class periods and co,..
binding or replacing IS or more subjects required of
all students.

2. Each subjedscEtaJaiM t its datIty with consetiosly planned
or with no correlation.

3* Seabjecat iluded axr unified or fused around a central
theme or units of work or problems stemming from one or
more subject field,

4. Predetermined problem areas based upne the peraenal-secial
needs of adolescents determine the scope of Che Ions.
Subject matter is brought in as needed in working on problems.

9. ep* of the go lrea is not predetermined. Pupils and
teafhoe are Alee to select the problems upon which they
vish to work.

Therefore, it is not surprising to find experimental programs in
business education that meet for a daily block of time, but there the
similarity ends.

In January, 1960, Fred S. Cook6 predicted that an intensified
modern etcur lum in business education, including a clerical and
stemographic b)ck program of one year, would soon be in existence.
It is inter -Ix to $*te, by looking at several different experi-
mental programs in business education in existence at the present
time, that this prediction has proven valid.



4Grace S. Wright, "Block-Time Classes and the Core Progra in the
Junior High School," Bulletin No. 6, 1958, p. 2, U. S. Dept. of Education.

5Nelson L. BDssing, "What are the Trends in Providing for Block-
Time Classes is Teday's Curriculum," A prepared address presented before
the 43rd Annual ConVention, p. 97, National Association of Secondary Principals.

6Fred S. Cook, "Wanted! A Modern Business Education Curriculum,"
Business Education Forum, Vol 14, No. 4, January, 1960, pp. 21-22.









Definition


The Vocational Office Education (Block Time) Plan is a specialized
instructional method designed for high school seniors, consisting of a
three-hour block for secretarial students and a two-hour block for cleri-
cal students, which provides training consisting of organized classroom
learning experiences in specific office activities. This approach trains
students to refine proficiency in skills needed to secure employment in
office occupations immediately following graduation. The Vocational
Office Education teacher coordinates and integrates advanced business
education subjects in a planned sequence of activities to provide the
student with an understanding of the relationships of the course content
to office occupations.


Obj ectives

The primary objective of this approach is to prepare students voca-
tionally to take their place in business as secretarial and/or clerical
workers. Specific objectives are:

1. To present, develop, and refine the required skills
necessary for job competency

2. To instill a sense of pride in office occupations and
develop wholesome attitudes toward work and learning

3. To relate learning and understandings in the classroom
to actual job situations

4. To teach participants the importance of cooperation
through actual work situations

5, To provide opportunities for students to develop an
ability to solve problems which might arise in every-
day business activities

6. To help students develop personality traits desirable
in the office positions: accuracy, neatness, promptness,
dependability, honesty, loyalty, and ability to follow
directions.

7. To encourage each student through individual attention
to develop his abilities to the highest degree


Operation

The program should be an integral part of the business education
department and the Vocational Office Education instructor and department
chairman should work closely in the following operational phases;

1. A committee, which may include the Vocational Office
Education instructor, the business education department
chairman, and the guidance counselor or principal, will
select the students assigned to this program.










2. Two tenths (.2) of a unit is allocated for each hour of
the block program offered; i.e., six tenths (.6) for the
three-hour secretarial block and four tenths (.4) for
the two-hour clerical block.

3. Each section will contain integrated units of work to
emphasize the secretarial or general clerical areas of
office occupations.

4. Credits will be earned for satisfactory completion of
the subject for each classroom period. The secretarial
student will receive credit for business English, office
practice, and second-year shorthand. The clerical student
will receive credit for business English and office prac-
tice. Students achieving a satisfactory rating on the
National Business Entrance Test in all subjects in their
particular block will be eligible to receive a Certificate
of Proficiency awarded by the National Business Education
Association.

5. Each section will be limited to a maximum of 20 students
and a minimum of 15.

6. Classes will meet daily during the regular school year.
(A yearly enrollment report must be filed at the beginning
of the school year, a yearly attendance report at the end
of the year, and a program follow-up form.)

7. Students permitted to enroll simultaneously in both Voca-
tional Office Education and Cooperative Business Education
in schools offering these programs should be reported for
only one of them.


Student Prerequisites and Requirements

Secretarial Block

1. Vocational Office Education classes are restricted to seniors.

2. Students should be planning to enter the field of office
occupations or to pursue a career in business education or
business administration.

3. It is preferable to have students apply a year in advance
to take VOE.

4. Scholarship, attendance, prognostic test scores, dependa-
bility, honesty, and willingness to work should be taken
into consideration when students make application to enroll.

5. Secretarial students must enroll in the entire three-hour
block. They are not permitted to enroll in any single sub-
ject unit of the program.









6. Secretarial students must have earned at least one unit
in typewriting and one unit in shorthand prior to enter-
ing the program. (It is recommended that Typewriting II
be taken one year previously or be taken concurrently.)

7. Students should have at least a C average in Shorthand I,
Typewriting I, and all previous English courses.

Clerical Block

1. Vocational Office Education classes are restricted to
seniors.

2. Students should be planning to enter the field of office
occupations or pursue a career in business education or
business administration.

3. Scholarship, attendance, prognostic test scores, dependa-
bility, honesty, and willingness to work should be taken
into consideration.

4. Clerical students must enroll for the two-hour block. They
are not permitted to enroll in any single subject unit of
the program.

5. Clerical students must have earned at least one unit in
typewriting prior to entering the program. One unit in
bookkeeping or recordkeeping must have been taken previous-
ly or be taken concurrently. (If Bookkeeping II and Type-
writing II are offered in the school, it is recommended
that the above-average clerical student enroll in either
or both of these courses.)


FACILITIES

Classroom

Classroom facilities must provide adequate work space and furniture
to simulate actual office conditions. Minimum standards as indicated in
the current Accreditation Standards in Florida Schools must be met. In
addition to bulletin boards, chalkboards, filing cabinets, and :acessary
tables and chairs, the following should be provided:

An ample number of electrical outlets through the use of
plugmolding, or individual outlets for each work station
where an electrically powered machine will be operated

A lavatory which is easily accessible (preferably in the
classroom)

At least one secretarial desk and posture chair per student

An adequate amount of storage space










Facilities, physical layout, and equipment are fully covered in
Bulletin 72: A Guide to Business Education in Florida Schools.
(Tallahassee: State Department of Education, 1967), Chapter IV,
pp. 137-153.

Office Machines and Equipment

The following is a minimum list of equipment which should be made
available in the classroom, Selection should be indicative of community
usage.

20 L-shaped desks

20 adjustable posture chairs

20 typewriters of various makes, preferably elite type. (at least
half of these are to be electric typewriters)

1 filing cabinet

1 electric full-keyboard adding machine

2 electric ten-key adding machines

2 electric or electronic rotary calculators

2 printing calculators

4 transcribing machines with adaptors (multi listening
units) preferred

1 stencil duplicator

1 fluid process duplicator

1 mimeoscope (illuminated drawing board)

1 set of styli and lettering guides

1 paper cutter with guard--at least 19" x 18"

1 stapler and staple remover

1 interval timer

1 stop watch

Additional desirable equipment, such as the following, shall be pro-
vided when possible:

1 posting machine (Clerical Block)

1 long-carriage typewriter (elite type preferred)

1 key-driven calculator (may be reconditioned)








1 photocopy machine

1 EDL Projector (rapid reader for shorthand and typewriting)

1 collating rack

1 postal scale

1 telephone (teletrainer may be used)

Additional models of electric typewriters, adding machines,
calculators, transcribing machines, and other equipment.


Instructional Materials, Audio-Visual Aids, Reference, and Supplies

It is recommended that the following should be made available for
classroom use:

tape recorder secretaries' handbooks

record player shipping and railroad guides

projectors plane, rail, bus, ship
(overhead, film, and filmstrip) timetables

postal zip code guides Hotel Redbook

reference books dictation tapes or records

unabridged dictionary filing sets

regular dictionaries workbooks

telephone directories- practice sets
classified (city) and others
necessary consumable
Atlas supplies (see p. 13, #4)

World Almanac










SUGGESTED PROGRAM OUTLINE


This is a brief outline of the integrated skill subjects offered
in the Vocational Office Education program. Immediately following, a
suggested course content for each subject is listed.

Part I INTRODUCTION AND DESCRIPTION

A. Program Orientation

1. The three hour secretarial block

2. The two hour clerical block

B. Relationship of Vocational Education to General Education

C. Overall Objectives

D. Classroom Procedure and Management

1. Preliminary instruction for using and caring for
equipment

a. Machines

b. Furnishings

2. Materials

a. Textbooks and manuals

b. Supplies

Part II EVALUATING THE STUDENT

A. Pre-testing

1. Business English

2. Personality and aptitude (Civil Service)

3. Shorthand and transcription (Byers Shorthand Aptitude Test)
(ERC Stenographic Aptitude Test
for Shorthand)
(Turse Prognostic Tests)

4. Typewriting see p. 192, Bulletin 72

B. Evaluate pre-testing

1. Student discovers what he already knows

2. Teacher discovers what student needs to learn








Part III REVIEW OF SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES

A. Business English

1. Vocabulary and sentence structure

2. Oral and written communication

3. Grammar

4. Punctuation and capitalization

5. Abbreviations and Figures

B, Shorthand and Transcription (Secretarial Block only)

1. Theory

2. Brief Forms and phrases

3. Transcribing from material dictated

C. Typewriting

1. Electric

2. Manual

Part IV NEW MATERIAL

A. Business English

1. Composing Business Letters

2. Types of Business Letters

a. Everyday Business Letters

b. Letters for Problem Situations

c. Letters that Sell

d. Other Business Communications

3. Speaking for Business

B. Office Practice

1. Acquaint student with machines and equipment that are
available.

a. Adding

b. Calculating










c. Duplicating

d. Transcribing

e. Electric and Manual Typewriters

2. Teach related areas

a. Filing

b. Data Processing

c. Postal Information

d. Grooming

e. Job Application

f. Telephone Usage

g. Personality

h. Office Etiquette

i. Human Relations

j. Managerial Services

k. Travel and Transportation

1. Receptionist and Secretarial Duties

m. Reference Books

C. Shorthand and Transcription (Secretarial Block Only)

1. Vocational Dictation with Related Vocabulary

2. Produce Mailable Copy

D. Typewriting

1. Minutes, Resolutions, and Legal Papers

2. Business Reports and Financial Statements

3. Business Forms

4. Production Typewriting

5. Daily Statistical Typing

6. Itineraries









BUSINESS ENGLISH


Objectives

A comprehensive practical course in business communications is
planned for all students entering the business world regardless of the
jobs they are to fill. To meet this need, the course has as its general
objective the mastery of effective oral and written communications to.
gether with an understanding of:

Problems encountered by business in oral and written communication

Importance of good human relations with the public, fellow em-
ployees, and management

Desirable work habits, attitudes, and personality traits necessary
for a successful business career.

The specific objectives are:

1. To review the fundamentals of grammar, stressing the importance
of spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, mechanics, diction,
and euphony.

2. TO stress the importance of intelligent reading as a necessary
element in developing reading comprehension.

3. To encourage the student to develop an extensive vocabulary
with emphasis on business and related terminology, and to form
habits of frequent and intelligent reference to the dictionary
and other reference books on business correspondence.

4. To acquaint the student with different types of social and busi-
ness letters, business reports, and business forms used by in-
dividuals and business concerns.

5. To develop the student's ability to express himself correctly and
forcefully in the writing of acceptable personal and business
letters.

6. To improve the student's oral expression in personal and business
situations.

7. To provide an understanding of how and why people react as they
do to oral suggestions or directions or to business letters.

8. To develop good listening habits so that students will follow
directions properly and convey information accurately to others.

9. To understand and conform to the accepted rules of business and
social etiquette.

10. To encourage legible handwriting.









Suggested Course Content


I Grammar Review

A. The Sentence

B. Verbs

C. Nouns

1. Plurals

2. Possessive case

D. Pronouns (Case)

E. Predicate Agreement

1. Simple subject

2. Compound subject

F. Adjectives

G, Adverbs

H. Prepositions

I. Conjunctions

Materials and Supplies

Filmstrip
Posters on parts of speech (see English Easy Way)
Today's Secretary, newspapers, television

Teaching Suggestions

1. Use filmstrip series to illustrate the principles
of grammar.

2. Prepare a bulletin board from posters or pictures
on the various parts of speech,

3. Use Today's Secretary on "Watch Your English" to
obtain supplementary materials for instructing, re-
viewing, and testing.

4, Prepare transparencies.

II Punctuation, Abbreviations, and Figures Review

A. Period










B. Question Mark

C. Exclamation mark

D. Comma

E. Semicolon

F. Colon

G. Dash

H. Quotation marks

I. Hyphen

J. Parentheses

K. Apostrophe

L. Capitalization

M. Abbreviations

N. Figures

Materials and Supplies

Filmstrip
Posters on punctuation (See English Easy Way)
Today' s Secretary

Teaching Suggestions

1. Use filmstrip to illustrate the principles of
punctuation, abbreviations, and figures.

2. Prepare a bulletin board from posters or pictures
to illustrate the principles of punctuation, abbre-
viations, and figures.


III Business Writing

A. Qualities of effective letters

B. Parts of the business letter

C. Style of the business letter

D. Everyday business letters

1. Ask and transmit










2. Answer

a. Acknowledgments
b. Responses

E. Letters for problem situations

1. Psychology applied to problem situations

2. Claim and adjustment letters

3. Credit and collection letters

F. Letters that sell

1. Sales letters

2. Public relation letters

3. Employment letters

G. Other business communications

1. Social-business communications

2. Memorandums

3. Business reports

4. Telegrams

5. Minutes

6. News releases

Materials and Supplies

Newspapers, magazines, periodicals
Business forms
Stationery
Samples of actual letters and application forms
Flannel board and business letter cut-outs
Book on parliamentary procedures

Teaching Suggestions

1. Have the class make a collection of letterheads,
business letter styles, business correspondence, and
social-business correspondence, memorandums; business
reports, telegrams, minutes, news:r~Leases,rannounce-
ments, and application blanks for bulletin board
display, instructional purposes, etc.

2. Secure actual application forms for display or
instructional purposes.










3, Assign business reports involving research on career
opportunities to utilize learning in fundamentals
of grammar, punctuation, spelling, sentence structure,
etc. The students may write letters to various busi-
ness firms to secure information regarding.their reports,

4, Prepare a bulletin board display under the-heading of
"Yours for the Asking." Have students clip free
advertisement offers from newspapers and magazines
and write requesting material to share with the class.

5, Prepare a flannel board presentation on the parts of
a business letter.

6. Have a representative of Dun and Bradstreet, a
representative of the Retail Credit Bureau, or the
credit manager of a local firm speak to the class on
one of the following topics:

a. The Importance of a Good Credit Standing
b. How We Determine Credit Risk
c. The Function of My Agency

Students may take notes to be used later as minutes, as
a report, or as a news release.

7. Have a student committee prepare an interesting dis-
play of various types of sales letters arranged under
two headings--"Letters That Sell Merchandise" and
"Letters That Sell Ideas."

8. Have students cut advertisements from newspapers and
magazines that use descriptive words to sell their
products.

9. Have a personnel representative speak to the class
on the importance of the data sheet and the letter
of application in getting a position,

10. Encourage each student to prepare a "Job Seeker's
Portfolio." This might include the following:

a. Sources of positions in community
b. Sample application forms, properly filled out
c. Personal data sheet
d. Sample letter of application
e. Sample letter requesting permission for reference,
reference, etc.
f. Sample letter requesting an interview
g. Student's work, student awards, etc.

11. Have students bring announcements from business page
of newspaper to study writing techniques used for
preparing news releases.










12. Prepare minutes of a mock meeting. At the same time
this will provide opportunity for students to see
parliamentary procedure in action.


IV Business and Social Speaking

A. The art of conversation

B. Meeting the public'

1. In person

2. By telephone (also included in Office Practice)

C. Working with groups

D. Giving a talk

E. Employment Interview (also included in Office Practice)

Materials and Supplies

Telephone or Teletrainer
Telephone message forms
Tape recorder

Teaching Suggestions

S1. Have students take turns making introductions. (Use
tape recorder as micro-teaching technique)

2. Introduce topics of conversation and have students
participate.

3. Conduct the following activities for working with groups:

a. Conference Method--Groups of 10 to 15 students
can work mutually with a leader to develop a
problem situation within their range of experiences.

b. Buzz Method--Class divided into small groups with
a chairman and a reporter to discuss a problem
within a limited time. Reporters act as spokesmen
when groups meet to pool ideas, recommendations, etc.

c. Case Method--Individuals or groups identify the
facets of a case problem. Experience is gained in
amplifying and pinpointing the problem.

d. Role-playing--Students dramatize a realistic
situation in which they are forced to think and
speak in terms of characters being portrayed.
Characterization should help to recognize the
feelings, prejudices, and frustrations 6f others.










4. Have each student select a topic, seek library and other
resource information, outline, and then write a three-
minute talk for oral presentation.

5. Have resource person discuss job interviews, employment
application forms, grooming for business, etc., regarding
employment requirements. (Also included in Office Practice
outline)

6. Have students visit business firms for job interviews
arranged by telephone or letter. Follow up with the proper
employment letters. (Also included in Office Practice
outline)

Evaluation

An evaluation of various areas in Business English may be deter-
mined through the use of the following:

1. Short answer test items for achievement testing in fundamentals
of grammar, punctuation, word usage, spelling, vocabulary
development, and letter format and style.

2. Long-answer test items are most appropriate where students
are expected to rephrase sentences in order to correct them,
to add clarity or conciseness, or improve the tone of business
correspondence.

3. Multiple choice type to be used in connection with all
parts of speech, for correct spelling, grammar, precise
meaning or improvement of tone quality.

4. Self-evaluation and class-evaluation may be used for
testing oral communication. A check list may be pre-
sented for the students and teacher to rate the qualities.

5. True-false test items may be used where applicable.

6. Letter or short essay composition in response to case
problem situations.

7, Satisfactory completion of the National Business Entrance
Test, available from National Business Education Associa-
tion, 1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W., Washington,.D. C.








OFFICE PRACTICE


Purposes

1. To develop an understanding of machine operation and functions
with some degree of job proficiency

2. To train students to consistently proofread their work

3. To develop personal traits of desirable behavior in business
situations

4. To acquaint students with automation in the office and business

Materials and Supplies

Fixed Equipment

Machine Manuals and Keys
Signature Writing Plate and Styli
Reference Books
Secretarial Training Records

Consumable Supplies

Voice recorder tapes, discs, belts
Cards: 3 x 5 Index; Ledgercards, IBM 5081 cards
Manila folders and guides
Letterheads, plain bond, onionskin, second sheets,
carbon paper
Envelopes--No. 10, No. 7-1/2, No. 6-3/4
Correct-a-Type
Adding machine tape; typewriter ribbons
Stencils and Spirit Masters
Mineograph and Duplicator paper
Correction fluid; single-edge razor blades
Duplicating fluid and ink
Hand cleaner
Working papers: checks, invoices, purchasing forms,
credit memos, telegrams, etc.
Filing Practice Sets; Data Processing Practice Sets
Miscellaneous Supplies: paper clips, staples, rubber bands
scotch tape

Suggested Course Content

I Text Units

A. Receptionist

1. Grooming, manners, speech
2. Receiving callers and making appointments










B. Handling Mail

1. Incoming mail
2. Outgoing mail
3. Equipment used

C. Reference books and office supplies

D. Others

II Transcribing Machines

A. Operation

B. Indication slip

C. Producing mailable transcripts

III Calculators

A. Operation of keyrdriyen, printing, and rotary calculators

B. Fundamentals of addition, subtraction, multiplication and
division

IV Id1iig Machines

A. Operation of ten-key and full-key

B. Touch system and most efficient techniques of using
materials

V DUplAgating

A. Stencil

B. Spirit

C. Dry Copy

D. Others

VI Typing (electric typewriter)

A. Basic operatlom of macblw

B. Production techniques

VII Bookkeeping Machine (optional for secretarial block)

A. Posting of debits and credits

B. Handling of materials

37










VIII Office Secretary ) (Different titles may be used and a
Office Receptionist) combination of duties may be required)

A. Office secretary does work for teacher and helps
students

B. Office receptionist greets callers and works on
projects at secretary's desk

IX Telephone Usage

A. Business Telephone Calls

1. Terminology
2. Preparation for placing calls
3. How to make a call
4. How to receive a call

B. Switchboard (PBX)

1. Types
2. Operation


X Grooming

A.

B.

C.

XI Filing


XII Data


Appearance (dress, make-up, posture, etc.)

Manners; annoying habits

Speech


A. What is filing

B. How to file

C. Rules for coding and indexing (alphabetic)

D. Charge, follow-up, and transfer methods

E. Other methods of filing

Processing

A. Need for Data Processing

B. Manual Data Processing

C. Mechanical Methods of Data Processing

D, Input Media

E. Output Media









XIII Job Application and Interviews

A. Letter of Application

B. Personal Data Sheet

C. Application forms

D. Employment tests

E. The interview

F. Follow-up

G. Accepting and Rejectit

XIV Postal Seminar

XV Key Punch or S$mulated Equipmer

XVI Housekeeping Duties in the Off


ng Positions


It

ice


Evaluation

Instruction in,6ffice practice may be evaluated by determining the
degree to which the pupil:

1. Meets the standards of proficiency required of beginning
office workers

2. Possesses the knowledge necessary to function as a beginning
office worker

3. Develops a desirable personality and businesslike attitudes

These may be determined by giving:

1. Production tests with time limits to measure the
student's ability to efficiently use machines on
which he has received training

2. Objective tests to determine the student's familiarity
with and understanding of the preparation of materials

3. Observation of personal traits and attitudes

Teaching Suagestions


Invite stationer or salesman to discuss office supplies.

Visit an automated office and have students file Fiild Trip
Form (Appendix ~) on return. Students may assist in making
the arrangements. Write thank you letters.


1.

2.


---**"-*----- -*-










3. In data processing, use completion of forms as a means of
reviewing the fundamentals of business arithmetic. The
EDL Business Math Filmstrips are suitable for such review.

4. Make information tapes or discs on voice transcription machines
related to various areas such as spirit or stencil duplicating;
include, for example, what it is, when used, advantages of its
use, instructions for typing and correcting masters and stencils.
Have students make a carbon copy to keep for reference when they
are on this unit.

5. Dramatize various types of telephone calls that occur in business
situations. Have students make practice calls with dialogue
already composed or ask students to write dialogue; as these are
enacted record the conversations on tape and play the recordings
to the class, having them fill in message forms while listening.
Check and discuss.

6. Use Teletrainer Kit available through the local telephone company.

7. Invite a businessman, preferably a personnel manager, to conduct
interviews in front of class. As an alternative, have students
go to a business office. Students should already have prepared
preliminary materials such as application letter and data sheet.

8. Have mock interviews of the correct and incorrect way to approach
an interview.

9. In adding up checks, etc., teach to lift form with left hand as
keys are depressed and flip over as + bar is depressed, thus
keeping checks in original order. When adding a list, use a card
to move down column to keep from losing place.

10. Actual work may be done for other teachers or offices in the
school so long as this does not interfere with assigned work.
Work Request Sheets (Appendix G) should be completed by person
desiring work at least two days in advance and all supplies should
be furnished. Person desiring work should rate work and return
form. If time allows in the Rotation Plan, students may be assigned
work for individual teachers for which they shall receive a grade,
(Sample of Rotation Plans follow)

11. Invite a fashion expert from local department store to give a
demonstration. Other suggestions are to have the students prepare
a project illustrating a week's wardrobe for a-w6rking girl or boy,
using dolls, etc. The students might put on a fashion show. To
publicize the VOE program simultaneously, other students.and/or
parents may be invited.

12. ,FHave students compile a Handbook of useful information which can
be used later as a reference source on the job.

13. Have students write letters of introduction and thank you letters
/ to Work-a-Week (paid work experience in an office situation)
employers.









14. Have students evaluate their own work on a Work-Appraisal
Sheet. (Appendix I). Also have students keep a daily record
of the work they do. (Appendix H)

15. Make out Rotation Plan for machines for at least six weeks at
a time or by the semester.

16. Arrange for machine demonstrations by a sales representative.


Rotation Plan

On the.followiAg :3 pages are suggested :rotation plans which may. be
applicable to the' secretarial block.






SUGGESTED ROTATION PLAN

First Semester--


1.23456


7 8 9 in 11 17 v1 1L 1~ 1


17 1f


CS FB VR VR 10K 10K FIL_ BM DUP

2 10K 10K DUP CS VR VR FIL ET FB

3 10K o10 r ET IST I ET FIL VR VR

4 DUP CS VR R 10K 10K FIL- ET

5 VR VR FB BM DUP H CS KP PR DP DP DP ET ET
I CALI __ __D D -
6 (n VVR VR 10K 10K PR A DP bP P RP DUP CS ET ET ROT ,
7%A, CAL cPT
t PR
7 CAL DUP 10K 10K T DP DP DP ET KP VR VR IET ET
8 ) 4H TDUP CS ET ET DP DP DP 10K 10K KP ET VR VR

9 I FILF L FIL FIL FI L FIL DUP C-S VVRVR 10K10K PR ET

10 FIL FIL FILFIL FIL FIL FIL 10K 10K ET ET DUP CS VR VR Y L

11 FILFFIL ILL FIF IL FIL ET T T K 10K VR VR FB BM

12 X y FIL FIL FIL L IL 0I FIL R DUP CS FB BM DUP CS
I--F DUP Cs CA
13 0 0 FB BM ET ET ET VR VR DP DP DP KP 10K 10K

14 C 0 ET ET ET FB BM < DUP CS KP DP DP DP ROT 10K 10K -

15 II Uf ET ET ET I r FB E- BM VR VR DP DP DP DUP CS KP
- - -- -,
16 ET ET ET DUP CS Q [2FB BM ROg VR VR PR DPIDP DP
...- - -, --.......
17 ET ET ET PR VR Q VR FB BM DUP CS ET DP DP DP

18 ET ET ET ET ROT T ET D D D
.. SAL _CA FB BM ET ET DP !DP DP
19 FIL FII L FIL FIL I FIL 10K 10K FB BM ET DP DP DP
20 FB R BM ET ET DP DP DP ET ET 10K 10K KP PR
CAL -CAL

- -_-- - -. - - --
BM Bookkeeping Machine ET Electric Typewriter ROT
CS Class Secretary FIL- Filing CAL-Rotary Calculator
DP Data Processing KP Keypunch lOK-lO-Key Add
DUP- Duplicating PR VR Voice Recorder
CAL- Printing Calculator FB Fullhank Add
42 Hillsborough High School
Tampa, Florida









SUGGESTED ROTATION SCHEDULE


Stenocord Transcriber
Dictaphone Time-Master Transc.
Gray Audiograph Transc.
Remington Calculator
Remington Calculator
Underwood-Olivetti Add Machine
Victor-10-Key Elec. Add Mach.
Remington-10-Key Man. Add Mach.
Sunstrand Man. Add Mach.
Victor Full-Keyboard Add Mach.


Sel
Mim
Scope
Dit
LC
3-M
Veri
PS(F)
Auto
Mach


IBM Selectric
Mimeograph
Mimeoscope
Ditto
Long-Carriage Type
Thermofax
Verifax
Practice Sets (Filing)
Automation Office Practice
Machines Practice Set


Group A 1 3 4 5 b
Thrasher FKV FKV MACHINE PRACTICE SET

Jackson 10-K-UO 10-K-UO "

Green #99 #99 "

Knowles 10-K-UO .10-K-UO "

Sanders DX94 DX94 "

Wilkerson- 10-KSM 10-KSM "

Group B

Brookins Dic Dic Dic PRACTICE SET (F)

Hicks Steno Steno Steno "

Suiimerall Die Die Pic "

Shaw Steno Steno Steno "

La Fontaine Gray Gray Gray "

Mixon Gray Gray ray "

Group C
egl Sc
SUlTIVRA Sec Sec Sc TR Veri Ditto e im

Bovette File File ScR -Vri Dftto

Blewett Lib Lib itto Mm S Se
Sc TVeri
Mim Sel
Mellgren Bul Bul eri Ditto M c TR
SR 0 3M Mi
Davis 10-KRM 10-KR, e Ver Ditto Sc


Kathleen High School
Lakeland, Florida


Steno
Dic
Gray
DX94
#99
10-K-UO
10-K-VE
10-KRM
10-KSM
FKV









ROTATION PLAN
20 weeks
20 students


WEEKS
UNIT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Filing AB AB CD CD EF EF GH GH IJ IJ KL KL MN MN OP OP QR QR ST ST

Transcribing CD CD AB AB GH GH EF EF KL KL IJ IJ OP OP MN MN ST ST QR OR

Rotary Calculator EF EF GH GH IJ IJ KL KL MN MN OP OP QR OR ST ST AB AB CD CD

Production Typewriting GH. GH EF EF KL KL IJ IJ OP OP MN MN ST ST QR QR CD CD AB AB

Data Processing IJ IJ IJ IJ MN MN MN MN QR QR QR QR AB AB AB AB EF EF EF EF
and
Ten-Key Adding Machine* KL KL KL KL OP OP OP OP ST ST ST ST CD CDCD CD GH GH GH GHL

Receptionist M N 0 P Q R S T A B C D E F G H I J K L

Fluid Duplicating N M P O R 0 T S B A D C F E H G J I L K

Stencil Duplicating OP OP MN MN ST ST QR QR CD CD AB AB GH GH EF EF KL KL IJ :IJ

Full-Key Adding Machine QR QR ST ST AB AB CD CD EF EF GH G U IJ KL KL MN MN OP OP

Printing Calculator ST ST QR QR CD CD AB AB G
*One student will always be working on the Ten-Keyboard Adding Machine. One week is allotted to the
Ten-Keyboard Adding Machine.


State of Kentucky
Office Practice Manual
Frankfort, 1966











SHORTHAND DICTATION AND TRANSCRIPTION


Purposes

1. To constantly review shorthand theory

2. To develop further a vocabulary to include common business
terms

3. To increase shorthand writing speed

4. To improve techniques of taking dictation and tran-
scribing usable and mailable copy

5. To continue the development of desirable work habits

6. To integrate typewriting and business English skills to
meet production standards


Materials and Supplies

1. Dictionary for each student

2. Reference books and manuals

a, Ruth E. Gavin and Lillian Hutchinson, Reference
Manual for Stenographers and Typists, (New York:
McGraw-Hill, 1965).

b. Larsen and Koebele, Reference Manual for Office
Employees, Fourth Edition, (Cincinnati: South-
Western, 1965)

3. Film: Secretary Takes Dictation

4. Filmstrip: Dictation Shortcuts
Taking Dictation and Transcribing

5. Dictation Material

a. Foundation for Business Education
Irvington, New York

Office style dictation and proofreading projects

b. Louis Leslie and Charles Zoubek, Transcription
Dictation, (Hightstown: Gregg Publishing Division)

c. Louis Leslie and Charles Zoubek, Dictation for
Mailable Transcripts, (Hightstown: Gregg Publishing
Division),









d. Charles Zoubek, Progressive Dictation, (Hightstown
Gregg Publishing Division)

e. Charles Zoubek, Speed Dictation, (Hightstown Gregg
Publishing Division).

f. Leonard J. Porter, Shorthand Dictation Pamphlet Series,
(Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall Publishing Co.)


Suggested Course Content

A. While the shorthand course is integrated with office practice
and business English, the traits and attitudes to be stressed in this
unit are some of those that apply particularly to dictation and tran-
scription.

1. Accuracy The student is made aware of the necessity for
checking all aspects of the finished transcript--English
usage, typing, letter form, dates, names, and figures.

2. Resourcefulness The student learns to use available sources
of information, such as reference books and files, to supply
any information not given by the dictator.

3. Willingness to Accept Responsibility In the class activities
the student develops the ability to carry through on his own
the assignments given and to complete them in the time allotted.

4. Common Sense and Judgment The student develops the ability to
proofread for sense, to select the correct typing form and
appropriate stationery, and to decide the number of copies to
be made.

5. Loyalty to the Company The student is taught the importance
of recognizing the employer's interests as being paramount,
keeping dictation confidential, conserving office supplies,
and making proper use of office time.

6. Ability to Follow Directions The student is taught the value
of writing down all instructions given, asking necessary questions,
and checking to see that all instructions have been carried out.

7. Ability to Work Under Pressure The student is trained to con-
centrate on producing quality work in a limited time and in the
face of distractions.

8. Pride in Work The student is taught to develop personal stan-
dards of accomplishment.

B. Some of the desirable work habits to develop in this unit
include:

1. Assembling materials









2. Arranging the secretarial desk

3. Handling enclosures

4. Handling finished transcripts

C. Instruction and practice are given in the handling of materials
required during the dictation period, techniques to be used in taking and
transcribing dictation, and personal conduct during the dictation period.

D. Experience in taking dictation from different people and under
different conditions is an integral part of the class activities.


Evaluation

It is desirable to set standards for the following aspects of the
second year of shorthand:

A. Dictation speed

B. Transcription rates

C. Mailable letters, memorandums, and short articles

Business standards and employment opportunities in the community
should be considered when determining the goals for the course.

The National Business Entrance Stenographic Test or a similar test
shall be used as a check on-final vocational competence.

Teaching Suggestions

These points are to be presented to students and demonstrated where
possible. The material may be duplicated and presented to the:rstudents.

Techniques in taking dictation:

1. Have notebook, pens, and pencils ready to take dictation
immediately.

2. Separate used portion from unused portion of notebook with a
rubber band.

3. Put the day's date in longhand at the bottom of the page.

4. Write special instructions, such as mailing directions, with
a colored pencil.

5. Take dictation in the left column of the notebook; reserve
right column for additions or corrections.

Techniques in transcribing:

1. Have all necessary materials at .add before starting to
transcribe










2. Transcribe "Rush" items first. Unless the dictator instructs
otherwise, follow this priority: telegrams, air mail and
special delivery letters.

3. Use eye level placement in arranging transcript.

4. Draw line through notes that have been transcribed.

5. Proofread transcript for accuracy and complete thought before
removing it from typewriter.












TYPEWRITING


All Vocational Office Education students will have completed one
year of typewriting, but it is conceivable that there may be students
in any of the following categories.

1. Students who have already completed a course in Typewriting II

2. Students who are presently enrolled in a course in Typewriting II

3. Students who have not and will not be able to take a separate
course in Typewriting II

The Typewriting pretest should reveal the previously acquired skills
and techniques of each student. From this, the teacher can formulate a
plan whereby each individual student will be familiar with all new material
before the end of the school year.

In the block concept it is understood that typewriting is a major
force for integrating skills in business English, office practice, and
shorthand transcription.


Purposes

1. To improve basic typewriting skills

2. To provide remedial instruction in business application of
typewriting skills

3. To introduce advanced business applications of typewriting
skills

4. To develop a high level of performance of business appli-
cations with a minimum of direction and supervision

5. To develop proper attitudes and work habits in office
practice and transcription procedure

Materials and Supplies

1. Students are expected to furnish typing paper, carbon paper,
onionskin paper, and large and small envelopes

2. A variety of business forms (preferably original) should be
available. Other forms may be obtained from workbooks and
practice sets. Forms not available may be duplicated.

Suggested Course Content


I Review of Basic Skills










A. Machine Parts

1. Paper guide
2. Ribbon Control

B. Kinds of type face

C. Operating Techniques

1. Margin stops
2. Vertical and horizontal centering
3. Ribbon changing
4. Differences between manual and electric machines

D. Building Skill and Accuracy

1. Foundations

a. Keyboard control
b. Figures and specialized characters

2. Building Skill in Sustained Typewriting

a. Increase muscular power
b. Ways of combating fatigue
c. Shortcuts to increase efficiency
d. Correcting Errors

E. Care of the Typewriter

1. Type cleaning
2. Cylinder or platen
3. Daily care

II Tabulation

A. Placement

B. Internal tabulation

C. Tabulated reports

1. Ruled reports
2. Unruled reports
3. Proofreading emphasis

III Business Forms

A. Rough Drafts and Manuscripts

1. Rough drafts

a. Preliminary copies
b. Proofreader's marks
c. Typing from rough draft

50









2. Manuscripts

a. Title page.
b. Table of contents
c. Outlines
d. Body of manuscript (placement and footnotes)
e. Bibliography

B. Minutes, Resolutions, and Legal Papers

C. Business Reports and Financial Statements

1. Forms
2. Bookkeeping statements
3. Graphs

D. Other Business Forms

1. Buying procedures and forms
2. Selling procedures and forms


Evaluation

The evaluation of the various areas in typewriting may be determined
by the following:

1. Timed production work to measure student's ability to use
machines effectively and knowledge of the various business
forms

2. Timed writings to determine student's speed as well as
accuracy

3. Objective tests to determine proficiency in parts of machine
and familiarity with materials


Teaching Suggestions

1. Use of a practice set gives the student experience in actually
setting up and submitting final mailable copies of business
forms

2. In typewriting letters use judgment placemat

3. Keep carbon pack even by dropping it into slip of eavelpe
or folded piece of paper, twirl the setup into the machine,
antd remove folded piece of -paopoer-*.. epeloper", .
corners of carbon paper so that all carbons may be removed
simultaneously.

4. In typewriting from rough drafts and corrected copies make
the necessary corrections in rough draft, read material
thoroughly and understand all corrections and markings before
beginning to type. Plan the format before beginning to type.










5. Use proper type of eraser and erase with light, repeated
strokes in order to preserve finish of the paper.

6. When correcting carbon copies, preserve carbon paper by
placing protective shield in front of carbon paper.

7. The student learns to place all materials in the proper
position for ease of handling and speed of production.
Correct techniques are emphasized as an element in
reducing fatigue.

8. The student is taught that his daily responsibilities
include keeping the cleaning supplies readily accessible,
and using them, moving carriage to one side when making
corrections, keeping the machine covered when not in use,
and keeping working area clean and neat.









GENERAL TIPS TO TEACHERS


1. Place a note on teachers' bulletin board about student help
available for faculty. Include details concerning the services
which can be performed..

2. Compile a list of resource people. Include charm schools, data
processing centers, prospective employers, former students, etc.

3. Have a former VOE student talk to class.

4. Keep a monthly attendance report to help facilitate making yearly
report. The State does not require monthly reports as do some
counties, but does require a yearly report.

5.. Send out job opportunity survey forms or have students send them
to local businesses to determine possible jobs for placement after
graduation. (Appendix N)

6. Form an Advisory Committee of business people who can help develop
a better program. The committee serving the Business Education
Department or CBE program may be used.

7. Students enrolling in VOE may be asked to serve as office assistants
in the school whenever this is practical.

8. The student assigned as office receptionist should be asked to dress
appropriately for the office that week.

9. Have representatives of Civil Service Commission and Florida State
Employment give employment tests to classes.

10. Have company representatives give machine demonstrations before
class.

11. Hold an "Open House" for parents; Christmas party for parents
and/or faculty

12. Have students plan bulletin boards centered around text topics.

13. Have Work-a-Week or Work-a-Day where students work in local business
offices observing regular office hours. Generally, they are not
paid for this work but will receive a grade. The cooperation of the
students, school administration, faculty, parents, and local businesses
is required. The following steps may be followed:

a. Obtain written permission from faculty and parents. (Appendix K)
b. Contact businessmen by letter and/or telephone to determine
available placement of students. (If done by letter, it is
suggested that these go out with the principal's signature also.)
c. Schedule students for work in various offices. Have students
write letters of introduction to businessmen to whom they have
been assigned.










d. Provide forms for use by businessmen to evaluate students.
(Appendix L)
e. Provide forms for students to evaluate activity. (Appendix M)
Students may be asked to prepare an oral and/or written report
on this experience. (These can be graded.)
f. Provisions should be made for the teacher to visit students at
least once while they are on the job.
g. Have students write letters of appreciation to businessmen for
providing the opportunity for office experiences.. (These may
also be signed by the teacher.)












/









2 NPIE[I
dHVERRI No1~
UK ug~









INTEGRATED LESSON


General Objective:

To provide an opportunity for the student to follow directions--both
direct and implied--in a realistic manner and to follow through on an assign-
ment.

Specific Objectives:
1. To provide an opportunity to type index cards and to make a mail-
ing list.

2. To take a letter from dictation and to assume responsibility for
correctly placing it on the page and correcting all errors--English and
otherwise.

3. To give students an opportunity to complete tasks that integrate
English, typewriting, duplication, dictation, filing and mailing.

4. To place responsibility on the student to complete a task in its
entirety as would be done in an office.

Things Involvedt

1. Preparing the index cards from the mailing list given them

2. Airanging names in alphabetical order

3. Dictating the letter to be sent to the names on the cards

L~ Transcribing the letter

5. Typing letter on master sheet and having it signed

6. Running off 20 copies on duplicator

7. Addressing a letter to each of the names on the index cards

8. Addressing an envelope for each letter

9. Folding letter and inserting it and the card to be enclosed in the
envelope

10. Stamping letters and sealing

11. Clean up desk, file cards and extra letters for future use

Evaluation of techniques used in presenting the lesson and the final results
obtained. Ask yourself these questions; Did all the students understand your
directions? Did they follow through from one task to the other as they should
have done? Were they orderly in what they did? Did they seem to have a feel-
ing of accomplishment? If not, then how can I improve on my instruction?

55











Supplies:

Index cards--3 X 5
Plain cards for enclosures
Duplication carbon
Duplication paper
Envelopes
Stamps
Mailing list
Shorthand notebook

Equipment:

Typewriters
Duplicator

Procedures

Give students mailing list that has already been duplicated
Give each student the correct number of index cards to be typed
and the cards to enclose in the finished letters
Make envelopes available for the letters
Dictate letter
Transcribe letter on plain paper
Type letter on master set
Run off 20 copies
Address letters
Fold letters and insert in envelope with enclosure
Seal letters and stamp
Clean up desk

The letter to be dictated and duplicated is enclosed.












List of Names for Mailing List


The South Georgia Grocery Company
1134 South Street
Adel, Georgia

The Central Grocery Company
11346 Central Avenue
Orlando, Florida

John Higgins Packing Company
11360 Kings Street
Jacksonville, Florida

A. H. Hernes Grocery Company
1123 University Avenue
Athens, Georgia

W; L. .Long and Company
1130 Dogwood Avenue
Asheville, N. C.

Williams Brothers, Incorporated
11450 Magnolia Street
Birminfgham ,!Alhbama

W. R. Robers Company
1189 Greenbrier Avenue
Charleston, South Carolina

Lone Star Motor Express Company
1407 Centennial Avenue
Fort Worth, Texas

Nelson Grocery Company
8340 East Southport Road
Atlanta, Georgia

Dillingham Packing Company
30595 East Carrollton Avenue
New Orleans, La.








Current Date


It required six months for us to gather and to condense into a
28-page booklet all the information the shipper needs for the selection,
packaging, sealing and shipping of corrugated fiber shipping boxes.

This booklet shows how to select the proper style of box construc-
tion, how to pack various commodities to conform to transportation regula-
tions, how to seal every sort-tof corrugated box, and how to specify just
what you require when you are ordering boxes or packing supplies.

We shall be glad to mail you a copy of this useful little booklet
with out compliments and to supply, without cost or obligation, any
further information that you may wish to have. Just check and mail the
enclosed card at once, while you have it in hand.

Yours very truly,


William A. Johnson
Sales Manager


lhh

Enclosure


Louise Hines
Santa Fe High School










A ONE-DAY PROBLEM-SOLVING PROJECT

FOR THE

SECRETARIAL PRACTICE COURSE


Your work as secretary to Jack W. Barnett, Manager of United Products
Corporation, covers a variety of jbb responsibilities in a normal work day.
Naturally, you move from one activity to another with efficiency and ease,
remembering such details as not to attach any initials or signature to memos
because Mr. Barnett prefers to do so with pen personally;, that he likes his
coffee at 10:00 right on the dot--"blonde but not sweet"; that he signs all
letters with .lack ink over his official title "because it looks better with
block styling and no punctuation"; to quoteBoss B.

Today you must remember to get stamps for his Christmas cards, drop off
his tuxedo to be pressed, and take a receipt to Binders, Incorporated for
$27.50 when you go to lunch which paid their account in full.

With these little tid-bits carefully digested, you now set about the
chores at hand!

JOB 1 Dictated Letter

Mr. Barnett dictated the following letter requesting that you send
carbopsato Frank B. Wilson, Manager of our Detroit factory at 601 Wynnton Rd.,
wh~t the cuff links are made and to Nathan Siebert our salesman for the
Chicago area whose address is Michigan Shores Apartment Hotel, Oak Park,
.Illinois. He also directs you to send a copy to the principal of Miss
S Watkins' school, Darrell J. Hutchins, for reference purposes without her
knowing it, lest she feel we are apprehensive about getting stuck with the
order. "Don't forget, says Boss B., to send her one of our wallet calendars."
Idiot! What does he take you for--a plumb ninny?

(Note: There are envelope forms attached for you to use)

Miss Mary Jo Watkins, Grove Hills High School, Chicago, Illinois. Dear
Miss Watkins: Thank you for your letter of December 2 requesting cancellation
of your order "400-P for 70 pairs of #14203 cuff links. We are canceling the
order in our factory today.

We are also asking the factory to make the substitution of 70 keys #19038-B
in black enamel and sterling. However, you must have taken the $1.75 price
from an old catalogue, because the current price of this key in sterling is
$2.75 plus a 20% tax. If this price is not satisfactory, will you please
let us know right away just what disposition you wish made of the order.

Best wishes for the New Year. Cordially,


JOB 2 Checks Invoices Credit Memo

It is your job to write checks in payment of invoices which, of course,
means keep the stub record also. Write the necessary checks, the last used
check being No. 297, putting the Invoice No. in the lower left hand corner





of each. Mr. Barnett sig4a all checks. One thing: on Invoice
No. 49292, we did not receive the chair pads and have requested a
credit memo. The invoice has been approved for payment without these
being included.


JOB 3 Invoice

On our No. 14H293, we sold and shipped to Plastico Industries,
Incorporated, 4178 Abbott Road, Cleveland Ohio, the following from
their Purchase Order No. 29671:

1 gross Elixir, R-4 @ $21.65
3 dos. Caledon @ 7.90
4 sheets 12' x 14' Ibsen @ 6.50

All of our shipments go by motor freight.

JOB 4 Note

The company has been approved for a 90-day loan from J. P. Stevens Co.,
in the amd unt of $650, payable at the Merchants & Farmers Bank with interest
at 6Z.

JOB ) taft

The Trust Company of QG6rgia is depositing $185.65 to the account of
Beek Getbgg Hardwar *Co. of Atlanta. Thirty days from today, united Products
Corporation guarantees to repay the bank with our Draft No, 149.


JOB6 Interoffice. emo

Send Paul J. Lovett, Treasurer of UPC, a memo fro t Mr. Barioet informing
htl~jouet the foregoing draft betin drawn and its due 4atfoei that his books
wtl balance accordingly.


JOB 7 ",1Telegram

Boss B. is making a hurried (and harried) trip to Philadelphia tomorrow
ag~#you need to get 'i a reservation--BUT QUICKI Cho6sey fellow* a studio-
type room is the only accoamodaton that he will consider, and the $15 range.

Wirerthe Reservation Clerk of the Sheraton-Ranger Rotel for overnight
accommodations and be sure to ask for a confirmatioW.


J489Vg Taburated Report

NOW he tells you that he needs a composite report of UPC sales for the
First Quarter of the year to take with him on the trip.

Lucky you, you collected such data some time ago but failed to write in
totals. Run these hurriedly (but accurately) now ad a type up the attached
report. (And they say women are pupredictablel)









A ONE-DAY PROBLEM-SOLVING PROJECT

FOR THE

SECRETARIAL PRACTICE COURSE


Job Description Integrated Activities



General Instructions 1. Office Practice

a. Handling memos
b. Personal habits
c. handling receipts

2. Correspondence

a. letter style
b. punctuation style
c. buying postage (petty cash)

Job 1 Dictated Letter 1. Handling Correspondence

a. correct no. of carbons
b. special notations--cc,
bcc, enclosures
c. check ZIP code

2. Dictation

a. verification of names,
and figures

3. Typewriting Transcription

a. correct letter style
and punctuation
b. space allowance for
notations
c. correct alignment and
placement of notations
d. proper distribution of
carbon copies for mail-
ing
Job 2 Checks, Invoices, Credit Memo 1. Recordkeeping

a. re-figure discount

2. Typewriting

a. erasing vs voiding
negotiable instruments













Job Description Integrated Activities


Job 3 Invoice





Job 4 Bank Note












Job 5 Bank Draft












Job 6 Interoffice Memo


b. When to & when not to
write checks in payment
of invoices

3. Business Machines

1. Typewriting

2. Business Machines

a. running extensions & totals

1. Office Procedure

a. notation on Tickler File
for due date

2. Typewriting


a. correctly typing nego-
tiable instruments
b. proper identification of
parties on note


all


1. Role-playing


who owes whom
repayment process


2. Typewriting

a. correct typing of negotiable
instruments
b. erasing vs voiding negotiable
instruments

1. Typewriting


correct form for memos
composition at the Keyboard


2. Following Instructions

















Job 7













Job 8 Tabulated Report










/




Note: This is merely a suggested approach
to planning integrated projects. Necessary
forms for" the particular project are WAot
Attached.


Job Description Integrated Activities


1. Communications

a. telephone
b. verification of names,
dates, prices
c, telegraph type service,
word count, wording

2. Typewriting

a. correct typing of tele-
gram
b. verification of address
in Hotel Red Book

1. Business Machines

a. running extensions S totals

2. Typewriting


tabulation:
statistical typing
proofreading


- Lucy C. Robinson
Tallahassee









A ONE-WEEK TYPING UNIT BASED ON OFFICE AUTOMATION
for the
CLERICAL PRACTICE COURSE

Lesson Plan 1
Minutes
Conditioning Practice :3

Two one-half minute timings on each of the three sentences in conditioning pr. 4

Quick review of manuscript typing. 4

Using numbered carbon, practice typing footnotes to end one inch from bottom of
page. 1 min,-Footuote 4; 1-4/2 min.--Footnotes 1, 2; l-132;mn.--Footnotes
1,2,5, 7

Begin Problem 1. Problems 1-3 will be completed tomorrow 30

Call attention to bulletin board and the fact that this unit contains infot.-
mation on automation and data processing. Mention some of the things computers
can do: Used in some states to keep record of all drivers' licenses and tells
when each one needs'to be renewed. Also keeps record of fines paid by each
person. This information can be obtained from a computer in a matter of seconds.6

Give suggested reading lists and explain that one article from this list or some
other, appropriate article is to be read and outlined. On Friday each student will
compose a short report at the typewriter, using his outline as a source of infor-
mation. 1



Conditioning Practice

a;sldkfjjghfjdkla;sldkfhjdks sjdkla k hfjdksla;sldkf ghfjdksla;
Accuracy in automation is essential as one error may create thousands.
To typing ability one must add the capacity 6t think thRough problems.
The Binary system combines the figures 0010 010 0011 which equal 263.

Directions:

Problems 1, 2, and 3 which follow are based on information about automation. Use
the directions for manpuript typaig on Page 149 of your teat. Type one carbon
copy of each problem and r ak neat cornsntions. These problems will be completed
tomorrow.

Problem 1--Manuscript

THIS IS AUTOMATION

The wudd ."utomationt is a relatively recent addition to the Englishthanguage. It
was coined in 1951 by John Diebold when he was a student at Harvard Business School.
At that time he used the word to mean a new system of making factory assembly lines
almost automatic through electronic control systems.1 The word was first listed
in dictionaries in 1956, and a 1961 Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary- gives the
meaning as "the technique of making a process or system automatic; automatically
controlled operation of an apparatus, process, or system, especially by electronic
devices."







The Reader's Guide listed articles under Automation for the first time in the March
1955-February 1957 index. Many magazines had articles expressing a sudden interest in
this word. This interest was not confined to a particular type of publication, and the
magazines ranged from Monthly Labor Review and Time and Reader's Digest to Scholastic,
Christian Century. and National Education Association Journal.

Automation has been heralded by some as a system that will cause mass unemployment and
degradation of the hVman spirit while others believe it will bring the nation to the
threshold of Utopia.

One area of automation which has aroused a great deal of public curiosity is that of
the computers. This is probably because they perform such complex operations and are
capable of maintaining such an infinite array of information that man finds their
accomplishments almost unbelievable. Some computers, for instance, can store more
than eight million characters of information and complete calculations in a millionths
of a second.

The Federal government made use of computers in 1951 in connection with the 1950 CZnsus,
and the firsttinstallation of a computer in a business firm was complete'din 1954.
Today several thousand computers are in use and many more are in the process of being
installed. These.giant computers are found most often in those businesses which employ
a large number of office workers such as government agencies, insurance companies, banks,
and public utilities.

Computers are speeding up the work in modern business offices, Management has more
current information and more types of information as a result of the electronic pro-
cessing of data. .This up-to-the-minute business information, rather than the savings
in clerical costs, provides the basic justification for the expenseof.automation in
business offices

Automation in the factory and the office will not come-withboutsome "growing pains."
Some jobs will be.eliminated by the machines, but new jobs will also be created. Like
the industrialrevolution, there will be problems; but automation will.also bring
increasedibenefits to mankind.

Of one thing.we may be sure, automation will require a greater need for trained tech-
nicians and "increased education is needed in the ability to think and understand
mathematical and logical methods."5 Because of these needs, automation will biting
some changes into the system of education,


Diebold, John, "Facing up to Automation," Saturday Evening Post, CXXXV
(September 22, 1962), 26.

2Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, (Springfield, 1961), p. 60.

3"What is Automation?" Collier's, CXXXVII (March 16, 1956), 38.

Lomax, Paul S. .'What Should Business Teachers Do About Offide Automation?"
Business Education W fE1mlXXX (KMay 1959),. 14

Collier's, op. t., p. 4.

Problem 2--Title Page
THIS IS AUTOMATION Compiled by
Problem 3-- Bibliography






BIBLIOGRAPHY


Diebold, John, "Facing up to Automation," Saturday Evening Post, CXXXV (September 22,
1962), 26.

Lomax, Paul S., "What Should Business Teachers Do About Office Automation?," Business
Education World, XXXIX (May, 1959), 14.

Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts, G. & C. Merriam Co.,
1961.

"What is Automation?," Collier's, CXXXVII (March 16, 1956), 38-44.

READINGS ON AUTOMATION

Business Week

"How a Big Computer Takes Over," July 24, 1954, p. 58-62.

Collier's

"What is Automation?," March 16, 1956, p. 38-44.

Look

"Man vs. Machine," December 13, 1955.

Monthly Labor Review

"Experience with the Introduction of Office Automation," April, 1960, p. 376-380.
Iy
Popular Mechanics

"My Most Exciting Moment," January, 1961, p. 133.

Reader's Digest

"Automation: Friend or Foe?," October, 1962, p. 101-106.
"Look What Those Knucklehead Machines Afe Doing!," April, 1963, p. 278-280.
"What is Behind This Word Automation?," May, 1955.

Saturday Evening Post

"Don't Swap Your Brains for a Computer," July 2, 1955.
"Facing Up to Automation," September 22, 1962, p. 26.

Time

"Automating the Archives: Computer to Take Over the Lawyer's Plodding Search
Through Archives," December 13, 1963, p. 82.
"IBM vs. the Others," March 8, 1963, p. 86-87.
"Let 315 Do It; Plan to Share a Computer Center," February 15, 1963, p. 89.

Lesson Plan 2
Minutes
Conditioning Practice 3

Two one-half minute timings on each of three sentences in conditioning
practice. 4






Timed Writings on Paragraph Material Minutes
Practice preview words for paragraph 1
Two one-minute timed writings
Practice preview words for paragraph 2
Two one-minute timed writings 13
Practice preview words for paragraph 3
Two one-minute timed writings
Practice preview words for paragraph 4
Two one-minute timed writings

Mention reading assignment to see if students are finding articles. Ask for
interesting fact from reading (one student).

Type of facts to incorporate into conversation: 7
Most computers cost a million or more dollars.
IBM rents machines from $2,600 to $63,000 a month.
Because many companies cannot afford these amounts on their own and do not
have enough work to keep the machines busy, some are going together
to buy or rent machines.
IBM has 80 per cent of the 1.5 billion a year computer market. Only one
company actually makes money on computers in competition with IBM.
IBM spends a great deal on research, and this is a constantly changing
field.

Complete manuscript, title page, and bibliography. 28

Lesson 2

Conditioning Practice

a;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldk
Automation can lead to increased leisure time and more rewarding jobs.
The demand for office workers has increased during the last ten years.
Page 89 of Business Automation is described as "highly controversial."

Preview Words for Timed Writing

Paragraph 1--automation second human initiative think information
Paragraph 2--subjects minimum shorthand increase emphasis electric classrooms
Paragraph 3-- key-punch offered colleges manufacturers
Paragraph 4--increasing acquiring purposeful teachers equipment

TIMED WRITING

DIRECTIONS: Use a seven-inch line of writing. Indent the paragraphs five spaces.
Words
Some students may wonder just what effect office 10 10
automation will have upon education. A major item to 20 20
remember is that the machines known as computers are being 32 32
used to solve problems in less than a second which would 43 43
require many man hours, but these machines are not really 54 54
"brains." They can use only that information which has been 66 66
given them, and human initiative is still required. In fact, 79 79
there will be an even greater need for students to learn to 91 91
think through problems in terms of how and why. 100 100

Many high school subjects will continue with a minimum 11 111
of change. Shorthand will still be taught, for even though 23 123





Words
dictating machines have been used for a number of years, the 35 135
demand for workers who are able to write shorthand has con- 46 146
tinued to increase. There will beadded emphasis on acearacy 59 159
and on the typing of numbers, and electric typing skill will 71 171
be taught more and more in the classrooms of our schools. 82 182

A few large high schools have been able to add a course 11 193
which Includes training in the use of the key-punch machine. 23 205
Other high schools now offer a short course about automation 35 217
in the office, but they do not teach the operation of the 46 228
vast machines. Most of the machine training is now offered 58 240
in private business schools, in colleges, in special courses 70 252
given by the machine manufacturers, and on the job. 80 262

The need for skilled workers is increasing, and few 10 272
jobs remain for those who drop out of school before acquiring 22 284
these skills. High school boys and girls may become more 34 296
informed about automation in the office through reading and 46 308
by purposeful talks with school counselors, teachers and 57 319
workers who use this type of office equipmentt in their jobs. 69 331

Lesson Plan 3
Minutes
Conditioning Practice 3

Control typing--Everyone begins with one-half minute writing. When 10
student types the individually determined speed without error,
he progresses to one minute, then 11/2 minute, etc. Each half
minute during all timings is called. (Use timed writing material.)

1/2 minute timing
1 minute timing
1-1/2 minute timing
2 minute timing
2-1/2 minute timing

Two five-minute writings--same timed writing material used yesterday (auto 17
mation and education).

Data Processing terms--Review directions. 25

Lesson 3
Conditioning Practice

a;sldkfjghfjdksa;dkfjghdksladksa;sdkfghfdksa;sdkfhfdkla;sldk
The electric typewriter is considered a basic modern business machine.
Memory devices for computers include magnetic tapes, drums, and cores.
The typewriter was purchased for 0365; the adding machine was $147.50.

Directions:

The list of terms which are used in automation in the office should be typed in a
form which you believe would be most attractive and which would make for ease in
locating words and in reading the definitions. Type one carbon copy.






Problem 1
AUTOMATION TERMS1

1. Access time--The length of time required to find information in a device's memory.

2. Binary--The type of arithmetic system used in electronic computers. Instead of
the 10j la g g i tgemcmonl.~ used,~inary arithmetic is based, on .two.
digits, 0 and 1. When the decimal number 296 is converted to a binary number,
it becomes 100101000.

3. Bit--The smallest unit of information in the binary numbering system. An
abbreviation of "binary digit." Normally, a bit refers to one ("on"), while a
no bit means zero ("off"); may also mean "yes" or "no".

4. Code--A system of symbols and rules for representing information in a language
that can be understood and handled by the computer.

5. Input--The transfer of external information into the computer.

6. Magnetic drum--A storage device consisting of a rotating cylinder surfaced with
a material that can be easily magnetized. Information is stored by the presence
or absence of magnetized spots on the surface of the drum.

7. Magnetic tape--A ribbon of metal or plastic that is coated on one side with a
material which can be magnetized. Information is stored by the presence or
absence of magnetized spots on the surface of the drum.

8. Memory--A general term for the equipment that holds information in machine
language in electrical or magnetic form. This equipment also receives information
for storage and gives out the stored information for later use. The word "memory"
usually means storage inside the computer, while "storage" refers to magnetic
drums, discs, cores, tapes, punched cards, etc., outside the computer.

9. Output--The information that is sent out from the computer.

10. Program--Noun: A sequence of steps to be executed By the computer to solve a
given problem. Verb: To plan and prepare the procedures required to solve a
specific problem.

11. Programmer--A person who prepares the planned sequence of events the computer
must follow to solve a problem but who need not necessarily convert them into
detailed instructions (coding).

12. Test routine--A procedure that shows whether or Aot a computer is functioning
properly.

Lesson Plan 4
Minutes
Conditioning Practice 5

Timings one.Problem- 3 .....w ......- ... . ...
Correct errors as you type. Check wpm after each timing.
1 minute beginning at first of letter
2 minutes beginning at first of letter


IMunsinger, John P., "Data Processing Terms in Gregg Shorthand," Today's
Secretary, LIII (March, 1961), 43-44.





Minutes
2 one-minute beginning with tenth line
1 minute beginning with third paragraph
2 minutes beginning with third paragraph 10

Review directions for Problems 1, 2, 3. 3

Production typing on Problems 1, 2, 3. 25

Remainder of period checking wpm, handing in papers, comments on data 12
processing.

Illustration:
The people who have been hurt most by loss of jobs when computers
are installed are those who are not skilled. Many jobs are
available for those with the necessary skills, but the
untrained and uneducated are the first to lose jobs and the
last to find new jobs. Companies know several years ahead
of time that they will be installing automated equipment,
and they try to shift workers to appropriate positions and
do not hire as many new workers during this period so that they
will not have to let many workers go when the new equipment is
put in.

What automated equipment can do in a library, in insurance
office, in the armed forces.

Mention again the article which is to be summarized tomorrow.

Lesson 4

Conditioning Practice

a;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldkfjghfjdksla;sldk
Electronic computers work some problems in a millionth of one second.
A Christmas seal and stamp are the same to automated postal equipment.
Electronic computer equipment may be rented for up to $63,000 a month.

Problem 1

DIRECTIONS: This letter is to be typed two times in modified block style with
mixed punctuation. Type an envelope and one carbon copy for each letter. Type
your address with the current date, and use your name in the signature position.
The letters are to be written to the two addresses given below.
Words
Kerr Business College 216 Main Street Dallas, Texas 11
Kingston University Houston, Texas 18

Gentlemen: At the end of this semester I will be graduating 30
from high school. I feel that my interest is in the field 42
of data processing although at the present I do not have in 54
mind a specific type of training. (P) Since I am not 65
familiar with the various types of training available in the 78
field, I would like a description of your offerings, the 89
cost of the courses, and the length of time required for 100
the training. Yours truly, (Your name) 109







Problem 2

DIRECTIONS: This rough-draft letter should be typed in modified block style with
mixed punctuation. Set up the course names in tabulated form with the longest name
centered. Type an envelope and one carbon copy of the letter.
Words
Mr. Clark Gillum 610 Huisache Street Refugio, Texas 10

Dear Mr. Gillum: The University bulletin has been mailed 22

to you. It gives details on tuition, room and board, plus 33

general information about the school. (P) Pages 199-200 44

give detailed information on the School of Business Adminis- 56

tration. As you will see, five courses are offered in the 67

general area of automation and data processing. None of 78

these courses are required in the degree plans that are 89

offered; however, they may be taken as electives. Complete 101

descriptions of the courses which are listed below will be 113

found in the Bulletin: Punched Card Machines 122

Principles of Data Processing Data Processing Systems 132

Analysis Automation and Accounting Problems in 141

Electronic Data Processing 146

(P) Please write or call if you have questions about our 158

program. Yours very truly J. Matthew Lynn, Dean 168


Problem 3

DIRECTIONS: Type this letter in modified block style with open punctuation. Type
one carbon copy and an envelope.

Mr. Clark Gillum 610 Huisache Refugio, Texas 9
Dear Mr. Gillum This school offers many types of courses, 21
and several of them include training in the area of data 32
processing. In fact, about 75 per cent of our students 43
include some form of data processing as a part of their 54
course of study. (P) Our Computer Programming Course is 65
a most popular program for men. The average time to 75
complete this program is from five to seven months, although 87
some students take longer and a few require a shorter period. 98
The cost of this course, with tuition and textbooks, is 109
$675. In addition to computer programming, this course 120
includes typewriting, ten-key adding listing machine, 130
accounting, payroll accounting, and IBM key-punch machine. 142
(P) Enclosed are programs of instruction offered at our 152
Ruth I. Anderson
North Texas State University
71 Denton, Texas
























Initial Survey Form for New Programs (Directing)
Initial Survey Form for New Programs (Block)
Initial Report for VOE Block
Initial Report for VOE Directing
Business Education Equipment & Repair Record
Instructional Resources Inventory
Initial Interview Form
Registration Form in Approved Sequence
Work Request Form
Daily Work Record
Student Work Appraisal Sheet
Field Trip Report
Work-a-Week Permit
Work-a-Week Employer Appraisal Form
Work-a-Week Student Appraisal Form
Job Placement Survey
VOE Permanent Record Card
Final Report Form (Directing)
Final Report Form (Block)
Follow-up Survey of VOE Graduates
Follow-up Reporting Form


* State Forms


* 1.
* 2.
*3.
* 4.
5.
* 6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
* 18.
* 19.
* 20.
* 21.


Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix
Appendix


r'~J1iJ~1S







APPENDIX A


BUSINESS AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION
Rev. 1967 STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304

INITIAL SURVEY FORM FOR NEW PROGRAMS


Vocational Office Education, (Directing Time), Number of Periods Date

County- School

Mailing Address- Principal -
-------r --------------------------------

1. Is a teacher available to coordinate this program' 1. Yes
who is certified in vocational office education? No

If so, give- Name Certificate Number
Rank Years Teaching Exp. Years Work Exp. __

2. Suitable facilities will be available for the VOE teacher to use 2. Yes
for individual interviews with students. No __

3. All students will be enrolled in at least two business education 3. Yes
classes dailj::to be classified as a VOE student. No __

4. Number of students identified as VOE. (Directing Time) students. 4.

5. Will this pers~a be permitted to attend an out-ofwcounty ptrdesaional 5. Yes
meeting called by the State Department of Education? No ___

6. Will the VOE (Directing Time) teacher have responsibilities other than 6. Yes __
directing this program? No __

If so what will they be __




DO NoT wa tTN TS SPACE signe '

Date recommended for approval:
------- i tt...rineip)
Date Rejected: . .. .. ,, ,,
(MIe4l Ciounty Director)

(Program Supervisor)
". +(+own Superintendent)





(Submit in Duplicate)
72








APPENDIX A


BUSINESS AND DISTRIBUTIVE 9.STiTOIN SECTION
DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL, TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION
STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304


INITIAL SURVEY FORM FOR NEW PROGRAMS


Vocational Office Education (Block Time)
Two hour block, Number of sections
Three hour block, Number of sections


(Date)


School'


Mailing Addressl, ,_ Principal:_______
-------------------------------- -----------------------------------------------
1. Give number of students (those who will be juniors and seniors next 1. Juniors
school year) who have indicated an interest in the program. Seniors


2. Is a teacher available to teach and coordinate this program who is
certified in Vocational Office Education?


If so give: Name:
Rank:


, Certificate No.


, Years Teabhing Exp.


3. Will instructional materials and equipment, as specified in the
teacher's guide, be provided for the VOE classroom when school
opens in September?

4. After conferences with interested students, will your program meet the
enrollment requirements of a minimum of 15 and a maximum of 20 students
in each block?

5. Will each student enrolled in VOE have earned the required two
business education units prior to enrollment?

6. According to community reports and surveys, will there be positions
available to students upon graduation from high school? (Attach any
supporting information to this form.)

7. Will arrangements be made to allow the VOE teacher to attend at least
one out-if-county professional meeting called by the State Department
of Education?

8. Will the instructor have responsibilities in addition to teaching in
the VOE program?
If so, list them on the reverse side.


DO NOT WRITE IN THIS SPACE

Date Recommended for Approval:

Date Rejected:


(Program Supervisor)


Signed:


(Submit in Duplicate)


(Sdhool Principal)


(Local County DireetH)


(County Superintendent)

, 73


Rev. 1967


County:


2, Yes
No


.r -. Work- Ep.


4, Yes

4. Yes
No


5. Yes
No

6. Yes
No


7. Yes
No


8, Yes
No


- ----~ ~ I *- ~


[ [ [ .I I [ I I I I


! ! ' [ IL


1 -1


__-._ 1


I I I I m I




D 66


Initial Report of VOE Classes


City


County


Instructor


Date Report Submitted Teaching Certificate No.


Section I 2 hr.f / 3 hr. f_ Section II 2 hr./ J 3 hr./
S Bus. Subj. Grd. 12 Bus. S Bus. Subj. Grd. 12 Bus.
e grd prior to subjects No Name of Student e grd prior to subjects
No Name of Student x grd 12 (not VOE) x grd. 12 (not V0E)

1 1______ _____________________
2_ 2
3 3_
T _----__5 ------

6
7 7

9 9
10 10
11 11
12 12
3 _13

5 15

7 17
. -- l -- -




09 191
0 1 20


Enrollment
Male
Female
Total
*Refer to reverse side


Signature of VOE Instructor


Signature of Principal



Sighature of Director
or Superintendent


STATE DEPAR E EDUCATION

Distributive, Cooperative, and Business Education Section
Tallahassee, Florida


School


----










ABBREVIATIONS FOR BUSINESS SUBJECTS ARE AS FOLLOWS:



Bookkeeping I B 1
Bookkeeping II B 2
Briefhand Bh
S Business Arithmetic BA
Business pglish BE
Business Law BL
Business Principles and
Management BPM
Clerical Office Practice COP
Consumer Education CE
Cooperative Business Education CBI
Distributive Education DE
Diversified Cooperative Training DCT
Economics E
Filing F
General Business GB
Notehand Nh
Office Machines OM
Office Practice OP
Personal Typing PT
Recordkeeping R
Salesmanship S
Secretarial Office Practice SOP
Shorthand I Sh 1
Shorthand II Sh 2
Speedwiting Sp
Stenoscript St
Transcription Tr
Typewriting I T 1
Typewriting II T 2
Vocational Office Education VOE






Appendix C


Form No. DCBE-7

STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Business and Distributive Education Section


Vocational Office Education
Directing Teacher


INITIAL REPORT

School City

County Date Submitted__

Directing Teacher.. ..

Teaching Certificate Number ._______

1. Are you certified for Vocational Office Education___yes no

2. Directing Teacher's Schedule

List classes by title and number of students in each

Period Course Pupils
-------------------------------------------
2

3
4 __ n n ._'l__,___ ..... nail Inj__nn

4

5

6

7
____ 5__________________________________


3. How many students have you identified with a stated career object-
ive in office occupations? (List on attached sheet)

Grade Level Number


Male


Female


Total

4. Check appropriate space if your school offers following special
business and office education programs.

Program Enrollment
CBE
VOE Block
Other
(Specify)








Appendix C
5. Identify the sequences of courses being taken by the Vocational Office
Education students and report how many are enrolled in each sequence.
Sequences may be listed as secretarial, clerical, bookkeeping, data
processing, or others that you offer, (Refer to Page 18, Bulletin 73H-5,
Vocational Office Education in Florida Schools).

A. Sequence
Number of students by grade level
10 11 12

List business education courses included in sequence


B, Sequence
Number of students by graPd level
10 11 12

List business education courses included in sequence


C. Sequence
Number of students by grade level
10 11 12

List business education courses included in seqggg@&


6. Please describe briefly what procedures were used to schedule
Vocational Office Education students in a sequence. (Use
additional space if needed.)





7. List the ways in which you have cooperated with the guidance department.





Appendix C


All Vocational Office Education (Directing Time) students must be
enrolled in at least two business education courses. Complete the
following information on your students. Group the students by
grade level.


Name Business Course Enrollment
Sex Grade
(Last first) Course I Colrse 2


Directing Teacher


Director or
Superintendent


Principal







F~m Me.-

Sclaasl


Desk No. Type of Ma~ineam Serial No.

Make 'odel_

Date Received New_

BUSINESS EDUCATION EQUIPMENT AND REPAIR Ear

PINELLAS COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS


Date Reported
Out Description of Repair Date Repair Date Repair OX Remarks About Repaias
of Order Requested Cmpleted 1 Unsattisactory






INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES INVENTORY

SECTION I. CLASSROOM EQUIPMENT


Number of Machines
Electric -- Manual
Elite Pica : Elite Pica


PURCHASED WITH:
Local or Federal
State Funds Funds


Appendix E


Rental


A. TYPEWRITERS

Adler
Facit
Hermes
IBM Executive
IBM Selectric
IBM Standard
Olivetti-Underwood
Olympia
R. C. Allen
Remington
Royal
Smith-Corona
Other:


Age of Typewriters:
Number:

SPECIAL TYPEWRITERS
Flexowriter
Varityper
IBM MTST
Other:


1 to 5 years


over 5 years


over 10 years


B. DUPLICATING EQUIPMENT


SPIRIT PROCESS
A. B. Dick
Ditto
Heyer
Standard
Other:
MIMEOGRAPHING PROCESS
A. B. Dick
Gestetner
Other:

OFFSET PROCESS
A. B. Dick
Ditto
Multilith
Other:


80


I








PHOTOCOPY MACHINES
A. B. Dick
Thermofax
Xerox
Other:

Age of Duplicating Equipment: 1 to 5 years
Number:



Number of Machines
Electric Manual*


over 5 years over 10 years



Purchased With
Local or Federal
State Funds Funds Rental


C. ADDING AND CALCULATING MACHINES

TEN-KEY ADDING MACHINES
Burroughs
Facit
Friden
Hermes
Marchant __
Monroe
NCR
Olivetti-Underwood
Remington
Victor
Other:

FULL-KEYBOARD ADDING MACHINES
Burroughs
Monroe
NCR
Remington
Victor
Other:


Age of Adding Machines: 1 to 5 years over 5 years over 10 years
Number:


KEY-DRIVEN CALCULATORS
Burroughs
Victor Comptometer
Other:

PRINTING CALCULATORS
Burroughs
Friden
Marchant
Monroe
Olivetti-Underwood
Remington Rand
Victor
Other:


- -



--




-- --





--



---
--


--




-- ---~










--
-- ---


--






-


--

1~ -










ROTARY CALCULATORS
Facit-Odhner
Friden
Marchant
Monroe
Olympia
Other:

Age of Calculators:
Number:


1 to 5 years over 5 years over 10 years


BOOKKEEPING MACHINES
Burroughs
Monroe
NCR
Other:


Age of Bookkeeping Machines:
Number:


1 to 5 years


over 5 years


over 10 years


D. MACHINE SHORTHAND
Stenograph
Stenotype
Other:


E. DICTATION/TRANSCRIPTION EQUIPMENT


Number of Machines
in Classroom


Purchased With


Local or


Federal


State Funds Funds Rental


MAGNETIC BELT
IBM Executary
Stenocord
Other:


MAGNETIC DISC
Telefunken
Other:

MAGNETIC TAPE
DeJur-Grundig Stenorette
Other:

PLASTIC BELT
Dictaphone
Other:

PLASTIC DISC
Edison Voicewriter
SoundScriber
Other:


TAPE
Norelco
Rekotape
Other:


--


--


--








Age of Dictation/Transcription Equipment:
Number:


F. SHORTHAND TAPE LABORATORIES

Number of Machines
in Classroom


1 to 5 years over 5 years over 10 years


Purchased With
Local or Federal
State Funds Funds


Console with individual
listening stations
Tape Recorders with
listening stations
Phonographs with
listening stations
Other:




G. DATA PROCESSING EQUIPMENT

Keypunch
Sorter
Collator
Interpreter
Reproducer
Verifier
Calculator
Accounting Machine
Computer and Printer
Other:


KEYPUNCH SIMULATORS
IBM Selectric
Royal Training Tandem
Smith-Corona 250KPT

Portable Card Punch


Rental


--


T












- --


--

--


-"


II








SECTION II. CLASSROOM FACILITIES AND FURNITURE


A. CLASSROOM FACILITIES

1. Number Feet of Counter Space

2. Number Feet of Uncer-Counter Cabinets

3. Number Feet of Cabinet Space Over Counter

4. Number Feet of Open Shelving

5. Sink in Classroom

6. Air Conditioning in Classroom

7. Type of Lighting in Classroom:

a. Fluorescent:

Ceiling Strips Ceiling Fixtures

Dropped Ceiling (Indirect)

b. Other Type:


Answers


Yes No _

Yes No


c. Is lighting: Completely satisfactory Adequate Inadequate

8. Windows in Classroom:

Venetian Blinds Shades Drapes Black-out Shades

9. Type of Floor in Classroom:

Tile Wood Cement Carpeted Floor

10. Electrical Outlets:

a. Number of electric machines in classroom

b. Number of electric outlets in classroom

c. Are outlets placed for satisfactory room arrangement: yes no

d. Are electric outlets satisfactory: yes no

e. Is master electrical switch easily accessible: yes no







B. CLASSROOM FURNITURE

1. Student Desks:

a. Bookkeeping Desk




b. Machines Desk


(Circle those in classroom and indicate number)

(1) (2)

Number_ Nmber

(1) (2)

Number__ Nunber_


c. Typewriting Desk


LZ]
Number-


(2)

Number -


(3) (4)

Number

upmber -


d. Other Type:

2. Student Chairs:

a. Posture Chairs (Number)

b. Other Type: ___

3. Student Work Tables:


(Specify Number, Type and Size of Tables)

4. Closet Storage Space:

One Closet Two Closets Three Closets

Storage Cabinets Other

5. Teacher's Equipment:

Desk Personal Filing Cabinet Telephone_

Teacher's Work Table Bookcase (Number)

Other











6. Filing Cabinets in Classroom:

a. Four-Drawer File Cabinet

b. Three-Drawer File Cabinet

c. Two-Drawer File Cabinet

d. File for Mimeograph Stencils

e. Drum Files

f. Other:


Number of Cabinets
Metal I Wood


7. Miscellaneous Supplies and Small Equipment:


Misc. Supplies Number Misc. Supplies Number
Clip Boards Paper Punch-Electric
Collating Rack Paper Trays
Copy Holders__ Postal Scale _. ..
Demonstration Stand Stapler-Manual ...
Interval Timer ___Stapler-Electric
Mimeograph Styli Staple Removers
Mimeo Lettering Guides Stop Watch
Mimeoscope Wall Charts
Numbering Machines Wire Baskets
Paper Cutter Other:
Paper Punch: Manual_____ _____


SECTION IV. CLASSROOM LAYOUT

Acorj-ximate number of square feet in room .

. Do you have an office or planning area: yes no .

C. If a drawing of your classroom layout is available, please enclose.








SECTION IV,


INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS / MEDIA


Available Available Can be ob- Purchased
.in in trained from with
Classroom Sch~ l Co. Office Federal funds


A. Media

1..









2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.


B. Reference Materials


Dictionaries

Secretarial Handbooks

Telephone Directories

City Directories

Zip-Code Directories

Transportation Schedule Books

Basic textbooks:

Title Pub.


Number of Copies Available
1 p/student : 1-5 : 6-10 : 10+










: ,




____: ___ :

*-
*
*-







_* __
*
_ .- *- _


La

Projectors:

Slide Projector
Film Projector
Single-Concept Film Projector
Overhead Projector
Opaque Projector

Tape Recorder

Tele-Trainer


Phonograph

Controlled Reader (EDL)

Television Facilities

Other:


-- -






--


__
__









__








__ _.
Il


7-
---~






I-




1--1 i





--- --~-
-. -- -








Appendix F


Date


Grade


Middle


Phone


Name of Parents


Subi ect


CLASS SCHEDULE (Present)

Teacher


Are you interested in a career in business?


Yes No
(Please check one)


If "Yes", what is your career objective?


Are you interested in teaching business education?

Are your plans now to attend college?


Yes No

Yes No


Lakeland Sr. High School
Lakeland, Florida


Name


Last


Address


First


Period


Room No.


__ _





Appendix G


REGISTRATION FORM

FOR

BUSINESS EDUCATION STUDENTS


DATE


SEQUENCE

COURSES APPROVED FOR 1967-68:

























PARENTS' APPROVAL

DATE


CONFERENCE DATE:


DIRECTING TEACHERS:


Lakeland Senior High School
Lakeland, Florida


NAME


'


- -


__






.


_______



..._








Appendix H







WORK REQUEST FORM

(This sheet should accompany work until
completion and then be retained for
Stenographic file)


WORK FOR

COMPLETE
PREFERABLY

BUT NOT
LATER THAN


CARBONS
DITTO
MIMEOGRAPH


KIND AND
PAPER SIZE


TYPE
PICA
ELITE


MARGIN


SHEETS NUMBERED


YES
NO


SPACE SINGLE
DOUBLE


TYPIST: PROOFREADER APPROVED DELIVERED BY


PUT IN SETS YES
NO


STAPLE YES
NO


SPECIFIC INSTRUCTIONS


NOo OF
COPIES


_ _____ ____


_ _




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