• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Stories by Mrs. Mary Rice Miller...
 Rhymes by Helen Gray Cone
 Fairy Tales
 Rhymes by Elizabeth S. Tucker
 Mother Goose jingles
 Rhymes by Edith M. Thomas
 Back Cover






Group Title: A treasury of stories, jingles and rhymes : short stories; fairy tales; Mother Goose jingles
Title: A treasury of stories, jingles and rhymes
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082634/00001
 Material Information
Title: A treasury of stories, jingles and rhymes short stories; fairy tales; Mother Goose jingles
Physical Description: 251 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Humphrey, Maud, b. 1868
Humphrey, Maud, b. 1868 ( Illustrator )
Thomas, Edith Matilda, 1854-1925 ( Author )
Tucker, Elizabeth S ( Author )
Cone, Helen Gray, 1859- ( Author )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: Frederick A. Stokes Company
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1894   ( lcsh )
Fairy tales -- 1894   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes -- 1894   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Fairy tales   ( rbgenr )
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with one hundred and forty vignette illustrations in half-tone after Maud Humphrey ; verses by Edith M. Thomas, Elizabeth S. Tucker and Helen Gray Cone.
General Note: Title vignette.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy donated by Robert Egolf.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082634
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002238702
notis - ALH9224
oclc - 01069814

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Half Title
        Page 1
    Frontispiece
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Stories by Mrs. Mary Rice Miller and Elizabeth S. Tucker
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
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        Page 27
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        Page 30
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        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Rhymes by Helen Gray Cone
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
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        Page 72
        Page 73
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        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Fairy Tales
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
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        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Rhymes by Elizabeth S. Tucker
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
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        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
    Mother Goose jingles
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
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    Rhymes by Edith M. Thomas
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
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        Page 250
        Page 251
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text













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A TREASURY
OF
STORIES, JINGLES AND
RHYMES.






































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WHO CARES FOR DINNER! THEY WOULD RATHER PLAY WHERE THEY ARE.-Page z.


6








A TREASURY
OF

STORIES, JINGLES AND

RHYMES

IVITH ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY VIGNETTE ILLUSTRA-
TIONS IN HALF-TONE AFTER

MAUD HUMPHREY
SHORT STORIES; FAIRY TALES; MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES;
VERSES BY EDITH M. THOMAS, ELIZABETH S. TUCKER
AND HELEN GRAY CONE


i .


NEW YORK
FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS


'~ ~ij





































Copyright, 1894, by
Frederick A. Stokes Company









CONTENTS.

STORIES
BY

MRS. MARY RICE MILLER
AND
ELIZABETH S. TUCKER.
A Dandelion Dream 11
The Nursery Band 4
Fauntleroy Park 16
The Holly Boy .20
Chocolate Creams 22
Six Wide-awakes 26
" Six Best Babies" 28
In Japan 3 32
Four Little Plums 34
The Fairies of To-day 38
" Peaches and Cream 40

RHYMES
BY
HELEN GRAY CONE.
A Lecture 44
Little Butterflies 46
The May Basket 48
November Plumes 50
Spring Wonder 52
Secrets. 54
Under the Mistletoe 56
The First Foreboding 58
" One, Two, Three-Miss" 60
Lily 62








CONTENTS.


Bo-Peep 64
A Christmas Stocking 66
The Dandelion Chain 69
Hidden Pearls 71
Fairy Wine-skins .73
A Soldier of the Snows 75
A Rhyme of Changing Children 77

FAIRY TALES.
The Three Bears 80
Cinderella 86
Little Red Rididg Hood 89
The Babes in the Wood 94
Tom Thumb 96
Jack and the Beanstalk 98
Goody Two Shoes I02
Beauty and the Beast 104
Puss in Boots 107
The Ugly Duckling IIO
The Sleeping Beauty 112
Little Snozw White 115
Hop 0' My Thumb 117
Aladdin .20
Jack, the Giant Killer 124
The Bluebird 125
The White Cat 128
The Musicians of Bremen 129
Blue Beard 130
Pretty Goldilocks 133

RHYMES
BY

ELIZABETH S. TUCKER.

Guinea Pigs 137
Child and Lamb T









CONTENTS.


Pussy Cat Gray 141
My Donkey 143
Pretty Poll! 45
Little Wlhite Mouse 47
The Doves 149
The Squirrel 15
" Chicks" .153
The Gold-Fish Speaks 55
The Rabbit Dance 157
Dear Puggy 159


MOTHER GOOSE JINGLES.

Little Bo Peep 162
Tommy Snooks and Betsey Brooks 164
Little Tom Tucker 164
Lucy Locket 166
The North Wind dothl Blow 66
Pussy Cat, Pussy Cat 168
Little Miss Muffett 168
As I was going up Primrose Hill 70
Little Nancy Etticote 170
There was a Little Boy and a Little Girl 172
Husk a bye Baby 172
Little Polly Flinders 174
Little Jack Horner 174
Ding, Dong, Bell 176
Curly Locks, 176
-Hot Cross Buns, 178
Jack and Jill 78
Little Boy Blue 180
Sing a Song of Sixpence 182
Mistress Mary 182
When I was a Bachelor 184
Bobby Shaftoe 186
There was an Old Woman 187








CONTENTS.


RHYMES

BY

EDITH M. THOMAS.

The Snow-ball Chieftain 90
The Little Prophet .94
March and Pussy-willow. 19 196
April the Trickster 200
In the Orchard 202
The Daisy 206
July and the Bumble-bec 208
The Water-lily 212
September 214
October the Artist 218
The Holly 220
The Mistletoe 224
American Child 226
African Child (To the Hollyhock) 228
Dutch Child 230
A Little Highlander 232
German Child 234
The Fleur-de-lis 237
Canadian Child 240
Swedish Child 242
Spanish Child 244
The Russian Child 246
English Child 248
May (Italian Child) 250














STORIES
BY
MRS. MARY RICE MILLER
AND


ELIZABETH S. TUCKER.










A DANDELION DREAM.
DANDELION-DAY in the park!
How did the babies know it?
How did the birds and the bees know it? Somehow
they feel their way to what they so dearly love; they do
not wait to be told. Blue sky overhead-green grass be-
neath, sprinkled over with dandelions and babies, the best
blossoms of the spring. Little Kate is trying a dandelion
under Rob's chin, to see if he likes butter. That isn't the
way to make butter!" says Ruth, peeping; "You can't
make real butter shine on his chin without a buttercup !"
Fat little Grace toddles along to help Kenneth, the
cutest pet of all, down on the ground, too busy to speak
under his sunbonnet.
Harold and Helen are puffing away with plumped
cheeks, to blow off the down of the dandelion top.
Nurse says the flower has gone to seed; so many seeds
from each flower; and each seed has a fuzzy wing; and
they must blow and blow, and scatter the seeds, and each
one will fall somewhere and grow, and make a mintfull of
dandelion dollars for poor little girls and boys.
Now count how many fuzzy seeds are left; one, two,
why there are twelve; and that is the time of day. Come
away, for it is dinner-time!
Who cares for dinner! They would rather play where
they are than eat the best dinner in anybody's house !
But the sun will shine another day, and dandelions will








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

be as yellow as gold to-morrow. One other thing is cer-
tain, baby's eyes will not be half so wide open, to see; and
baby will be so tired (who said so cross?) that she. cannot
half see the flowers unless she has her dinner and her nap.
One of these babies dreamed that she was lost in the
meadow on grandpa's farm ; that the grass was tall and the
dandelions kept reaching up higher and higher, till they
hid her completely. She could not see the other children,
neither could nursey find her, though she cried as loud as
ever she could-in a dream.
0, dear dandelions !" she said, "please go to seed and
blow away down to twelve, to bring the dinner-time, and
surely my mamma will come to find me !"
Then she heard something which sounded like a mowing-
machine, coming, clickity-click, to cut down the grass.
"O, what now shall I do!" sobbed the-poor baby, in her
dream. 0, dear grasshopper; please let me sit on your
back, and jump me out of this high grass !" But he hopped
the other way. Then she felt a big bird, flying low over
her head; he brushed her face with his black wings.
0, if I can just catch you now, you shall fly up with
me, away, out of these tiresome old dandelions!"
She reached up her hands and caught-what do you think ?
Why, her papa's black whiskers; his dear face bending
down to kiss her, asleep. Beside her, in the crib lay the
wilted dandelions, she had brought home in the hot sunshine.
Next day, there she was again, with the others-the dearest
dandelion baby of them all !




























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HURAH FO THE NURSERY BAND
HURRAH FOR THE NURSERY BAND !


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THE NURSERY BAND.

H URRAH for the Nursery Band !
Eleanor is first violin ; Beatrice has the mandolin:
Edna takes the pretty tambourine, and Marie the banjo.
Eleanor has just jumped out of her pony-cart, and run
away from her dogs, in time to begin. It is not any tune
you ever heard, she is playing. Mamma's violin will hardly
forgive itself for giving such squeaks and shrieks.
Baby Beatrice, with the softest voice is quite satisfied
with the way she is singing, "Daithy, Daithy you mutht
be crathy !" and her mamma's mandolin is astonished at
its own voice, and is so proud of its musical family.
Edna thumps with her white fist at the tambourine;
whirls it merrily about to hear the tinkling of the fairy
bells; then peeps around it singing, Peek-a-boo, I see
you I'm a band, too !" cries Marie, bobbing her yellow
curls.
Hey-day !" cries grandmamma; "Who ever heard every
piece in the orchestra playing a different tune, at the same
time !" "Lots o' music!" said Eleanor, smiling sweetly,
with her ear upon the wailing violin.
Um, me make music too!" said Marie, tum-ti-tum-
tumming on her banjo.
The invitations which Aunt Carra had sent said "three
o'clock," and music by the band."
It was almost three o'clock, and here was the band !








THE NURSER Y BAND.


We'll put you up on the roof"; growled Uncle Harry,
pretending to be vexed.
O, Uncle Harry !" cried Edna. You be a real bear,
you do growl so lovely. You can dance on your hind
legs, and we will make the music for you "
And that was really what handsome Uncle Harry was
doing, when the door opened softly, and who do you think
stood there, seeing the fun ? Why, Uncle Harry's sweet-
heart, who had come with Marie's mamma to grandma's
birthday party. Up and down went the dear fellow, shak-
ing his paws, bobbing his head, wobbling his russet feet as
clumsily as ever he could. The dear little band was
squealing away four-no, forty-different tunes at once.
Oh, it was the funniest dance you ever saw !
Ting-a-ling Tum-ti-tum Tra-la, tra-la!"
0, you know one can't write such music any more than
one can hug a dancing bear-while he is dancing !
But all of a sudden the fun stopped. The bear happened
to look over his shoulder and saw his lady-love laughing
heartily, although grandma's finger was on her lips, a sign to
keep the ladies quiet. Beyond the portiere all the mammas
were waiting to pay for the music with bon-bons and kisses.
Wasn't Uncle Harry tired? And didn't the pretty lady
love him better than ever, when she saw how very fond of
him the little girls were !
After the birthday supper, Uncle Harry played the
violin, while the ladies and the little girls danced;
grandma sat smiling, enjoying this dance better than the
other-the ezighy-year-old darling.












FAUNTLEROY PARK.



Y OU don't know where Fauntleroy Park is ? Why, it is
the babies' park; where the sun seems glad to shine
and the children love to play.
All around it are such pretty houses, and each house has
a baby or two, and a key which unlocks the park gates.
The park calls together the people who have children.
The every-day baby parade is so distracting that folks who
have no baby to play in the quiet walks, or to sleep in the
pleasant shade, or to laugh at the sprinkling fountain, are
here tempted to buy or beg one of the dimpled darlings.
Fall pampas grass used to grow here. When the white
feathery plumes were cut down, they were given to the
children who happened to be inside the gates.
Once upon a time, a little boy carried home his arms
full: his mamma placed the gay grass flowers in a mantel
vase. Very pretty it was, until a match, which a maid was
striking, lit the plumes, which flashed and flared a pyramid
of fire. It caught the white curtains ; it snatched the pretty
hangings from the poles; it quickly spoiled that pretty
house on Fauntleroy Park.
No more pampas grass there after that mischief: the
place where it grew is every year planted with lilies.











































a, Kai*


THE BLESSED BABIES WERE SENT TODDLING AMONG THE LILIES.


:









A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

The white-capped nurses, trundling the baby-carriages,
watch the sprouting of the bulbs in the early spring; watch
them send up their pointed leaves, and open a bit to let a
tall stalk shoot upward ; to shiver off into another leaf, and
another. At last the bunch of flower-buds is seen ; rather
clumsy at first; the new babies can have no idea of what is
coming.
Day after day the wicker carriages go by, and the babies
coo and chatter, and the buds are growing.
Mammas look out of the windows upon the Square, to
welcome the lilies, as they open in the sunshine. Now and
then a real bee, from nobody knows how far away, flies from
lily to lily, helping himself to sweets.
Sometimes sad-faced men and women peep through the
railings, walking slowly, wondering at the lilies and the
Square-babies," there are so many of each.
At last the lilies are all in blossom. When they begin to
fade the old park gardener comes to cut them down.
Oh, please wait a minute !" cried a gentle voice. Do
let me make a picture of those darlings!"
The nurses pushed the empty carriages down the tulip
walk.
The blessed babies were sent toddling among the lilies,
where their good fairy made this picture of them.
Now, when the lilies are cut again, in Fauntleroy Park,
may you be there to see !





















19


SO HERE GOES THE HOLLY!


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THE HOLLY BOY.

W ILL WINTER does not think himself quite dressed
till somebody lends him a muff, for his dimpled
hands. He has been with his sister to the church where the
young people are winding Christmas wreaths. A lady gave
him this bunch of holly.
Holly is the favorite Christmas trimming for the house
where Will is taking it, as fast as his fat, short legs can go.
His mamma's name is Hollis; papa calls her Hollie, and
they live in Holliston. So here goes the holly!
Will could travel faster if he were not in rubber boots.
They live where the snow lies deep in open squares, and
where boys snowball each other. Will coaxed papa to buy
these boots, so that he could frolic in the snow.
He does enjoy them very much ; he feels tall and manly
when he stands up in them.
When he was called in from play, to be washed and
dressed for the walk to-day, pretty long stockings and dainty
button shoes were laid out for him to wear.
He looked from boots to shoes, and began to whimper.
"Dust look at doze littlee shoes!" he said scornfully;
" Dey so littlee nobody will see my feet !"
Wht-n sister found he felt so badly, she said; 0 mamma !
Let him wear the boots; he is so happy in them "
No foot-<.,ar since Cinderella's glass slipper has had more
to do with a bl:.d\'s happiness than the new rubber boots










frGar nrir,- lil,;: r.l' i.Luil,. lii Hi- '.. ih.li WQ Jo1l -P ma hIt tl i 'S TiW :,
gaitt;; trsi nllg -il jl"-s in iinies. i. L.. are alwms ats re, and his *.<..,. ari-
ah~a amlt 11airg. llis saf& wmi'e iia li.i- .....i ...:..i..., his
:. iri'i.- mays, yam h-mcuii l,,l,l i .' [L,-'ri:. e e wiitlh his pAiet -re
ini -.... [,,, Il imdL 1B mt yim I imhe iis a *.liii,'.
ett t 1 MJilr.dllit.. 1he 11 n t ... sa"l;-'' ]l..f., 1' iC r s. H11 wa,,
.iia.r i Jis biId: h ose Inie 1.. ain td taid round t01e room,
w1ineiM iinanna hal a L h idihe.
""3 ,--. W ,' ll" Ae saidd, 1.-a.: anVre quiet
Boy I.- Iutto mm;nc( 1.. .. sayi im.:: I we n"t 1,- him trot,
nit.l'kilillsrii *'' 1Ti*i .*'I: iiii3 iI.... ., ii.,* Y mw 4 ,, n inaimm 3.M,
t""' .; i, li.jjiif.lulta !'" i ]n e ]h_ i".. S c1., dlust let me show .. i
'lie :!:'i.i.:..II-JL- -.. .in1 slower and slower, itill it st ..1 ;
atad tihe fittdle J',_ il.- r ,11 iniup on the foot of mamma's couch
aInd went to sIeeap.
He Bha's a. cnooxled ,e.,d I -i... when he is ._ ii". f... ; at
I.- .r Ihe said :: Mammawaints her -' '- -.... ..* !" when he
went to .'--c fr the glove-buttnoner. The i,..c-^,.." he
cals the ... -. 1iru, day he cae home 1r' ,' ri i n.
and i..". .I that they had gone as far as the ,; .-' :. when
he inceant tolll-gtate..
AWhen a new horse was ir.-. .. Lr home Will asked with
d'-T? 'tii: ""Do we1 v 1..: to that L.. ..s--. now, ?....?
',-i i sister crowds him a little, he says: "P'ese sit a
littlee nearer off "" He does not like much butter on his
bread; "" It makes it so '!" he says.
G .,-,.,.,d-,, .--, dear -iil 0'i -. r !i








CHOCOLATE CREAMS!

N OT the kind of chocolate creams that you buy in a
-" 1... but if 1r nice little brown-faced ti,., in white
frocks. TV'". looked as sweet as any ch.:.'. rl:- and their
frocks were like the cream part. I felt like eating them
rl:ht up! You see I was very lonely, as we were away
"down South in Dixie where mamma took me to get
vw..1, one winter. I was sitting on the verandah doing
n -.i-::: ... i the gate <-'- iJ. and the chocolate creams
came a <.i in one by one, and stood all in a row '-li....i-.e
me. One was ,., and held her i ., r in her mouth all the
time. One Q,' ~. .! behind a '.1, one turned her back to
hide a big bunch of !.. : .s, and smiled at me over Ther
shoulder--and the other one had a -- .:.ni that very
warnm day !
f',,!. all stood -.i,. till I said Good-morningo'" Thene
they all ,..' i.-'. and the one with the Tl. .mx rs said, ""1 ~I i' ..-rlin"
y'a! Ti ,:i I said, "What's your nani ?'" and the mne
with the muff said, "Sara Ann AM-t i.,--..t, e M.uiffi 2.r
S '.r: 1i.:....I 1 'l a v ..,r" to carry.," '-. she miudg~ef ttlie
one with the .l., r;, and sic said, '" N i ,-' '- T ',' ,,i.-
bell, 'kase I k 1.i rs so much." The one wiitlh Ake i:...
never took it down from her face, but said fri om 1i4 ..-!.l"i ii iim
a rIV, .. voice, My name's E"hiil., l.r.7 FtancyM-I-4c llllMs i
Fan :-.r short-' .I :l'. The e onewith her in her ironitlh wno lldl itt
say a word--an{d the 1i.- .ir girl had to t" he, n-matIe. S'.n'
said, Name's Tilly 2.-imrinrt-'ktlaste she i ..- .:'i",['i''ri
so an' she Ant iv- has one in her .n'.iti an"' cam \. "







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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then the muff girl said, What's your name ? And I
told them Charlie," and she said, I've brought you some-
thin' right here in my muff-guess what ?" And I had to
guess a lot of things-but none of them was right, so she took
out a little paper box from her muff, and I undid it, and what
do you think! A lot of glass beads-red and blue and all
colors. She said, You can string 'em on a thread, an' make
necklaces an' rings." And then the flower girl said, I've
brought you somethin'too!"-and she gave me her big
bunch of lovely flowers.
Then the fan girl said, So have I brought you a pres-
ent." And she took her hand from behind her back and
gave me-what do you suppose ? A dear little live turtle
tied by a string Was n't that nice ?
Then they all looked at the peppermint girl-and she put
her finger in her mouth and hung her head. They all giggled
again-an' when I said, "What's the matter ?" then the
flower girl said, "Tilly Pepp'mint, she set out to bring
you some pepp'mints-but 'fore she got here, she eat them
all up!"
Then Tilly Pepp'mint said, "I've got one left"-but I
said, No thank you. You eat it." So she popped it in her
mouth, and they all giggled together!
I asked them to stay and play with me-but they only
giggled again, and went out of the gate one by one, and
away down the road. They were too shy to stay. But
they were the jolliest little chocolate creams I ever saw.
Elizabet/ S. Tucker.

































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SIX WIDE-AWAKES.

SIX wide-awake babies, bless them !
That means six baths, six breakfasts this morning; at
least as many kisses as there are toes and fingers apiece.
0, you dear little troublesome tots !
What a small place in the house you seem to fill; the
smallest chair, the tiniest bed. But if you slip away, there
is a hollow which all the king's horses, and all the king's
men cannot fill.
Each one, as it comes along, its grandma has called the
dearest and sweetest she ever saw.
Babies are like parrots and monkeys in doing and saying
what people about them do and say.
No cross nurse has ever slapped one baby in this picture;
no naughty brother has struck one. Only gentle hands
and voices have been around them-at least we hope so.
Only pleasant thoughts and fancies are dropped into their
mind gardens; so, only lovely actions spring up and blos-
som there ; peep through their eyes and see.
Of course they are not all the time so dreadfully clean as
when they were having their picture taken. A little fresh
dirt does not hurt any baby.
The boy who is pulling his playmate's hair seems to be
doing it politely Behind him is another fellow, a whole-
sale dealer in flowers. He has given the girl on each side
of him a handful, and the patient one in the corner knows
she will have some, soon.








SIX WIDE-A WAKES.


You would have a heartache if you knew how many little
folks in great cities have no flowers.
Paradise Park in New York is a shabby bit of dry grass,
with a few miserable trees, and some wooden benches.
It is never like the Paradise we dream about, except on
Saturday afternoons in summer time. Then, down the
narrow street, drives a big wagon, filled with country flowers.
These are given into dirty little hands that get soap and
water as rarely as they get flowers, there. Old people come,
carrying babies, all forlorn ; every one gets a flower.
0, how the children push and crowd to get near, for fear
there will not be enough for all. Hundreds of boys and
girls, shouting: 0, please give me a rose !" 0, lady, my
mother is sick; do send her a growing flower Say, mister !
This'ere little chap didn't get any !
O, dear! You cannot hear your own voice in the hub-
bub.
At last the flowers are all given away ; the basket must
be turned up side down, and the wagon driven out of sight
before the children start.
There they go They carry the bright, sweet-smelling
flowers up into garrets, down into cellars, where there is not
-one other single pretty thing.
Yellow haired German babies; dark skinned Italian
babies; milk white Irish babies.
Listen to papa! He says they are all American babies;
we must never forget that; although their fathers and
mothers came over the sea.













"SIX BEST BABIES."

SOME people say they like six babies best when they
are fast asleep !
Six shops full of candies, six cafds full of cakes and pies
which we cannot reach, are not so good as one box of
sweets at home, to eat with someone we love.
So, six little pets asleep in the public garden, are not
worth so much to you and me as our one baby at home,
asleep or awake.
If we could only help ourselves to one of these tired
babes, who has nodded off to sleep among the posies "
But how could we choose, while the fringed curtains are
down before the windows of baby's face ?
Step softly! There One has heard you and lifts her
head, rubbing her dimpled knuckles against her sleepy eye.
Now if she catches sight of us, she may cry long and loud t
Wonder if she has any teeth Suppose she can talk ?
How came these human flowers here ? Did they fall, to-
gether, from some balloon passing overhead ? It would
be a pity to let one fall where it was not wanted !
Somebody loves these babies; for see how cunning are
their little gowns and bibs. This small jacket shows how-
fast this fellow has grown.
It may be a baby show, and we have come too early.





































IT MAY BE A BABY SHOW.








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Wise babies When there is nothing else to do it is
best to go to sleep. That will save your shoes and your
nerves, and keep the spectacle man far off.
You know some one who loves a pug?
You ask what babies are good for?
Good for earth and good for heaven ; good to frolic, to
learn, to love, to grow up to be good boys and girls.
Pugs and puppies are amusing; but don't put one in the
scales against a dewy-lipped, starry-eyed baby Pug would
be ashamed of himself, and wriggle away, and run to the
kennel or the stable.
But you have no baby at your house ?
Well, you can find places where there is a baby for
every brick in the sidewalk. To give one of them a nice
home, with a bed and a bath and something to eat would be
jolly; bye-and-bye it would be better than a dog when it
could talk to you and sing.
You know a cat that is loved like a baby ?
Don't bother to tell us about that, either.
Why, babies are even better than flowers, for they bloom
all the year round !
In some countries, people do not think very much of
baby-girl; but here she is worth her weight in gold; worth
just as much as her brother.
Hush! The babies are sleeping yet !
Perhaps this is all the show there is to be !
Let us tiptoe home, and leave them dreaming among the
flowers.

















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DEAR LITTLE JAPANESE GIRLS.











IN JAPAN.

PERHAPS your name is Rose or Lily; or perhaps you
know some little girls who have been named after
those flowers. But did you ever know one named Kiku ?
That is a common name in Japan; the chrysanthemum
is called Kizkuz there; it is much easier to spell and to
speak, surely. In this picture of dear little Japanese girls,
Kiku is showing you some of her name-flowers.
The little friend next to her is named Haru. You think
that is a queer name ? Everything is queer in Japan, but
the flowers Haru, and all the girls and ladies must have
a ribbon tied about the waist; what we call a sash, they
call obi.
Next to Haru is pretty Ilo. Do you see how the hair
of each little beauty is tucked up in a puff, waxed smooth
and shiny? Nobody's hair in Japan is dressed every day!
At night, people do not tumble about on hot feather pil-
lows, soft beds and bouncing springs. They sleep upon
mats on the floor, which keep them straight; and their
heads rest on a box ; in that way the hair is not rumpled,
but keeps beautifully smooth for several days. You would
rather see it all rumpled ? But you are not in Japan How
would you like to wake up and find your house rocking;
glass and silver jingling ; pictures swinging from the walls;
and know it was an earthquake that was rocking you ?
They are quite used to such little things in Japan.








IN JAPAN.


The fourth pet is Sono; she wonders if you were ever
carried on your brother's back? In Japan, you might see a
boy coming towards you on the street and think he surely
had two heads! But as he passed you would see he was
taking his younger brother or sister for a walk ; or, perhaps
was playing with a baby tied to his back!
You would admire the splendid kites which are almost
always to be seen flying in the air, with wonderful shapes
and faces. Men make the kites and fly them with the
boys. And what is just as delightful, the women play with
dolls! They make clothes for them, and carry them out
on the streets, just as you little girls do in our parks.
Everybody in Japan has flowers and umbrellas.
They spend most of their time out of doors : they do
not teach the children very much ; they play about almost
as idly as kittens, and are good-natured and gentle.
They have black hair, bright eyes and clear yellow skin.
You would not change your blue-eyed baby for Kiku's
little sister! And she would not have such an ugly black
umbrella as your mamma's !
The umbrellas in Sono's house are of bright colors, with
flowers and pictures on them. On the mantel are lovely
snakes and toads, in bronze and china, and over the doors
are horrid big heads with great round eyes and grinning
mouths and long red tongues.
You would want to run away from the sight ?
But you would laugh at it if you had grown where these
Jap babies grew, in Japan.










FOUR LITTLE PLUMS!

M R. PLUM lives on a Long Island farm, where there is
room and time for these little Plums to grow and
ripen in the sun. The smallest, sweetest Plum is a graft
from a Quaker farm; her great-grandma sat on the facing
seat in a Friend's Meeting-house, and never said anything
more severe than thee and thou.
The next Plum has another flavor. Her other great-
grandma went up on the roof and rang a bell, when the
British soldiers were in the house, looking for money and
silver spoons. Crack, went the muskets, bang went the
guns below; ding-a-ling-aling, went the girl's dinner-bell;
not a shot hitting her. The soldiers were scared, and
jumped into their boats ; they were rowing out of the har-
bor when the neighbors came to help. Look at this second
Plum ; she could do the same.
Master Ned battles with the bugs in the melon patch and
potato field as his great-grandfather fought for Molly
Stark, with all his might. Master Ned feeds the chickens
and has a share of eggs and fowls to sell.
They have a garden patch and plant what they please;
they sow seeds, they pull weeds, and their father sells their
lettuce and radishes with his own.
The mother-the best Plum of all !-gives the children a
sum of money every Saturday. They keep account books,
and put down what money they get, where it goes and
what it buys. At the top of the cover of Ned's book, is this:











--4.--


FOUR LITTLE PLUMS!








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

NED PLUMS ALOUENS.

You will make allowance for his spelling; his counting is
all right.
Out of this money must come all the presents they make
in the year; Birthdays and Christmas. They do not give
what other people buy for them.
If you could be in this Plum orchard a while you would
learn many things you are not expected to learn in the city.
Patty and Ned counted twenty kinds of weeds in a walk
with me;-dandelion, catnip, mullein, plantain, snap-dragon,
mayweed, dock, clover, smartweed, burdock, chickweed,
thistle, sheep-sorrel, pigweed, horse-sorrel, tansy, pepper-
mint, penny-royal and spearmint. All in a morning walk,
by the roadside, in the woods and by the brook.
And the birds The country children love the birds, and
know their names and how and where they build their nests.
Louise, the big sister, is a little mother to baby, and saves
her dear mamma many steps in each busy day.
It is too bad that their Newfoundland dog, Roger, is not
in the picture. In the country, a big, faithful dog, seems part
of a child's life. Roger hunts the weasel in the stone wall,
which catches the young chickens. Roger finds the wood-
chuck, and keeps him shut in, till Ned or his father comes.
You may be sure that wide-awake country children have
many chances to learn easily, from day to day, what city
boys and girls learn slowly, from books and tutors.
Do you wish you were a Plum ?



































THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY.










THE FAIRIES OF TO-DAY.

T HE first fairy was looking out of her mother's window
when she spied a pale-faced lady, alone, at a window
opposite. She kissed her hand; the lady smiled, but wiped
her eyes. Somebody said that lady had lost her children.
Mamma," said the first fairy, you say my bright eyes
find lost things May I help that lady find her children ?"
"You may, dear Sunbeam !"
And when Sunbeam shone into the quiet room across the
street, the lady grasped the little hand, which led her down
the street, around a corner into a dark alley.
"There are so many children here," she said, "if your
lost babies are not among them, you can help yourself "
The sunbeam and the lady's gold lighted up the alley,
and a Day Nursery grew out of the first fairy's heart.
The second fairy was dancing among the flowers when
she saw an old man going by ; all bent with troubles. The
fairy filled his hands with flowers. Looking down upon her
smiling face, he breathed the sweetness of her lilies and
roses, until he smiled! Only a fairy could make old Mr.
Moneybags smile.
The third fairy saw little Sammy Bowlegs hobbling upon
his ankles, before his mother's door.
What makes him walk so queerly? the fairy asked.
Mrs. Bowlegs (so the street-boys called her) answered
from the door:
I wash all day, honey ; and Sammy takes care of him-








THE FAIRIES OF TO-DA Y.


self; he walked too soon, and made his legs crooked for
life!"
I think not! said fairy; hurrying on to see her uncle,
a very great doctor.
Why, Fly-away; how came you here alone ? he asked.
"I could n't wait for mamma! I just found the lamest
boy! Cure him, and I will give you my darling dog!"
Now, if you pass that laundry door, you will see Sammy,
quite happy, with a sort of harness on his feet and with
splinted legs. No more tears fall into the tub ; he and his
mother believe in fairies !
My fourth fairy, like a honey-bee, sucks sweets from
every thing If it rains, she says: "Now I can clean my
dollys' house and wash their clothes !"
If the company expected does not come, she says:
" Never mind, mamma; we can play with each other "
When -Meg broke off the best doll's head, she said,
"We'll wrap it up and play it is a mummy !"
When papa goes away she comforts mamma: There
will be the letters And we will meet him when the steamer
comes in !"
Her mouth is a rainbow between her smiles and tears.
Perhaps she is the best kind of every-day-fairy, for a
pattern, to copy after. She is ready to make the best of
everything. Are you ?
Don't be looking in hollow trees and under toad-stools
for fairies. But look in the glass. You will see there a
good fairy, or a bad fairy-which shall it be ?









"PEACHES AND CREAM!"




THAT is the luscious name by which these lovely, lively
little women are known.
If you do not like this kind of Peaches and Cream, per.
haps you have not any heart, or it has fallen into the place
where you put the other kind of peaches and cream.
Such jolly little Peaches-such sweet little Creams !
It was Aunt Bess, in her studio at Woodstock, who
gave them this name. She had invited these four little
neighbors to visit her boys, Max and Fritz.
One of these little women loves to sew. Aunt Bess has
given her a work-bag with a doll's apron in it, blunt scis-
sors and a wee thimble. This is Mabel. Max made that
wreath for her to wear while her picture is being painted.
Mabel is as sweet as cream.
One of the Peaches, Constance, is fond of "making
believe" stories and plays. Aunt Bess has given her a
pad tied with bright ribbons, to make a book.
The pink-cheeked Peach, Agatha, wanted a slate like
Fritz's; so Aunt Bess has hung one on her arm, to have
all to her own self, forever and ever, or till it is broken.
The shyest little Cream, Dorothy, wanted to write a
letter to her mamma, who is far away; so Max gave her a
big sheet of paper.




















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SUCH HOLLY LITTLE PECES-SUCH SWEET LITTLE CREAMS
SUCH JOLLY LITTLE PEACHES-SUCH SWEET LITTLE CREAMS !


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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

These four little woinen are growing too fast; that is
all the fault anybody can find with them.
Aunt Bess says there is only one thing to do about it.
And she is going to do it !
They have had a tea-party, on her piazza; where the
white roses climb on the lattice. The pitcher of tea-kettle
tea is empty, and the goodies are all eaten, and now for
.the picture! That will not let them grow, after to-day.
Here they shall stay, so little-so big.
Now if there were a market, really and truly, where a
Mr. Cupid was selling such Peaches and Cream, which one
of these would you like to buy, little boy ? Whisper; no
one shall hear!
Agatha, with the slate, would tease you to make pictures,
all day.
Dorothy would perhaps get crying for her mamma and
the Cream would be abnost sour.
Constance would make a Little Boy Blue of you, or a
"Jack the Giant-killer;" you must always be playing you
are somebody else, when Constance is the mistress.
And Mabel is so fond of cutting! Your hair and your
kite, and your heart-strings might all be snipped before
you knew it.
Don't be in a hurry, dear little man, to get this kind of
Peaches and Cream. Be v-e-r-y sure which kind you really
want. Then wait till you have a nice place all your own
to put one in ; a place to lock up; and there will be only
one key, and you will carry that safely in your heart.















RHYMES
BY


HELEN


GRAY


CONE.








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


A LECTURE.




SER subject was a chestnut;
Her lecture was a treat;
She said, a fairy hid inside
And lived upon the meat.

And if you tried to roast it,
You'd find if this were true;
The shell would open with a "pop!"
While off the fairy flew.

The only proof still lacking,-
And somehow hard to get,-
Was just to see the fairy fly,
Which had not happened yet!
Helen Gray Cone.








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HER SUBJECT WAS A CHESTNUT;
HER LECTURE WAS A TREAT.


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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


LITTLE BUTTERFLIES.




W HAT are you following, wistful eyes?
The golden flocks of the butterflies?
What is the secret you long to know?
Whence and whither they come and go ?

Whence each comes like a flying flower,
Is a fairy tale for a twilight hour;
Of a wingless creature that can but creep,
Of a silken shroud and a folded sleep.

Whither each goes. is a dream for you
To dream on your pillow a long night through;
Of boundless fields and a wind set free,
And a blue sky deep as the soundless sea!
Helen Gray Cone.



























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WHAT ARE YOU FOLLOWING, WISTFUL EYES?
THE GOLDEN FLOCKS OF THE BUTTERFLIES?







A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMfES.


THE MAY BASKET.




V IOLET and Maidenhair,
Once in happy weather,
Went to hang a May-basket,
Straying off together.

Up the street and down the lane
They wandered east and west;
But brought it back to mother's door,
Because they loved her best!
Helen Gray Cone.














































VIOLET AND MAIDENHAIR,
ONCE IN HAPPY WEATHER,
WENT TO HANG A MAY-BASKET,
STRAYING OFF TOGETHER.

49







A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


NOVEMBER PLUMES.




I LOVE the white chrysanthemums;
For when their time of blooming comes
I think of Fairy Princes brave,
With great snow-plumes that float and wave.

Like proud white princes, fair and bold,
They grace the gardens in the cold,
And toss along the Autumn air
A scent of something strange and rare;
Fit flowers for my white prince to wear!
Helen Gray Cone.
































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A SCENT OF SOMETHING STRANGE AND RARE;
FIT FLOWERS FOR MY WHITE PRINCE TO WEAR!


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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


SPRING WONDER.





SOVELOCKS and Sweetlips,
Rose and Kiss-me-quick,
All wonder, wonder, wonder
At the downy baby chick.

Cheep, cheep," the chick says;
The meaning can you tell?
I wonder, wonder, wonder
At the world outside the shell!"

0 big world, 0 bright world,
And wider than they know,
Be good to little chirping chicks
That wonder at you so!
Helen Gray Cone.



























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ALL WONDER, WONDER, WONDER
AT THE DOWNY BABY CHICK.


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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


SECRETS.




OU'LL never tell about the humming-bird
That came into the garden yesterday-
No, not a word! for may be if he heard
He'd
stay
away!

And other secrets we will keep just.so,
And you'll tell only me, and I'll tell you;
And Toddles, when he's big enough, you know,
We'll
tell
him
too !
Helen Gray Cone.
























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AND OTHER SECRETS WE WILL KEEP JUST SO,
AND YOU'LL TELL ONLY ME, AND I'LL TELL YOU.








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND lRHIIMlES.


UNDER THE MISTLETOE.




ABOVE the rosy boys and girls
The mystic shoots like watchers lean,
With glistening berries grey as pearls,
And listening elfin eas of green.

".Though folks are queer, this time of year,
We'll do just what they told us to;
Tust why it is, we're not so clear,
But you kiss me and I'll kiss you!"
Helen Gray, Conc.









































*112










JUST WHY IT IS WE'RE NOT SO CLEAR,
BUT YOU KISS ME AND I'LL KISS YOU!


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A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.





THE FIRST FOREBODING.




N OT many griefs has Daffodil;
Not many dews her dear eyes fill;
Her voice is gay, her smile is sunny,
Her little heart is full of honey.

Yet I have seen her sad, because
Her own gray kitten, Velvet-Paws,
Will grow and change-just think of that !--
Will change and grow, and be a cat!

How pleasant life would be, oh dear!
If daffodils bloomed all the year,
And willow catkins stayed just so,
And own gray kittens didn't grow!
Helen Gray Cone.












































HOW PLEASANT LIFE WOULD BE, OH DEAR!
IF OWN GRAY KITTENS DIDN'T GROW!

59








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

"ONE, TWO, THREE-MISS!"



OW, Flaxen-Floss in the red riding hat,
What is the thing that you are puzzled at?
I fancy it is something like to this:
Why cannot anybody keep right on?
Why is it, that however high you've gone,
At last you miss?

I can't tell why; but this is the amount-
If you should jump longer than you can count,
As many times as grass-blades are, and past,-
As many times as there are stars in heaven,-
Yes, if you jumped right on to twenty-leven,
You'd miss at last!

It's just the reason why the bubbles break;
Why water-lilies cannot hold awake;
Why fire-fly lanterns go out now and then;
Why often elder folk, in life's grave game,
Just have to stop, sigh "miss!" and without shame
Begin again.
Helen Gray_ Cone.
















































WHY IS IT, THAT HOWEVER HIGH YOU'VE GONE,
AT LAST YOU MISS?







A ITREASURiY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


LILY.





O LILY, wonder-sweet
And pure as snow,
I cannot touch you,
Though I love you so.

It seems as though,
From out the blue aloft,
A cloud of angels drifted,
Slow and soft.

And resting on your tall green stalks
I found them.
With wings half-folded, and
Heaven's fragrance round them.
Helen Gray Cone.































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O LILY, WONDER-SWEET AND PURE AS SNOW.
I CANNOT TOUCH YOU, THOUGH I LOVE YOU SO.









A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


BO-PEEP.





APPLECHEEKS and' Dimplechin,
Chancing on the clever plan,
Played Bo-peep, with merry din,
Round an outspread fan.

"Now I see you!" What delight!
"Now then, now then, I seej ou/"
How they laughed The day was bright,
And the fan was blue.

Why was this so sweet? Ah, why ?
Weary women, grown-up men,
That's the secret you and I
Ne'er shall know again!
Helen Gray Cone.

































'V


Si- A -


PLAYED BO-PEEP, WITH MERRY DIN,
ROUND AN OUTSPREAD FAN.


~~ssctr~:- q
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s







A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


A CHRISTMAS STOCKING.




UST be patient, dolly,
We will get you out!
Seems to me she's very good,
Doesn't cry nor pout!

Didn't hear the sleigh-bells-
Wonder when he came?
Aren't you glad her eyes are brown?
Wonder what's her name?

Guess he wouldn't like it,
Smothered up all night,
If he found a chimney once
Fitted him so tight.
Helen Gray Cone.













V.


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JUST BE PATIENT, DOLLY, WE WILL GET YOU OUT!
SEEMS TO ME SHE'S VERY GOOD, DOESN'T CRY NOR POUT!


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-' *'..: -. .

















WHILE BLOSSOM-BABY'S BLUE, BLUE EYES,
AS CLEAR AS SKIES OF SPRING,
ARE WIDE WITH INNOCENT SURPRISE.









THE DANDELION CHAIN.


THE green field smoothed
her velvet gown
The gifts of Spring to hold ;
Spring laughed, and in her
lap threw down
A shower of guinea-gold.

The burnished dandelions
burn
Beneath the sunny sky;
But dandelion-gold will turn
To silver by and by.


















/
j ,


So let us link a chain, to
deck,
In this gay golden hour,
Our Blossom-Baby's rose-leaf
neck,
That's softer than a flower:

While Blossom-Baby's blue,
blue eyes,
As clear as skies of Spring,
Are wide with innocent sur-
prise
To see the shining thing !
Helen Gray Cone.


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69












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TEL M. "A D STL -
IN THE W.T .F H
... ..,
,7 -" V_ -'Z .'

*-. y ^ . .
-. '- .- .,










TELL ME. WHAT DOES THE HUSK YOU HOLD
IN THE WARM LITTLE FINGERS, HIDE?










HIDDEN PEARLS.


SILKEN-LOCKS in the
summer corn,
Softly a-stir in the dreamy
air,
Two round years, since you
were born,
Have rolled away and been
lost somewhere.

People are wise at two years
old,
Serious-lipped and sober-
eyed;
Tell me, what does the husk
you hold
In the warm little fingers,
hide?


What if we pried and tried
to see ?-
Under the light-green,
tangled silk,
Folded away from you and
me,
Wonderful pearls, as white
as milk!

-Ah, she looks up, and smiles,
and shows,
Parting her lips, my grave
wee girl,
Milky-white in their tiny
rows,
Treasures of dearer pearl!
Helei Gray Cone.


. -4. Ill



























l














I KNOW THE ROGUE WHO DRAINS THEM,
A ROBBER BOLD AND SMALL;
THE LAST DROP IN THE WINE-SKIN
HE LIKES THE BEST OF ALL.


- ------- --11----~-----1~-~-








FAIRY WINE-SKINS.


FAIRY WINE-SKINS.




W HEN dusky grapes in clusters
Weigh down the ropes of vine,
Like dusty leather bottles,
Plumped out with fairy wine,

I know the rogue who drains them,
A robber bold and small;
The last drop in the wine-skin
He likes the best of all.

Each russet sack he presses,
And stains with red the tips
Of all his gypsy fingers,
And both his eager lips.

O Peach-Cheeks, when the fairies
By moonlight seek the vine,
And find a heap of empty sacks
But not a drop of wine,








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.


Just fancy how they'll grumble
Because you've spoiled the feast,
While you are soundly sleeping,
Not caring in the least;


Ar :- .


Lids fast and lashes fallen,
And dreaming that it's true
That all the world's a great round grape,
Full ripe, and meant for you !


i

--V~








A SOLDIER OF THE SNOWVS.


A SOLDIER OF THE SNOWS.




Y brave boy loves the winter-time;
He loves the bright, wild days
When the strong sun shines, and the icy trees
With a host of bayonets blaze;
And the silver bullets drop left and right,
And the wind goes charging past
With the whirl of a thousand cuirassiers
And the sound of a trumpet-blast !

From a veteran tree, all.scarred and gray,
He has wrested a steely bough;
He has captured the enemy's colors gay,-
In his face he bears them now!
He bears them in his merry face,
That's like the bold red rose;
And henceforth he shall ever be
My Soldier of the Snows!








































c .. ., ^* -- ;. ..-:,







FROM A VETERAN TREE, ALL SCARRED AND GRAY,
HE HAS WRESTED A STEELY BOUGH.







A RHYME OF CHANGING CHILDREN.


A RHYME OF CHANGING
CHILDREN.




W HERE are last year's little folk,
Whom we loved and knew?
-Hair a trifle browner gold;
Eyes not quite so blue.

Where's that curve in Rose-Red's cheek
Used to please me so?
Where, the curls that Love-Locks had
Not so long ago?

Just as Spring in Summer's lost,
Sure it is and clear,
Every child is children four
In a single year!



































,.- ... .. -













WHERE'S THAT CURVE IN ROSE-RED'S CHEEK
USED TO PLEASE ME SO?

78











FAIRY TALES.















THE THREE BEARS.




DID you ever hear of the three Bears who lived in the
middle of a wood, in a- little house of their own?
One was a great big Bear with a very gruff deep voice;
the second was a middling-sized Bear, with an ordinary
middling-sized voice; and the third was a little wee Bear,
with a tiny voice like a squeak.
One day, they all went out for a walk in the wood be-
fore breakfast, and while they were gone, a little girl called
Silver-locks passed by and saw the nice little house stand-
ing there. So she opened the door and walked into the
Bears' sitting-room. On the table she saw three bowls of
smoking-hot porridge, and by the side of each bowl was a
spoon. The first bowl was very large, and by it lay a large
spoon. So Silver-locks tasted the large bowl of porridge,
but it was so hot that it burned her mouth. Then she tried
the second bowl. which was a middling-sized bowl, and had a
middling-sized spoon, but this porridge was not hot enough.















































-p.


THEN SHE TRIED THE MIDDLING-SIZED BED.








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

Then she tried the third bowl, which was a little wee bowl,
with a little wee spoon, and the porridge was so delicious
that she ate it all up. Then she felt tired and thought that
she would like to sit down. She looked round the room,
and saw that there were three chairs there. One was a
very large chair, so she got up on that, but she found it so
hard that she soon clambered down again. Then she tried
th.e second chair, which was a middling-sized chair, but this
was so soft that she sank down in it, and felt quite lost.
So this did not please her, and she got off it and tried the
third chair, which was a little tiny chair, and this was so
comfortable that she sat there until the bottom came out.
And when this happened, little Silver-locks thought that
she had better go through the house and see what else was
there. So she went up-stairs, and there she found a nice
tidy little bedroom with three white beds in it. One was
quite big, and she got into that, but it was hard, like the big
chair down-stairs, so she got up again. Then she tried the
middling-sized bed, but that was too soft, like the middling-
sized chair, so that did not please her. And then she lay
down on the little bed, and this was so comfortable that she
fell fast asleep. After a time, the three Bears came in from
their walk to have their breakfast. First came the big
Bear, and when he saw the spoon in his porridge, he
roared in his big gruff voice: SOMEONE HAS BEEN
EATING MY PORRIDGE!" Then the second Bear
came in, and he looked at his bowl, and said in his middling
voice: SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE !" And








THE THREE BEARS.


when the little bear looked at his bowl, he squeaked:
" Someone has been eating my porridge, and has eaten it all
up "


_-'_'




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C2~



C. i


.4




"SOMEONE HAS BEEN EATING MY PORRIDGE, AND
IT ALL UP!"


HAS EATEN


Then the three Bears knew that someone had been in
the house, so they looked round the room, and the big
Bear roared out: "SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING
IN MY CHAIR!"
"SOMEONE HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR, TOO !" aid
the middling-sized Bear. Someone has been sitting in my
c/hai-," squeaked the little Bear, "anzd has sat the bo/tom








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

out/ Then the three Bears looked very grave, and they
went up-stairs to their bedroom. The big Bear found his
bed all tossed, so he roared: "SOMEONE HAS BEEN
LYING IN MY BED!" SOMEONE HAS BEEN LYING IN
MY BED, TOO !" said the middling-sized Bear. Then the
little bear squeaked in his wee voice: "Someone has been
lying in my bed, and here she is /" And they all three col-
lected round Silver-locks, who was gazing at them in terror,
for when she heard the voice of the big Bear she thought
it was thunder in her dreams. When the second Bear had
spoken she had not noticed him at all because his voice
was quite an ordinary voice, but when she heard the little
Bear squeaking, she had waked immediately. Suddenly
she jumped off the bed, and-leaped out of the open window,
and fled away into the wood.
"WELL, SHE MIGHT HAVE TOLD US HER
NAME," roared the big Bear.
CERTAINLY," said the middling-sized Bear.
Certainly," squeaked the little wee Bear.
But little Silver-locks was never seen or heard of any
more.










K2^J.-.






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ON HER FEET WERE SLiPPERS THAT SHONE LIKE GLASS.
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ON HER FEET WERE SLIPPERS THAT SHONE LIKE GLASS.
















CINDERELLA.





ONCE upon a time there lived a widower and his
daughter, and she was as sweet a child as ever lived !
The father decided to marry again, and took for a wife a
widow with two daughters, who he fancied would be company
for his own little girl. But they were cross and unpleas-
ant, and treated the child most shamefully, making her work
like a servant and dress in rags, while they took their ease,
and dressed in silks and fine laces. When her work was
done she sat on the hearth, among the ashes and cinders,
and for that reason they called her Cinderella. The
stepmother treated her just as unkindly, and the poor girl
had a hard time of it, but made no complaint to her father.
One day the king sent heralds to proclaim that a ball
would be given for the prince, his son, and all the young
girls were invited to dance at it. Such a time as there
was The two sisters were in a great flutter of prepara-
tion, and Cinderella was kept busy from early morning till








CINDERELLA.


late at night. At last the evening came, and Cinderella
dressed her two sisters, and they went off to the ball in
grandeur, while she sat down in the chimney corner and
wept bitter tears. While she sat thus her fairy godmother
appeared and asked what was the matter. You want to
go to the ball?" said she. "Well, so you shall." But
how can I go in these rags?" cried Cinderella. "I'll soon
fix that. Only do as I tell you," was the reply. A pump-
kin was brought in and a rat-trap filled with rats and mice,
and these, at a touch from the magic wand, were trans-
formed into a fine coach with driver and footmen. Another
touch of the wand, and Cinderella's rags turned into a
beautiful dress, and on her feet were slippers that shone
like glass. Now go to the ball," said the godmother,
"but be sure and come away before twelve o'clock, or you
will find yourself in rags."
Cinderella went to the ball, and was the most beautiful
woman there, and the prince fell madly in love with her.
It was nearly twelve o'clock when Cinderella remembered,
and flew away-just in time. For outside the door her
clothes turned to rags, and the rats and mice went scurry-
ing off. Soon after she reached home the sisters came in
and told her all about the ball, and the lovely princess who
was there. She begged to go to the second ball, which
was to take place the next night; but they laughed at her
scornfully. The fairy godmother came again, and used
her magic wand, and at the ball Cinderella was the admira-
tion of all. The prince was so attentive and the time








A TREASURY Y OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

passed so swiftly that Cinderella forgot. And when she
looked at the clock, it was on the stroke of twelve She
S left in haste, and as she ran down the
stairs her clothes changed to rags, and
-. away went one of her glass slippers.
The prince picked it up, and
i .- I tioulh the porters at the door
.: \\ lVere questioned, they said that
-r. I',no ptricess had passed,-only a
.-' ,,' d, .


11 -' *4


ri~


Mlttle ki.tcien-wuenc a run
t hliroi:h.
Mle.inwhile Cinderella had
run home all the way in


her rags, and had only just arrived
when the sisters returned, full of wonder
at what had happened, and of conjec-
ture as to \\ hI- t h e beautiful
princess rieall- i was.
And the ricene .i fell sick with
love; so the .- king sent heralds
round the t:n to inform the
people t i a whoever could
put on the ---. little glass slip-
per dropped at the ball should
marry his son. AS SHE RAN DOWN THE STAIRS
E v e r y o n e HER CLOTHES CHANGED tried it on, but
it was too tiny, TO RAGS. and fitted no
one.








CINDERELLA.


Finally, the heralds came to the two sisters, but they
fared no better, tug and strain as they would.
"Let me try it," said Cinderella; and the sisters
objected. But the herald said that his orders were to try it
on everyone.
So Cinderella put it on with the greatest ease, and then
she drew the fellow-slipper from her pocket, and when she
had put this on, she stood up in her robes of gold and
silver, and the sisters knew that she was the princess they
had seen, and begged her forgiveness.
Then Cinderella married the prince, and soon after the
two sisters, who had learned to subdue their pride, married
two lords of the court.


LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

THERE was once a wood-cutter and his wife, who had
one little girl. She was very pretty, with sweet blue
eyes and golden hair; and she could feed the pigs, and sew
seams, and churn the butter; so she was very useful to her
mother. In the next village lived her old grandmother,
who loved her so much that she made a scarlet hood for her
to keep her warm, and when the neighbors saw it they called
her Little Red Riding Hood."
One day her mother said to her: Granny has been very
ill. Put on your hood and run and see her, and take her
these cheesecakes and this pat of fresh butter that I have
made for her." Little Red Riding Hood started off very









A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

happily, with her basket on her arm, and soon came to a
wood that lay between the two villages. Just then a wolf,
who was passing, saw her, and came up to speak to her. He
would very much have liked to kill her and eat her, but
there were some wood-cutters cutting trees close by, and he
did not dare to touch her. So he came up to her in the
most friendly way and said : Where are you going, Little
Red Riding Ho.od?"
I am going to see my grandmother, dear Mr. Wolf,"
answered the little girl. Where does she live?" asked
the wolf. Oh, she lives in the first cottage past yonder
mill. She is very ill, so I am taking her these cheesecakes
and a pat of butter that my mother has made for her."
If she is so ill, I will go and see her too," said the wolf.
" I will go this way, and go you through the woods, and we
will see which gets there first." So saying, he shambled off,
and then ran all the way to the cottage.
Tap, tap, he knocked' at the cottage door. Who is
there ? asked grandmother. It is I, answered the wolf,
in a soft voice, Little Red Riding Hood; I have brought
you nice fresh cakes and butter."
Pull the bobbin, and the latch will lift up," called 'out
the old grandmother.
And the wolf pulled the bobbin, and lifted the latch, and
entered the cottage. Then he ate up the poor old grand-
mother, and when he had quite eaten her up, he put on her
night-gown, and pulled her frilled night-cap right over his
ugly rough head, and got into bed. "The old lady was



















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II














LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD OPENED THE DOOR.








A TREASURY OF STORIES, JINGLES AND RHYMES.

tough," he said, "but the little girl will be a delicate
morsel."
But Little Red Riding Hood lingered on in the wood.
It was so bright and fresh there. Everything was happy
and full of life. She chased the dainty butterflies for
very glee, and then she gathered a posy of primroses and
violets for the old grandmother, who could not get out and
see the spring flowers grow. At last, tired with her play,,
she set off to reach her grandmother's cottage.
She knocked at the door, and the wolf, softening his
voice as much as possible, called out: Pull the bobbin and
the latch will lift up." Little Red Riding Hood opened
the door and walked in.
Put the basket on the table, and come into bed with
me," said the wolf, for I feel cold." Little Red Riding
Hood thought that her grandmother's voice was very hoarse,
but then she remembered that this might be on account of her
bad cold, and being an obedient little girl, she got into bed.
But when she saw the hairy arms she began to grow
frightened. "What long arms you have, grandmother."
"The better to hug you with, my dear!"
Then she saw the long ears sticking up outside the night-
cap. What great ears you have, grandmother."
The better to hear you with, my dear "
"What large eyes you have, grandmother."
The better to see you with, my dear "
But what great teeth you have, grandmother." "The
better to eat you with, my dear!" And so saying, the








LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


wicked wolf fell upon poor Little Red Riding Hood and
ate her all up.
That evening, as the wood-cutters were coming home
from their work, they saw Little Red Riding Hood pulling
flowers in the wood. They called her, but she took no
notice, and walked on through the wood till she came to
the grandmother's cottage. Here she vanished, and the
woodcutters, bursting open the door, found the wolf lying
there asleep, and slew him with their axes.
Oftentimes in the woods you will see Little Red Riding
Hood walking along with the basket on her arm, and her
posy of wild flowers in her hand, sweet and happy, as she
was in life.


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I.
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"THE BETTER TO EAT YOU \WiH, MY DEAR!"


r;
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THE BABES IN THE WOOD.

O NCE upon a time a rich gentleman and his wife lived
happily with their two little children, a boy and a
girl, until a sad time came, when both the father and the
mother died.
The father had a brother, to whom he gave the care of
his beloved children.
After they became orphans, the two little children went
to live with this uncle, who was a bad man at heart,
although he was thought to be kind and good.
Their father had left to these children a large sum of
money, which was to be divided between them; but, in
case of their death, their uncle was to have it.
One day this wicked uncle sent for two robbers, and bar-
gained with them to take the children away, and kill them,
so that he might secure their fortune.
So the two robbers carried them off to the woods; but
on the way the children prattled. so innocently that one of
the robbers took pity on them, and tried to persuade the
other to allow the children to live. The other robber re-
fused, and the two fought over the matter until one of
them was killed.
The other robber then took the babes by the hand, and
told them to wait for him, and he would' go away, and
come back, bringing them food; but the poor little brother
and sister wandered up and down, and the robber never
came back.
Finally, with their arms about one another, they fell
asleep, never to wake again; and the birds came and sang
over them, and covered them with leaves.
After years had passed away, the wicked uncle met with
many misfortunes, and finally was sent to prison, and died
there.




















V


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:frr -

.-C



'-I,


THE BIRDS CAME AND SANG OVER THEM, AND COVERED
THEM WITH LEAVES.


a^s














TOM THUMB.




ALONG time ago a ploughman wished for a child, even
if it was no bigger than his thumb. So one day
when he went home he found his wife nursing a wee baby,
that grew to the size of his thumb and then never grew
any more. One day while his mother was making a plum-
pudding, Tom fell into the bowl, and his mother stirred him
up and put him in the pot. The hot water made him kick,
and his mother took out the pudding and gave it to a pass-
ing tinker. Tom cried out Hello !" when the tinker
sneezed, which so scared him that he threw the pudding
into a field and it tumbled to pieces. Tom crept out and
went home to his mother, who was glad to see him, though
he was all over a crust of dough and plums. One day he
was nearly drowned in the milk-jug; another time he was
lost in the salt-box; and when he went with his mother into
the fields to milk the cows, she tied him to a thistle with a
piece of thread, for fear he should be blown away by the
wind. Soon after, a cow ate up the thistle and swallowed









TOM THUMB.


Tom; but Tom scratched and kicked so she was glad to
throw him out of her mouth again. Once
as he was ploughing with his father, a great '(
eagle swooped down, caught him in its beak,
and carried him off to a giant's castle.
The giant would have eaten him up, but
Tom bit his tongue, and held on by his -
teeth till the giant in a rage took him )A '
out of his mouth and
threw him into the
sea, where a large fish :-. ,
swallowed him im-
mediately. The fish i
was caught and made ---. i
a present to King '
Arthur, and when <
the cook opened it, ;
there was Tom
Thumb inside. He HIS MOTHER WAS GLAD TO SEE HIM.
was carried to the king and became a great favorite and a
Knight of the Round Table.




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