• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Introduction
 Selection of adult basic education...
 Specific criteria for evaluating...
 Materials for the introductory...
 Materials for the elementary...
 Materials for the intermediate...
 Addresses of publishers
 Back Cover














Title: Personnel directory for industrial education
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082736/00003
 Material Information
Title: Personnel directory for industrial education
Alternate Title: Bulletin 71F-3 ; Florida State Department of Education
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Florida. Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education. Industrial Education Section.
Publisher: Florida. Division of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education. Industrial Education Section.
Place of Publication: Talllahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1969
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082736
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
        Title Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page i
    Introduction
        Page ii
    Selection of adult basic education instructional materials
        Page iii
    Specific criteria for evaluating the content, organization, and format of adult basic education instructioal materials
        Page iv
    Materials for the introductory stage
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Materials for the elementary stage
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Materials for the intermediate stage
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
    Addresses of publishers
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Back Cover
        Page 61
        Page 62
Full Text



















































THE STATE DEPARTMENT
OF EDUCATION




State Superintendent


TALLAHASSEE. FLORIDA


BULLETIN 71F-3



AUGUST, 1968



C





















A Selected Annotated Bibliography

of Instructional Literacy Materials

for Adult Basic Education


IP





BULLETIN 71F-3


A Selected Annotated Bibliography
of Instructional Literacy Materials
for Adult Basic Education


V4000 400


DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL,
TECHNICAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION


CARL W. PROEHL, Assistant Superintendent


ADULT and VETERAN EDUCATION


JAMES H. FLING, DIRECTOR


AUGUST, 1968









3-75: oo001751
pc,36L
r -7 1r-i'



































WRITTEN BY:


'j Edwin H. Smith
Director
Fundamental Education Materials Center

and

Weldon G. Bradtmueller
Consultant, Adult Basic Education
Florida State Department of Education


EDITED BY:

Mrs. Eloise Berry
Consultant, Adult Basic Education
Florida State Department of Education

Sand

Ralph Rosenberg
Consultant, Adult Basic Education
Florida State Department of Education

^z



































CONTENTS


Introduction.............................................. ii

Selection of Adult Basic Education Instructional
Materials............................................... iii

Specific Criteria for Evaluating the Content,
Organization, and Format of Adult Basic
Educational Instructional Materials..................... iv

Sections
Part I Materials for the Introductory Stage
Readability Level 1....................... .... 1-6
Readability Level 2............................. 7 10
Readability Level 3,,........................... 11-17

Part II Materials for the Elementary Stage
Readability Level 4.............................. 18-26
Readability Level 5............................. 27-35
Readability Level 6............................. 36-43

Part III Materials for the Intermediate Stage
Readability Level 7............................. 44-49
Readability Level 8............................. 50-54
Readability Level 9........ ..... ............ 55-58

Addresses of Publishers.................................. 59-60














INTRODUCTION


In 1965 the Adult and Veteran Education Section of the
Florida State Department of Education published an
extensive bibliography which listed most of the lit-
eracy materials then considered acceptable for use with
adults. It is hoped that the improvement of the qual-
ity of materials for Adult Basic Education will con-
tinue. It is anticipated that by 1971 many of the
literacy materials currently acceptable will fail to
meet the improved standards.

This bibliography is divided into the three stages of
Adult Basic Education (now often referred to as pre-vo-
cational education). These are the Introductory Stage
(readability levels 1-3), the Elementary Stage, (read-
ability levels 4-6), and the Intermediate Stage (read-
ability levels 7-9). At the end of the Intermediate
Stage the adult is considered functionally literate.
He can read the newspaper, most popular magazines,
and many vocational training manuals.

This bibliography is not complete. Some fine publica-
tions may have been omitted inadvertently. Readers
are requested to inform us of any superior materials
that are not now listed so that they may be included
in future revisions.







SELECTION OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS


Instructional materials for Adult Basic Education classes need to be selected
in terms of the learner, the classroom situation in which instruction is to
take place,and the educational philosophy of the teacher and the system
involved.

The problem of what materials to use in teaching the functionally illiterate
4dult is compounded by the fact that often he has been manifestly unsuccessful
in the learning situation. He may be suspicious of teachers and schools
and generally feels that he cannot learn. The teacher's task then becomes
one in which he must gain confidence, demonstrate the immediate values of
additional learning and assure immediate success in the learning situation.

The accomplishment of these instructional goals requires careful selection
of teaching materials. Instruction, if it is to be relatively successful,
must be so designed that a great deal of individualization is possible.
The wide range of academic achievement plus the need of each adult to feel
that he is a worthy, respected person necessitates the addition of this
factor in the selection of materials. In the light of the above, the following
criteria are suggested as evaluative guidelines for the selection of Adult
Basic Education instructional materials.

General-Selection Criteria

1. The contents must be appropriate for adults.

2. Cost should be in line with similar publications.

3. Print should not be under 10 point.

4. Several different rhetorical devices (such as colored inks, sub-
headings, etc.) should be utilized.

5. The edition.date should be fairly recent.

6. The text should be designed to serve as a guide for self-instruction.

7. The materials should be adaptable for both individual and group
instruction.

8. No one method is suitable for all students; therefore, no single
series or single text should be used.

9. The range of reading levels within a class is often seven grades,
therefore, multi-level materials must be provided.

10. "Software" (books, etc.) should be given preference over "hardware"
until each class has a well-stocked library of instructional materials.
















SPECIFIC CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING THE CONTENT, ORGANIZATION, AND
FORMAT OF ADULT BASIC EDUCATION INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS


1. Goals for each lesson should be clear, practical, and attainable.

2. Each lesson should provide one or two concepts thoroughly.

3. Subject matter and learning activities should be familiar and interesting.

4. Content should, whenever possible, raise the self-esteem and status of
the adult learner.

5. Materials should motivate or encourage individual reading, speaking,
writing, and other study.

6. The language used in lessons should be adult in tone.

7. Sentences used in some lessons should be similar to the sentence patterns
used by adults in oral communication.

8. Skills and concepts should be taught in sequential, logical order.

9. Drawings, illustrations, and other graphics should clarify ideas
presented verbally.

10. Materials should be written in such a manner that they are conducive to
individual study.

11. Materials should have built-in measuring devices to show both quantitative
and qualitative student progress.

12. Materials should provide content in actual life situations, such as food
purchasing, property ownership, job, votingand'civics, safety, social
security, housing, homecraft, financing, etc.









PART I


Materials for the Introductory Stage

LEVEL I


Reading Development Kit A. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968.

Kit A contains 80 different (160 total) coded lesson pamphlets on
readability levels 1.75 through 3.9. Within Kit A are four separate series
(Series X, 100, 200, 300), one of which contains articles and skill development
in critical thinking and reading. The remaining series contain high interest
articles and include vocabulary and skills development. The lessons are
designed so that instruction can be individualized. A teacher's manual,
student answer booklets and placement tests are included in the kit. The
materials can be used as a core program or can supplement other programs.

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program, Series 300. Allied Education Council,
1965.

The "total language program" covers readability levels 1 through 12.
It is designed for adults, and has many of the advantages and disadvantages
attributed to basal series designed for children.

Reading 300 deals with materials designed for levels 1 through 3.
The word attack approach used stresses phonics. The series provides for
the systematic development of word attack, spelling, writing, composition
and listening and understanding skills.

Basic Language 300A provides for initial instruction in reading,
writing and spelling. Initial consonants, vowels, blends and final endings
are included. Many written exercises for the student are included.

Basic Language 300B provides additional instruction on vowel combina-
tions and irregular spellings. Reading selections are included as well as
numerous exercises on vowels, reading and writing. Assignments are done by
the student in sequence.

Word Bank 300. This book is divided into 12 units. Each unit
presents photo vocabulary with the word written in manuscript and cursive.
Space is provided for copying sentences using the new words. At the end
of each unit is a reading selection using the words previously introduced.
Comprehension exercises are included.

Basic Numbers and Money 300. The purpose of this book is to help the
students use numbers, handle money,and use newspaper advertisements. There
are worksheets for practice examples. Skills introduced in this book are
addition, subtraction, simple multiplication, and division examples. Simple
word problems provide another type of exercise.

At this same level, supplementary reading is provided for by the Fair
Chance Series 300. The occupational and vocational reading is found under the








Apprentice Series 300. Titles include: The Auto Mechanic, The Filling Station
Attendant, The Meat Cutter, Polly Looks for a Job, The Road Workers, The Carpenter,
Needlecraft 300 and Homecraft 300.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination train-
ing, and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the Bloomfield-
Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when used as an
entirety. Parts may be used separately. It includes listening, reading, and
writing skills developmental exercises.

Series I: Reading. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1966.

Series I: Reading consists of four programmed workbooks designed to
teach reading to people with serious reading problems. It has proven to have a
high interest level and the material is at the adult level. Series I will take
the student through the second grade readability level. This series is accom-
panied by small supplementary unprogrammed readers that are of high interest and
that are appropriate to the programmed workbook they accompany.

Learning 100, Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the first book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills of the totally illiterate adult. It starts with dots, and
builds to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the TachX Set
AxBxCx.
E.D.L. has a complete set of materials designed to develop visual
perceptual skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, controlled
Reader, and Tach X materials. Various instructional media are used and many
learning modes employed. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are treated
as related skills. The series extends through Level 6.

Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

This is a sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is a
fairly comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills and
progressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along the
same general format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is used
and a detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in a
loose leaf binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher-and
class-made materials.

Money Makes Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 140 pp.

This book is for students who need basic skills in handling money.
The book permits students to work on their own. Illustrations are pertinent
to adults. The book proceeds from simple to complex problems.

Using Dollars and Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 126 pp.

This book, like Money Makes Sense, deals with money. However, it is
on a higher level. Content and illustrations are of adult interest.


-2-








Figure It Out, Book I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.


This book develops arithmetic skills needed for everyday living
and for vocational work. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
exercises are presented. Space is provided for the student to record his
responses.

Getting Started, Communications I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 105 pp.

A basic understanding of reading and writing is developed primarily
through employing the "linguistic approach". It teaches writing at the same
time as reading. It progresses from the known to the unknown by presenting
a picture of the object accompanied by the oral word for it, followed by the
written word.

Systems to Success, Book I. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 123 pp.

This is one of a series of two books. Book I goes from Level I to
Level 4. Book II goes from Level 5 to Level 8. It covers the gamut of adult
basic education, except for the general knowledge segment. It should be supple-
mented at every level.

English Lessons for Adults. Harcourt Brace and World, 1966.

English Lessons for Adults contains lessons for the development of
speaking, reading, and writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis
is placed on visual and auditory discrimination and basic composition skills.
The content reflects the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional
approach to language study.

Holt Adult Education Program, Basic Series. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1965.

This is a series of paperback texts designed to take the adult student
from elementary through high school. The texts are classified in three separate
series according to levels and cover a wide variety of subject matter. The texts
generally are written at a higher readability level than that suggested by the
authors. Subject materials books for the most part are poorly written in terms
of their basic objective.
First Series-Basic 0 through 4th grade reading level.

Learning to Read and Write
Life with the Lucketts
The Thomases Live Here
Measure, Cut and Sew
Get Your Money's Worth

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not
the native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born
with six years of practical experience in English through guided repetition,
correction, and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to
use from book one to six, the other from seven to twelve.


-3-








Streamlined English. Macmillan Company, 1956, 111 pp.


Streamlined English contains thirty lessons developed for teaching
the student to read through the Laubach method. Each lesson introduces a new
sound. Pictures are associated with the letters to help make strong associations.
Special symbols are used to make the spelling more "phonetic". The system depends
strongly on Laubach phonics. It may be helpful where,other methods have failed.
A teacher's manual is designed to accompany the workbook and should be used if the
system is employed. This approach calls for much other supplementary material,
perhaps best developed through experience stories.

Programmed Reading for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966.

This series of 8 programmed workbooks begins with numbers and letters
and teaches reading skills to the fourth grade readability level. The basic
program is self-contained, but much supplementary reading should accompany the
program after the student has completed Book 4. The program moves much too
slowly in Books 1 and 2 for most adults.

Programmed Math for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.

Series I of Programmed Math for Adults consists of five 96-page pro-
grammed workbooks, five 32-page books of word problems, a book of progress tests,
a diagnostic placement examination, an achievement and final examination, and
an instructor's manual. It is a self-pacing, self-instructional remedial
course for adults taking the student through the basic operations:.of addition,
subtraction, multiplication and division. Each book is divided into six-page
lesson units with the answer printed on the left side of the page.

Operation Alphabet. National Association for Public School Adult Education,
1962, 111 pp. (Now being published by Noble and Noble)

This text is designed to accompany the Operation Alphabet television
course, but it may be used independently of the course. Each lesson is self-
contained and the vocabulary and the rate of introduction of new wotds is con-
trolled. Writing exercises are included, but no provision is made for a phonics
program. It should be used as supplementary materials or be supplemented by
other texts.

How We Live. Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc., 1949, 148 pp.

This is a hard-back text intended for beginning readers and semi-
literate adults. The material is arranged in short units and ranges from
simple sentences to short paragraphs. Exercises are included.

English Through Pictures. Pocket Books, 1952, 286 pp.

Line drawings are used to introduce words and phrases. Vocabulary
consists of the most frequently used words. These are especially helpful with
the foreign-born, but of some supplementary help with native-born students.

Readers' Digest Adult Series. Reader's Digest, 1964-65, 32 pp. each.

A series of twelve books extending from Level I to Level 4. The first
four books are for Level 1. This series was especially designed for adults and








adolescents. The books have a high interest level, appearance is similar to the
regular Reader's Digest, legibility is excellent,and the subject matter is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Exercises for the development of comprehension
and vocabulary are included and the teacher's manual for the series contains
helpful suggestions. The series should be supplemented with other books.

Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 1, Parts I and II. Reader's Digest, 1963.
64 pp.

Part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high.,
and the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

Modern American English. Regents Publishing Company, 1962.

This is one of a series of four books developed to teach the foreign
born to read and speak English. The series is not recommended for use with
native-born American adults for the pace is much too slow for them. For those
involved in teaching the foreign born, it is recommended that they review
numerous publications of the Regent's Publishing Cogpany which are designed
especially for that type of student.

Reading In High Gear. Science Research Associates- 1965.

This is an unusual approach to literacy education (Progressive Choice
Method). It is designed to carry the student at his own learning rate through
reading levels 1 through 8. It is especially designed for disadvantaged youth.
It appears to suffer from an over-emphasis on phonemics (phonics re-styled) and
may prove most effective with those who fail through other approaches.

SRA Reading Laboratories. Science Research Associates.

The SRA Reading Laboratories suitable for the Introductory stage of
reading include Reading Laboratory Ib, and Ic and the older, but not out-moded
Elementary Edition (1958). The laboratories contain many articles as separate
items which are grouped according to readability level. They are suitable for
adults. Teacher's manuals are complete and lessons are designed so that much
of the learning is self-instruction. The laboratories should be supplemented
with vocabulary development materials.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty.
Basic language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of
phonics-related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for
individualized study on the student's part. The format resembles that of
programmed instruction. The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.

I Want to Read and Write. Revised Edition. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1964, 128 pp.

Interest level is fair and exercises in basic writing skills are good.
The vocabulary control is not good and the rate of introduction of new words is
too fast for many students. The exercises meet immediate felt needs of adults.
This text should be supplemented with other texts on Level 1.







My Country. Revised Edition. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1964, 96 pp.

The content is social studies, the interest level is fair, and the
legibility is excellent. Vocabulary control and the rate of introduction of
new words is adequate when supplemented with other materials. The compre-
hension exercises and phonics~ are adequate. The 1964 revision differs little
from the earlier edition.

Steps to Learning, Books 1 and 2. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 64 pp.

The needs of the adult beginning reader and writer are considered in
this book by presenting reading and work materials in sequential form. Adult
interest and problems are of prime concern in presentation of material. Oral
language, reading, and writing, and number skills are included.

Men in the Armed Forces. U.S. Government Printing Office, 252 pp.

This book extends in readability from Level 1 through Level 4.
Interest level is fair, legibility is good, and general.appearance is good.
Vocabulary load is high and the text does not contain a planned phonics program.
Part I of the book can be used with Level 1 readers, but it should be supple-
mented with other materials.





LEVEL 3


Reading Development Kit, Series A. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968.

Kit A contains 80 different (160 total) coded lesson pamphlets on read-
ability levels 1.75 through 3.9. Within Kit A are four separate series (Series
X, 100, 200, 300), one of which contains articles and skill development in criti-
cal thinking, and reading. The remaining series contain high interest articles
and include vocabulary and skills development. The lessons are designed so that
instruction can be individualized. A teacher's manual, student answer booklets,
and placement tests are included in the kit. The materials can be used as a:core
program or can supplement other programs.

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program, Series 300. Allied Education Council,
1965.

The "total language program" covers readability levels 1 through 12,
It is designed for adults, and has many advantages and disadvantages attributed to
basal series designed for children.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination
training and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the Bloom-
field-Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when used
as an entirety. Parts may be used separately. It includes listening, reading and
writing skills developmental exercises.

Series I: Reading. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1966.

Series I: Reading consists of four programmed workbooks designed to
teach reading to people with serious reading problems. It has proven to have a
high interest level and the'material is at the adult level. Series I will take
the student through the second grade readability level. This series is accom-
panied by small supplementary unprogrammed readers that are of high interest and
that are appropriate to the programmed workbook they accompany.

Why Work Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1967.

This is a kit of twenty-one reading selections and eight recordings of
certain selections. The reading levels range from two through seven. The
selections are designed to introduce the undereducated to the world of work.
Each selection consists of a story and comprehension questions. This is good
for supplementary reading practice.

Learning 100, Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the fist book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills of the totally illiterate adult. It starts with dots, and
builds to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the Tach X Set
AxBxCx.

E.D.L. has a complete set of materials designed to develop visual
perceptual skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, Controlled
Reader, and Tach X materials. Various instructional media are used and many
learning modes employed. Listening, speaking, reading and writing are treated
as related skills. The series extends through Level 6.








Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

This is a sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is a :
fairly comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills and
progressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along the same
general format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is used and
a detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in a loose
leaf binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher- and class-made
materials.

Money Makes Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 140 pp.

This book is for students who need basic skills in handling money. The
book permits students to work on their own. Illustrations are pertinent to adults.
The book proceeds from simple to complex problems.

Pacemaker Story Books. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1955.

This series of six small books developed for the culturally deprived
retarded reader is a useful supplement with adolescents. The teacher's manual
which accompanies the series is not strong.

Using Dollars and Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 126 pp.

This book, like Money Makes Sense, deals with money. However, it is
on a higher level. Content and illustrations are of adult interest.

Figure It Out, Book I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book develops arithmetic skills needed for everyday living and
for vocational work. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
exercises are presented. Space is provided for the student to record his
responses.

Getting Started, Communications I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 105 pp.

A basic understanding of reading and writing is developed primarily
through employing the "linguistic approach". It teaches writing at the same
time as reading. It progresses from the known to the unknown by presenting a
picture of the object accompanied by the oral word for it, followed by the
written word.

Basic Vocabulary Books. Garrard Press, 1952.

This series is made up of 16 books broken down into three groups.
These are true stories about animals, world folklore stories, and Indian folklore
stories. While somewhat childish to sensitive adults, they have been used for
years in literacy education to promote independence in reading.

English Lessons for Adults. Harcourt Brace and World, 1966.

English Lessons for Adults contains lessons for the development of speak-
ing, reading, and writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis is
placed on visual and auditory discrimination and basic composition skills. The
content reflects the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional approach
to language study.







The Morgan Bay Mysteries, Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1962, 89 pp.

This series consists of two books on Level 2 and two books on Level 3.
Content, illustrations, and exercises are suitable for adults. The vocabulary
development should be planned for. The two books on Level 2 are: The Mystery
of Morgan Castle and The Mystery of the Marble Arch.

Holt Adult Education Program, Basic Series. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965.

This is a series of paperback texts designed to take the adult student
from elementary through high school. The texts are classified in three separate
series according to levels and cover a wide variety of subject matter. The texts
generally are written at a higher readability level than that suggested by the
authors. Subject materials books for the most part are poorly written in terms
of their basic objective.
First Series Basic 0 through 4th grade reading level.
Learning to Read and Write
Life with the Lucketts
The Thomases Live Here
Measure, Cut, and Sew
Get Your Money's Worth

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not the
native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six
years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to use from book
one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Programmed Reading for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966.

This series of 8 programmed workbooks begins with numbers and letters
and teaches reading skills to the fourth grade readability level. The basic pro-
gram is self-contained but much supplementary reading should accompany the
program after the student has completed Book 4. The program moves much too slowly
in Books 1 and 2 for most adults.

ProgrammedMath for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1965.

Series I of Programmed Math for Adults consists of five 96-page pro-
grammed workbooks, five 32-page books of word problems, a book of progress tests,
a diagnostic placement examination, an'achievement and final examination, and an
instructor's manual. It is a self-pacing, self-instructional remedial course for
adults taking the student through the basic operations of addition, sub-;
traction, multiplication, and division. Each book is divided into six-page
lesson units with the answer printed on the left side of the page.

News For You. The Adult Newsletter. New Reader Press, Edition A.

This four-page newspaper for literacy classes comes with a teacher's
guide. It contains photographs, feature articles, and news items. Edition A is
written at readability Level 2-3.

How We Live. Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc., 1949, 148 pp.

This is a hard-back text intended for beginning readers and semi-
literate adults. The material is arranged in short units and ranges ftomisimple








sentences to short paragraphs. Exercises are included.


Reader's Digest Adult Series. Reader's Digest, 1964-65, 32 pp. each.

This is a series of twelve books extending from Level 1 to Level 4.
The first four books are for Level 1. This series was especially designed for
adults and adolescents. The books have a high interest level, appearance is simi-
lar to the regular Reader's Digest, legibility is excellent and the subject matter
is articles from the.Reader's Digest. Exercises for the development of comprehen-
sion and vocabulary are included and the teacher's manual for the series contains
helpful suggestions. The series should be supplemented with other books.

Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 2, Parts I, II, III. Reader's Digest, 1963.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high,
and the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

SRA Reading Laboratories. Science Research Associates.

The SRA Reading Laboratories suitable for the Introductory stage of
reading include Reading Laboratory Ib, and Ic and the older, but not out-moded
Elementary Edition (1958). The laboratories contain many articles as separate
items which are grouped according to readability level. They are suitable for
adults. Teacher's manuals are complete and lessons are designed so that much of
the learning is self-instruction. The laboratories should be supplemented with
vocabulary development materials.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty. Basic
language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of phonics-
related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for individualized
study on the student's part. The format resembles that of programmed instruction.
The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.

Adult Reader. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1949, 127 pp.

Adult Reader is an excellent supplementary book either for use with other
Steck adult books or to supplement another series. Print, illustrations, and cover
are godd. This content is of a practical nature used in conjunction with tasks
that facilitate other communication skills.


-10-







LEVEL 3


Reading Development Kit, Series A. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968.

Kit A contains 80 different (160 total) coded lesson pamphlets on read-
ability levels 1.75 through 3.9. Within Kit A are four separate series (Series
X, 100, 200, 300), one of which contains articles and skill development in criti-
cal thinking, and reading. The remaining series contain high interest articles
and include vocabulary and skills development. The lessons are designed so that
instruction can be individualized. A teacher's manual, student answer booklets,
and placement tests are included in the kit. The materials can be uses as a core
program or can supplement other programs.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination
training and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the Bloom-
field-Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when used
as an entirety. Parts may be used separately. It includes listening, reading, and
writing skills developmental exercises.

Series II: Reading. Behavioral Laboratories, 1966.

This is a continuation of Series I: Reading annotated at Level 1. This
programmed series will take the student through the fourth grade readability level.
Much supplementary reading should accompany the program. Additional work in cbmi-
prehension will be needed. This series is appropriate for adult basic education
classes. The accompanying readers are of high interest to both adults and adoles-
cents.

Why Work Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1967.

This is a kit of twenty-one reading selections and eight recordings of
certain selections. The reading levels range from two through seven. The
selections are designed to introduce the undereducated to the world of work.
Each selection consists of a story and comprehension questions. This is good
for supplementary reading practice.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section of
Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Followfnig Directions, Reference
Skills, Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II. The booklets
come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and are designed to
be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise unit of subject
matter which is followed by a question. The answers are programmed in such a way
that the student can progress rapidly or receive further practice in weak areas.
It is recommended for supplemental use.

Learning 100, Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the first book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills for the totally illiterate adult. It starts with dots, and
builds to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the Tach X set
AxBxCx.
-11-








E.D.L. has a complete set 6f materials designed to develop visual
perceptual skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, Controlled
Reader,and Tach X materials. Various instructional media are used and many
learning modes employed. Listening, speaking, reading and writing are treated
as related skills. The series extends through Level 6.

Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

This is a sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is a
fairly comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills and
progressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along the same
general format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is used and
a detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in a loose
leaf binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher- and class-made
materials.

Money Makes Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 140 pp.

This book is for students who need basic skills in handling money.
The book permits students to work on their own. Illustrations are pertinent to
adults. The book proceeds from simple to complex problems.

Using Dollars and Sense. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1960, 126 pp.

This book, like fbney Makes Sense, deals with money. However, it is
on a higher level. Content and illustrations are of adult interest.

You::and Your World. Fearon Publishers, Inc., 1964, 118 pp.

This work text provides many opportunities for the student to write.
The development of the book is in an "expanding world" style. Topics include
you, your family, neighborhood, school, city, state, country, continent, and
world. Some selections are a little juvenile, but on the whole, the book has some
worthwhile units.

Accent Education Titles. Follett Publishing Company, 1965.

This series consists of six books: You and They, You are Heredity and
Environment, Taking Stock, You and Your Needs, You and Your Occupation, Getting
That Job and an Instructor's Guide for each book title. The books are designed to
develop thinking skills through discussion. Basic social skills and concepts are
developed to help adults and adolescents reach personal goals through understand-
ing society and their role in it.

Figure It Out, Book I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book develops arithmetic skills needed for everyday living and for
vocational work. Addition, substraction, multiplication, and division exercises
are presented. Space is provided for the student to record his responses.

Interesting Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1964.

This series can be used to supplement other instructional materials. It
is not designed for corrective or remedial work.


-12-









On the Way, Communications II. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 107 pp.

The book follows Getting Started, Communications I, and extends the
concepts presented there. Emphasis is on monosyllabic letter patterns having
long vowel sounds. Later on, polysyllabic words and comprehension skills are
stressed.

Discovery Books. Garrard Press, 1964.

A series of 35 books about famous Americans. Interest level is good and
adolescents like the books. Excellent for individualized reading and for building
the general knowledge area of adult basic education. The covers are not strictly
adult.

English Lessons for Adults. Harcourt Brace and World, 1966.

English Lessons for Adults contains lessons for the development of
speaking, reading, and writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis
is placed on visual and auditory discrimination and basic composition skills. The
content reflects the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional approach
to language study.

The Deep Sea Adventure Series. Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1962.

This series is similar to The Morgan Bay Mysteries described at Level 2
Books include Sea Hunt, Treasure Under the Sea, and Submarine Rescue.

The Morgan Bay Mysteries. Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1962.

This series consists of two books on Ldvel 2 and two books on Level 3.
Content, illustrations, and exercises are suitable for adults. The vocabulary
development should be planned for. The two books on Level 2 are: The Mystery
of Morgan Castle and The Mystery of the Marble Arch. The two books on Level 3
are: The Mystery of the Midnight Visitor and The Mystery of the Missing Marlin.

Holt Adult Education Program, Basic Series. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965.

This is a series of paperback texts designed to take the adult student
from elementary through high school. The texts are classified in three separate
series according to levels and cover a wide variety of subject matter. The texts
generally are written at a higher readability level than that suggested by the
authors. Subject materials books for the most part are poorly written in terms
of their basic objective..
First Series Basic 0 through 4th grade reading level.
Learning to Read and Write
Life with the Luckets
The Thomases Live Here
Measure. Cut, and Sew
Get Your Money's Worth

Learning to Read and Write. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965, 150 pp.

This text is designed for adults and takes an unusual, add in parts,
linguistically unsound approach to literacy training. It may be of some help
as a supplementary text. Ignore the manual.


-13-







English This Way Series. McMillan Company, 1963.


This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not the
native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six
years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to use from book
one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Programmed Reading for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966.

This series of 8 programmed workbooks begins with numbers and letters
and teacher reading skills to the fourth grade readability level. The basic pro-
gram is self-contained but much supplementary reading should accompany the
program after the student has completed Book 4. The program moves much too slowly
in Books 1 and 2 for most adults.

Programmed Math for Adults. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1966.

Series I of Programmed Math for Adults consists of five 96-page pro-
grammed workbooks, five 32-page books of word problems, a book of progress tests,
a diagnostic placement examination, an achievement and final examination, and an
instructor's manual. It is a self-pacing, self-instructional remedial course for
adults taking the student through the basic operations of addition, subtraction,
multiplication, and division. Each book is divided into six-page lesson units
with the answer printed on the left side of the page.

News for You. The Adult Newsletter. New Reader Press. Edition A.

This four-page newspaper for literacy classes comes with a teacher's
guide. It contains photographs, feature articles, and news items. Edition A is
written at readability Level 2-3.

How We Live. Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc., 1949, 148 pp.

This is a hard-back text intended for beginning readers and semi-
literate adults. The material is arranged in short units and ranges ftom"simple
sentences to short paragraphs. Exercises are included.

Your Family and Your Job. Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc., 1948, 7 pp.

This book is part of the Adult Education sdVies intended for beginning
readers and semi-literate adults. The material is centered around the daily lives
of the Brown family.

Springboards. Portal Press, Inc., 1966, 4 pp. each.

Forty short reading selections are followed by comprehension questions
or selections stressing grammatical skills. Originally written for the unmotivat-
ed high school reader, the interest level is extremely high; the characters are
high school students or historical figures of all social and ethnic groups.
Almost all of the selections pack a well-hidded moral. Lesson plans are available.
Readability varies from Levels 3-6. An excellent supplementary and motivational
material.

Reader's Digest Adult Education Readers, Books A and B. Reader's Digest, 1954,
128 pp. each.

Reader's Digest Adult Education Readers, Books. A and B, look like adult
-14-








books. They have a hfgh interest level. Exercises for developing vocabulary and
comprehension skills are excellent. These books may be used as basic texts at
this level or as supplementary aids. The books were designed by adult educators
for adult use.

Reader's Digest Adult Series. Reader's Digest, 1964-65, 32 pp. each.

This is a series of twelve books extending from Level 1 to Level 4.
The first four books are for Level 1. This series was especially designed for
adults and adolescents. The books have a high interest level, appearance is simi-
lar to the regular Reader's Digest, legibility is excellent and the subject matter
is articles from the Reader's Digest. Exercises for the development of comprehen-
sion and vocabulary are included and the teacher's manual for the series contains
helpful suggestions. The series should be supplemented with other books.

Reader's Digest Readings: English as a Second Language, Books 1 and 2. Reader's
Digest Educational Division, 1964, 144 pp.

This is a new series of six books designed for teaching the foreign-born
to read the English language. The articles are from the Reader's Digest and are
of high interest to adults. The books contain exercises for building vocabulary
and comprehension skills. They will prove useful with both foreign-born and
native-born students.

Reader's Digest Science Reader. Reader's Digest, 1963, 128 pp.

This is one of a series of four books which are designed for reading
levels 3, 4, 5, and 6. Appearance, interest level, and legibility are high. This
book is an excellent supplementary book for each of the levels for which it was
designed. It will prove of value both in developing reading skills and building
the general knowledge area of adult fundamental education.

Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 3, parts I, II, and III. Reader's Digest,
1963.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high,
and the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

American Classics: Simplified and Adapted. Regents Publishing Company, 1953-54.

This series of books extend:'from the grade three readability level
through the elementary stage. Exercises in vocabulary, comprehension, and
spelling are built into the series. American Classics is probably most useful
with the foreign-born.

Family Life in the U.S.A. Regents Publishing Company, 1962, 138 pp.

Each chapter of this book presents some aspect of the life of an Ameri-
canized family with school-age children. It gives some insight into inter-
personal relationships, their relationship to the neighborhood in which they live,
the school the children attend, and their functions as citizens. Two readings
compose each chapter. The second is on a higher level than the first and is
intended to provide a bridge to independent reading. Dialogues, speech exercises,
and discussion practice help to develop oral communication skill as well as ex-
planations of grammar principles.


-15-







Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research Associates, 1959, 48 to
64 pp.
This series comes in five different worktexts written at three different
levels of readability. Level 1 is third grade difficulty, Level 2 is fourth grade
difficulty, and Level 3 is fifth grade difficulty. The subject matter is the same
at the three different reading levels. The topics handled are gas stations,
bakeries, restaurants, supermarkets, and truck farming. They should be supple-
mented.

SRA Reading Laboratories. Science Research Associates.

The SRA Reading Laboratories suitable for the Introductory stage of
reading include Reading Laboratory Ib and Ic and the older, but not out-moded
Elementary Edition (1958). The laboratories contain many articles as separate
items which are grouped according to readability level. They are suitable for
adults. Teacher's manuals are complete and lessons are designed so that much of
the learning is self-instruction. The laboratories should be supplemented with
vocabulary development materials.

SRA Reading for Understanding: Junior Edition. Science Research Associates, 1962.

SRA Reading for Understanding is a packaged program of individual :
lessons for improving comprehension. The readability range is from grade three to
grade eight. As with other SRA package programs, this program is organized so a
wide range of students can be handled at the same time.

The Job Ahead: New Rochester Occupational Reading Series, Level 1. Science
Research Associates, 1963, 169 pp.

This series, written on three different readability levels (Levels 3, 4,
and 5) does not use the same story content as the original Rochester Occupational
Reading Series. Each book contains the same stories written on different reada-
bility levels. Thus, three different groups can deal with the same material. The
materials are highly interesting:to adolescents and adults. The accompanying work-
books can be used to build both vocabulary and comprehension skills. They should
be supplemented.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty. Basic
language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of phonics-
related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for individualized
study on the student's part. The format resembles that of programmed instruction.
The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.

Learning and Writing English. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965,125 pp.

This workbook is designed for adult classes in English and includes
subject materials usually taught in the third and fourth grades. It is good for
use as a supplementary source of materials.

Steps to Learning, Books 1 and 2. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 64 pp.

The needs of the adult beginning reader and writer are considered in
this book by presenting reading and work materials in sequential form. Adult
interest and problems are of prime concern in presentation of material. Oral
language, reading, and writing, and number skills are included.


-16-









Working With Word Patterns. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1967, 95 pp.


Working With Word Patterns is an excellent supplementary workbook for
building vocabulary, teaching comprehension skills, and building the area of
General Adult Basic Education. The content is adult oriented and a systematic
approach to word patterns and sentence patterns is incorporated in the program.
Parts of the text are suitable for use at readability Level 2.


-17-







PART II

Materials for the Elementary Stage

LEVEL 4


Reading Development Kit B. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968

Kit B contains 80 different (160 total) coded lesson pamphlets on
readability levels 4.0 through 6.9. Within Kit B, as with Kit A, are four
separate series (Series Y, 400, 500, 600), one of which contains articles
and skills development in critical thinking and reading. The remaining series
contain high interest articles written in the content areas of work, health,
safety, and law and include vocabulary, skills and comprehension development.
The lessons are designed so that instruction can be individualized. A teacher's
manual, student answer books, and placement tests are included in the Kit. The
materials can be used as a core program or can be supplementary to other pro-
grams.

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program, Series 600. Allied Education Council,
1965.

This series presents the reading skills taught in grades 4, 5, and 6.
Illustrations and content matter are geared toward adult interests. The basic
texts are: Basic Language Skills 600A, and Basic Language Skills 600B. Each
unit includes an instructional lesson with reading, spelling word study, and
composition exercises. An instructional manual is provided. Occupational
and vocational reading materials are available at this level. They include
Needlecraft 600 and Homecraft 600.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination
training and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the Bloom-
field-Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when
used as an entirety. Parts may be used separately. It includes listening,
reading, and writing skills developmental exercises.

Using the Context. Barnell Loft, 1962, 52 pp.

Using the Context is a series of three books for Levels 4, 5, and 6.
This series develops skill in developing vocabulary and comprehension skills
through the use of the context clue. These books are acceptable for adults
and excellent supplementary drill book.

Series II: Reading. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1966.

A continuation of Series I: Reading--This programmed series will
take the student through the fourth grade readability level. Much supple-
mentary reading should accompany the program. Additional work in comprehen-
sion will be needed. This series is appropriate for adult basic education
classes. The accompanying readers are of high interest to both adults and
adolescents.


-18-







Series I: Reading. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1966.
SeriestI: Reading consists of four programmed workbooks designed to
teach reading to people with serious reading problems. It has proven to have
a high interest level and the material is at the adult level. Series I will
take the student through the second grade readability level. This series is
accompanied by small supplementary unprogrammed readers that are of high in-
terest and that are appropriate to the programmed workbook they accompany.

Why Work Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1967.

This is a kit of twenty-one reading selections and eight recordings
of certain selections. The reading levels range from two through seven. The
selections are designed to introduce the undereducated to the world of work.
Each selection consists of a story and comprehension questions. This is good
for supplementary reading practice.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section
of Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions, Re-
ference Skills, Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II.
The booklets come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+),
and are designed to be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise
unit of subject matter which is followed by a question. The answers are pro-
grammed in such a way that the student can progress rapidly or receive further
practice in weak areas. It is recommended for supplemental use.

Cornerstones of Freedom. Children's Press, 1965.

Cornerstones of Freedom is a series of books dealing with some of the
traditions which symbolize our American heritage. It includes: Story of the
Liberty Bell, Story of the Statue of Liberty, Story of the Star Spangled Banner,
and the Story of Mount Vernon. The books are generally well written and illustrat-
ed.

Standard Test Lessons in Reading. Book D. Bureau of Publications, Teachers
College, Columbia University Press, 1961, 78 pp.

Standard Test Lessons in Reading, Book D is one of a series of high
interest comprehension-building books that are designed to build reading power
and speed. Books in this series may be used as self-teaching devices.

Learning 100, Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the first book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills of the totally illiterate adult it starts with dots, and
builds to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the TachX Set
AxBxCx.
E.D.L. has a complete set of materials designed to develop visual
perceptual skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, Controlled
Reader, and Tach X materials. Various instructional media are used and many
learning modes employed. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are treated
as related skills. The series extends through Level 6.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Social Studies. Educational Development Laborato-
ries, 1962.

This packaged program is similar to the EDL Study Skills-Library for
Science, except that the content is social studies.


-19-







EDL Study Skills-Library for Reference. Educational Development Laboratories,
1962.
This is organized like the other EDL packaged programs; this program teaches
the use of reference skills and places great stress on critical reading.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Science. Educational Development Laboratories,
1962.

This packaged program contains individual lessons in science for
reading Levels 4 through 9. These self-correcting lessons develop the princi-
ple comprehension skills and also contribute to vocabulary growth. They are
of proven worth in teaching reading to adolescents and adults.

Accent Education Titles. Follett Publishing Company, 1965.

This series consists of six books: You and They, You Are Heredity and
Environment, Taking Stock, You and Your Needs, You and Your Occupation, Getting
That Job and an Instructor's Guide for each book title. The books are designed
to develop thinking skills through discussion. Basic social skills and con-
cepts are developed to help adults and adolescents reach personal goals through
understanding society and their role in it.

Figure It Out, Book I. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book develops arithmetic skills needed for everyday living
and for vocational work. Addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division
exercises are presented. Space is provided for the student to record his
responses.

Follett Vocational Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 96 pp.

The stories in this series are designed to enable the student to
identify with the characters and the problems they face. Lessons that accom-
pany each story provide practice in reading, language and communication skills.
The stories are vocation-oriented to acquaint adults and young adults with
various career opportunities. Four titles are presently available: Marie
Perrone, Practical Nurse; The Delwo Sisters, Beauticians; John Leveron, Auto
Mechanic; The Millers and Willie B.--Butcher, Baker, Chef, and Instructor's
Guide.

Learning Your Language One. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 472 pp.

Comprehension and basic language disciplines are developed in Learning
Your Language One. Six booklets provide a sequentially developed and inte-
grated program of composition, language, and literature. Each lesson centers
around high interest stories, articles, and poems.

On the Way, Communications II. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 107 pp.

The book follows Getting Started, Communications I, and extends the
concepts presented there. Emphasis is on monosyllabic letter patterns having
long vowel sounds. Later on, polysyllabic words and comprehension skills are
stressed.

Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follet Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

A sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is a fairly
comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills and


-20-








progressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along the
same general format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is used
and a detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in a
loose leaf binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher- and
class-made materials.

The Follett Basic Learnings Program. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett
Publishing Company., Study Lessons in Our Nation's History, 1964, 432 pp

Reading comprehension and communication and study skills are developed
while American history concepts are being taught. The lessons are presented in
nine single-unit booklets, and are paced to review the previous lesson, intro-
duce new words, encourage vocabulary building, state reading purpose, and check
comprehension through self-testing.

Turner-Livingston Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 48 pp.

This series deals with such topics as citizenship, economics, and the
general social studies. It is designed for adolescents and adults. It should
be supplemented, or perhaps be best used as a supplement to other books for
developing reading skills. Some of the books in the series are: The Person
You Are, The Money You Spend, and The Town You Live In.

Achieving Reading Skills. Globe Book Company, Inc., 1958, 245 pp.

The various skills are handled on several levels of readability.
The materials are arranged in order of difficulty extending from the third
grade readability level to about the sixth grade level. It has been used
extensively with adults and adolescents.

English Lessons. for Adults. Harcourt, Brace and World, 1966.

Contains lessons for the development of speaking, reading, and
writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis is placed on visual
and auditory discrimination and basic composition skills. The content reflects
the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional approach to language
study.

The Deep Sea Adventure Series. Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1962.

Books at Level 4 include The Pearl Diver and Frogmen in Action.
This series is similar to The Morgan Bay Mysteries described at Level 2.
Books include Sea Hunt, Treasure Under the Sea, and Submarine Rescue at
Level 3.

The Wildlife Adventure Series. Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1964, four
books, 90 pp. each.

This series is made up of these four books: Gatie the Alligator,
Sleeky the Otter, Skipper the Dolphin and Tawny the Mountain Lion. They
were designed for use with adolescents and adults and the appearance, illustra-
tions, and content are adult interest level. A series of comprehension exer-
cises is included as is a breakdown of the vocabulary used. Excellent supple-
mentary materials. A teacher's manual accompanies the series. All.books have
a fourth grade readability level.


-21-






Holt Adult Education Program, Basic Series. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1965.

Holt Adult Education Program, Basic Series is a series of paper-
back texts designed to take the adult student from elementary through high
school. The texts are classified in three separate series according to levels
and cover a wide variety of subject matter. The texts generally are written
at a higher readability level than that suggested by the authors. Subject
materials books for the most part are poorly written in terms of their basic
objective.
First Series Basic 0 through 4th grade reading level.
Learning to Read and Write
Life with the Lucketts
The Thomases Live Here
Measure, Cut, and Sew
Get Your Money's Worth

Reading for Meaning.. BJ BLippincott: Company, 1962, 72 pp,..

Reading for Meaning is an excellent series to use for developing com-
prehension techniques. While not designed for adults, the format and content is
acceptable to them. Vocabulary development is worked into the selections in an
interesting way. This series has proven to have great value in teaching both
adolescents and adults. There are books for readability Levels 4, 5, 6, 7,
and 8.

A Door Opens. Macmillan Company, 1963, 122 pp.

This book follows Streamlined English. The story is about a family
and each chapter tells about various activities of the family. New words are
introduced before each chapter. Going Forward is the second book which continues
the story.

Collier-Macmillan English Readers. Macmillan Company, 1966.

This is a series of four books: Stories to Surprise You, The Story
of My Life (Helen Keller), The Mitchell Family, and Buffalo Bill written at
Level 3 through 4 readability. These are interesting, straightforward stories
depicting the American scene and way of living. It is good supplementary
reading material.

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not
the native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with
six years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correct
ion, and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One' is to usT from
book one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Learning How to Use the Dictionary. Macmillan Company, 1963, 99 pp.

A special programmed unit, this worktext presents the basic skills used
in finding words in the dictionary and those skills needed for defining, spelling,
and using words appropriately. While participating in this program, the studentt
is required to use his dictionary more than 245 times. Progress tests and a
teacher's manual are included in the program.

What Job For Me Series. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 19,66-67.

What Job For Me Series is a series of 12 short (45 pp.) books dealing
with adolescent and adult jobs and job problems. Interest level isvery high

-22-








and comprehension checks follow each chapter. Some topics include Ginny the
Office Assistant and Phil the File Clerk.

How to Find a Job. New Readers Press, 1959, 24 pp.

This booklet provides practical tips on procedures and agencies for
job-finding. Some of the topics discussed are: "What Kind of Job You Want,"
"How to Find a Job," "How to Apply for a Job." Pictures and illustrations show
various aspects of job-finding.

News For You. The Adult Newsletter. New Readers Press, Edition B.

This four-page newspaper for literacy classes comes with a teacher's
guide. Edition B has a readability level of 4-5.

Why You Need Isurance. New Readers Press, 1959, 24 pp.

Various types of insurance are discussed specifically under headings
of fire, car, and health insurance. Chapters on "Insurance Advice," "Know
These Things About Life Insurance," and "Know These Words About Insurance,"
provide more general information.

Live and Learn. Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc., 1962, 153 pp.

This book was developed to teach adults to read and understand
words and sentences which deal with such concepts as Social Security, citizen-
ship rights and duties, and interviewing for a job. It is probably best used
with the foreign born.

Springboards. Portal Press, Inc., 1966, 4 pp. each.

Forty short reading selections are followed by comprehension questions
or selections stressing grammatical skills. Originally written for the unmo-
tivated high school reader, the interest level is extremely high; the characters
are high school students or historical figures of all social and ethnic groups.
Almost all of the selections pack a well-hidden moral. Lesson plans are avail-
able. Readability varies from Levels 3-6. An excellent supplementary and
motivational material.

Reader's Digest Readings:* English as a Second Language, Books 3 and 4.
Reader's Digest Educational Division, 1964, 144 ~pp.

This is a new series of six books designed for teaching the foreign
born to read the English language. The articles are from the Reader's Digest
and are of high interest to adults. The books contain exercises for building
vocabulary and comprehension skills. They will prove useful with both foreign
born and native born students.

Reader's Digest Science Reader. Reader's Digest, 1963, 128 pp.

This is one of a series of four books which are designed for reading
Levels 3, 4, 5, and 6. Appearance, interest level, and legibility are high.
An excellent supplementary book for each of the levels for which it was designed.
It will prove of value both in developing reading skills and building the general
knowledge area of adult fundamental education.


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Reader's Digest Skill Builder. Parts I, II. and III. Reader's Digest, 1963,
144 pp. each.
Reader's Digest Skill Builder is a series which extends through Level
8. The content is articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good,
interest level is high, and the manual offers practical suggestions for use
of the series.

Elementary Reader. Regents Publishing Company, 1950, 128 pp.

Elementary Reader contains short stories and articles of mediocre
interest. The vocabulary and grammar exercises are probably more suited to the
foreign born than to the native born reader.

Family Life in the U.S.A. Regents Publishing Company, 1962, 144 pp.

Family Life in the U.S.A. is useful for Americanization classes as
well as literacy classes. Exercises for developing comprehension and vocabu-
lary are included.

Graded Exercises in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1959, 186 pp.

Essentials of grammar are presented in a systematic way from basic
to advanced instruction. There is one exercise for each new idea presented.
There are some review pages included. The book seems very compact and com-
plete as far as items of study are included. The book is on the intermediate
level and the content is generally suited to adult interests.

Second Book in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1950, 136 pp.

This book offers additional skills in vocabulary and grammar. Much
attention is centered on conversation and pronunciation. There are exercises
at the end of each lesson. The book is on the intermediate level.

Getting Ready for Pay Day. Frank E. Richards, Publisher, 1963.

Getting Ready for Pay Day.is a series of three books dealing with
essential knowledge about how to handle money. This small series offers an
excellent source for reenforcing reading skills while teaching a vital area
of adult basic education.

The Getting Along Series of Skills-Workbooks. Frank E. Richards, Publisher,
1963.

This series consists of five workbooks written for adolescents and
adults. Reading, writing, and arithmetic is taught as correlated skills, The
subject matter is appropriate but the readability is unstable and the series
does not appear to be well planned, The series has some value as a source of
supplementary materials for those above a readability level of three or four.

What is Electricity. Frank E. Richards, Publisher, 1966, 29 pp.

An elementary explanation of energy and electricity is given in this
paperback booklet. Diagrams and illustrations reinforce explanations of these
two concepts, and electrical experiments are suggested in the latter part of
the book.

Dimensions in Reading. Manpower and Natural Resources, Science Research
Associates, 1966.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different


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themes designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construc-
tion work, transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and stories
on any level may be at any readability within that level. Each selection
contains a story and comprehension questions. The Levels are 4-6: 50 each;
Level 7: 401 Levels 8-9: 30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A very short
Teacher's Handbook and Answer Keys are included.

Learn How to Study. Science Research Associates, 1961, 66 pp.

This book is designed to help students develop good study habits.
Topics that are covered are: "Why is It Important to Study," "How to Find In-
formation," "How to Organize Information," and "How to Report Information."

The material is presented in workbook form with exercises and activities to
reinforce learning.

Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research Associates, 1959,
48-64 pp.

This series comes in five different worktexts written at three different
levels of readability. Level 1 is third grade difficulty, Level 2 is fourth
grade difficulty, and Level 3 is fifth grade difficulty. The subject matter
is the same at the three different reading levels. Topics handled are gas
stations, bakeries, restaurants, supermarkets, and truck farming. They should
be supplemented.

SRA Reading for ,Understahding. -: Junio~EEditioni. Science.Research Associates, 1962.

SRA Reading for Understanding: Junior Edition is a packaged program
of individual lessons for improving comprehension. Readability range is from
grade three to grade eight. As with other SRA package programs, this program
is organized so a wide range of students can be handled at the same time.

SRA Readihg Laboratory IIc : Science Research Associates. ; :

The-SRA"Reading Laboratories suitable for the Introductory stage of
reading include Reading Laboratory Ib, and Ic and the older, but not out-moded
Elementary Edition (1958). The laboratories contain many articles as separate
items which are grouped according to readability level. They are suitable for
adults. Teacher's manuals are complete and lessons are designed so that much
of the learning is self-instruction. The laboratories should be supplemented
with vocabulary development materials.

The Job Ahead: New Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research
Associates, 1963, 169'pp.

This series, written on three different readability levels (Levels 3,
4, and 5) does not use the same story content as the original Rochester Occupa-
tional Reading Series. Each book contains the same stories written on different
readability levels. Thus, three different groups can deal with the same material.
The materials are highly interesting to adolescents and adults. The accom-
panying workbooks can be used to build both vocabulary and comprehension skills.
They should be supplemented.

New Avenues in Reading. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1957, 128 pp.

New Avenues in Reading is a combination reader and workbook with good
comprehension and vocabulary exercises. It is better with adolescents thanadults.


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New Goals in Reading. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1960, 112 pp.


New Goals in Reading is a complete workbook for teaching the various
skills needed at Level 4 and also offering help with skills that have been intro-
duced at a lower level and need re-teaching or :reinforcing. While not designed
for adults, experience indicates that they enjoy working in this text, It is
part of the Reading Essential Series which extends from grades one to eight.
The first three level books are not appropriate for adults, but the others are.

Steps to Learning. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 64 pp.

The needs of the adult beginning reader and writer are considered in
this book by presenting reading and work materials in sequential form. Adult
interest and problems are of prime concern in presentation of material. Oral
language, reading, and writing, and number skills are included.

Wings Book Series:. Steck-Vaughd Company, 1965. ;.

This set of books includes a wide range of social studies and science
concepts. They provide interesting reading for adults with appropriate illustra-
tions. The books include experiments, demonstrations, and questions. Areas
covered are: Science: Geology, Physics, Psychology, Physiology, and Botany;
Social Studies: Sir Issac Newton, Sociology, Geography, Vanilla, What IT Money.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty. Basic
language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of phonics-
related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for individualized
study on the student's part. The format resembles that of programmed instruction.
The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.

New Practice Readers. Webster Publishing Company, 1960, 144 pp.

A series of workbook type exercises presents lessons in three parts.
There are questions to prepare for the reading and a comprehension check. Some
work in vocabulary is offered. While not designed for adults, the series should
be acceptable to them. Books A, B, and C are for readability levels of grades
four, five, and six.

Step Up Your Reading Power. Webster Publishing Company, 1966, 90 pp.

Step Up Your Reading Power is a series of graded practice readers for
adults. There are five books in the series with Book A using short two page
exercises written at a fourth grade readability level. Book B (5th grade
readability), Book C (6th grade readability), Book D (7th grade readability),
and Book E (7th-8th grade readability). The selections get longer as the
readability level goes up. Content is at the adult interest level. This
series appears to be most useful for supplementary work at levels four and
five.


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LEVEL 5


Reading Development Kit B. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968.

Kit B contains 80 different (160) total coded lesson pamphlets on read-
ability levels 4.0 through 6.9. Within Kit B, as with Kit A, are four separate
series (Series Y, 400, 500,600), one of which contains articles and skills develop-
ment in critical thinking and reading. The remaining series contain high interest
articles written in the content areas of work, health, safety, and law and include
vocabulary, skills, and comprehension development. The lessons are designed so
that instruction can be individualized. A teacher's manual, student answer books,
and placement tests are included in the Kit. The materials can be used as a core
program or can be supplementary to other programs.

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program, Series 600. Allied Education Council, 1965.

This series presents the reading skills taught in grades 4, 5, and 6.
Illustrations and'content matter are geared toward adult interests. The basic
texts are: Basic Language Skills 600A, and Basic Language Skills 600B. Each unit
includes an instructional lesson with reading, spelling, word study, and composi-
tion exercises. An instructional manual is provided. Occupational and vocational
reading materials are available at this level. They include Needlecraft 600 and
Homecraft 600.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination train-
Sing and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the Bloomfield-
Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when used as an
entirety. Parts may be used separately. It included listening, reading, and writing
skills.developmental exercises.

Using the Context. Barnell Loft, 1962, 52 pp.

Using the Context is a series of three books for Levels 4, 5, and 6.
This series develops skill in developing vocabulary and comprehension skills through
the use of the context clue. These books are acceptable for adults and are an
excellent supplementary drill book.

Why Work Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1967.

This is a kit of twenty-one reading selections and eight recordings
of certain selections. The reading levels range from two through seven. The
selections are designed to introduce the undereducated to the worLd of work. Each
selection consists of a story and comprehension questions. This is good for
supplementary reading practice.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section of
Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions, Refer-
ence Skills, Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II. The
booklets come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and are
designed to be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise unit
of subject matter which is followed by a question. The answers are programmed
in such a way that the student can progress rapidly or receive further practice
in weak areas. It is recommended for supplemental use.
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Enchantment of America Series. Children's Press, 1965.


This series of books deals with the settling of the different states.
Each tells the story of the respective state's pioneers, resources, and historical
growth. The books are attractive with good print and excellent illustrations.
' he books include: California, Florida, Illionis, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada,
New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, and Wisconsin. Other titles are in pre-
paration. Alsb included in this series are eight books dealing with the regions
of the United States. These give a historical viewpoint of the U. S. development.
They include: High Country (Rocky Mountains and Plateau States), Pacific Shores
(Pacific States, Alaska and Hawaii), Sea and Sunshine (South Atlantic States),
Panoramic Plains (Great Plains States), Gulf Lands and Central South (South
Central and Gulf States), Lakes, Hills, and Prairies (Mid-Western States), and
Hills and Harbors (Middle Atlantic States).

Frontiers of America Series. Children's Press, 1964.

Frontiers of America Series is a series of books on readability levels
5 and 6. These books bring American history to life in modern day. Each book
tells stories of an authentic nature. Titles include: Explorers in a New World,
Heroes of the Western Outposts. Steamboats to the West. Gold Rush Adventures, and
many others.

Out of the Past. Children's Press, 1964, 64 pp.

Do not let the title of the publisher mislead you' This is one of a
series of four books written for use with adolescents and adults. The books are
interesting and may be used for developing study-type reading abilities.

Cornerstones of Freedom,. Children's Press, 1965.

Cornerstones of Freedom is a series of books dealing with some of the
traditions which symbolize our American heritage. It includes: Story of the Liberty
Bell, Story of the Statue of Liberty, Story of the Star Spangled Banner, and the
Story of Mount Vernon. The books are generally well written and illustrated.

EDL Study Skills Libraries. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962.

EDL Study Skills is organized like the other EDL packaged programs,
this program teaches the use of reference skills and places great stress on critical
reading.

Learning 100, Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the first book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills of the totally illiterate adult. It starts with dots, and builds
to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the TgchX Set AxBxCx.

EDL has a complete set of materials designed to develop visual perceptual
skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, Controlled Reader, and Tach X
materials. Various instructional media are used and many learning modes employed.
Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are treated as related skills. The series
extends through Level 6.

Figure It Out, Book II. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book extends the skills developed in Book I. It also introduces
fractions, decimals, rounding and percentages. Work is presented in exercise and
problem form and space is provided for the student's responses.
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Follett Vocational Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 96 pp.

The stories in this series are designed to enable the student to identify
with the characters and the problems they face. Lessons that accompany each story
provide practice in reading, language and communication skills. The stories are
vocation-oriented to acquaint adults and young adults with various career opportunities.
Four titles are presently available: Marie Perrone, Practical Nurse; The Delwo
Sisters, Beauticians; John Leveron, Auto Mechanic; The Millers and Willie B. --
Butcher, Baker, Chef; and Instructor's Guide.

Learning Your Language One. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 472 pp.

Comprehension and basic language disciplines are developed in Learning
Your Language One. Six booklets provide a sequentially developed and integrated
program of composition, language, and literature. Each lesson centers around high
interest stories, articles, and poems.

Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

This is a sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is a
fairly comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills and pro-
gressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along the same gen-
eral format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is used and a
detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in a lopse leaf
binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher and class made materials.

The Follett Basic Learnings Program. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett
Publishing Company., Study Lessons in Our Nation's History, 1964, 432 pp,

Reading comprehension and communication and study skills are developed
while American history concepts are being taught. The lessons are presented in
nine single-unit booklets, and are paced to review the previous lesson, introduce
new words, encourage vocabulary building, state reading purpose, and check com-
prehension through self-testing.

Turner-Livingston Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 48 pp.

This series deals with such topics as citizenship, economics, and the
general social studies, It is designed for adolescents and adults. It should be
supplemented, or perhaps be best used as a supplement to other books for developing
reading skills. Some of the books in the series are: The Person you Are, The
Money You Spend, and The Town You Live In.

Achieving Reading Skills. Globe Book Company, Inc., 1958, 245 pp.

The various skills are handled on several levels of readability. The
materials are arranged in order of difficulty extending from the third grade
readability level to about the sixth grade level. It has been used extensively
with adults and adolescents.

Effective Reading. Globe Book Company, Inc., 1953, 214 pp.

This text is designed to teach the various reading skills. The exercises
are good and the interest level is fair to good. It offers specific help in
developing study-type reading skills.
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Successful Reading. Globe Book Company, 1953, 210 pp.

This book developed for corrective work in junior and senior high school
is still one of the better books for teaching adults specific vocabulary and compre-
hension skills. The exercises are well constructed and the readings are acceptable
to adults.

Building Reading Confidence. C. S. Hammond Company, 1964, 220 pp.

Building Reading Confidence can be used as a basal text as it covers most
of the reading skills needed at this level. Joseph Gainsberry is well-known for his
corrective reading books for adolescents. It is a fairly complete text.

English Lessons for Adults. Harcourt, Brace and World, 1966.

English Lessons for Adults contains lessons for the development of speaking,
reading, and writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis is placed on
visual and auditory discrimination and basic composition skills. The content reflects
the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional approach to language study.

The Deep Sea Adventure Series. Harr Wagner Publishing Company, 1962.

This series is similar to The Morgan Bay Mysteries described at Level'2..
Books include Sea Hunt, Treasure Under the Sea, and Submarine Rescue described at
Level 3 of The Deep Sea Adventure Series.

Holt Adult Education Program, Intermediate Series, Holt, Rinehart, and Winston,
Inc., 1962-64.

This paperback series of texts is designed to take the adult student from
the primary level through high school. Elementary school subjects are covered.
Titles include:
Basic Dictionary of American English, 1962, 848 pp.
Arithmetic, 1963, 300 pp. Number concepts are introduced. Progression
is made from simple addition and subtraction to word problems, multiplication and
division of common and decimal fractions.
English, 1962, 154 pp. The basics of the English language are provided.
The topics deal with sentences, punctuation, words, good usage, ways of getting
information, and oral and written communication. Review exercises are provided at
the end of each chapter.
Science, 1964, 326 pp. This book is slanted toward the upper intermediate
levels in its concepts. Its chapters include: the earth and its surroundings, matter,
energy, the human body, and health.
Introduction to Geography, 1964, 420 pp. This is a coverage of world
geography with emphasis on the physical and natural resources. Exercises are
included at the end of each chapter. The book is more suitable for a higher level.
Impressions of the United States, 1964, 278 pp. Impressions of the
United States is a series of letters from the foreign born describing their reactions
to this country. Many students can identify with the experiences expressed.

Let's Read: Third Series, Book I. Holt, Ridahart, and Winston, Inc., 1962.

This is one of a series of four books designed for adolescents with read-
ing levels of five through seven. Interest level is good and the teacher's manual
offers help, especially to the new teacher.


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Reading for Meaning. J. B. Lippincott Company, 1962, 72 pp.


Reading for Meaning is an excellent series to use for developing compre-
hension techniques. While not designed for adults, the format and content is
acceptable to them. Vocabulary development is worked into the selections in an
interesting way. This series has proven to have great value in teaching both
adolescents and adults. There are books for readability Levels 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.

Collier-Macmillan English Readers. Macmillan Company, 1966.

These are interesting, straightforward stories depicting the American
scene and way of living. They are good supplementary reading material. The
titles are: The Virginian, The Vanishing Lady, Twelve Famous Americans, The
Presidency in Conflict, The Black Tulip, Three Detective Stories, Fact or Fiction,
and The Russells of Hollytree Circle.

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not the
native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six
years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One manual to use from
book one to six, and thesother from seven to twelve.

Building Reading Power. Charles E. Merrill, 1963.

Building Reading Power is a laboratory type of material which uses
programmed instruction. It is worth investigating, but your authors have not
used it.

Springboards. Portal Press, Inc., 1966, 4 pp. each.

Forty short reading selections are followed by comprehension questions
or selections stressing grammatical skills. Originally written for the unmotivated
high school reader, the interest level is extremely high; the characters are high
school students or historical figures of all social and ethnic groups. Almost all
of the selections pack a well-hidden moral. Lesson plans are availabU&. Readability
varies from Levels 3-6. An excellent supplementary and motivational material.

World Landmark Books. Random House, 1962, 192 pp.

This set of world history books deals with such topics as the ancient
world, the prehistoric world, Asia, Africa, and the modern world. The series is
helpful in teaching study-type reading and is of use in supplementing other
instructional books.

Reader's Digest Readings: English as a Second Language, Books 5 and 6. Reader's
Digest Educational Division, 1964.

This is a new series of six books designed for teachingi.the foreign born
to read the English language. The articles are from the Reader's Digest and are of
high interest to adults. The books contain exercises for building vocabulary and
comprehension skills. They will prove useful with both foreign born and native
born students.


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Reader's Digest Science Reader, Grade 5. Reader's Digest, 1963, 128 pp.

This is one of a series of four books which are designed for reading Levels
3, 4, 5, and 6. Appearance, interest level, and legibility are high. This book is
an excellent supplementary book for each of the levels for which it was designed.
It will prove of value both in developing reading skills and building the general
knowledge area of adult fundamental education.

Reader's Digest Skill Builders, Grade 5, Parts I. II, and III. Reader's Digest,
1963, 144 pp. each.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high, and
the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

Easy Reading Selections in English. Regents Publishing Company, 1962, 144 pp.

Easy Reading Selections in English is a book of English and American
short stories accompanied by comprehension exercises. It is probably most useful
with the foreign born.

Graded Exercises in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1959, 186 pp.

Essentials of grammar are presented in a systematic way from basic to
advanced instruction. There is one exercise fof each new idea presented. There
are some review pages included. The book seems very compact and complete as far
as items of study are included. The book is on the intermediate level and the
content is generally suited to adult interests.

Second Book in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1950, 136 pp.

This book offers additional skills in vocabulary and grammar. Much
attention is centered on conversation and pronunciation. There are exercises at
the end of each lesson. The book is on the intermediate level.

Foundations of Citizenship, Book I. Frank E. Richards Publishing Company, 1965,
92 pp. Book II, 98 pp.

This hard-back book with companion workbooks stresses daily living and
citizenship through brief units and exercises on topics such as: the community,
the family, jobs, taxes, savings, and insurance, and use of leisure time. Illustra-
tions reinforce various concepts that have been presented.

What is Electricity. Frank E. Richards. Publishing Company, 1966, 29 pp.

An elementary explanation of energy and electricity is given in this
paperback booklet. Diagrams and illustrations reinforce explanations of these two
concepts, and electrical experiments are suggested in the latter part of the book.

Dimensions in Reading. Science Research Associates, 1966.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different themes
designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construction work,
transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and stories on any level
may be at any readability within that level. Each selection contains a story and
comprehension questions. The Levels are 4-6; 50 each; Level 7: 40 each; Levels 8-9:
30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A very short Teacher's Handbook and Answer Keys
are included.


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Learn How To Study. Science Research Associates, 1961, 66 pp.


This book is designed to help students develop good study habits. Topics
that are covered are: "Why is It Important to Study," "How To Find Information,"
"How to Organize Information," and "How to'Report Information." The material is
presented in workbook form with exercises and activities to reinforce learning.

Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research Associates, 1959,

This series comes in five different worktexts written at three different
levels of readability. Level 1 is third grade difficulty, Level 2 is fourth grade
difficulty, and Level 3 is fifth grade difficulty. The subject matter is the same
at the three different reading levels. Topics handled are gas stations, bakeries,
restaurants, supermarkets, and truck farming. They should be supplemented.

SRA Reading for Understanding: Junior Edition. Science Research Associated, 1962.

SRA Reading for Understanding is a packaged program of individual lessons
for improving comprehension. The readability range is from grade three to grade
eight. As with other SRA package programs, this program is organized so a wide.range
of students can be handled at the same time.

SRA Reading Laboratory IIc. Science Research Associates

This laboratory contains graded materials for readability Levels 4 through
9. It should be supplemented. It has been well accepted by adolescents and adults.

SRA Organizing and Reporting Kit. Science Research Associates, 1962.

This laboratory can be used with students whose reading levels extend
from grades four to six. It is designed to build study skills including study-
type reading. It is excellent for supplementary work.

Spelling Word Power Laboratory, IIB (Revised). Science Research Associates.

This kit includes exercised for studying sound sight relationships.
Vowels, consonants, abbreviations, contractions, plurals, homonyms, and difficult
words are presented in programmed learning whdels. A variety of check tests,
spelling key cards, a student record book, and a teacher's manual are included.

The Job Ahead: New Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research
Associates, 1963, 169 pp.

This series, written on three different readability levels (Levels 3, 4,
and 5) does not use the same story content as the original Rochester Occupational
Reading Series. Each book contains the same stories written on different readability
levels. Thus, three different groups can deal with the same material. The materials
are highly interesting to adolescents and adults. The accompanying workbooks can
be used to build both vocabulary and comprehension skills, They should be supplemented.

English Essentials. The Steck-Vaughn Company, 1964, 96 pp.

The essentials of English are reviewed in this book. Many types of
written exercises are used. The content and interest are for the adult. The grade
levels are 5 and 6. This could be used with adults who have had previous experi-
ence in reading, writing, and grammar.


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How To Read Better, Book One and Two. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1964, 64 pp.

How To Read Better contains adult-centered stories with review exercises
and exercises which direct attention toward getting the main idea, remembering
facts, and analyzing situations.

Language Exercises. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

This is a set of four books, each about 128 pages in length. The stories
provide for language art experiences for those on readability levels from 5 through
8. The &sdsons are presented in workbook sty.e and help develop skills in vocabulary,
sentence structure, grammar, dictionary usage, and letter writing. Test lesson
booklets are also included.

Our Florida. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1962, 112 pp.

This worktext provides an excellent overview of the history and develop-
ment of Florida. The units include information about the geography of Florida, its
plants and animal life, industries, cities, and schools. A bibliography is included.

New Adventures in Reading. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1957, 151 pp.

New Adventures in Reading is similar to, but on a higher readability level
than, New Journeys in Reading, which is annotated at Level 5.

New Journeys in Reading. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1957, 128 pp.

New Journeys in Reading is a combination reader and workbook that is
acceptable to adults and adolescents. The exercises are well constructed and have
a moderately high interest level.

They Served America. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1966, 151 pp.

They Served America provides a brief biography of twenty-seven great
Americans of the past. The selections contain well known facts about their personal
and professional lives. There are no illustrations accompanying the stories.

Wings Book Series. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

This set of books includes a wide range of socialstudies and science
concepts. They provide interesting reading for adults with appropriate illustrations.
The books include experiments, demonstrations, and questions. Areas covered are:
Science: Geology, Physics, Psychblogy, Physiology, and Botany; Social Studies:
Sir Issac Newton, Sociology, Geography, Vanilla, What is Money.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty. Basic
language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of phonics-
related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for individualized
study on the student's part. The format resembles that of programmed instruction.
The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.


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Stories Worth Knowing. U. S. Armed Forces Institute, 1954, 190 pp.


This reader is designed to give practical experience in using the language
skills taught in the accompanying workbook. The instructor's course outline provides
suggestions for student assignments. Although self-teaching devices are included
in the material, guidance should be provided by the instructor.

New Practice Readers. Webster Publishing Company, 1960, 144 pp.

A series of workbook type exercises presents lessons in three parts.
There are questions to prepare for the reading and a comprehension check. Some
work in vocabulary is offered. While not designed for adults, the series should
be acceptable to them. Books A, B, and C are for readability levels, o6 grades
four, five, and six.

Step Up Your Reading Power. Webster Publishing Company, 1966, 90 pp.

Step Up Your Reading Power is a series of graded practice readers for
adults. There are five books in the series with Book A using short two page
exercises written at a fourth grade readability level. Book B (5th grade readability),
Book C (6th grade readability), Book D (7th grade readability), and Book E
(7th 8th grade readability). The selections get longer as the readability level
goes up. Content is at the adult interest level. This series appears to be most
useful for supplementary work at levels four and five.


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LEVEL 6


Reading Development Kit B. Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., 1968.

Kit B contains 80 different (160 total) coded lesson pamphlets on read-
ability levels 4.0 through 6.9. Within Kit B, as with Kit A, are four separate
series (Series Y, 400, 500, 600), one of which contains articles and skills
development in critical thinking and reading. The remaining series contain high
interest articles written in the content areas of work, health, safety, and law
and include vocabulary, skills, and comprehension development. The lessons are
designed so that instruction can be individualized. A teacher's manual, student
answer books, and placement tests are included in the Kit. The materials can be
used as a core program or can be supplementary to other programs.

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program, Series 600. Allied Education Council,
1965.

This series presents the reading skills taught in grades 4, 5, and 6.
Illustrations and content matter are geared toward adult interests. The basic
texts are: Basic Language Skills 600A, and Basic Language Skills 600B. Each
unit includes an instructional lesson with reading, spelling, word study, and
composition exercises. An instructional manual is provided. Occupational and
vocational reading materials are available at this level. They include
Needlecraft 600 and Homecraft 600.

Mastery of Reading. Study Book 3. American Book Company, 1960.

Mastery of Reading, Study Book 3 is a series of books accompanied by
workbooks with readability levels from upper grade six into grade nine. The
workbooks will prove helpful with adults and adolescents.

Michigan Language Program. Ann Arbor Publishers.

This program was written originally for children but has shown to be
adaptable to the adult. It is based on visual perception and discrimination
training and proceeds to directed reading instruction patterned after the
Bloomfield-Barnhart method. This series is a complete language arts series when
used as an entirety. Parts may be used separately. It includes listening,
reading, and writing skills developmental exercises.

Using the Context. Barnell Loft, 1962, 52 pp.

Using.the Context is a series of three books for Levels 4, 5, and 6.
This series develops skill in developing vocabulary and comprehension skills
through the use of the context clue. These books are acceptable for adults
and an excellent supplementary drill book.

Why Work Series. Behavior Research Laboratories, 1967.

This is a kit of twenty-one reading selections and eight recordings of
certain selections. The reading levels range from two through seven. The selec-
tions are designed to introduce the undereducated to the world of work. Each selec-
tion consists of a story and comprehension questions. This is good for supplemen-
tary reading practice.


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Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section
of Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions, Re-
ference Skills, Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II.
The booklets come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and
are designed to be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise
unit of subject matter which is followed by a question. The answers are programmed
in such a way that the student can progress rapidly or receive further practice in
weak areas. It is recommended for supplemental use.

Frontiers of America Series. Children's Press, 1964.

Frontiers of America Series is a series of books on readability
levels 5 and 6. These books bring American history to life in modern day.
Each book tells stories of an authentic nature. Titles include: Explorers
in a New Worl~ Heroes of the Western Outposts, Steamboats to the West, Gold
Rush Adventures, and many others.

Let's Travel Series. Children's Press, 1960-61.

This series is designed to give the reader an overview of the geo-
graphical aspects of certain countries. There are no accompanying exercises
or teacher's manual. The readability level is advanced. Some of the titles
in the series are: Let's Travel in Italy, 1960; Let's Travel in France, 1960;
and Let's Travel in England, 1961.

Standard Test Lessons in Reading, Book D. Bureau of Publications, Teacher's
College, Columbia University Press, 1961, 78 pp.

This is one of a series of high interest comprehension-building books
that are designed to build reading power and speed. Books in this series may
be used as self-teaching devices.

Teen-Age Tales. D. C. Heath and Company, 1954-59.

Teen-Age Tales are six books of high interest for adolescents. Each
book contains a collection of short stories concerned with the teen-age subculture.
These books are not recommended for older adults or disadvantaged persons.

EDL Study Skills Libraries. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Reference is organized like the other EDL
packaged programs, this program teaches the use of reference skills and places
great stress on critical reading.

Learning 100 Look and Write. Educational Development Laboratories.

This is the first book of a series designed to develop the visual
perceptual skills of the totallyilliterate adult. It starts with dots, and
builds to letters and numbers. This book is coordinated with the TachX Set
AxBxCx.
E.D.L. has a complete set of materials designed to develop visual
perceptual skills for the total illiterate. These include Aud-X, controlled
Reader, and Tach X materials. Various instructional media are used and many
learning modes employed. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are treated
as related skills. The series extends through Level 6.
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Figure It Out, Book 2. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.


This book extends the skills developed in Book 1. It also introduces
fractions, decimals, rounding and percentages. Work is presented in exercise
and problem form and space is provided for the student's responses.

Follett Vocational Reading Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 96 pp.

The stories in this series are designed to enable the student to identify
with the characters and the problems they face. Lessons that accompany each story
provide practice in reading, language and communication skills. The stories are
vocation-oriented to acquaint adults and young adults with various career oppor-
tunities. Four titles are presently available: Marie Perrone. Practical Nurse;
The Delwo Sisters, Beauticians; John Leveron, Auto Mechanic; The Millers and
Willie B.--Butcher, Baker, Chef; and Instructor's Guide.

Learning Your Language One. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 472 pp.

Comprehension and basic language disciplines are developed in
Learning Your Language One. Six booklets provide a sequentially developed
and integrated program of composition, language, and literature. Each lesson
centers around high interest stories, articles, and poems.

Reading for a Purpose. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett Publishing
Company, 1965, 222 pp.

This is a sight-word approach to teaching reading to adults. It is
a fairly comprehensive developmental approach beginning with readiness skills
and progressing through dictionary skills. The lessons usually follow along
the same general format. The style of the elementary basal series approach is
used and a detailed teacher's guide is included. The material is presented in
a loose leaf binder. It is designed to permit the teacher to add teacher- and
class-made materials.

Success in Language A. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 304 pp.

A sequentially integrated program, Success in Language A develops
language skills from stories that express ideas and experiences to which the
adult and young adult students can relate. There are 8 books including an
instructor's guide, unit tests, and key. Each lesson in the unit is organized
to give students practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

The Follett Basic Learnings Program. Educational Opportunities Project, Follett
Publishing Company, 1964.

Reading comprehension, communication and study-skills are developed
while American history concepts are being taught. The lessons are presented in
nine single-unit booklets, and are paced to review the previous lesson, intro-
duce new words, encourage vocabulary building, state reading purpose, and check
comprehension through self-testing.

The Turner-Livingston Communication Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1966,
48 pp. each.

Comprehension and vocabulary are stressed as the means to greater
communication and awareness that each adult and young adult has of himself and
his environment. The six topics are presented in the form of worktexts: "The


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Letters You Write," "The Phone Calls you Make," "The Movies You See," "The
Newspapers You Read," "The Language You Speak," and "The Television You Watch."

Understanding the Automobile. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 85 pp.

This book is designed as a basic text for use with MDVA programs,
vocational agricultural courses and others. It gives an overview of the nine
basic systems of the automobile so that the reader immediately has a full picture
of how an automobile works. Each of the systems is examined in detail with the
function of every part explained. Carefully labeled drawingsillustrate the
thousands of working parts in a modern automobile, and technical words are briefly
defined.

Aorld History Study Lessons. Follett Publishing Company, 1962-63, 208 pp.

Nine unit booklets, unit tests and key, and a teacher's guide
comprise the World History Study Lessons. They are designed to deal with
events in World History in a way so they can be related to the world in which
we live. The booklets are structured to develop reading, communications, and
study skills while subject matter is presented.

Better Reading. Globe Book Company, 1962, 447 pp.

This is an excellent book for both adolescents and adults. The
exercises in comprehension and vocabulary are well-constructed and the content
is acceptable to adults. Very- little supplementary instructional material will
be needed when this book is used as the basic text.

English Lessons for Adults. Harcourt, Brace and World, 1966.

English Lessons for Adults contains lessons for the development of
speaking, reading, and writing skills for the beginning adult learner. Emphasis
is placed on visual and atuditory discrimination and basic composition skills. The
content reflects--the practical aspects of life and living. A traditional approach
to language study.

Holt Adult Education Program. Intermediate Series. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston,
1962-64.

This paperback series of texts is designed to take the adult student
from the primary level through high school. Elementary school subjects are
covered. Titles include:
Basic Dictionary of American English, 1962, 848 pp.
Arithmetic, 1963, 300 pp. Number concepts are introduced. Progression
is made from simple addition and subtraction to word problems, multiplication, and
division of common-and decimal fractions.
English, 1962, 154 pp. The basics of the English language are provided.
The topics deal with sentences, punctuation, words, good usage, ways of getting
information, and oral and written communication. The review exercises are provided
at the end of each chapter.
Science, 1964, 326 pp. This book is slanted toward the upper inter-
mediate levels in its concepts. Its chapters include: the earth and its surroun-
dings, matter, energy, the human body, and health.








Introduction to Geography, 1964, 420 pp. This is a coverage of.
world geography with emphtiii on the physical and natural resources. Exercises
are included at the end of each chapter. The book is more suitable for a
higher level.

Let's Read: Third Series, Book II. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, Inc., 1962.

This is one of a series of four books designed for adolescents with
reading levels of five through seven. Interest level is good and the teacher's
manual offers help, especially to the new teacher.

Reading Skills. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, Inc., 1959.

Reading Skills is a good text for adolescents and younger adults.
These skills offer specific training in vocabulary and comprehension skills
and are acceptable to adults.

Reading for Meaning. J. B. Lippincott Company, 1962, 72 pp.

Reading for Meaning is an excellent series to use for developing compre-
hension techniques. While not designed for adults, the format and content Are
acceptable to them. Vocabulary development is worked into the selections in an
interesting way. This series has proven to have great value in teaching both
adolescents and adults. There are books for readability levels 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.

Collier Macmillan English Readers. Macmillan Company, 1966.

This is a series of four books: Stories to Surprise You, The Story
of My Life (Helen Keller), The Mitchell Family, and Buffalo Bill written at
Level 3 through 4 readability. Th'e@ are interesting, straightforward saj*es
depicting the American scene and way of living. It is good supplementary leading
material.

English This Way Series. MacMillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not the
native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six
years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to use from book
one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Springboards. Portal Press, Inc., 1966

Forty short reading selections are followed by comprehension questions
or selections stressing grammatical skills. Originally written for the unmotiva-
ted high school reader, the interest level is extremely high; the characters are
high school students or historical figures of all social and ethnic groups. Almost
all of the selections pack a well-hidden moral. Lesson plans are available.
Readability varies from Levels 3-6. An excellent supplementary and motivational
material.

Reader's Digest Science Reader, Grade 6. Reader's Digest, 1963.

This is one of a series of four books which are designed for reading
Levels 3, 4, 5, and 6. Appearance, interest level, and legibility are high.
This book is an excellent supplementary book for each of the levels for which it
was designed. It will prove of value both in developing reading skills and building
-40-






the general knowledge area of adult fundamental education.


Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 6. Reader's Digest, 1963.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content
is articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is
high, and the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

Second Book in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1950, 136 pp.

This book offers additional skills in vocabulary and grammar. Much
attention is centered on conversation and pronunciation. There are exercises
at the end of each lesson. The book is on the intermediate level.

Foundations of Citizenship, Book 2. Frank E. Richards Publishing Company, 1965,
98 pp.

This hardback book with companion workbooks stresses daily living
and citizenship through brief units and exercises on topics such as: the
community, the family, jobs, taxes, savings, and insurance, and use of leisure
time. Illustrations reinforce various concepts that have been presented.

Dimensions in Reading Kit. Science Research Associates, 1966.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different
themes designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construc-
tion work, transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and
stories on any level may be at any readability within that level. Each selection
contains a story and comprehension questions. The Levels are 4-6: 50 each;
Level 7: 40; Levels 8-9: 30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A very short
Teacher's Handbook and Answer Keys are included.

Learn How to Study. Science Research Associates, 1961, 66pp.

This book is designed to help students develop good study habits.
Topics that are covered are: "Why is It Important to Study," "How to Find
Information," "How to Organize Information," and "How to Report Information."
The material is presented in workbook form with exercises and activities to
reinforce learning.

Rochester Occupational Reading Series. Science Research Associates, 1959.

This series comes in five different worktexts written at three dif-
ferent levels of readability. Level 1 is third grade difficulty, Level 2 is
fourth grade difficulty, and Level 3 is fifth grade difficulty. The subject
matter is the same at the three different reading levels. Topics handled
are gas stations, bakeries, restaurants, supermarkets, and truck farming. They
should be supplemented.

Spelling Word Power Laboratory IIc. Science Research Associates.

This kit includes exercises for studying sound sight relationships.
Vowels, consonants, abbreviations, contractions, plurals, homonyms, and dif-
ficult words are presented in programmed learning wheels. A variety of check
tests, spelling key cards, a student record book, and a teacher's manual are
included.
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SRA Better Reading Books, Book I. Science Research Associates, 1950, 90 pp.

This series is designed to improve reading power and speed. It is
written for adolescents and adults, The comprehension exercises are fair.
It is best used as a supplementary text.

SRA Reading for Understanding: Junior Edition. Science Research Associates,
1962.

SRA Reading for Understandinglis a packaged program of individual
lessons for improving comprehension. The readability range is from grade three
to grade eight. As with other SRA package programs, this program is organized
so a wide range of students can be handled at the same time.

SRA Reading Laboratory lic. Science Research Associates.

This laboratory, oottaiAsigraded materials fortreadability Levels 4
through 9. It should b6 supplemented.': It hid beenWell accepted by adole,-
scents and .adults.

English Essentials2 SteckdVaughniCompany, 1964,0 9 pp.. :,

The essentials of English are reviewed in this book. Many types
of written exercises are used. The content and interest are for the adult.
The grade levels are 5 and 6. This could be used with adults who have had
previous experience in reading, writing, and grammar.

Language Exercises. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

This is a set of four books, each about 128 pages in length. The
stories provide for language art experiences for those on readability levels
from 5 through 8. The lessons are presented in workbook style and help develop
skills in vocabulary, sentence structure, grammar, dictionary usage, and
letter writing. Test lesson booklets are also included.

Our Florida. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1962, 112 pp.

This worktext provides an excellent overview of the history and
development of Florida. The units include information about the geography of
Florida, its plants and animal life, industries, cities, and schools. A bib-
liography is included.

Wings Book Series. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1966.

This set of books includes a wide range of social studies and science
concepts. They provide interesting reading for adults with appropriate illustra-
tions. The books include experiments, demonstrations, and questions. Areas
covered are: Science: Geology, Physics, Psychology, Physiology, and Botany;
Social Studies: Sir Issac Newton, Sociology, Geography, Vanilla, What Is Money.

Building Your Language Power. Silver Burdett Company, 1965.

This series includes six books on different levels of difficulty.
Basic language skills are taught, from basic letter formation study to study of
phonics- related activities. The books are self-teaching and provide for
individualized study on the student's part. The format resembles that of
programmed instruction. The books range from Level 1 to Level 6.


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Call Them Heroes. Silver Burdett Company, 1965, 80 pp. each.

Call Them Heroes presents the biographies of forty-eight men and
women who achieved some measure of success by overcoming difficult circumstances.
The four books in this series are designed as supplemental material which can
be used in guidance, social studies, and language arts classes. Discussion
questions are included in the teacher's manual.

New Flights in Reading. U.S. Armed Forces Institute, 1955, 173 pp.

This is a supplementary reader containing a collection of articles
and stories, many of which are adapted from other sources. Stories are geared
to adult interests and problem areas. Exercises are included with each story.
It is written on the intermediate level.


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Part 111
Materials for the.Intermediate Stage
Level :7

The Mott Basic Language Skills Program. 900 Series. Allied Education Council,
1965.

Basic language skills 900A and 900B include formation and developmental
exercises on vocabulary building, comprehension skills, spelling skills, English
usage, oral reading skills, rate improvement, numbers, charts, maps, and graphs.
Supplementary reading is provided by the Progress Series 900 and occupational ma-
terials in the Craftsman Series 900. Titles in this series include Needlecraft
900 and Homecraft 900.

American Health and Safety Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

American Health and Safety Series is a series of programmed books on such
things as First Aid, Personal Health, Nutrition, and Safety. The r-s&ries:-may be
helpful with advanced ABE students with interests in these areas.

Consumer Mathematics Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

This series of programmed texts deals with the Household Budget, Income Tax,.
Insurance, The Pay Check, and other such subjects. These books appear most useful
as resource books for ABE students.

The United States Constitution. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964, 260 pp.

This programmed workbook covers the evolution of our Constitution and teaches
the early history of America and the Constitution as it has evolved today. It is
appropriate for some adults at the 7th or 8th grade readability levels. It may be
particularly useful for reinforcing concepts developed in discussion.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section ofLessons for
Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions,"Referenc' Skills, e&d-
ing Interpretations 1, and Reading Interpretations 11. The booklets come on f6r'"
levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and are designed to be supple-
mentary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise unit of subject matter which is
followed by a question. The answers are programmed in such a way that the student
can progress rapidly or receive further practice in weak areas. It is recommended
for supplemental use.

Modern Reading, Book 1. Charles Merrill Company, 1960.

Modern Reading, Book 1 is one of a series of three books for developing reading
skills at the junior-senior high school levels. Vocabulary and comprehension ex-
ercises are excellent and the material is fully acceptable to adults.

Let's Travel Series. Children's Press, 1960-61.

This series is designed to give the leader an overview of the geographical as-
pects of certain countries. There are no accompanying exercises or teacher's manual.
The readability level is advanced. Some of the titles in the series are: Let's
Travel in Italy, 1960; Let's Travel in France, 1960; and Let's Travel in England, 1961.

EDL Study Skills-Libraries. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Reference is organized like the other EDL packaged


-44-







programs, this program teaches the use of reference skills and places great stress
on critical reading.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Science. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962.

This packaged program contains individual lessons in science for reading
Levels 4 through 9. These self-correcting lessons develop the principle com-
prehension skills and also contribute to vocabulary growth. They are of proven
worth in teaching reading to adolescents and adults.

EDL Study Skills-Library for Social Studies. Educational Development Laboratories,
1962.

This packaged program is similar to the EDL Study Skills-Library for Science,
except that the content is social studies.

EDL Word Clues, Book G. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962, 160 pp.

EDL Word Clues, Book G is a programmed text which enables the student to
build his word power. The student works through the first set of frames and starts
from the beginning again to do the second set of frames. The words selected for
use are high figuring words according to research. The back has 30 lessons of 10
words each. Teacher's manual and unit tests are available.

American History Study Lessons. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 704 pp.

These short books make excellent vehicles for teaching adults to read social
studies materials. History concepts are taught in short, self-contained units.
They can be used as self-help books. Follett's Study Lessons on Documents of
Freedom are similar to American History Study Lessons.

Figure It Out, Book II. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book extends the skills developed in Book 1. It also introduces frac-
tions, decimals, rounding and percentages. Work is presented in exercise and
problem form and space is provided for the student's responses.

Individualized English, Set J. Follett Publishing Company, 1964.

Individualized English, Set J is a set of 11x8 cards containing a linear
program in English. Grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, and some of the
mechanics of language are taught. Prepared for junior high school classes, the
readability is around 7th grade level. A teacher's manual, tests, and alternate
cards for a second exposure of material not learned the first time are available.
The programming is not as sound as it should be, but the series is usable.

Success in Language-A. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 304 pp.

A sequentially integrated program, Success in Language-A develops language
skills from stories that express ideas and experiences to which the adult and
young adult students can relate. There are 8 books including an instructor's
guide, unit tests, and key. Each lesson in the unit is organized to give stu-
dents practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

The Turner-Livingston Communication Series. Follett Publishing Company, 1966.
44 pp. each.


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Comprehension and vocabulary are stressed as the means to greater communica-
tion and awareness that each adult and young adult has of himself and his
environment. The six topics are presented in the form of worktexts: "The Letters
You Write," "The Phone Calls You Make," "The Movies You See," "The Newspapers
You Read," "The Language You Speak," and "The Television You Watch."

Understanding the Automobile. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 85 pp.

This book is designed as a basic text for use with MDTA programs, vocational
agricultural courses and others. It gives an overview of the nine basic systems
of the automobile so that the reader immediately has a full picture of how an
automobile works. Each of the systems is examined in detail with the function of
every part explained. Carefully labeled drawings illustrate the thousands of
working parts in a modern automobile, and technical words are briefly defined.

World History Study Lessons. Follett Publishing Company, 1962-63, 208 pp.

Nine unit booklets, unit tests and key, and a teacher's guide comprise the
World History Study Lessons. They are designed to deal with events in World
History in a way so they can be related to the world in which we live. The book-
lets are structured to develop reading, communications, and study skills while
subject matter is presented.

Steps to Better Reading, Book 1. Harcourt, Brace and World, 1964, 197 pp.

Steps to Better Reading is one of the few really acceptable programmed books
for developing vocabulary and strengthening weak areas in comprehension. Students
should be given experience in programmed materials to prepare them for self-study
in the future.

Holt Adult Education Program. Advanced Series, Holt Rinehart and Winston, Inc.

The series deals with pre-high school subjects. Some titles include:
English for Adults, 1964; Principles of Geography; You and the Law, 1964; Fun-
damental Mathematics; Earth and Space; Physical Science; and Citizenship and
Government.

Reading for Meaning. J. B. Lippincott Company, 1962, 72 pp.

Reading for Meaning is an excellent series to use for developing com-
prehension techniques. While not designed for adults, the format and content
is acceptable to them. Vocabulary development is worked into the selections in
an interesting way. This series has proven to have great value in teaching both
adolescents and adults. There are books for readability Levels 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8.

Driving the Reading Road. Lyons and Carnahan, 1943.

This "oldie but goody" is still excellent as a basal text for adolescents
and younger adults. It has good comprehension and vocabulary exercises. In-
struction is pointed to specific reading skills. It's weaknesses will do little
damage.

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not the
native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six


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years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to use from book
one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Key to English Series. The Mtcmillan Company, 1964.

There are ten books in the series which are designed to advance the student's
mastery of English and grammar. The levels of difficulty range from intermediate
to advanced. The books can be used as supplementary material or for individual
study. Practice exercises are at the end of each lesson. Books include:
Prepositions 1, Prepositions 2, Two-word Verbs, Verbs, Vocabulary, Figurative
Expressions, Nouns, Adjectivesl, Adjectives 2, and Letter Writing.

Be a Better Reader, Book 1, Prentice-Hall, 1963, 128 pp.

Be a Better Reader, Book 1 is a relatively complete text for teaching com-
prehension and vocabulary skills on the 7th grade level. While developed for
adolescents, it has proven effective with adults. Interest level is high and
study type reading is stressed. This series extends through the high school
levels.

Help Yourself to Improve Your Reading, Part 1. Reader's Digest, 1962, I60 pp.

As with other Digest offerings, the material is adult in nature and of high
interest level. The source of the readings is Reader's Digest. Vocabulary and
comprehension exercises are sound and the book is designed so that it may be used
as a self-help book by students whose reading is sixth or seventh grade level.

Reader' SDigest Skill Builder, Grade 7. Reader's Digest, 1963.

Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 7. Reader's Digest, 1963.
64 pp.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high, and
the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

Everyday Dialogues in English. Regents Publishing Company, 1953, 166 pp.

This is a book of dialogues covering adult interest situations. The pur-
pose of the book is to acquaint those in beginning English with typical con-
versational patterns. The book may also be used as an advanced conversation text.
The illustrations and content material reflect adult interests. The reading level
is advanced. If a supplementary grammar book is needed, the authors suggest the
use of Graded Exercises in English (annotation at Level 4).

Dimensions in Reading. Science Research Associates.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different themes
designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construction work,
transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and stories on any
level may be at any readability within that level. Each selection contains a
story and comprehension question'. The Levels are 4-6: 50 each; Level 7: 40;
Levels 8-9: 30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A very short Teacher's Handbook
and Answer Keys are included.


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How To Be A Better Student. Science Research Associates, 1956, 96 pp.

Information on how to be a better student is presented in workbook form.
Illustrations, charts, and tests evaluate present study habits. Exercises and
activities are then suggested to improve weak areas and show how to use study
time most effectively.

Spelling Word Power Laboratory, 11B 4Revised) Sciencel-Research Associates.

This kit includes exercises for studying sound sight relationships. Vowels,
consonants, abbreviations, contractions, plurals, homonyms, and difficult words
are presented in programmed learning wheels. A variety of check tests, spelling
key cards, a student record book, and a teacher's manual are included.

SRA Better Reading Books, Book 1.. Science Research Associates, 1950, 90 pp.

This series is designed to improve reading power and speed. It is written
for adolescents and adults. The comprehension exercises are fair. It is best
used as a supplementary text.

SRA Reading Laboratory, llc. Science Research Associates.

SRA Reading Laboratories suitable for the Introductory Stage of reading in-
clude Reading Laboratory Ib, and Ic and the older, but not out-moded Elementary
Edition (1958). The laboratories contain many articles as separate items which
are grouped according to readability level. They are suitable for adults.
Teacher's manuals are complete and lessons are designed so that much of the
learning is self-instruction. The laboratories should be supplemented with
vocabulary development materials.

SRA Reading for Understanding. Science Research Associates, 1962.

SRA Reading for Understanding is similar to the SRA Reading for Understanding:
Junior Edition described at Level 3, but extends from readability levels of five
through twelve.

Auto Dynamics and What They Mean to You. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

The material presented in programmed form explains the various forces in
vehicle accidents. Simple drawings accompany each set of frames. Each frame
consists of a paragraph of information and then a sentence to be completed by the
student. The answer is verified by consulting an answer sheet in the back of the
book.

Basic Science for Adults, Book 1. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 104 pp.

This book presents the basic concepts in science. Each unit is composed of
a reading lesson, vocabulary and comprehension exercises. Topics of study include
the universe, air, water, weather, plants and animals, the human body and health.

Language Exercises. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

This is a set of four books, each about 128 pages in length. The stories
provide for language art experiences for those on readability levels from 5
through 8. The lessons are presented in workbook style and help develop skills


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in vocabulary, sentence structure, grammar, dictionary usage, and letter writing.
Test lesson booklets are also included.

Our Democracy. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 128 pp.

The book consists of 12 chapters. Each one has a reading selection about
some specific topic followed by a series of written exercises by the student.
The book develops understanding of historical freedom, documents, branches of
government and their functions and citizen responsibilities. Test lessons and
a teacher's manual accompany the books.

The Story of a Great Document. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1953, 94 pp.

The text presents the historical background of the Constitution, the
Constitution itself, the various related workbook exercises. A teacher's
manual and test booklet are included.

New Flights in Reading. U.S. Armed Forces Institute, 1955, 173 pp.

This is a supplementary reader containing a collection of articles and
stories, many of which are adapted from other sources. Stories are geared to
adult interests and problem areas. Exercises are included with each story. It
is written on the intermediate level.


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LEVEL 8


Mott Basic Language Skills Program. Allied Education Council, 1965.

Basic language skills 900A and 900B include information and developmental
exercises on vocabulary building, comprehension skills, spelling skills, English
usage, oral reading skills, rate improvement, numbers, charts, maps, and graphs.
Supplementary reading is provided by the Progress Series 900 and occupational
materials in the Craftsman Series 900. Titles in this series include Needlecraft
900 and Homecraft 900.

Reading Skillbook I. American Book Company, 1962, 128 pp.

Reading Skillbook I covers the waterfront in terms of the various reading
skills treated. Interest level is good and there are a wide variety of tasks to do.
An excellent text to have handy to treat specific deficiencies in word attack, word
meaning, and specific comprehension skills.

Programmed Vocabulary. Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1964, 214 pp.

This programmed text is devised to teach the twenty most important
prefixes and the fourteen most important roots. This text is helpful for supple-
mentary independent study.

American Health and Safety Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

American Health and Safety Series is a series of programmed books on
such things as First Aid, Personal Health, Nutrition, and Safety. The series may
be helpful with advanced ABE students with interests in these areas.

Consumer Mathematics Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

This series of programmed texts deals with the Household Budget, In-
come Tax, Insurance, The Pay Check, and other such subjects. The books appear
most useful as resource books for ABE students.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section of
Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions, Reference
Skills, Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II. The booklets
come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and are designed
to be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise unit of subject
matter which is followed by a question. The answers are programmed in such a way
that the student can progress rapidly or receive further practice in weak areas.
It is recommended for supplemental use.

Modern Reading, Book II. Charles Merrill Company, 1960.

Modern Reading, Book II is one of a series of three books for developing
reading skills at the junior-senior high school levels. Vocabulary and comprehen-
sion exercises are excellent and the material is fully acceptable to adults.

Let's Travel Series. Children's Press, 1960-61.

This series is designed to give the reader an overview of the geo-
graphical aspects of certain countries. There are no accompanying exercises or


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teacher's manual. The readability level is advanced. Some of the titles in the
series are: Let's Travel in Italy, 1960; Let's Travel in France, 1960; and Let's
Travel in England, 1961.

The "True Story" Series. Children's Press, 1964.

The stories consist of twelve biographies of well-known men. They are
well-written and illustrated. Each book is over 100 pages long. They provide
interesting supplemental and personal reading for the advanced student. Titles
include: Lawrence of Arabia; Gandhi, Man of Peac'h; Lord Nelson, Naval Hero;
Sir Francis Drake, Privateer; Captain Scott, At the South Pole; Albert Schweitzer,
Humanitarian; Cecil Rhodes, In Africa; David Livingston, Explorer; Sir Winston
Churchill; Queen Victoria; Napoleon; Albert Einstein,

Standard Test Lessons in Reading. Bureau of Publications, Teacher's College,
Columbia University Press,-1961, 78 pp.

Standard Test Lessons in Reading, Book D, is one of a series of high
interest comprehension-building bools that are designed to build reading power
and speed. Books in this series may be used as self-teaching devices.

Test Lessons in Reading-Reasoning. Bureau of Publications, Teacher's College,
Columbia University Press, 1961, 78 pp.

This text was devised to improve the critical reading and thinking
ability of adolescents and adults. It consists of seventy-eight lessons which
teach ways of uncovering fallacies in reasoning and give practice in detecting
such fallacies. Adults enjoy the exercises and the book makes an excellent
supplement to other more general texts.

EDL Study Skills Libraries. Educational Development Laboratories, 1962.

EDL Study Skills Library for Reference is organized like the other EDL
packaged programs. It teaches the use of reference skills and places great stress
on critical reading.

World Affairs Workshop Series. Encyclopedia Britannica Press, Inc., 1965.

This series of 75 to 100 page books is by correspondents and contrib-
utors to the New York Times. It ranges in readability from Level 7 to Level 10.
The interest level is extremely high and the subject matter is vital to effective
citizenship. Some of the titles are: Communist China, Africa, The Soviet Union,
and Latin America. These are adult books and are appropriate for most advanced
ABE classes.

Figure It Out, Book II. Follett Publishing Company, 1965, 80 pp.

This book extends the skills developed in Book I. It also introduces
fractions, decimals, rounding and percentages. Work is presented in exercise
and problem form and space is provided for the student's responses.

Success in Language A. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 304 pp,

A sequentially integrated program, Success in Language A develops
language skills from stories that express ideas and experiences to which the
adult and young adult students can relate. There are 8 books including an
instructor's guide, unit tests, and key. Each lesson in the unit is organized
to give students practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.


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World History Study Lessons. Follett Publishing Company, 1962-63, 208 pp.

Nine unit booklets, unit tests and key, and a teacher's guide comprise
the World History Study Lessons. They are designed to deal with events in World
History in a way so they can be related to the world in which we live. The book-
lets are structured to develop reading, communications, and study skills while
subject matter is presented.

Steps to Better Reading, Book II. Harcourt Brace and World, 1964, 197 pp.

Steps to Better Reading, Book II, is one of the few really acceptable
programmed books for developing vocabulary and strengthening weak areas in compre-
hension. Students should be given experience in programmed materials to prepare
them for self-study in the future.

Holt Adult Education Program. Advanced Series. Holt, Rinehart, and Winston,
1962-64.

The series deals with pre-high school subjects. Some titles include:
English for Adults, 1964; Principles of Geography; You and the Law, 1964; Fun-
damental Mathematics; Earth and Space; Physical Science; and Citizenship and
Government.

Reading for Meaning. J. B. Lippincott Company, 1962, 72 pp.

Reading for Meaning is an excellent series to use for developing compre-
hension techniques. While not designed for adults, the format and content is
acceptable to them. Vocabulary development is worked into the selections in an
interesting way. This series has proven to have great value in teaching both
adolescents and adults. There are books for readability Levels 4,5,6,7, and 8.

Collier-Macmillan English Program. The Key to English Series. Macmillan Company,
1966.

This is a series of four books: Stories to Surprise You, The Story
of My Life (Helen Keller), The Mitchell Family, and Buffalo Bill written at Level
3 through 4 readability. These are interesting, straightforward stories depicting
the American scene and way of living. It is good supplementary reading material.

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

This series is designed to be used in classes where English is not
the native language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with
six years of practical experience in English through guided repetition, correction,
and drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One manual is to use
from book one to six, and the other from seven to twelve.

Be a Better Reader, Book II. Prentice-Hall, 1963, 128 pp.

Be a Better Reader, Book: II, is a relatively complete text for teaching
comprehension and vocabulary skills on the 7th grade level. While developed for
adolescents, it has proven effective with adults. Interest level is high and
study type reading is stressed. This series extends through the high school levels.


Help Yourself to Improve Your Reading, Part II. Reader's Digest, 1962, 160 pp.

As with other Digest offerings, the material is adult in nature and of


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high interest level. The source of the readings is Readers Digest. Vocabulary and
comprehension exercises are sound and the book is designed so that it may be used
as a help-self book by students whose reading is sixth or seventh grade level.

Reader's Digest Skill Builder, Grade 8. Reader's Digest, 1963.

This is part of a series which extends through Level 8. The content is
articles from the Reader's Digest. Legibility is good, interest level is high,
and the manual offers practical suggestions for use of the series.

Everyday Dialogues in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1953, 166 pp.

This is a book of dialogues covering adult interest situations. The
purpose of the book is to acquaint those in beginning English with typical con-
versation text. The illustrations and content material reflect adult interests.
The reading level is advanced. If a supplementary grammar book is needed, the
authors suggest the use of Graded Exercises in English (annotation at Level 4).

Dimensions in Reading. Science Research Associates, 1966.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different
themes designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construction
work, transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and stories on
any level may be at any readability within that level. Each selection contains a
story and comprehension questions. The Levels are 4-6: 50 each; Level 7: 40;
Levels 8-9: 30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A very short Teacher's Handbook and
Answer Keys are included.

How to Be a Better Student. Science Research Associates, 1956, 96 pp.

Information on how to be a better student is presented in workbook
form. Illustrations, charts, and tests evaluate present study habits. Exercises
and activities are then suggested to improve weak areas and show how to use study
time most effectively.

SEA Reading for Understanding. Science Research Associates, 1962.

SRA Reading for Understanding is similar to the SRA Reading for Under-
standing: Junior Edition described at Level 3, but extends from readability levels
of five through twelve.

SRA Reading Laboratory IIc. Science Research Associates.

See annotation at Level 1. This laboratory contains graded materials
for readability Levels 4 through 9. It should be supplemented. It has been well
accepted by adolescents and adults.

Words. Science Research Associates, 1962, 224 pp.

Words is a programmed text of 2200 frames in 14 chapters. This text has
a real place in adult literacy training. It teaches the student that he can learn
on his own and prepares him for self-learning and the use of a type of material
that will be best used in the future for on-the-job training. It is an excellent
supplementary material.

Auto Dynamics and What They Mean to You. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.
The material presented in programmed form explains the various forces in


-53-






vehicle accidents. Simple drawings accompany each set of frames. Each frame con-
sists of a paragraph of information and then a sentence to be completed by the
student. The answer is verified by consulting an answer sheet in the back of the
book.

Basic Science for Adults, Book I. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 104 pp.

This book presents the basic concepts in science. Each unit is com-
posed of a reading lesson, vocabulary and comprehension exercises. Topics of
study.include the universe, air, water, weather, plants and animals, the human
body and health.

Language Exercises. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

This is a set of four books, each about 128 pages in length. The stories
provide for language art experiences for those on readability levels from 5 through
8. The lessons are presented in workbook style and help develop skills in vocabu-
lary, sentence structure, grammar, dictionary usage, and letter writing. Test
lesson booklets are also included.

Mastery in Reading. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1958, 144 pp.

This worktext provides a wide variety of reading selections and exercises.
It seems to extend skills in vocabulary, organization, reading for main ideas and
details, and speed of comprehension. A text booklet is included.

Our Democracy. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 128 pp.

The book consists of 12 chapters. Each one has a reading selection about
some specific topic followed by a series of written exercises by the student. The
book develops understanding of historical freedom, documents, branches of govern-
ment and their functions and citizen responsibilities. Test lessons and a teacher's
manual accompany the books.

New Flights in Reading. U. S. Armed Forces Institute, 1955, 173 pp.

This is a supplementary reader containing a collection of articles and
stories, many of which are adapted from other sources. Stories are geared to
adult interests and problem areas. Exercises are included with each story. It is
written on the intermediate level.


-54-








LEVEL 9


The Mott Basic Language Skills Program. 900 Series. Allied Education Council,
1965.

Basic Language Skills 900A and 900B include information and developmental
exercises on vocabulary building, comprehension skills, spelling skills, English
usage, oral reading skills, rate improvement, numbers, charts, maps, and graphs.
Supplementary reading is provided by the Progress Series 900 and occupational
materials in the Craftsman Series 900. Titles in this series include Needlecraft
900 and Homecraft 900.

Programmed Vocabulary. Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc., 1964, 214 pp.

This text is divided into two sections. The first develops the meaning of
prefixes through the programmed frames, After a number of prefixes are intro-
duced, an essay is presented. At this time the student utilizes his knowledge
to complete the thoughts in the essay. Part II is similar in structure but
utilizes roots instead of prefixes.

American Health and Safety Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

American Health and Safety Series is a series of programmed books on such
things as First Aid, Personal Health, Nutrition, and Safety. The series may
be helpful with advanced ABE students with interests in these areas.

Consumer Mathematics Series. Behavioral Research Laboratories, 1964.

This series of programmed texts deals with the Household Budget, Income
Tax, Insurance, The Pay Check, and other such subjects. The books appear most
useful as resource books for ABE students.

Lessons for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills. California Test Bureau, 1963.

The four titles which comprise the Reading Comprehension section of Lessons
for Self-Instruction in Basic Skills are: Following Directions, Reference Skills,
Reading Interpretations I, and Reading Interpretations II.
The booklets come on four levels: A-B (3-4); C-D (5-6); E-F (7-8); G (9+), and
are designed to be supplementary study aids. Every lesson contains a concise
unit of subject matter which is followed by a question. The answers are pro-
grammed in such a way that the student can progress rapidly or receive further
practice in weak areas. It is recommended for supplemental use.

The "True Story" Series. Children's Press, 1964.

The stories consist of twelve biographies of well-known men. They are
well-written and illustrated. Each book is over 100 pages long. They provide
interesting supplemental and personal reading for the advanced student. Titles
include: Lawrence of Arabia; Gandhi, Man-of Peace; Lord Nelson, Naval Hero;
Sir Francis Drake. Privateer; Captain Scott. At the South Pole; Albert Schweitzer,
Humanitarian; Cecil Rhodes, In Africa;.David Livingston, Explorer; Sir Winston
Churchill; Queen Victoria; Napoleon; Albert Einstein.


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Success in Language A. Follett Publishing Company, 1964, 304 pp.


A sequentially integrated program, Success in Language A develops language
skills from stories that express ideas and experiences to which the adult and
young adult students can relate. There are 8 books including an instructor's
guide, unit tests, and key. Each lesson in the unit is organized to give students
practice in reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

World History Study Lessons. Follett Publishing Company, 1962-63, 208 pp.

Nine unit booklets, unit tests and key, and a teacher's guide comprise the
World History Study Lessons. They are designed to deal with events in World
History in a way so they can be related to the world in which we live. The
booklets are structured to develop reading, communications, and study skills
while subject matter is presented,

Collier-Macmillan English Program. The Key to English Series. Macmillan Company,
1964.

There are ten books in the series which are designed to advance the student's
mastery of English and grammar. The levels of difficulty range from intermediate
to advanced. The books can be used as supplementary material or for individual
study. Practice exercises are at the end of each lesson. Books include: Preposi-
tions 1, Prepositions 2, Two-word Verbs, Verbs, Vocabulary, Figurative Expressions,
Nouns, Adjectives 1, Adjectives 2, and Letter Writing.

English This Way Series. Macmillan Company, 1963.

Thisseries is designed to be used in classes where English is not the native
language. There are twelve books which provide the foreign-born with six years
of practical experience in English through guides repetition, correction, and
drill. There are two accompanying teacher's manuals. One to use from book
one to six, the other from seven to twelve.

Everyday Dialogues in English. Regent's Publishing Company, 1953, 166 pp.

This is a book of dialogues covering adult interest situations. The purpose
of the book is to acquaint those in beginning'English with typical conversational
patterns. The book may also be used as an advanced conversation text. The illustra-
tions and content material reflect adult interests. The reading level is advanced.
If a supplementary grammar book is needed, the authors suggest the use of Graded
Exercises in English.

Dimensions in Reading. Science Research Associates, 1966.

This is a kit of 300 reading selections built around eight different themes
designed for boys and men. The selections deal with farming, construction work,
transportation, etc. Eight readability levels are included and stories on any
level may be at any readability within that level. Each selection contains a
story and comprehension questions. The Levels are 4-6: 50 each; Level 7: 40;
Levels 8-9: 30 each; Levels 10-11: 25 each. A veryshort Teacher's Handbook and
Answer Keys are included.


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How To Be A Better Student. Science Research Associates, 1956, 96 pp.

Information on how to be a better student is presented in workbook form.
Illustrations, charts, and tests evaluate present study habits. Exercises and
activities are then suggested to improve weak areas and show how to use study
time most effectively.

How To Study. Science Research Associates, 1956, 128 pp.

Topics included in this worktext are: Plantng Your Time for Study, The
Physical Setting for your Study, The Mastery Zechniaues, Helps to Study, Getting
Ready for and Taking Examination, Better Learning, Note Taking, and Building Your
Vocabulary. Charts and tests evaluate study habits. Weak areas can then be
improved through the exercises and activities presented for each topic. The
readability level extends from Level 9 to 12.

SRA Spelling Laboratory IIc. Science Research Associates (revised in June, 1965).

The spelling lab is based on ten learning wheels and color-coded according to
levels of instruction within a six grade range. The wheels provide the student
with exercises in phonics and word analysis. Through the use of a step-by-step
procedure and single frame exposure in the wheels, the student can get a "clear,
visual memory of problem words." The program incorporates individualized study
by the students and emphasizes the teaching of spelling words and the principles
of spelling. Along with the wheels are three Achievement Surveys that serve as
a check on overall progress, Key Cards which are self-scoring tests, Check tests
which evaluate progress at each level, a student's record book, and a teacher's
handbook. Because of the format of the kit, it can also be used with advanced
5th grade and slower 7th grade students.

SRA Spelling Laboratory liIa. Science Research Associates (revised)

This spelling lab, like lab IIc, is based on learning wheels, color-coded
according to ten levels of instruction with a seven grade range, providing the
student with studying phonics and word analysis. The program stresses individ-
ualized student work. Not only spelling of words but principles of spelling
are emphasized in the lab. In addition to the learning wheels, check tests,
key cards, achievement surveys are included for testing purposes. A student's
record book lets the student follow his own rate of progress. A teacher's
manual is included.

Auto Dynamics and What They Mean to You. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965.

The material presented in programmed form explains the various forces in
vehicle accidents. Simple drawings accompany each set of frames. Each frame
consists of a paragraph of information and then a sentence to be completed by the
student. The answer is verified by consulting an answer sheet in the back of
the book.

Basic Science for Adults, Book 1. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 104 pp.

This book presents the basic concepts in science. Each unit is composed of
a reading lesson, vocabulary and comprehension exercises. Topics of study include
the universe, air, water, weather, plants and animals, the human body and health.


-57-










Our Democracy. Steck-Vaughn Company, 1965, 128 pp.


The book consists of 12 chapters. Each one has a reading selection about
some specific topic followed by a series of written exercises by the student.
The book develops understanding of historical freedom, documents, branches of
government and their functions and citizen responsibilities. Test lessons and
teacher's manual accompany the books.


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ADDRESSES OF PUBLISHERS


Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc.
Reading, Massachusetts 01867

Allied Education Council
Distribution Center
Galien, Michigan 49113

American Book Company
Lancaster, Texas

Ann Arbor Publishers
610 South Forest
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Appleton-Century-Crofts, Inc.
35 West 32nd Street
New York 1, New York

,-rBarnell Loft
111 South Centre Avenue
Rockville Centre
Long Island, New York


Behavioral Research Laboratories
Box 577
Palo Alto, California 94302

Bureau of Publications
Teachers College
Columbia University Press
525 West 125th Street
New York 29, New York

California Test Bureau
DelMonte Research Park
Monterey, California 93940

Charles E. Merrill Company
1300 Alum Creek Drive
Columbus 16, Ohio


Children's Press,
Jackson Boulevard
Chicago, Illinois


Inc.
and Racine Avenue
60607


C. S. Hammond
Maplewood, New Jersey

D. C. Heath and Company
225 Columbus Avenue
Boston 16, Massachusetts

Educational Development Laboratories
75 Prospect Street
Huntington, New York


Encyclopedia Britannica Press, Inc.
425 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago 11, Illinois

Fearon Publishers, Inc.
2165 Park Boulevard
Palo Alto, California 94306

Follett Publishing Company
1010 West Washington Boulevard
Chicago 7, Illinois 60607

Frank E. Richards Publisher
Phoenix, New York

Garrard Press
510 North Hickory Street
Champaign, Illinois

Globe Book Company, Inc.
175 Fifth Avenue
New York 10, New York

Harcourt, Brace and World
757 Third Avenue
New York 17, New York

Harr Wagner Publishing Company
609 Mission Street
San Francisco 5, California

Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.
383 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10017

J. B. Lippincott Company
East Washington Square
Philadelphia 5, Pennsylvania

Lyons and Carnahan
407 East 25th Street
Chicago, Illinois 60616

Macmillan Company
School Department
866 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10022

McGraw-Hill Book Company
330 West 42nd Street
New York, New York 10036

McGraw-Hill Book Company
Webster Division
680 Forest Road N. E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30312


-59.










National Association for Public
School Adult Education
1201 Sixteenth Street, N. W.
Washington, D. C. 20036

New Reader Press
Box 131
Syracuse, New York 13210

Noble and Noble Publishers, Inc.
67 Irving Place
New York 3, New York

Pocket Books, Inc.
(order from Affiliated Publishers, Inc.)
630 Fifth Avenue
New York, New York 10020

Portal Press, Inc.
605 Third Avenue
New York, New York 10016

Prentice-Hall, Inc.
Route 9 W
Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey

Random House, Inc.
457 Madison Avenue
New York 22, New York

Reader's Digest Services, Inc.
Educational Division
Pleasantville, New York

Regents Publishing Company
200 Park Avenue South
New York 3, New York

Science Research Associates
259 East Erie Street
Chicago 11, Illinois

Silver Burdett Company
Park Avenue and Columbia Road
Morristown, New Jersey 07960

Steck-Vaughn Company
Austin 61, Texas

U. S. Armed Forces Institute
Madison 3, Wisconsin

U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington 25, D. C. 20402


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