• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 Back Matter
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: I and my master
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082648/00001
 Material Information
Title: I and my master
Physical Description: 72 p., 6 leaves of plates : ill., ports ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Stephenson, Mary
Hodges, John ( Publisher )
Montague, Irving ( Illustrator )
Dryden Press ( Printer )
J. Davy & Sons ( Printer )
Publisher: John Hodges
Place of Publication: London
Manufacturer: Dryden Press ; J. Davy & Sons
Publication Date: 1894
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Aunts -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Mary Stephenson ; with illustrations by Irving Montague.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082648
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237823
notis - ALH8316
oclc - 222019978

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
        Front Cover 3
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Chapter I
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Chapter II
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Chapter III
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Chapter IV
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 50a
        Page 51
    Chapter V
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    Chapter VI
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Chapter VII
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 70a
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






























I AND MY


MASTER


Vas


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'I 1; rI I
7'
~-p- ~s-j' 'i




t,
ftil-~3ii~;









and my Master



BY



MARY STEPHENSON


WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY IRVING MONTAGUE









JOHN HODGES
39 BEDFORD STREET STRAND LONDON
1894




























grheJ. t I3res L:
J. DAVY & SONS, 137, LONG ACRE, LONDON, W.C.

















I AND MY MASTER.



CHAPTER I.


T was a lovely morning, and the sun
streamed in at the window of my Mas-
ter's sitting-room, making a nice little
patch of light on the floor. I had ar-
ranged myself carefully, so as to get as
much of me as possible under the in-
fluence of its pleasant warmth. This had taken
some time and thought, as there is a good deal of
me, and what there is is not easily compressed. I
was as comfortable as a poodle could wish to be,
and just awake enough to appreciate the fact and
to keep one eye at a time upon my Master.
B









I and my Master.


I am very fond of looking at my Master, as I think
a good many other people are; and they are quite
right, for he is very nice to look at. In some things
he is rather like me. His hair is black and curly, like
mine, and his eyes brown, as I have been told mine
are. He has beautiful strong white teeth, which I
regret to say he neglects sadly, for the whole time I
have been with him I have never seen him gnaw a
bone once, though I have often pressed him to take
one of mine. Men are strangely obstinate about
some things.
Then his moustache, too, is small and very like
mine, and he shaves the rest of his face every day. I,
thank goodness, only undergo that operation once a
month; but then, I am done all over, which takes
hours.
On the other hand, he has to wear clothes, and I
am sure I would rather be shaved all over every day
than subject myself to such an infliction.
If he would only be contented with one suit and
keep it on always, he would save himself endless time









I and my Master.


and trouble; but he not only takes off his clothes
every night, merely to have the trouble of putting
them on again in the morning, but he is always
changing them during the day. If he comes home
from his work in uniform, in which by the way he
looks particularly nice, nothing will induce him to
go out walking without dressing again. Can you
imagine why? He has kept me waiting some-
times when I was ready to go out, until I have
quite lost patience. I have brought him six different
coats in turns, but he would have the special one
he wanted. But there he is only a man, and one
must make allowances.
,I had always been brought up to consider that
short legs are a great beauty-indeed, that length of
legs is criminal. I had a cousin once, who was cut
short in the flower of his youth by being drowned in a
stable bucket because his legs were considered a dis-
grace to the family from their length; but my Mas-
ter's legs are the longest legs I have ever seen, and
he never seems the least ashamed of them. I suppose









I and my Master.


his being of another breed makes a difference. My
family are pure Russian; besides, he has only two
instead of four.
For my part, though of course I may be prejudiced,
I have always considered him the most beautiful
creature in the world, notwithstanding his legs, and a
most pleasant person to live with.
We have very seldom had a difference of opinion,
and on those few occasions he has always frankly
apologised, and we have soon been friends again.
On this particular morning of which I am speaking
I own I was puzzled, and not altogether pleased,
with his conduct. As a rule, he was an easy-going
man, and when he had come in from his drill, or
whatever he had to do, he would fling himself into a
big chair, while I settled myself down by his side,
and we spent the time very agreeably and peacefully.
To-day, however, and indeed for the last three or four
days, there had been no peace; he never stayed quiet
for a minute, and it was quite getting upon my nerves.
He had apparently got a severe attack of what









I and my Master.


human beings call "tidying," a disease with which he
was not generally afflicted, and as you probably know,
the first effect which a person produces who is tidy-
ing a room is to make an unbearable mess of it. My
poor Master had not got beyond this first phase, and
to all appearances it was not likely that he ever
would, I never saw anything like the confusion. Our
sitting-room was a very small one, and there were no
less than five boxes in it of different sizes, and he had
fetched everything he possessed from every corner of
the hut and piled them in heaps all over the floor,
and was now sitting exhausted in the middle of
them.
I forgot; perhaps you do not know what a hut is,
How shall I describe it? Let me see.....It is really
very like a large kennel divided into compartments
inside, and is a very comfortable residence, especially
in the summer. I and my Master had spent three
very happy years together in this one down at Alder-
shot, and the idea of any change was hateful to me;
but human beings never seem satisfied unless they









I and my jlMaster.


are rushing about, and I did not like the look of
things at all.
After a moment's rest my Master set to work again
in a feverish way to bury all the things he had
collected in the different boxes, as if they had been
bones-in fact, one thing I am sure must have been
a bone, though I could see no value in it, for it was
nothing but a piece of cardboard. But he seemed to
think a lot of it, for he kept on burying it, and then
digging it up again, and looking at it as if it was
something quite entrancing, and then wrapping it
up again and burying it deeper than ever, three or
four times over; and finally he cut it down with his
scissors and put it in his inner pocket, taking it out
several times, even then, to see if it was safe. Of
course no one would have taken so much trouble
about anything but a bone; but I assure you it
would have done no one's teeth the least good-nasty
soft stuff. I tried the pieces he cut off, and they
were simply not worth gnawing. Men are so odd.
SPresently he looked up and caught my eye, and









I and mIy 1Master.


evidently read my disapproval of his conduct in it,
for he said ruefully:-
"You don't like boxes, do' you, Betsy? and I've
made a nice mess of the room, haven't I, eh, old girl ?"
I could not bring myself to say it was nice, but I
moved my tail politely.
"Poor old Lady," he continued, "you'll be sorry to
have to leave your nice hut, won't you, and your
Master, eh, Betsy ?"
Leave my Master? What did the man mean? I
sat up and gave him my whole attention-this remark
required explanation.
"Yes," he said, "you and I must part" for the
present, Betsy-only for the present. You quite
understand, don't you? I shall come back soon,
when we've given those beggars a hiding, and had a
little fun; and we'll have some good times together
again. But what am I to do with you, Betsy, while
I am away? There are several fellows who I could
get to take charge of you, but I don't quite trust
them. They might not treat you as you expect, and,








I and my Master.


of course, ought to be treated, and they have all got
dogs of their own, which, I know, would not suit you."
Certainly it would not suit me at all. He stopped
a moment to consider, and then he said abruptly:-
I don't see anything else to be done. Betsy, you
must go to my father. There will certainly be no
other dogs there, and I am sure you will be kindly
treated, for my sake, though dear old Dad has one
fault which I must warn you of-he doesn't like dogs.
I expect he will be obliged to like you, though, you
irresistible old person; and you'll do your best to
make him, won't you ?"
I thumped my tail on the floor, and he looked
much relieved.
"And, Betsy," he continued, stroking my head,
"you will see her, and perhaps she will be kind to
you. I don't believe she could help being kind to
anybody; and I think she will be kind to you because
-well, because she has heard about you before.
I wish I had got time to run down with you, and say
good-bye to dear old Dad, and-and all of them. I









I and my Master.


wouldn't lose this chance for anything in the wide
world. It's the best bit of luck I ever had; but,
upon my word, I'm jealous of you, Betsy, you old
wretch. You'll go for walks with her, and she'll
stroke your head, and perhaps, if you are very good,
she will kiss you, just here," said my Master, stooping
down to kiss me very gently on the top of my head.
" If you don't fall madly in love with her and go
wild with joy at your good fortune, I really can't say
what I shall think of you."
My good fortune It was all very well for him to
talk like that. I knew he only did it to cheer me up,
and I wasn't taken in in the least. It was perfectly
absurd to pretend that I could get any pleasure out
of walking about with any woman; though, who this
particular one was, I hadn't the least idea. He might
say what he liked, I knew I had a hard task before
me, and my spirits sank at the prospect. It was bad
enough, I am sure, to have to leave my dear Master
but to have to go and live with a stupid, ignorant old
man, who didn't like dogs, didn't know anything








10 I and my Master.

about them, of course, and wouldn't understand a
word I said, was too despairing to think of.
My Master was very intelligent and anxious to
learn, but it had taken me nearly three years to teach
him to understand what I said, and now to have to
begin all over again with a stupid, and probably
inattentive pupil, was enough to break one's heart.
I lay down again in the sun, but it didn't feel so
nice as it did before. I was very wide awake now
and couldn't sleep a wink, which is very unusual with
me, so I fixed both eyes on my master so as not to
lose sight of him for one moment out of the few we
should have to spend together.



















CHAPTER II.



) HEY were very few indeed. The next
day my master walked with me down
to the station. He took my ticket,
and tied a note of introduction to my
collar, and then he fastened a chain
to my neck. I protested strongly.
Such a thing had never been done to
me before. He apologised, but said it was necessary
for travelling and that he could not help it. I told
him it was no use to try and deceive me, he knew
perfectly well he never had a chain on when he
travelled, but he looked so unhappy and low spirited
-that I had iot the heart to argue with him. I tried







I and my Master.


to comfort him, though I was dreadfully miserable
myself. I would have concealed my feelings for his
sake if I could, but I had no control over my tail. I
could not hold it up, and as for wagging it, it was
completely beyond my power, so I rubbed my
head against his leg and told him not to worry
about me, that I would subdue the old gentleman
somehow,
The train rushed into the station, my master
handed me into the guard's van and introduced me to
the guard, who promised to see me safe to my desti-
nation. Goodbye old girl, dear old Betsy," he said.
My heart beat violently as the train began to move.
I pulled myself together with a tremendous effort,
gave one wag of my tail, flung myself down with a
howl of grief, and was whirled away out of the
station. Away from my dear master and my happy
home, whither I knew not, and just then did not even
care to know.
I shall never forget that journey, the noise and
shaking were very painful, and the floor was very hard.








I and my Master.


I had always hated travelling, but this was ten times
worse than anything I had ever experienced before,
for I had always gone with my master and sat on a
rug at his feet. Oh why couldn't he have taken me
with him this time ? There are some things a poodle
cannot .understand.
It was late in the evening when I arrived at my
destination, which was the smallest station I had ever
seen, with only one porter belonging to it, and he
looked like a second hand one with all the best of
him worn off.
I was the only passenger for this place, and the
guard handed me out with great care and gave the
end of my chain to the porter.
"What am I to do with it?" he said, vacantly.
" It indeed !
"That ain't my business," said the guard. I was
told to deliver her safe here, and here she is, and a
nice dog, too. She is directed."
Insolent man Did he think I was a parcel My
patience was beginning to give way. "Take my









I and my Master.


chain off at once," I said sharply to the porter. The
fool only started and dropped his end of it. Don't
you go for to do that," he said nervously. Pretty
little doggie, nice little dog. You come along with
me, there's a good old boy."
This time my temper really was roused, and I
appeal to any lady whether she would not feel justi-
fied in actively resenting being called "a good old
boy." I take great credit to myself for not having
bitten him. I only told him plainly that I would do
so if he did not retire immediately, and, oddly
enough, he seemed to understand this, for he pro-
ceeded promptly to leave the station.
He was stopped, however, by the entrance of a
studious looking elderly gentleman, dressed in rather
shabby clerical clothes.
At sight of him the porter pulled up short and
touched his cap with great respect. Good evening ,
sir," he said. Was you expecting' of a parcel,
sir?"
"Not exactly, Thomas," returned the old gentle-








I and my Master.


man, not precisely. I was expecting something by
this train, but I see it isn't here."
"No, sir, there ain't nothing' here 'ceptin' a great
beast of a dog, which how I am to dispose of the
animal is more than I can say. As spiteful a brute
as ever I Where has the darned beast, beg-
ging your pardon, sir, gone and got to ?"
"A dog, Thomas?" said the elderly gentleman
rather nervously. It was a dog I-er-was expect-
ing-my son, Master James, you. know Thomas, has
been ordered off with his regiment to Egypt, as I
daresay you have heard, and he has sent me this
animal for which he entertains a very absurd, but no
doubt harmless affection, to take care of during
his absence. He assured me that it was a very
well dispositioned creature. I hope the animal is
not unsafe. It appears to have alarmed you,
Thomas."
"What me, sir ? Lor bless you, sir, not a bit. A
very 'ansom dog, sir, a fine animal. Where 'as the
blessed creature took itself off to ? "









I and my Master.


I thought it was now time to step forward and
present myself. That hypocritical Thomas looked at
me nervously, and I should have loved to make him
jump, but I did not wish to make a bad impression on
my new master, I therefore wagged my tail and
reassured him with a smile.
"What an extraordinary animal!" exclaimed the
old gentleman, lifting up his hands in apparent
astonishment. "Where can James have picked up
such an object? Half its hair is shaved off too.
Dear me! the poor thing is certainly not beautiful."
It made me hot all over, I assure you, to hear a
respectable elderly gentleman, and a connection more-
over of my master, expose himself in this way. The
unfortunate man had evidently never seen a well-cut
poodle before. It was almost past belief, and far
beyond my worst expectations. What should I ever
be able to make of such a man as this.
Well, well," he continued, I must do my best to
please the dear boy, he hasn't many foolish fancies,
bless him. Just give me the chain. Thomas." "Yes,








I and my Master.


sir," said Thomas, holding out his hand towards me,
and then drawing it back hastily, as,if he thought I
was going to bite him. Will you be so good as to
give me the dog's chain," repeated the old gentle-
man politely. Thomas looked at him despairingly,
breathed lard, and 'fixing his eyes on mine, made a
wild but successful grab at the chain, which he handed
to the old gentleman, who prepared to move off with it.
I was quite willing he should do that, but not with
me at the end of it. To be lugged about by a chain
was a thing I never would submit to, and I felt it was
best that this should be understood at once. I there-
fore sat down with an air of calm determination, and
the elderly gentleman was brought up with a jerk. I
told him I would come with pleasure if he would take
the chain off, but, of course, he didn't understand.
He tugged at the chain till he quite hurt my neck, but
I forgave him ; his conduct arose more from ignorance
and stupidity than ill-feeling, and, after all, it.hurt him
more than it did me. He had made himself terribly
hot and breathless, poor man.
C








I and my Master.


"It don't seem exactly inclined to move, sir,"
remarked Thomas, scratching his head slowly.
"Inclined to move! I should think it wasn't inclined
to move. But it must move. It shall move. It will
have to be moved somehow. I can't stay here all
night. I never was placed in a more humiliating
position. I would go and leave the nasty beast if it
wasn't for James; but I could never look him in the
face again."
"It's the most obstanaceous brute I ever 'ad
anything to do with, that it is," said Thomas.
"You haven't had much to do with it, that I am
aware of," said the old gentleman rather testily, he
was getting very hot and tired.
"Perhaps, sir," said Thomas apologetically, "If
you was to push and I was to pull, we might
move it."
"Very well, Thomas, or you might push."
"As you please, of course, sir," said Thomas
nervously.
It's just the same to me, Thomas, if you will take











(3









I-











''


"All of a sudden, with a jerk, the chain broke off close to my collar."


..'"' --------------r~::l- .1;-
L.






.... ~.... rJ II


.









I and my Master.


the chain and kindly pull very hard when I give the
word, I shall be very much obliged."
Thomas planted his legs out firmly and pulled
till I thought his eyes would have come out of
his head, and the old gentleman did his best. I
made myself as heavy as I could, but they managed
to pull me several inches along the platform; cir-
cumstances, however, were in their favour, the plat-
form was slippery, and the part of me next to it
was shaved.
I saw a look of triumph in Thomas' eye, when all
of a sudden, with a jerk, which nearly upset me, the
chain broke off short close to my collar, and he flew
to the other end of the station, where, unfortunately,
he sat down violently on the bell, which hurt him very
much. He had been extremely rude to me, and it
was only right that his pride should have a fall; but
I was sorry that it should have happened to be on
the bell.
The old gentleman, much horrified, hastened to his
assistance, while I sat still and rested.
C 2









I and my Master.


At this moment a third person appeared on the
scene-a very young lady.
I- do not, as a rule, approve of ladies, especially very
young ones; but I was glad of any addition to the
present company, and this one had a very intelligent
face, and was certainly very pleasant to look at.
Her voice sounded pretty, too, as she called out
"Oh! Mr. Boden, I have got someone to hold our
pony, and I have come to see if you have got
your dog all right. Why, what has happened to
Thomas ?"
"Thomas, my dear, has had a fall. The fact is
this dog, I fear, is even more unmanageable than I
anticipated."
"Oh what a dear dog," said the pretty young
lady, as her eyes fell on me.
She really was very pretty, and undoubtedly intelli-
gent. I gave myself a most responsive shake, and
moved slowly towards her.
SPoor dear," she said, laying a small hand on my
head, how hot and tired you are."









I and my Master.


"Don't you go for to touch the beast, Miss,"
shouted Thomas.
The young lady started and withdrew her hand.
This time I fervently wished I had bitten that idiot.
"Has she bitten you ?" she asked, hastily.
"Well, not exactly, miss, but it was only for want
of opportunity." (Base, ungrateful wretch!) "'Ere's
Mr. Boden and me, miss, 'as 'ad our arms most pulled
off by the creetur, and there it sets a' grinnen and
showing' its teeth as if it had been reg'ler exertin'
itself to do the agreeable. I'm of opinion (gloomily)
"we'll never get it out of this station alive. I'd like
to take and tie it to an express engine, and see if
that would move it," with a vindictive scowl at me.
The young lady's mouth gave a little twitch, and
she put her hand out again towards me, and let me
lick it gently.
"May I try, Mr. Boden," she said, if it will come
with me?"
"I'm sure I should be most grateful," said the poor
man, who was mopping his face with a red silk hand-








I and my Master.


kerchief; "but I don't like you to run any risk.
James said she was a most amiable dog, but I fear he
is foolishly prejudiced."
Will you come with me ?" she said.
I smiled up at her and prepared to move. She
slipped one of her little fingers into my collar, and
we walked out of the statiori together. Thomas, just
like him, followed, with the remains of the chain,
which he was most anxious to fasten, or to get some-
one else to fasten, to my collar; but the young lady,
who was evidently accustomed to good society, resisted
this insult being put upon me, and volunteered to
come to Mr. Boden's house to show me the way.



















CHAPTER III.



HE house was in no way worthy or
description. It was like two huts,
one on top of the other, with steps
up the middle to lead to the top
one. The door of one of the down-
Sstairs rooms was open, so I just
walked in and ran my nose round it.
I was too tired to go into details; but I found that
there was a cat in the establishment, no dogs, as my
master had said, and probably rats in the wainscot,
of which I made a note for further investigation.
It is sad to think how helpless a poor human crea-
ture must feel in a strange place. As far as I have









I and my Master.


been able to ascertain from careful observation,
ninety-nine out of a hundred, men might as well
have no noses at all, they do not even attempt to
use them. I am sure they are not properly trained
when they are puppies. They take so much care
of their eyes, and use what 'they call spectacles to
strengthen them. Why don't they invent something
of the kind to help their poor useless noses?
Having seen me safe at my destination and thought-
fully provided me with a basin of water, the young
lady left, promising to return the next day and see
how I was getting on, which I was glad of, for I had
taken quite a fancy to her, and I felt an utter want of
confidence in my temporary master. As soon as we
had seen her off from the hall-door, Mr. Boden and I
went into the room I had looked at before. Here I
found a nice rug, and lay down to have a little rest
after my very fatiguing day, while he fell limply into
a large chair close to me, and sat there with his hands
hanging over the arms, and his mouth half open,
staring at me helplessly.









I and my Master.


After a few minutes, he roused himself and rang a
bell, which was answered by a woman, very unlike
the pretty young lady, twice as fat and more than
twice as old, and as ugly as ten cats. She came
into the room with a tread which shook the very
rug I lay on, and she wore squeaky boots. She
stopped close to the door and looked round her
nervously.
Fuller," said my new Master, I have got back at
last, and this-this is the animal."
Fuller craned her short neck forward, so as to con-
template me without moving further from the door,
and then threw up her hands in a most affected
manner.
"Well, that ever I should live to see an owdacious
black beast a stretching itself out on your best rug, as
if it was the Queen herself, and an ugly creature, too.
However the pore boy could take up with such an
image-not but what we must bear with it for his
sake, a-going to be murdered for his country, with-
out a soul to wash and mend him. He always








I and my Master.


was the same, was Master James, with his fancies
about beasts, and wanting the kitchen cat to sleep in
his bed, and such-like foolishness, which, if I've
scolded him for it once, I've done it a thousand times.
But there, bless him he never minded what no one
said, he always was that masterful. If he was only
here to look after the beast himself."
Heaven knows I wish he was, Fuller," said the
old gentleman, looking so sad that I felt quite drawn
towards him. "And I really feel," he continued,
" quite a heavy responsibility with regard to this dog.
The boy, as you say, was always fanciful, and I have
no doubt he believes himself to be really attached to
it. It is a most obstinate brute," looking at me
sternly. Thomas and I had a dreadful trouble with
it at the station. I do not believe I should ever have
got it here if it had not been for Miss Daisy. It
followed her at once like a lamb."
"Which showed some sense in the creature," put in
Fuller ; "not but what an alligator would have done
the same if she had laid herself out to persuade it."








I and my Master.


"I suppose we must give it some food, Fuller. I
wonder what it ought to have. Master James says
in his letter that she has her chief meal at night,
though he generally allows her a little share of his
breakfast as well. He writes so hurriedly that he
forgets to give any particulars. I am sure," doubt-
fully, I haven't the least idea what to give her."
I began to feel alarmed.
I've never had no dealing's with dogs," said Fuller,
pursing up her mouth as if the subject was too shock-
ing to be discussed, then, relenting at the sight of the
old gentleman's helplessness, she volunteered the
further statement that her "aunt's second husbandd
which she lived with her as a girl did once have a
puppy."
Ah," said the old gentleman, breaking in eagerly.
" Do you remember what they fed it on ? "
I'm sure sir," said Fuller, reflectively, I wouldn't
like to say. My recollection is that they didn't feed
it at all."
Didn't feed it at all. What an abominable thing-!









I and my M/aster.


I do not like dogs myself, but to let an animal die of
starvation !"
It didn't die of starvation, sir," interrupted Fuller.
"It was bit through the throat by a retriever before my
aunt's husbandd 'ad 'ad it for more than a couple of
hours."
"Dear me," said Mr. Boden, "but Fuller," with
fresh hope, "perhaps you ,can remember what they
fed the retriever on."
No, sir," said Fuller firmly, I never 'ad no ac-
quaintance with it."
Well, well, we must do our best," he said. See
what you can find, and bring it here."
This was not promising, and the result was even
worse than my fears had ever pictured. Poor people,
they had evidently never enjoyed the advantages of
really good military society. There was that excuse
to be made for them, but they really showed an utter
disregard for the ordinary rules of good breeding which
even a neglected education could not account for, and of
which I should have thought even a woman incapable.









.I and my Master.


When that Fuller not only gave the cat, a common
low tabby who would have been insolent if she had
dared, her supper before offering me a morsel, but
actually had the impertinence to expect me to eat
mine off the same plate, I could only feel thankful
that my poor master could not know the treatment I
was enduring, it would have broken his heart. Of
course I had to go to bed supperless, and I was so
hungry, so terribly hungry. But there are some things
to which even death is preferable, and I hope I know
my duty to my family well enough to starve any day
rather than eat off a cat's plate.
Then there came the question as to where I was to
sleep. That Fuller wanted me to be locked up in an
outhouse. I would have kept them awake if they had
tried it. Fortunately my master's directions on this
subject had been explicit, and I was finally left on a
rug in the hall to get what sleep I could and long for
breakfast. Naturally I had a very restless night and
had only just dropped off to sleep comfortably, and
was enjoying a delicious dream in which I imagined








I and my Master.


myself eating roast mutton off a silver fork held by
Fuller, while the old gentleman and the pretty
young lady looked on approvingly, and the cat
glared hungrily from a corner, when I was awakened
by Fuller pushing me with the toe of her boot.
She hustled me into the garden, and shook out my
mat, holding it by the extreme edge as if it would
bite her, as I longed to do. My master really should
have had some consideration for my feelings, and
have thought twice before handing one over to this
woman to be insulted as if I had been any common
pug dog.
Silent contempt was the only weapon I could
condescend to use towards this female, but I think
she felt the cold dignity of my manner, though she
only turned her back upon me impatiently as I
walked quietly away.
There is nothing like the interest of a series of new
smells for distracting the mind. I found quite a new
variety in this garden, and had almost recovered my
equanimity in the effort to analyse and commit them










































,


"S' h ht me- "- t J.k ma/."



"She hustled me into the garden and shook out my mat."








I and my Master.


to memory when I suddenly came on one which
affected me most disagreeably, and brought back all
my painful sensations of nervous irritability with
renewed vigour. I looked up and understood the
cause at once. There, close to me, but on the other
side of the garden gate, stood that hateful Thomas.
He started violently when he saw me, and hastily
moved back a step. "Well, and 'ow are you getting
on?" he enquired in a genial manner which was
perfectly infuriating. "You're not going to be cross,-
are you ? There's a nice dog," with a cheerful air of
unconcern, which did not in the least conceal the fact
that he was abjectly terrified of me.
I merely gave him a glance of scorn.
He looked at me again doubtfully, and then pushed
the gate open with his hand. I put a stop to that at
once. "The other side of the gate, if you please," I
said quietly, but without moving.
"Oh, lor !" exclaimed Thomas, positively flying
into the air, and letting the gate swing to with a
bang, Don't you go for to do that."








I and my Master.


"I'm not doing anything," I observed; though, of
course, I knew it was waste of breath to talk to the
fool.
"You wouldn't go for to bite poor Thomas, would
you ? he remarked, leering at me in a way that made
him look more odious than ever.
If you like to come through the gate you'll see," I
said gently, and I sat down to wait for further
developments.
Thomas mopped his face with the dirtiest hand-
kerchief I have ever seen (I have never been able to
smell train oil since without feeling my temper
ruffled), and gazed anxiously down the road.
"Ah!" he exclaimed, with a sigh of relief,
"There's the butcher's young man at last." "Oh, is
there ?" I said, Don't you delude yourself with false
hopes, I can manage the two of you."
The butcher's young man drove a very fast pony,
and in another minute he had dashed up to the gate,
pulled up with a jerk which nearly threw the pony
off its legs, and jumped down.








I and my Master.


"'Ullo Thomas! What are you after ?" he said.
I've come up with the Vicar's umbrella what he
left behind yesterday when he was a tackling of this
'ere darned dog at the station," said Thomas. I just
run up with it, seeing' as 'ow I 'ad a spare moment
before the next train come in, but 'ere I've been stuck
behind this gate with that great beast of a dog a
growling something frightful."
"She don't look partic'ler savage," said the butcher's
young man, glancing at me, and giving the gate a
push. "You go on, Thomas."
Oh, lor!" said poor Thomas.
"The dog won't touch you," said the butcher's
young man contemptuously. Go on through, can't
yer, I'm in a hurry."
I waited till Thomas had got half-way in and then
I just curled up my upper lip. It was quite sufficient.
He lost his head at once, and made a precipitate bolt,
nearly knocking down the butcher's young man, who
remonstrated warmly.
"It's all very well," protested Thomas, "but I'm








I and my Master.


not a going to be bit to please anybody, and that
ugly beast is as vicious as she can be. Look at her
eye."
Bother her eye," said the young man irritably.
"Why don't they chain her up? They won't get
their meat that's one thing. I'm not a going to
stop 'ere all day, dancing attendance on a blooming
dog."
You're quite welcome to come through, nobody's
preventing you," I said. Tradesmen are a necessity
of life, and must be tolerated; but I can see no use for
porters, and I will not allow that insolent man to put
his foot inside a place which I am honouring with my
presence. If you like to come by yourself you can
come."
But of course he didn't understand.
At this moment up drove the baker, and was
greeted with a torrent of words from the two others,
chiefly consisting of a startling variety of adjectives,
which were all applied to me. They concluded by
cordially inviting the baker to verify their statements









I and my Master.


by a practical experiment, but he said he preferred to
take their word for it, and remain on the safe side of
the gate. So they all stood in a row, gazing at me,
and taking turns to swear.
I couldn't help being amused, they looked so
supremely foolish; but I was very much annoyed at
their stupidity, because I wanted my breakfast so
badly, and as long as they would insist on trying to
force that wretched Thomas on me, I saw no chance
of anybody in the house getting any food at all.
The climax was reached by the arrival of the milk-
man. I was simply longing for some milk.
I positively beamed on him in my anxiety to en-
courage him to come in, but the other three idiots
alarmed him so much with their account of my
behaviour that he could not be induced to attempt an
entrance.
If we was to shout," at length suggested the but-
cher's young man, P'raps some one might 'ear us and
call off the dog,"
It's worth trying," said the baker.
D 2








I and my Master.


They all took to howling in turns, and then alto-
gether, till I should have thought they would have been
heard a mile off. It was several minutes, however,
before it had any effect, and then a heavy tread, like
the marching of a regiment, told me that the enemy
was advancing on my rear.
An expression of relief came over all the four faces
over the gate, as Fuller, gasping for breath, came in
sight.
"Just look at your dog !" they exclaimed in chorus,
with the addition of several adjectives, which I prefer
not to repeat. She won't let any of us pass."
"I knowed it was that dog," said Fuller. "She'll
be the death of me before she's done."
"Well, you're certainly more than likely to die of
starvation if you don't'keep her shut up," assented
the butcher's young man. "I was just a going to
take the meat away."
And if you're wanting any bread to-day, Mrs.
Fuller," put in the baker, sarcastically, "p'raps you'll
kindly take it, for I'm off."









.I and my Master.


Come away this minute, you nasty aggravating'
creature," said Fuller, giving me a push. She knew I
wouldn't bite her, and took a mean advantage of me
in consequence.
It ain't no manner of use of pushing her," re-
marked Thomas, gloomily, I can tell you that."
"What is to be done? said Fuller.
"That ain't my affair," said the butcher's young
man. "Thank goodness she isn't my dog. I'll give
you two minutes more to get her away, and then I'm
off, and you can carry the meat up to the house your-
self if you want it."
"Which the same's my sentiments," said the milk-
man.
Fuller gave me another push, and then rained a
perfect torrent of abuse on my head. I will say for her
that there was never anything hypocritical about her.
I bore it all, as usual, with silent contempt, and
things were still at a deadlock when the shrill scream
of a distant train was heard.
Thomas started. "I'm hanged if that ain't the









I and my Master.


8.45," he said. If that nasty brute has made me
late I must run for it. 'Ere just catch hold of
the umbrella," and thrusting it into the baker's hand,
who was standing next him, he started off at a tre-
mendous pace down the road.
I never felt more relieved in my life. The situa-
tion was beginning to pall on me, and I was getting
more hungry every minute.
"Now, why couldn't he have done that before,
obstinate fool," I thought, "instead of giving every-
body so much unnecessary trouble."
Come along in all of you, and make haste. We've
wasted quite enough time."
There was a regular procession of us up the drive.
First me, then Fuller, followed by the baker and the
milkman and the butcher's young man. We found
the old gentleman waiting for us at the door in a
dreadful fuss because his breakfast was late.
They all combined in blaming me-me of all
people! But I had learned to expect nothing else
but injustice from these people.









I and my Master.


Ah, where is my dear master! I thought, and
where is that pretty young lady? She can appreciate
the feelings of a well bred dog, though she does have
the misfortune to live in the country. I wonder, now
I come to think of it, if it was her my master
meant, when he said she would be kind to me.
She really is very nice, for a woman.



















CHAPTER IV.



HAD a good basin of bread and milk for
breakfast, and then followed Mr. Boden
into his sitting-room, where I remem-
bered that there was a very comfortable
rug, on which I could have a nap, to
make up for the discomforts of the night.
We had a little struggle at the door, for he tried to keep
me outside; I believe he really thought I should be
contented to sit in the passage I got my head in,
however, before he could close the door, and, of
course, he did not dare to shut it on me. He knew
by experience that nothing he could do would move









I and my Mlaster.


me, but was too obstinate to give in, and there we
remained till I was forced to push past him rather
roughly. The door shut with a bang, nearly upsetting
the old gentleman.
"Oh you aggravating brute," he said crossly.
On the rug sat that odious cat-nasty, selfish beast
-she knew it was the only comfortable thing in the
room. Directly she.caught sight of me she hunched
up her back, and began to spit, and make use of the
most offensive expressions, very trying to my temper;
but nothing would ever induce me to so far forget
myself as to speak to a cat, and I merely looked at
her with a warning expression, and moved slowly
across the room, to give her time to get out of the
way. She wouldn't take the hint, so, after having
stopped at the edge of the rug to give her a last
chance, I sat down quietly, so that half my weight
came on her. She gave a scream of rage, and hit out
with lightning rapidity, with the result that both her
claws caught in my hair, and she was held fast,
shrieking with terror. The more she fought and








I and my Master.


struggled, the more she became entangled. She
pulled my hair so fearfully that it brought the tears
into my eyes; but I did not give her the satisfaction
of knowing she was hurting me; and really it was
worth a little discomfort, for I never wish to see a
cat in a more miserable condition of fright and help-
lessness, though she ought to have known that I
shouldn't touch her in the house. She might wait till
I got her outside !
The old gentleman was in a terrible state of alarm
and excitement.
Come here-come here at once, you wicked dog !"
he shouted from the other end of the room.
"Don't you see," I shouted back, "that I can't
come without bringing this beastly cat with me?"
Leave go of her," shrieked Mr. Boden.
"Come and take her off, you old silly," I retorted,
stung by his injustice.
"Come here at once, when I tell you !" persisted
the pig-headed old gentleman.
"Very well," I said, "have it your own way, but I









I and my Master.


will not be responsible for any damages," and I pro-
ceeded to walk across the room, dragging the
wretched cat after me, howling and spitting, and
trying to dig her hind claws into the carpet, to hold
back by.
"Now are you satisfied?" I enquired of the old
gentleman.
"No, no. Lie down lie down! there's a good
dog," he shouted, wringing his hands in an agony of
distress.
There, what did I tell you !" I said. "Come and
take her off!"
The real state of the case appeared to dawn upon
him at last, and he did make an effort to take the
creature off; but he was a very helpless old person,
his long thin hands seemed perfectly useless, and he
was as blind as a new-born puppy. He fumbled and
fumbled, and the cat fought and kicked, and I began
to think I had had about enough of it, when-I am
not sure whether he did it, or whether the cat did it
herself in despair, but, with a fearful wrench, one of







I and my Master.


her claws was freed. She struck out at once in fury,
and there was an awful yell from the old gentleman.
The silly fool had struck her claw into his shoulder,
and nothing would induce her to take it out again, so
there we all three were, hooked together by a dis-
gusting cat.
"Fuller! Fuller!" shrieked the old gentleman,
struggling desperately to get free.
Why don't you leave go of the cat ?" I remarked,
sarcastically.
"Fuller!" he roared again, "for heaven's sake,
make haste."
Fuller burst open the door; she was crimson in
the face with alarm, as she pressed her fat hand to her
side, and, screwing up her eyes as tight as if to
shut out some scene of carnage, announced with
a ghastly calmness of manner: That dog 'as bit
you-I knowed it would. The first minute 'as I set
my eyes on it, I said 'That awful beast 'ull be the
death of Master, and Master James 'ull never
survive it.'"








I and my Master.


"There, there, Fuller," said Mr. Boden, impatiently.
Don't stand there talking, with your eyes shut; come
and take off the cat. Ow!" as the cat ran her
claw further into his shoulder.
Why, poor dear Pussy," exclaimed Fuller, opening
her eyes, and roused to the greatest excitement at
the sight of the painful position of her favourite.
She did not seem to care about my feelings, or even
for her Master's sufferings, and the poor man was
really getting very much scratched.
"Poor dear pussy, what 'ave they been doing to
you ?" she said.
"Doing to her !" said the old gentleman, Doing
to her! she's tearing my shoulder to pieces; come
and take her off!"
"Yes, come and take her off," I said, "I've had
enough of this."
Keep quiet, there's my good pussy," said Fuller,
bending down and trying to get the claw out of Mr.
Boden's shoulder. "Fuller won't let the horrid dog
hurt her."








I and my Master.


"Well, I must say Fuller," said the old gentleman,
"that the dog was not to blame this time, and she
really has borne it very well."
"Don't tell me," said Fuller indignantly, "that
dog is at the bottom of everything, deceitful beast,
catching the poor thing's claws in its nasty dirty
hair." Oh that woman.
"I suppose," said the old gentleman, "you think I
caught her claw in my shoulder on purpose. Oh!
can't you get her off?"
Of course, sir, it aint for me to speak, but the poor
dear may well feel it hard to have her master turn
against her, to take up with others that intrudes their-
selves. She knows her friends, don't you, my pussy.
There, I've got it off your shoulder, sir. Oh !" with
a sudden shriek of agony, as the cat made a clutch
with its free claw at her neck, and there I was fastened
on to Fuller. I vowed deadly vengeance on that cat
if ever I got her outside the house.
The old gentleman rubbed his shoulder and gazed
at Fuller with rather a malicious smile. Just let me









I and my Master.


get hold of my scissors," said Fuller, groping about
in her pocket, "and I'll cut off the nasty creature's
hair."
Cut off my hair! I was quite paralysed with horror
I felt something desperate must be done; I started to
my feet and tried to drag myself free; for a few
seconds all was wild confusion, then, with a tremen-
dous effort, I wrenched myself away, and, with a
culminating yell from Fuller and the cat, I stag-
gered across the room and flung myself on the
rug, while Fuller slowly rose to her feet and left the
room with the cat clinging convulsively to her
shoulder, and still swearing at me. Fuller turned
round to shake her fist at me before shutting the door
with a bang. She and I were now sworn enemies, but
I felt that the old gentleman and I had been rather
drawn together by our mutual injuries, and he really
tried to make himself pleasant to me, though he was
a very dull companion, poor man. I had been too
much upset to be able to settle down to sleep, as I had
intended, and was delighted when I heard a light step,









I and my Master.


which was certainly not Fuller's, and the pretty young
lady's fresh voice at the door saying Good morning,
Mr. Boden, may I come in ? How are you, and how
is the dog?"
I had never felt so glad to see anyone before,
excepting my master, of course. She looked brighter
and prettier than ever in the morning light; and even
the old gentleman looked quite cheerful as he put
down his book and spectacles to greet her. She drew
a chair close up to his and let me lay my chin on her
knee, and stroked my head in a way which was
peculiarly soothing.
"Very good of you, my dear, to look in," said
Mr. Boden. It is really remarkable how that
dog takes to you, really remarkable now, it won't
go near Fuller. I hope you are not letting it
dirty your pretty dress. I am afraid the poor
beast has been sadly spoilt, and I can't bear to be
otherwise than kind to it for my dear boy's sake,"
apologetically, "but I can't expect you to feel the
same."








I and my Master.


"Oh, no! of course not," said the young lady
hastily, the pink in her cheeks deepening a little, that
is I mean I am so fond of dogs, and this
one is such a dear, aren't you ?" and she stooped her
head down to me and looked into my eyes with her
lovely blue ones, and I felt convinced that she was a
dear at any rate, and there was more sense in my
master's remarks on the subject than I had given him
credit for.
Of course, as I was enjoying myself, that Fuller
must come and interfere.
Now, Miss Daisy," she said appearing suddenly at
the door in her apron, "don't you let yourself be put
upon by that creature, which she do provoke one, a
setting' there as if the place belonged to her. I'd see
hdr further.before she come messing up my rooms if
it weren't for Master James, the poor darling, at this
moment on the ocean, a martyr to his country, only
to land to be murdered by a lot of heathens," wiping
her eyes with her apron.
"Well, well, Fuller," said her master. "It is no








1 and my Master.


use anticipating trouble. We must hope for the best,
and I wouldn't have kept him at home if I could.
To take care of this dog is the only thing we can do
for him, and we must do it the best way we can,
though I know its a trial to you."
"Which I'm sure I never was one to grudge
trouble," said Fuller, tremulously, reappearing from
behind her apron with a very red nose. "Which
what I've been through with dormice and rabbits no
one knows, but never 'ave been treated before in
such a superfluous way as that there shaved image
treats me. But there, it can be as audacious as it
likes if only Master James will come home safe."
Do you think, Mr. Boden," said the young lady,
" that I might take her for a walk. I am sure she
ought to have some exercise, and I should really like
it if she will come with me. Will you come, Betsy ? "
"Betsy !" exclaimed the old gentleman. "Now
how did you know the animal had such an absurd
name? And, by the way, how did you know that
she was arriving by that train last night ? "








































4 .. '-



.Will you c e fr a wk wh B y



Will you come for a walk with me, Betsy ?"









I and my Master.


The young lady's pink cheeks again got pinker.
"I-I've heard your son mention her name when he
was here last," she said, and-and- "
"Betsy!" broke in Fuller, to the young lady's
evident relief. "A nice name to give a heathen dog.
But, there, when he insisted on calling that spotted
guinea pig Maria, after my aunt, which it would have
killed her if she had known it, I made up my mind
that nothing' Master James could do would ever sur-
prise me again, which it never shall," concluded
Fuller, with the air of a martjrr prepared to die for
her principles.
"Will you come for a walk with me, Betsy? said
the pretty young lady again. I gave three thumps
with my tail, and off we went, and a very nice walk
we had.










WE


CHAPTER V.


HE rest of the day was wretched,
and the food very bad indeed. The
old gentleman did his best to be
kind, but he was a very dull com-
panion, and both Fuller and the cat
-were quietly insolent in manner.
By the end of the day I had made up
my mind that things could not go on like this. I had
done my best to adapt myself to my surroundings,
but these people, especially the woman, were quite
impossible. So when the young lady brought me back
from my walk the next day I determined that I would
go home and lunch with her. We had a great struggle








I and my Master.


over it, but my quiet firmness of manner won the day
as usual, and I had good cause to congratulate my-
self on my success; for I had an excellent lunch, pro-
perly served on a china plate, instead of a kitchen
one; and spent a very pleasant hour with the young
lady and her aunt, who was distant in her manner 'at
first, but became quite agreeable after a time.
The young lady brought me back in the afternoon.
and that made a second walk, which was another
advantage. Having once found the way to her
house, I went up there early each morning to save
her the trouble of coming to fetch me, and I insisted
on lunching there every day. They did not want me
at the other house, and I am sure the pretty young
lady was dull alone with her aunt and did want me,
so my arrangement was much the best for all parties,
as they very soon found when they got accustomed
to it. I never went home till the evening. The
days passed very comfortably indeed, and I should
have been quite happy if it had not been that I was
anxious about my dear master. Both Fuller and








I and my Master.


Mr. Boden had a way of looking miserable whenever
his name was mentioned which alarmed me very
much, and they were so inconsiderate that I could
not trust them to tell me if there was anything really
wrong with him.
One evening I had come home in good spirits'
having spent a very pleasant day with my pretty
young lady. It had been a wet, dreary day, but we
had had two nice walks, for she said she felt so rest-
less that she would not stay in the house. She had
been talking to me about my master in a very
intelligent and appreciative way, and I felt quite
cheered, but I had no sooner got into Mr. Boden's
room than I saw that something terrible had happened,
and I never doubted that it concerned my dear
master. The old gentleman was standing, leaning
against the mantelpiece, holding in his hand a small
piece of paper, which shook as his hand trembled.
Fuller, her apron right over her head, was sobbing and
groaning in the most exasperating manner. Neither
of them would take the least notice of me, and I was








I and my Master.


in absolute despair, when a sudden idea struck me,
and I tore out of the house and ran as fast as I could
to the young lady, my one hope and refuge.
Her house was shut up for the night, and it was
pitch dark, but I found my way to the window and
tapped with my paw as loud as I could. After a
minute the front door was opened, and the young lady
called me in. "Good gracious, Betsy!" both the
ladies exclaimed, as soon as I had got into the light,
and they could see how agitated I was, "What is the
matter ?"
Something dreadful has happened to my master,
and they won't tell me what it is. Do come quick and
make them, there's a dear, good, kind young lady," I
implored. Being only a human being of course she
couldn't understand what I said, but I made frantic
signs, running backwards and forwards between her
and the door, and at last, in desperation, seized her
gown in my teeth, and tried to drag her along with me.
Then it dawned on her suddenly.
"Something has happened to Jim Boden, I know








I and my Master.


it has," she said. All the pink colour was gone out
of her cheeks, and there was a frightened look in her
eyes, I must go at once and see."
My dear Daisy," said her aunt, dropping her
knitting in horrified astonishment, "What are you
thinking of at this time of night ? "
Oh Aunt Mary, I must," she pleaded.
Nonsense, my dear, I can't allow it; you are really
not reasonable. There is no cause to suppose there is
any bad news of Captain Boden, and if there were,
there is really no call for you to go rushing down to
the vicarage at this hour, and pouring with rain as it is
too. Eliza can go down and enquire the first thing
in the morning."
"Do you think I can wait till then, all night without
knowing whether he is killed ? Oh Aunt Mary."
My dear Daisy," said her aunt, putting on her
spectacles hastily, to look at her. The colour ran
back into the young lady's cheeks.
"It is Mr. Boden I'm thinking of, Aunt Mary,"
she said quickly, He will be nearly off his head, and








I and my Master.


there is only that stupid Fuller there. I am so fond of
him, you know, dear old man Aunt Mary sud-
denly-" It's no use talking, I'm very sorry, but I
,must go," and in another minute, wrapped in a big
cloak, with her aunt's goloshes flapping on her feet,
she was running down the road with me, and that
other poor lady was standing at the door wringing her
hands, and peering after us into the darkness.
We found both Fuller and Mr. Boden just as I had
left them. They looked up when the young lady
came in, but they were both too absorbed in their
misery to be surprised to see her.
"What has happened ?" she said, breathlessly.
The old gentleman held the paper out to her in his
shaking hand; he could not speak. She gave a little
cry of distress as she saw it, but she never forgot other
people's feelings, and even now remembered my
anxiety. Oh! Betsy," she said, with a little sob, he's
been wounded," and she flung her arms round my neck.
The next few weeks were very miserable. Every-
body was in a state of restlessness that I have never








I and my Master.


seen equalled; even the old gentleman would not sit
still in his chair for more than five minutes at a time,
but was perpetually wandering about the house, and
getting into Fuller's way; and as for that woman, the
amount of noise and dust she managed to create made
it impossible for any dog to stay in the house with her;
and her temper was unbearable. Fortunately, I did
not have to see much of her, for I spent the days, as
usual, with my young lady, but even she was not quite
like her usual self.
At times, when she was with her aunt, she was quite
painfully cheerful; of course, it was quite natural she
should be; she was so young and lighthearted, and she
had nothing to trouble her, but I confess that the
apparent want of consideration for my feelings did hurt
me, and I think her aunt was a little puzzled by her be-
haviour, for I noticed the good lady often looking at her
through her spectacles as if she could not quite make
her out. At other times, when we were alone, nothing
could have been more sympathetic than she was; and
she always told me all she heard about my master,









I and my Master. 59

which was a great comfort to me. He had not been
wounded very badly, but had had fever, which made
us very anxious for some time : but he soon got well
enough to start for home, and, at last, after what
seemed to me like several months, a letter came to say
he might be expected in a few days.
















CHAPTER VI.



HEN the young lady told me the
good news I nearly went mad with
joy. I was obliged to tear round
Sand round the garden (a thing I
hadn't done for years) to relieve
S my feelings, and the young lady
S- was so carried away by my excite-
ment, that she actually raced round
after me, till we both fell exhausted on the grass.
It was late in the evening, two days afterwards,
when he actually arrived.
The old gentleman went to meet him at the
station, and, as he did not go out so late as a rule.
I expected something, and was on the look out. I








I and my Master.


caught the sound of a carriage coming slowly,
oh! so slowly, along the drive, and at last it
stopped at the door and Fuller flew to open it. In
another minute she had almost carried my master
into the house, and was hugging him and crying over
him, as if he had belonged to her, while I, his own
lawful dog could not get near him !
Bless you, Fuller," said my master, cheerfully,
"There's nothing to cry about. They haven't killed
me yet."
Which I'm not so sure of that," sobbed Fuller,
with a renewed hug, "for you're nothing but, a
shadder. Just skin and bones is all them murdering
heathens have left you, and I ain't so sure about
the bones. Why couldn't you keep in the back-
ground somewhere and let some one else go and
get cut up ?"
"That's not exactly what I went for, Fuller,"
laughed my master.
"No; you went to get killed if you could, which
you've always been the same, and when you've done








I and my Master.


it one- of these days you'll be sorry, mark my
words "
"There, there, Fuller," said the old gentleman.
He's tired. Let's get him to bed."
"Which it's not me that's keeping him," said
Fuller, indignantly. "And his bed's all ready for him.
In here, sir," opening the door of the sitting-room.
" You're not fit to go upstairs if you have got both
your legs, which I have my doubts."
Would you believe it? That woman actually
tried to keep me out of the room, and managed to
slam the door in my face, but I protested so loudly
that my master heard me, and insisted on my com-
ing in.
I cannot describe our meeting. We were both
too happy for words. I spent the next few days by my
dear master's side in spite of all Fuller's remonstrances,
so unutterably thankful to have him safe, though he
was very thin and pale, and could do nothing but
lie still all day on his bed, or on the sofa in his
room. On the morning of the third day, after he had








I and my Master.


come back, as I was lying by the sofa with his
hand on my head, I was roused by hearing the
pretty young lady's voice talking to Fuller.
"How is Captain Boden this morning?" she
said. "My aunt wanted to know, and I came to
see if Betsy would like a walk."
"Well, I'm sure! What you and Master James
do see in that black image beats me. Won't you
come in and see him ? It would do him good. He's
on the sofy."
"Oh! I don't think said the pretty young
lady, but she came in all the same.
This is very good of you, Miss Daisy," said my
master eagerly, sitting up on his sofa and holding out
his hand. She came up to the sofa and put her
hand in his, and stood there looking prettier than I
had ever seen her look before.
Lie down at once, Master James," said Fuller, in-
terfering as usual. The idea of your sitting up like
that. It's no manner of use your frowning at me.
You should just see yourself, flushed as red as a









. and imy Master.


pony with the exertion. Just you tell him to lie
down, Miss Daisy, perhaps he'll mind you."
"Yes; please lie down," she said, drawing away
her hand. "And I mustn't stay-I mustn't really.
No, Mrs. Fuller, I won't sit down, thank you."
But my master still sat up rigidly on his sofa, with
his eyes fixed on the pretty'young lady's face, and a
most imploring expression in them. I had often tried
just that same expression when I wanted a bone
particularly badly, and I knew from experience that
she couldn't resist it, so when she made a move to-
wards the door and called me to come, I did not
trouble to get up.
She took a step and then looked at my master
from under her eyelashes, hesitated, turned her eyes
away again, and walked to the door with an air
of decision. My master never moved. As she
put her hand on the door, she was foolish enough to
look at him again, and then she gave in of course.
S"Just five minutes then," she murmured, as she
dropped into the chair Fuller had put for her.









I and my Master.


"Ah, that's right," exclaimed my master, letting
himself fall back heavily on to the sofa with a sigh of
satisfaction. I know it's very selfish of me to keep
you in here on such a lovely morning. And Betsy
too, you won't thank me for stopping your walk, old
lady! But you have had so many chances of seeing
Miss Daisy. It's awfully good of you you know,
Miss Daisy, to be so kind to the old girl. She's not
a bad old beast is she ? anxiously.
She's a dear," said Miss Daisy, warmly.
"And so are you I exclaimed, emphasizing the
remark on the floor with my tail, for I meant it tho-
roughly.
"Well, I'm sure," put in Fuller with a sniff, "but
there, there's no accounting' for tastes. I must be off
to my work, so you'll just see that Master James
keeps hisself quiet, won't you, Miss Daisy ?"
"Oh it's all right Fuller," said my master, I shan't
want to move as long as Miss Daisy will talk to me."
And how they did talk! If you want to know
what they said I'm sure I can't tell you. They began









I and my Master.


by discussing me, and really they both said such nice
things about me that I could not bring myself to re-
peat them (though they are all quite true), and after
that their conversation became so exceedingly unin-
teresting that I positively could not keep awake to
listen to them, so I made use of the time to have a
comfortable nap, and was awakened by the young
lady jumping up, and exclaiming that it was nearly
luncheon time, and what would Aunt Mary say !
I had to wait till the afternoon for my walk.



















CHAPTER VII.



T was all very well, and I do not wish
to complain, but when this happened
every day it became aggravating. When
4 1 my young lady arrived in the morning
Smy Master always insisted on her coming
in, and then, when once they began to
talk, there was no stopping them. They seemed
sometimes almost to forget my existence and I must
confess that the fault lay with my Master. He knew
perfectly well that she only came to fetch me for a
walk; she always said so herself, and she often tried
to get away; indeed I have actually known him









I and my Master.


obliged to hold her hand to keep her there, and then
what could she do ?
But the best of men are only men, after all, and
one must remember that and make allowances.
Later on, when he was able to go out, it was not
much better, for he kept me and the young lady
dawdling about the garden with him, when I knew
she was dying to get off for a good walk with me.
But one gets accustomed to anything, and I will
acknowledge that we all three spent some very plea-
sant hours together, sitting in the sun, for autumn
was coming on and it was getting too cold to sit in
the shade; or wandering slowly round and round the
garden, stopping each time we passed the old gentle-
man, who had brought his chair out on to the veran-
dah, to speak a word to him, and make him look up
for a minute with a pleased and absent smile; though
he was too engrossed in his book to take much
notice of anything else.
We had stayed out one evening much later than
usual. It was getting so dark that the old gentleman









I and my Master.


could hardly see to read his book, but the day had
been very warm, and the air was beautifully soft.
I must go," said the young lady, at last, breaking
a long silence. "Look, the sky is quite red, and
Aunt Mary will be getting in a fidget."
Bother your Aunt Mary No-no-I beg your
pardon; but I think you might remember that this
is my last day here," said my Master, in an injured
voice. You will not be troubled with poor Betsy
and me much longer."
The young lady stooped down over me till her
cheek nearly touched my head.
"Dear old Betsy," she said, "don't you go with
him. Stay here with me. You like me best, don't
you ?" coaxingly.
Of course, I wagged my tail and licked her hand;
I could not do less.
"Oh, Betsy, you faithless old girl!" said my
Master, reproachfully.
I wagged my tail again. I really did not know
what to say.








I and my Master.


"Betsy!" they both called, simultaneously, moving
a step away from me in opposite directions, Betsy!
who will you come with ?"
Now, did you ever hear of a poor dog being placed
in a more embarrassing position ? I looked from one
to the other, but could not make up my mind to
move towards either of them and leave the other.
"Oh dear! oh dear !" I whined, positively shiver-
ing all over with the agony of mind I was in. Dear!
dear! dear! What am I to do ? I am so very fond
of both of you ? Cannot you settle it, somehow,
without lacerating my feelings like this? Why, of
course!"
A sudden idea struck me, the most simple thing in
the world.
Why can't we all three stay together?" I ex-
claimed. "I really can't do without either of you.
Oh! my dear Master, do let us take the young lady
back to our hut, where there is no Fuller and no cat.
Then she can talk to you and take me for walks, and
we can all be happy together."












a A.





,s '-,






"Now then, that will do! How about me ? "









I and myn Master.


My Master understood me at once.
I know what Betsy thinks," he said, going close
up to the young lady. She says she can't be happy
away from either of us. There is only one way out
of it If you will, Daisy ?"
If the young lady could have seen my Master's
eyes just then, she wouldn't have withstood them for
a moment, but she couldn't, for she kept her own
fixed most carefully on the toe of her little shoe,
with which she was drawing imaginary lines on the
grass.
I thiew all the expression I could into my eyes,
and I think the young lady must have almost felt
the concentrated gaze of our four imploring eyes,
which never left her face, but she would not look up.
I held my breath with suspense.
Suddenly my Master moved still closer to the
young lady, and. put his arm round her.
Daisy," he said, very gently, you will come ?"
Then at last, she looked up and met my Master's
eyes, and of course, as usual, she promptly gave in.








I and my Master.


I could have barked loudly with joy and relief, and
gratified pride, too, to think they were doing this en-
tirely for my sake I sat still, though quivering with
emotion, waiting to be called to take part in the re-
joicings at this happy result of the discussion. But,
you will hardly believe it, those most extraordinary
people seemed to have entirely forgotten my ex-
istence! They stood there, gazing at each other
without speaking, till my patience was exhausted.
"Now then, that will do! How about me? "
I called out so loud that Mr. Boden was startled,
and looked up from his book. The book dropped
with a thud on to the ground.
Bless my soul !" exclaimed the old gentleman.


c~a




































" Bless my soul! "







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