• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 The happiest three
 A Christmas gift
 "Begaddles"
 Teddy's kitty
 "See my Christmas present!" - Mamma's...
 Our Carlo
 What the firefly told them
 Baby's kitty - A tangled tale
 Naughty babykin
 Marjory's nest
 The Christmas mittens
 The boasting kitten
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 How the baby hid - Lost
 Great fun
 Baby's bedtime
 How she left the bath
 Five years old
 What the wind told them
 The kind little girl
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 The cat's lament
 Bye-low song for Johnny
 Where Flossy's doll was
 The pony's flower-blanket - Polly's...
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 In the day night-dress
 What the bee told them
 The pot of Easter flowers
 Two little new suits
 The big brass band
 What the oak-tree told them
 The little polar bear
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 The doll-mother
 Three cats
 The roguish rabbit
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 William McElroy's story
 A boy in a bundle
 What aunty let brought Gillis
 Baby's story
 Breakfast time
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 Baby's caller
 The cut finger
 The belle of the Sunday school
 A rhyme for baby's fingers
 A queer little plaything
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 Baby bee
 What scared kitty
 What the rose told them
 How she corrected Sister Heste...
 In miceland
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 Moll and her cat
 Baby's dessert
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 Pussy White's answer - Little...
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 What the moon told them
 The sweetest baby
 On the big steamboat
 Baby elephant's holiday
 What the shell told them
 At the seashore
 How they sleep
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 What the rain told them
 She teaches papa a lesson
 Three boys
 Polly Pry and Toddlekins
 What the blackberry-vine told...
 The morning-glory ring
 December days - A shipwreck
 Neighbor babies
 What the sparrow told them
 If I was the baby
 How she made pies
 An "unreasonable" baby
 What the spider told them
 Getting ready for Christmas
 Baby-tenders
 What the snowflake told them
 Mary Ridgely White
 The twins
 The kits that went a maying
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Santa Claus' surprise : a Christmas gift for the little folks.
Title: Santa Claus' surprise
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082549/00001
 Material Information
Title: Santa Claus' surprise a Christmas gift for the little folks
Physical Description: 1 v (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Closson ( Engraver )
Barnes, C ( Engraver )
Tucker, S. S ( Engraver )
Barnes, Hiram P ( Hiram Putnam ) ( Engraver )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors; some illustrations engraved by Closson, C. Barnes, Hiram Putnam Barnes and S. S. Tucker.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements on endpapers.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082549
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224621
notis - ALG4887
oclc - 214285121

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    The happiest three
        Page 1
    A Christmas gift
        Page 2
        Page 3
    "Begaddles"
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Teddy's kitty
        Page 6
        Page 7
    "See my Christmas present!" - Mamma's arithmetic
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Our Carlo
        Page 10
        Page 11
    What the firefly told them
        Page 12
    Baby's kitty - A tangled tale
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Naughty babykin
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Marjory's nest
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The Christmas mittens
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The boasting kitten
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 24
        Page 25
    How the baby hid - Lost
        Page 26
    Great fun
        Page 27
    Baby's bedtime
        Page 28
        Page 29
    How she left the bath
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Five years old
        Page 32
        Page 33
    What the wind told them
        Page 34
        Page 35
    The kind little girl
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The cat's lament
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Bye-low song for Johnny
        Page 42
        Page 43
    Where Flossy's doll was
        Page 44
    The pony's flower-blanket - Polly's dolly
        Page 45
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 46
        Page 47
    In the day night-dress
        Page 48
        Page 49
    What the bee told them
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The pot of Easter flowers
        Page 52
        Page 53
    Two little new suits
        Page 54
    The big brass band
        Page 55
    What the oak-tree told them
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The little polar bear
        Page 58
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 59
    The doll-mother
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Three cats
        Page 62
        Page 63
    The roguish rabbit
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 67
    William McElroy's story
        Page 68
        Page 69
    A boy in a bundle
        Page 70
        Page 71
    What aunty let brought Gillis
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Baby's story
        Page 74
    Breakfast time
        Page 75
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Baby's caller
        Page 78
    The cut finger
        Page 79
    The belle of the Sunday school
        Page 80
        Page 81
    A rhyme for baby's fingers
        Page 82
    A queer little plaything
        Page 83
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 84
        Page 85
    Baby bee
        Page 86
    What scared kitty
        Page 87
    What the rose told them
        Page 88
        Page 89
    How she corrected Sister Hester
        Page 90
    In miceland
        Page 91
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 92
        Page 93
    Moll and her cat
        Page 94
    Baby's dessert
        Page 95
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
    Pussy White's answer - Little Rob
        Page 99
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 100
        Page 101
    What the moon told them
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The sweetest baby
        Page 104
        Page 105
    On the big steamboat
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Baby elephant's holiday
        Page 108
        Page 109
    What the shell told them
        Page 110
        Page 111
    At the seashore
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    How they sleep
        Page 115
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 116
        Page 117
    What the rain told them
        Page 118
        Page 119
    She teaches papa a lesson
        Page 120
        Page 121
    Three boys
        Page 122
        Page 123
    Polly Pry and Toddlekins
        Page 124
        Page 125
    What the blackberry-vine told them
        Page 126
        Page 127
    The morning-glory ring
        Page 128
        Page 129
    December days - A shipwreck
        Page 130
        Page 131
    Neighbor babies
        Page 132
        Page 133
    What the sparrow told them
        Page 134
        Page 135
    If I was the baby
        Page 136
        Page 137
    How she made pies
        Page 138
        Page 139
    An "unreasonable" baby
        Page 140
        Page 141
    What the spider told them
        Page 142
        Page 143
    Getting ready for Christmas
        Page 144
        Page 145
    Baby-tenders
        Page 146
        Page 147
    What the snowflake told them
        Page 148
        Page 149
    Mary Ridgely White
        Page 150
        Page 151
    The twins
        Page 152
        Page 153
    The kits that went a maying
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
    Advertising
        Page 157
        Page 158
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text


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-: FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS MIDWAY..

Bv MNARGARET SIDNEY. 1rnmo, $1.50.
When the first "Peppers" book appeared, it was
such a revelation of the happiness growing out of pure,
sweet, unselfish family love; even in the midst of trying
... and discouraging surroundings, that not only the children
for whom it was primarily intended, but all the elders i
w 'ho read the book to or with them, were charmed and
.'. enthused. It was simply the magnetism of a bright, '"
natural, true-to-life story, never at any time idealized .
beyond the possibilities of actual happenings, and yet .
having the genuine inspiration which comes of looking ''.
4- above and beyond the poor, dead level of every-day care I
"" and fret. The simple story did its work; the interest
in it spread like wild-fire, and all over the country families
were reading this charming record of home life and love
in the midst of poverty and privations. There could
have been few who did not rejoice in the improved for-
"' tunes of the little Peppers at the end of the book, and
ong-to know more of their history. In fact, the author
was besieged with letters, begging for "more, more."
And so, at last;she wrote the sequel which chronicles the
doings of this jolly family after they went to live with old
S. r. King, their friend and patron, in his big city mansion.
-,' "Five Little Peppers Alidway" tells the story of ---
their life in the interval between childhood and the
S.- young manhood and maidenhood of the older children,
and a royally good story it is. The same loving little Peppers- Polly, Ben,
." -Davie, Joel, and the universal pet, Phronsie -all reappear in the new story,
v not a bit.spoiled by the prosperity that has come to them and their wise and
S tenderly loved lalamsie." They live in luxury now with the Whitneys and
". Kings, among whom are as many more wide-awake children. The story is'
S replete with ,aieties, among which are parlor theatricals, in which pet Phronsie
S.covers her i iorv as the beautiful princess who is carried off by terrible
S.'" dragons (tl Dovs). There are some exciting but less agreeable happenings,.,:
S too, as when Dicl' breaks his leg. Phronsie gets lost, a real burglar is secured
by Dick's heroism, and a sham burglary results disastrously to Joel.
q.s So the bright side of life has its needed contrast; while beautiful lessons in
kindness, heroism and unselfish thought for others are skillfully woven into...
"... the story, and the children are made better as well as happier by the reading. '
^ -,^1 i A perfect Cheeryble of a book ; to read it is like inhaling oxygen." Bout": -ea''. d.
* ,. Margaret Sidney stands side by side with Louisa Alcott in fresh, unstiltcd style, in refined sensibility and.in
.'*; ?pure and wholesome depiction of home life among children."--/.'rna.' ofEjacati, .
,' ... Every page of the book is full of sunshine."- Der..t Free Freas. -'.
r. "Little Phronsie will become one of the best loved characters of ch s fiction."- BJatn journal.
l'f: For sale at the bookstores, or sent postpaid, on receipt of price, by
SD..LOTHROP COMPANY, Publishers, Boston, Mass. :

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FIVE LITTLE PEPPERS GROWN"UP.
By MARG-ARET SIDNEY. 12mo, $1.50.
,1 Five Little Peppers and How
They Grew" and Five Little Pep-
pers Midway" had gone forth to
delight all children and those who
i love children. But these did not
satisfy the vast audience that hang
waiting on Margaret Sidney's writ-
Il ten words. "And then what?"
What happened next ? they cried.
B And so the third Peppers book
was written, and now we have Five
Little Peppers Grown Up." It is
almost a pity that they must grow
up, but that is what children do in
real life, and this story can but fol-
~" ow. Even Phronsie is getting to
/ be a big girl now, though not losing
S'' her childlike innocence and; trust.
She is the same generous, thought-
ful child as at first, winsome and
-- lovable beyond most of the children
of fiction, yet not mere goody-good
or mawkishly sentimental. Her nose
is a little "out of joint," for there is a new baby now to be catered to, a little
King-Fisher, who is nearly spoiledwith pettings. But Phronsie is not spoled,r -
nor Polly either, though everybody conspires to do it. But the mother's teach-
ing and their own good sense keep them simple and true. Polly bravely starts
out as music-teacher, and not only succeeds in the technique of her work, but
also in stimulating her young pupils to larger and nobler efforts. Of course
she has hosts of admirers, and it is a matter of intense interest which one of
her eager lovers the little maiden will accept.
Ben and Jasper begin their business careers, and Joel and Dave are college
students with the usual experiences of young collegians. There are some
graphic descriptions of the book publishing business in which Jasper engages.
Various new characters are introduced, and the story winds in and out among
them all with that bright sparkle of animated life which marks all of Margaret'
Sidney's stories. .
Throughout the book, there is a realization not only of physical growth, '-
but of the growth of noble character. 'And yet there is no preaching, save
what comes indirectly by example; and the young people are bright and
rollicking, healthy and hearty, and enjoy life without stint. It is books like
these which inspire and encourage young people to be brave and true, manly
and womanly in all the relations of 'life.
For sale at the bookstores, or sent postpaid, on receipt of price, by
D. LOTHROP COMPANY, Publishers, Boston, Mass.






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SANTA CLAUS' SURPRISE


A CHRISTMAS GIFT FOR


THE


LITTLE


FOLKS


BOSTON
SD. LOTHROP COMPANY
PUBLISHERS

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COPYRIGHT, 1893,
BY
D. LOTHROP COMPANY.















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THE HAPPIEST THREE.


The Tarbell
THE BROWNS.
children's father
and mother were away, and
some one was sick, and they
could not reach home until the
day after Christmas, and so
the little Tarbells would have
no Christmas gifts Christmas
morning !
Mr. Brown, the man who.
had taken the telegram to the
Tarbells, spoke of it at home.
0 0! O now they can't

/ ,,>


have their Christmas presents!
O! O! O!" the little Browns
said at once, and they spoke
about it more than ten times
that evening. "It will be so
hard for Baby Tarbell !"
they said.
S"I'll tell you what!"
S said Dot Brown suddenly,
very joyfully. And she
did tell them what. And
they said they would do it.
Well, it came to pass that on
Christmas morning the three
little Tarbells did have Christ-
mas gifts; but there were three
other children even happier
than the little Tarbells and
these three very, very, very
happy children were the three
little Browns as they scam-
pered back home in the frosty
Christmas dawn.





A CHRISTMAS GIFT.


A CHRISTMAS GIFT.

Come, Katie, quick! Oh! come and see
Another gift for you and me;
Nurse says it came this morning, too.
Unwrap it, Nurse, let's see it, do;
Don't make us wait -Oh! what's the use
Of all that flannel-cut it loose,
So we can see it. Will it break?
Oh! I can guess-'tis a big cake;
And half is mine, remember, Kate.
0, hurry, Nurse! don't make us wait;
No, 'tisn't cake; what can it be ?
A doll 0, my! and not for me.
Look, Kate! a great deal bigger size
Than one you've got. 0,. look! its eyes
Can open. Oh look there, look there!
It moves its hands, I do declare.
What is it, Nurse? don't make us tease -
Do tell us all about it, please;
O, Kate! I know- a bran-new sister,
And I'm the very first that kissed her.




/,






















































































A GERMAN HOME.-- THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS.




"BEGADDLES."


BEGADDLES."
(Stories About Sweelheart.)

Sweetheart was always doing Begaddles !" said Sweet-
and saying funny things. heart, smacking her. lips and
One day when Sweetheart looking very wise at mamma.
was just beginning to talk, That was her way of saying
papa had put her into her little "molasses."
high-chair at the dinner-table; Mamma laughed and took
and she said very softly and her little daughters to the sink
smilingly as if she were think- and washed them.
ing of something pleasant: Then she went to hunt up
Begaddles." a new stopper for the molasses
She said it two or three jug; and the new cork was a
times, and neither papa nor very tight stop-
mamma could think what she per indeed, and
meant.
But mamma found out the
next day.
She opened the pan- [-
try door, and there sat
Sweetheart and sister ^-
Hester, one each side of "BEGADDLES SAID SWEETHEART.
the molasses jug, taking turns so Sweetheart got no more
at sucking the stopper! begaddles."



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"A MERRY CHRISTMAS TO YOU ALL!"






TEDDY'S KITTY.


TEDDY'S


KITTY.


Kitty likes


mouse
As well as any cat;
She runs and scampers through
the house,
To catch a naughty rat.

She likes the darkness and the
night,
Much better than the day;
And when our Teddy wants a
light,
His Kitty runs away.


Her breakfast is of milk, and
Ted


KT- -_ -TrA E-.
, '* --


KITTY TAKES A NAP.


Says: Kitty,


eat lap !


lap!
Then in your pretty cradle-bed


You'd better take


a nap.


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Our Teddy's


TEDDY'S


KITTY.


















































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CIHRISTMAS MORNING.


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"SEE MY CHRISTMAS PRESENT! "- MAMMA'S ARITHMETIC.


"SEE MY CHRISTMAS PRESENT "


MAMMA'S ARITHMETIC.

2 big eyes, soft and blue,
I sweet mouth with kiss for you,
2 small feet that trot all day,
I queer tongue with much to say,
2 white hands, plump and fair,
I bright head of golden hair,
I small nose, a wee bit pug-
Make one dear girl just right to hug.























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OUR CARLO.


OUR CARLO.

Our Carlo is such a cute little dog-
I wish you could see how he begs!
He sits up as straight as a sol-
dier-boy
On his two little black hind
legs,
\ IW,' ith a bow-wow-wow!

; i He waves his fore-paws around
S' in the air
,aK That's zis way, you know,
to say "please "-
"i And if I don't give him the
'cake right off,
i..'." W hy,'he'll just sit there and
tease,
CARLO SAYS PLEASE." With a bow-wow-wow!

But Carlo's a very polite little dog,
In spite of all of his pranks,
For whenever I feed him, he never forgets
To wag his wee tail for "thanks!"
With a bow-wow-wow!
























































































A CHRISTMAS GIFT.






WHAT THE FIREFLY TOLD THEM.


THE FIREFLY TOLD THEM.
(The Tiptoe Twins.)


ON THE WAY TO STORYLAND.
ON THE WAY TO STORYLAND.


"You'd better go to Story-
land," said Nurse, when the
Tiptoe Twins begged for more
stories.
What is Storyland ?" asked
Tiny, the girl-twin.
Why, the land where every
one tells stories," said Tony,
the boy-twin.
Can we go?" said Tiny.
" Do you know where it is?"
"Of course we can. I've


been there with papa. Come!"
said Tony.


Tony did know the way; and
the very first person they met
was a Firefly, bright as a spark,
and. he stopped them with a
story to tell.
What do you think! said
he. I have seen a funny
thing to-day. The Golden
Robin caught a Firefly friend
of mine, and flew off with him,
and set him in the bottom of
her deep, dark nest, so that the
Baby Robins might have a light
to go to bed
by! What
do you think
of that ?" ,
And away '
the laughing
Firefly flew LIGHTING THE NEST.
Firefly flew ^^ s"
to tell the funny story to some-
body else.


WHAT


It





BABY'S KITTY.-A TANGLED TALE.


BABY'S 'KITTY.

This is my kitty, and don't you think
She's all over furry and black as ink!
When I want her I only just mew!
^..-.i S And she comes as quickly as you
'could do.

I try to teach Kitty not to scratch,
And hope she soon will the bad mice catch;
Then mamma can set her cake and cheese,
Where I can reach it when I please!









A TANGLED TALE.


Kinky Winky and Tiny
I Tangle,
Naughty Knotty ,and Snarle-
yow,


Made them a nest in the baby's
tresses;
Nobody knows just when or
how.





A TANGLED TALE.
"Please come out," coaxed Then Kinky and Tiny camn
gentle Brushkin, out in a tremble, '
But not bold Knotiy an,
Snarleyow.

/ -: W'~A pounce and a pull and a tu,
B' and a tussle,
That brought a frown to th
'baby's brow.
Enough! enough!" crie
Knotty, "we're going! "
We'll come back to-morrow
BABY'S HAIR IS TANGLE. called Snarleyow.

"Tangles, here, we never
allow."
"This is our nest," cried
Naughty Knotty,
",We shall stay here always,"
said Snarleyow.

Though I'velost some teeth,"
muttered grim old Comb-
kin,
I'm able to deal with such
rascals now. BABY HAS HER TRESSES COMBED.
































































































WINTER BIRDS.


A, '





NAUGHTY BABYKIN.


NAUGHTY BABYKIN.


Go to sleep! Go to sleep! Babykin, go!
Shut up your eyes, and then mother can sew;
Father will find, when he comes from the town,
Babykin wearing a pretty new gown.
Go to sleep! Go to sleep !
Babykin, go!
Now you are ready to frolic and crow-
Just when I'm busy it always is so!
Go to sleep! Go to sleep!
Naughty Babykin, go!


Go to sleep! Go to sleep! Babykin, go!
Shut up your eyes, or I never can sew!
Never all ready for supper can make
White loaf or brown loaf, or bonny plum cake.
Go to sleep! Go to sleep!
Babykin, go!
Father will find, when he comes from the town,
Nothing to eat, and no baby's new gown ;
Then when we want you to twitter and crow,
You will be nodding-it always is so!
Go to sleep! Go to sleep!
Naughty Babykin, go!
















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GO TO SLEEP! GO TO SLEEP! BABYKIN, GO!


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MARJORY'S NEST.


MARJORY'S NEST.


Marjory called it her nest
because she had watched the
birds build it. One day
mamma took Marjory in her
arms, and let her peep between
the vines. Yes, there was the


another peep. This time there
were no blue eggs, but four little
birds, "without any clothes on,"
Marjory said; for they had not
a single feather, and such great
eyes, and such funny wide


THE FIRST TIME MARJORY LOOKED THE NEST WAS EMPTY.


nest, and oh! so smooth and
soft inside, quite empty.
After a few days Marjory
took another peep. But be-
hold! four blue eggs lay in it.
By and by Marjory took


mouths, which they all opened
with a "Peep, peep," when they
heard the vine rustle, that Mar-
jory laughed out loud, and
danced up and down in mam-
ma's arms with delight.
















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A LUNCHEON AT THE BARN.






THE CHRISTMAS MITTENS.


KNITTING FOR THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


THE CHRISTMAS MITTENS.


You remember the tale
Of the Three Little Kittens
That were careless at- play
And came in with no mittens ?

It was early in winter,
And the Three Little Kittens
Wondered what they should do
In the snow with no-mittens.

So they sat by the fire,
All-the Three Little Kittens,
And they dozed and they slept
And forgot they'd no mittens.

Then their grandmother said,
"See our Three Little Kittens!


They are stupid, they're dull,
All because of no mittens!

" Now as Christmas is coniin,.
For our Three Little Kittens
I suggest that we knit
Some delightful new mittens:!

So the aunts and the grandmli
Of the Three Little Kittens,.
O, they knit day and night
On the dear little mittens.

And I certainly hope
That these Three Little Kitter
Will take care not to lose
The pretty new mittens.


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A HEAVY LOAD.






THE BOASTING KITTEN.


AND ONE AND ALL CAME .CLOSE TO SEE THE SHOW.


THE BOASTING KITTEN.


This tale is of a boasting little kit
Who thought herself a cat of wondrous wit-
I'll tell you how she learned she'd not a bit!


One day, downstairs, she found a house of wire;
"Now this," said she, is something to admire !
I'll step right in, and, if I like, I'll hire."






THE BOASTING KITTEN.

So in she stepped, this cat of great dispatch,
When, snzi! snap! down went the door and latch -
It was a trap, youi know, and made to catch!

A trap for rats, this little house so nice-
O what a joke on her! and in a trice
The joke was known to all the cellar mice.

"The cat is in the trap! she's caught! oh, ho!"
And one and all came close to see the show;
"She can't," they said, "get out at us, you know!"

There in the trap a day and night staid she;
And when the coal-man set her free, said he,
"O, what an idiot this cat must be! "

Poor kit no more made boasts of catching rats,
And modest were her purs and pit-i-pats
Forever after when with other cats.







POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-II.

OLLY Pry likes there was the Boofer K
T oddle kins fast asleep on his own cus
pretty well, but "Perhaps it is a stray
likes best the said mamma. Look ag;
Boofer Kitten. So Toddlekins went
She plays jokes and looked and she found
on them both. Pry in a corner behind a"
"Kitty, kitty!"
Polly Pry calls from h6r perch.
In runs the Boofer Kitten.
She thinks Toddlekins wants ..
her. Then Polly Pry laughs. .".
"Hooray, Polly! Pret-ty
Polly. O-look at Polly!" i. ,, .
One day Toddlekins heard -
a sad mewing in the parlor.
"Boofer Kitten must be shut ,' .
up in there," she said, and went -.-*
to let her out. ,jut Boofer
Kitten was nowhere to be seen.


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"A Miaow.
the cry of
kins looked
Then she


/!


inuaow! "


came


distress. Toddle-
around in surprise.
ran upstairs and


"POLLY, WAS IT YOU ?,


"Polly," she said very
ly, "was it you? "
"Miaow, miaow!" said


grave.

Polly
































































"GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREAD I"





HOW THE BABY HID.--LOST.


" YOU CAN'T FIND ME "THERE YOU ARE "


HOW THE


BABY


HID.


"Shut both your eyes-you know you must not see!i
Now you may look. Ready! You can't find me!"
Good folk, where do you. think this darling Baby hidff
She raised her little parasol-that's all she did !

ii
LOST.
EDN ES DAY last while, but when she went tu|
week just at dinner call him he could not be foundl-


time little Hollis
was missing.
Nurse had dressed
him and sent him to


Mamma's room to stay a little


Mamma had not seen him.
Susan and Robbie ran all
over the house calling, Hollisi
Hollis! where are you, Hollis?"
Every one was alarmed, for


r


I[


HOLLIS.





GREAT FUN.


he was such a little fellow they
feared some harm had come to
him. Nurse thought perhaps
he had slipped out of the front
door and run away.
Mammawent to the closet for
her bonnet, but when she opened
the door a little voice piped
up: Here I am, Mamma."


Why, Hollis, what are you
doing here ?" said Mamma.
"Hiding," said Hollis, his
blue eyes dancing with mis-
chief and clapping his little
hands. "A joke, Mamma!"
Mamma kissed her little boy,
but she told him he must never
play that joke again.


GREAT FUN.

Four little girls
All out together!
In boots and cloaks
They don't care whether gs
It blows or snows,
Or what's the weather !


Just one small sled
For four a-sliding!
But they take turns
And each goes riding--
They tuck her in,
They set her gliding,


With many a push
They gaily waft her,
Till off she goes!
Then all run after,
To draw her back
With shouts of laughter.





BABY'S BEDTIME.


BABY'S BEDTIME.

Vl' Slippetty slip,
,' 'Down goes her head;
10 .. Flippetty flop,
Cover her up;
Peppetty pop,
Eyelids now shut;

Dear little girl,
Now she lies there
S-Smooth out a curl,
S' Murmur a prayer;
-. *- -. M ake it all dark,
NOW ONE SWEET KISS." Put out the light,
Hippetty skip, Now one sweet kiss-
Right into bed; Baby, good-night!



"Good luck! an umbrella! ''
It may rain," he said,
And under a mushroom
The toad hid his head. ,i






















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"KING SOLOMON AND THE QUEEN OF SHEBA."
(From the picture by Sir Arthur Clay, Bart., exhibited at the Royal Academy.)


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HOW SHE LEFT THE BATH.


HOW SHE LEFT THE BATH.
(Stories. A bout Swee/teart.)


When Sweetheart took her
bath she loved to stand up and
jump and splash about in the
tub. One night, after a long
frolic, mamma told her she
wanted to take her little
daughter out.
But Sweetheart would not







-



listen, and by ahd by what do
you think happened ?
The tub was slippery, and
as Sweetheart was prancing
about her little feet flew right


up in the air, and out she weni
upon the floor! Oh, how as
tonished she was! She thought
mamma had taken her out
"Want to get out myself!'
she said, beginning to cry.
-" Well, you did get out
yourself," said mamma smiling
Then she put a clean little
shirt and a clean little night
dress on Sweetheart and sat
down in the by-low chair with
her. '" Tell a 'tory," said
Sweetheart. Suppose you
tell me one," said mamma.
Sweetheart thought for
minute: "Well, little Tibbie sh
yun away, an' her mudder c'y!
"Oh, how very sad!" sai(
mamma. Then she sang
little song, and Sweetheart wa!
fast asleep in two minutes.





















































































THE LITTLE HOUSEKEEPER.






FIVE YEARS OLD.


FIVE YEARS OLD.

Hurrah! I'm five years old to-day,
But brother John is only three;
I can count ten, and I can say
The big and little A, B, C;
But Johnnie cannot read like me.
There is not much that he can do:
He's 'fraid of my toboggan slide;
My sled is awful nice and new,
I put him on to take a ride -
Oh! how he screamed and how he cried,
Though I was at his side!


"ME! I have a nice new sailor suit,
And wear shirts stiff as they can be; /
1 take my toy gun out and shoot
Quite to the top of a tall tree;
But Johnnie he can't shoot like me.
He's just a baby-that is all;
He cannot build with blocks, you see, /
Nor ride a horse, nor play at ball-
But then, you know, he's only three,
And can't of course do things like me, -
For I am five, you see! "JOHNNIE!"
























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TRYING TO BE A MAN.


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WHAT THE WIND TOLD THEM.


WHAT THE WIND TOLD THEM.
(The Tiptoe Twins.)

UFF! puff!" said the Wind, as he ble,
in at the door with a slam and a bang
The Tiptoe Twins clapped their hands
over their curls to keep them from blowing away,
S Oh! cried the Wind,
such a joke! I was blow- <
ing over the Common in a
great hurry, when I saw a
cross little boy in black vel-
vet at play with a big kite.
And I caught the kite out of his ,;:
hands, and blew it away to a green #.". ;
hill where a sweet little boy in
patched trousers sat, singing to himself. And I dropped
it down, very softly, on the grass beside him, and he laughed
and spatted his hands and cried
out that the kite must have come
down from heav- en. Wasn't that
a joke?" cried the Wind. "Puff
puff! I think I will go on ad
see if I can find :. '"another cross little
bov's kite; if I do ir -. I'll blow it away!

















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TELLING A SECRET TO BABY.


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THE KIND LITTLE GIRL.


COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO AND CUT-CUT-DAH-CUT.


THE KIND LITTLE GIRL.

A dear little girl was out walking one day;
With a song and a laugh she went on her way,
And a hop and a skip, as little girls may,

When a turkey all feathers stepped out of a shed,
His eye it was bright, and his comb it was red;
With a gobble-a-gobble he stopped her and said:

"Though a little girl dances and giggles and sings,
I hear everywhere she is fond of such things
As gizzards and hearts and wishbones and wings,

And expects to have 'turkey'-or so they all say-
For her dinner on Christmas and Thanksgiving Day
And I'd like to inquire if it's so, if I may!"






THE KIND LITTLE GIRL.

The little girl blushed; then she laughed as she said,
"It's summer, dear turkey! put this out of your head!
In summer I live on berries and bread !"


The turkey looked sharp at the dear little lass,
But her smile was so kind he allowed her to pass,
And he said to himself as he nibbled the grass,


"ARE YOU THE LITTLE GIRL WHO IS SO 'FOND OF WISHBONES?


"The summer is long! So I'll try to be gay!
That nice little girl was a comfort to-day,

And I hope that she oft may be going my way!"


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POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-IV.

SFRIEND of her yellow curls. "0, no!
Toddlekins don't cut them off!" she cried.
c came yesterday "Go home! Get youi nair
tospend the day cut!" said the voice agair. and
S with her. Tod- Lucy went! Out of the door
4 dlekins was be- and up the street and home,
ing dressed in she flew. Naughty Polly never
the nursery, so
Lucy sat down
in the parlor to wait. She
was a pretty little girl, with .
long fair hair, but not very *'*
brave, as you will see. It was __
a warm day, and she sat very '
still in the cool, dim parlor. ', 1 ',
Suddenly. a voice spoke from ---
the corner. .
"Tut, tut! Get along! Go <
nome!" it said. Lucy jumped
with fright.
"Tut, tut, tut!" said the FRIGHTENED LUCY.
voice. "Get your hair cut? told that it was she who sat
Get your hair cut!" in a dark corner, and scared
Lucy put both hands-up to poor Lucy away!

























































I I


CARRYING OFF THE KITTY.





THE CAT'S LAMENT.


THE CAT'S LAMENT.

Our old cat
On the rug she sat,
And said, "Mew! Mew!
I have something to say to you.

S'"I have.not one kitty-
"HER M' Now, do you not pity
"HEAR ME!"


A poor old mother-
That somehow or other
Has lost as many as four
And hasn't one left to purr
any more ?

" One was gray;
She purred all day,
Was soft as silk,
And as fond of milk
As you or I -
No! She didn't die -


I saw her put in a basket;
My leave, they didn't ask it.
Mew! Mew! Mew!

" One was black;
But on her back
Was a little spot
Of white, with a dot
Of gray in the middle -
0, she was hi-diddle-diddle!
A little dear, the first to scratch
No, she had not her match


" For rolling and tumbling. But, one sad day,
She was nailed in a box and carried away
By a girl who giggled and said, 'How sweet!'
I shall nevermore see her little black feet!







THE CAT S LAMENT.


"One was yellow;
A bright little fellow,
Maltese on his nose
And white on his toes;
His ears pricked up,
And his tail curled round,
And he never mistook
The milk-pail's sound.
How he mewed
As they bore him off! my pet,
My golden one!
Is he mewing somewhere yet ?


" One was left
To me bereft-
My grand maltese!
He was my joy, my pride,
He had never a spot
On either side!
He was so bright, so quick,
He was so sweet to lick.
His claws were as sharp
As my lady's pin
When he was inclined
To stick them in!


He had the keenest ears for a mouse -
He'd have been a blessing in the house!
Those ears were so pink on the inner side,
And his voice like his mother's when he cried!
Ah! A bad little lady stole him away
And I haven't a kit to play with to-day!
I sit alone! a lonely, lonely cat!
I care not for bird, or mouse, or rat!
"Mew mew! Mew! Mew !i
Mew- mew I mew to you.
Don't-say it is
Nothing at all to you!
It ought to be!
Just bring my kittens back to me!" MEW TO YOU.






BYE-LOW SONG FOR JOHNNY.


BYE-LOW SONG FOR JOHNNY.


What does Bow-wow Doggy
say
To Johnny, to Johnny?
"Come and play with me to-day,
My little baby bonny!
We'll frolic, jump, and bark,
From daylight until dark;
We'll chase the cats and rats,
And will not that be funny?"

What does Pussy Mew-cat say
To Johnny, to Johnny?
"Come out in the barn to play,
My little baby bonny!
We'll catch the fattest mice,
And eat them in a trice;
We'll frisk amid the hay,
So warm, so bright, so sunny."

What does Buzzy Hum-bee say
To Johnny, to Johnny?
" Come and fly with me away,
My little baby bonny!


We'll
We'll
Then
We'll


fill our little sacks,
make some pretty wax;
in the rose that glows,
dine on dew and honey."


What does happy Mamma say
To Johnny, to Johnny?
"He has not slept a wink
to-day,
The little baby bonny!
Now safe on Mamma's lap,
He'll take a quiet nap,
A-rocking slow, while low
I sing ey, nonny, nonny '"

(Song.)
Hey, znony, nonny, oh!
My johnny, johnny, oh!
So bonny, bonny, oh!
O softly here we go,
A-rocking to and fro,
Hey, nonnyy, nonny, oh!

















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WHERE FLOSSY S DOLLY WAS.


WHERE FLOSSY'S DOLL WAS.


she remembered something,
and she went down into the or-
chard, where she and Dolly
had played picnic yesterday.
A robin who met her looked


very wise. O, Robin, do
you know my Dolly is runned
away?" she asked. So Robin
led the way to the pound.
pippin tree; and there, on one
of the branches, sat the lost
dolly.
I am de-gusted, Dolly!"
said Flossy. "I put you up
there and then forgot you!
I'll have to buy a new thinker
for myself! I am de-gusted !"
The robin hurried home to
tell his wife and babies all
about the forgetful little girl.
mamma,
The little girl-mamma took
her child down from among
the wet apple-tree leaves, and
went with her up to the house,
and put her in the oven to dry,
and there she forgot her again!
I will not tell you how dolly
looked when cook took her out.


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THE PONY'S FLOWER-BLANKET. -POLLY'S DOLLY.


THE PONY'S FLOWER-BLANKET.

'Baby," the pony, belongs
a little princess over the sea,
ose name is Wilhelmina.
metimes the Queen-mamma
kes a flower-blanket for
)aby;" it is'silk net stuck all
er with flowers and grasses.
ice when Baby wore a flower-
.nket there was a picture
de of her, and here it is.


POLLY'S


DOLLY.


What a tale' have I to tell!
Once I was a poor dumb-bell,
Now I am a darling dolly!
On the closet shelf I laid,
In the dark I always staid,
And it was not one bit jolly!
Now I have two eyes, a nose,
Lovely hair on my head grows,
Arms I have, and I wear clothes;
Also, everybody knows
I belong to little Polly!


I.


POLL'S DOLLY.






POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-V.


A MM A," said
Toddlekins,
"the Boofer
Kitten had a
party. Polly
Pry ought to
S have a- party
too.
So she ought said mam-
ma. Whom shall we ask-? "
O, I know," said Toddle-.
kins. So she and mammawrote
five notes to five little girls and
boys, and the next day Polly Pry
had a party. TherewerePolly
Hopkins, the gray parrot from
across the street, and Bob the
blackbird, and Jenny the mock-
ing bird, and Dick the canary,
and a little white hen in a basket.
At first the birds were all
very shy, but by and by Polly
Pry began to talk. How-de-
do ? How-de-do? How-de-


do ?" and that set Polly Ho
kins talking; and Bob beg;
to whistle, and Dick to tri
and Jenny to scream, and
little white hen to cut-cut-d
cut," until the children putt
hands to their ears and rano


of the room, laughing.
me!" said mamma, "a
party is worse than a cat-p



































































I ~


CHAIRLIE IS DISCOURAGED.


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IN THE DAY NIGHT-DRESS.


IN THE DAY NIGHT-DRESS.
(Stories About Sweetheart.)


Another day Sweetheart was
naughty.
She jumped right up and
down and screamed, because
she wanted to do something
mamma did not wish her to do.




il







I

KITI'Y IS UNKIND TO SWEETHEART.
A pail of water stbod be-
hind her on the kitchen floor,
and Sweetheart jumped so high
that when she came down she


lost her balance, and sat do.,n
in the pail of water!
She did not scream any
more; she was cold and wet.
Mamma thought Sweetheart
had been punished enough, so
she took off her wet clothes,
slipped her into a dry night.
dress, and put her into the
crib, with Kitty for company.
By and by, Kitty put out
her sharp claws and scratched
Sweetheart's hand.
0, mamma!" she called,
Kitty picked me! Her got
pins in her toes. Come pull
em out!)
Mamma kissed the scratch;
she rubbed vaseline on it, and
tied a soft linen cloth around
Sweetheart's hand, and soon it
was well.



























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WHAT THE BEE TOLD THEM.


WHAT THE BEE TOLD THEM.
(The Titoe Twins.)

3 .lb "Buzz, buzz!" said the Bee,
S Don't talk to me. I'm busy. I
.h'-" have some honey to make for the
good little girl who lives in the
:i~ .., o nlibrown cottage around the corner.
THE BEES' HOME. She has always a little honey
for her supper on Sunday even-
ing. But yesterday, when there
was only one jar left, she car-
ried it her-
self to poor
old Mother
Blake who is
i .I blind and d
loves sweets,
and ate dry
bread for her
THE GOOD LITTLE GIRL EATS HER SUPPER,
own supper.
I would never sting a little girl like
that. I shall make her some more/honey.
Buzz, buzz! Good-by!" And down he
TAKING THE HONEY TO MOTHER
BLAKE. went, head-foremost, into a lily-cup.

























































































UP TO MISCHIEF.






THE POT OF EASTER FLOWERS.


THE POT


OF EASTER FLOWERS.
(Stories About Sweetheart.)


Sweetheart's birthday comes
in the month of January.
The Easter after she was two
years old, papa and mamma took


- '5


SWEETHEART IN CHURCH.


Sweetheart and sister Hester
to the children's carol service.
When the rector came out
Sweetheart looked at him in


great surprise. Pointing witl
one finger, she said aloud, bu
quite softly: 0, mamma! hi
got on his night-dress! "
Mamma took the little finger
into her own hand, and toll
Sweetheart to keep still; bui
although she did not talk ani
more, she kept flying about if
her seat, smiling at a class o
boys who were laughing at hei
After the children had fi
ished singing, every girl ani
boy received a beautiful litti
plant in blossom. Sweetheal
had one, and sister Hester als
Sweetheart was so please
with hers that she went
sleep that night hugging it cl0s
to her breast, and mamma
hard work to take it away wh
she put her baby girl into be








































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BABY BOY AT GRANDPA'S.


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TWO LITTLE NEW SUITS.


TWO LITTLE NEW SUITS.

Little Teddie, without doubt,
Feels quite grand a-walking out
With his new clothes on;
See him with his head so high,
Little snub nose in the sky,
Walking all alone!
(What a pity!)


Next behold our little Joe,
Teddie's dearest friend, you know,
With a new suit too;
"Pooh," says he, "I'm very fine !
His suit's ugly-look at mine,
Cock-a-doodle-doo !"
(What a pity !)


" Boy," says Teddie, go away!
I'll not play with you to-day-
I'm almost a man.
By your nurse you better stay,
With the babies you can play,
'Tis your safest plan."
(What a pity !)


THIS IS JOE.


Angry Joe-how he brushes
Past poor Ted, and he flushes
Oh, so fiery red!
Then with taunt he's ready:
"You've no pocket, Teddie,
And I have," is said.
(What a pity!)


THIS IS TEDDIE.






THE BIG BRASS BAND.

That is why this morning bright
Joe and Teddie have a fight.
Why are boys so bad? "
And those suits why, they spoiled them,
Tore and pulled, frayed and soiled them;
Is it not quite sad?



THE BIG BRASS BAND.


The band is out,
And here they come,
A singer to sing,
A drummer to drum,
And a horn that toots
As only can
The daily bugle
Of the pop-corn man.

What tune do they play?
In truth, not any,
Each tries for himself
A little of many;
The horn man whistles;
She quavers and quakes;
And a good loud pounding
The drummer makes.


A little way off
It sounds to me
Like a blue-bird piping
And a bumble-bee;


HER. THEY COME !


But as long as they think.it
Fine and grand,
We may as well call it
A big brass band.







WHAT THE OAK-TREE TOLD T`EM.


WHAT THE


OAK-TREE
(The Tiptoe Twins.)


TOLD THEM.


EAR me,"
said Tony,
looking up,
:"' what a
very big tree this
is!"
"And dear me,"
said the oak-tree,
with a soft stir of
laughter through
all its leaves, "what
a very little boy
this is! Listen," said the oak-
tree, and I will tell you the
tale of the woods, as it was
told to me."
This is what the oak-tree
told to Tony, the boy twin,
the day he stood under its
wide-spreading branches:
"A great many years ago a
.little boy with a hole in his


pocket, went out into the wood!
to gather nuts.
SHe found some pretty
acorns on the ground, and pul
one in his pocket to take
home.
But on the way the acor
fell through the hole in the
boy's pocket and rolled away
beside the road. And pretty
soon, where the acorn was,
there grew a little plant, and
then where the plant wa
there grew a big tree.
"And that is how I came t
be here."
And the little boy that los
the acorn ?" cried Tony, th
boy twin.
Oh that," said the oal
tree, "was your own granf
father Tiptoe."










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A HARD CLIMB FOR PUPPIES.


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THE LITTLE POLAR BEAR.


"I'M HOMESICK, DON'T YOU KNOW!


THE LITTLE


POLAR


BEAR.


I'm a poor little Bear,
And belong to the Show,
And I stand here and sulk,
And it's naughty, I know.
They wish me to growl
And I won't growl at all,
Nor go to the front
Of my cage when they call.
They wish me to stand
On my two back feet,
And bow, and shake hands,
And behave very sweet.


They expect great things
Of the little White Bear-
O, I know I am bad,
And I do not care!
Of candy I'm sick,
And a cage is not nice-
I want to go home
And sleep on the ice.
I am just a poor
Homesick little Bear,
And I will not growl,
And I do not care!






POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND

UT, tut!" said
SToddlekins.
"Naughty Polly!
,you wish to be
i''. punished, do
Syou ?
She put Polly
into her cage and set the cage
in the closet. That was be-
cause Polly screamed.
Polly liked to scream. She
would talk to herself for a
while, and then begin to scream
so loud that every one ran
out of the room. -'Toddlekins
talked to her about it, but Polly
screamed just the same. So
Toddlekins set her in the closet
as soon as she began.
Polly knew that was a pun-
ishment. She would sit on the
closet shelf and say in low
tones to herself, "Polly, why
did you do that? Naughty,


TODDLEKINS.-VII.

naughty Polly! 0, naughty,
bad Polly Pry!"
Now when Polly begins to
scream, she stops herself and
says, very softly, Tut, tut,
Polly! 0, naughty Polly!"
Sometimes she goes and gets
into her cage, and then Tod-


"TUT! TUT!" SAID TODDLEKINS.
dlekins laughs and says, Polly
is punishing herself!"





THE DOLL--MOTHER.


THE DOLL-MOTHER.


Lucy Bell, across the way,
Never has a Washing Day.
I love dollies to be clean,
Always ready to be seen.


My dolls like to run and play,
That is healthful, doctors say;
But they often are a sight
As they all come in at night.


Dust and dirt, splash and stain!
Still I never do complain,
For I have my little tub,
And I dearly love to rub.


Rub and rinse, rub and wring!
Fresh and sweet is everything.
Every week I wash for five,
Happiest mother that's alive!













































































"TOO WARM TO BE DRESSED, MAMMA!"


1






THREE CATS.


THREE CATS.


Three little cats went out to walk one day,
Their little frolic minds intent on play;
Grimalkin Gray, and Tag, and Tom-To-Tee,
Smart little cats were they- I knew all three!
They had their faults: Grimalkin liked to brag;
The jokes and pranks were always planned by Tag-
These two did all the mischief that was done,
And Tom-To-Tee looked on and saw the fun.
"I'll be the first cat up this mighty oak!"
Of course it was Grimalkin Gray that spoke;






THREE CATS.


And scrambling up the tree they went, all three,
Grimalkin Gray, then Tag, then Tom-To-Tee.
"You're always first," said Tag; "no other cat
Can climb or jump like you; we all know that.
I even think that you could jump this brook!"
And Tag gave Tom-To-Tee a funny look.
"Of course I can," Grimalkin said, "look now!"
And springing off the lofty oak-tree bough
He landed-in the water, head-and-ears,
And naughty Tag and Tom gave him three cheers!






THE ROGUISH RABBIT.












T' NG TO MAKE PUSSY MIND.
,. /.'... "






THE ROGUISH RABBIT.

Ah! you naughty Rabbit!
See a thing and grab it! /
Pray is that the way you do, when ,
you want a bite?
Come, this isn't fair, sir,
You should take good care, -.", i,' i,1
sir,
Not to touch a thing at all ... '
unless it's yours r :- ,
by right. "*:- ,, .,


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THE GOOSE-MOTHER.


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A MOUSE STORY.


-- --


: I





POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-VIII.


.-T OLLY Pry was
"- alone in the
ii kitchen. It was
a warm day, and
jY ,I'i everybody had
'i I gone upstairs to
take a nap. Polly sat on her
perch by the window and
looked out. Pretty soon a
strange woman came up the
path to the back door. She
wore a red skirt, and she had
a shawl over her head. She
was a gypsy, and had come to
beg for something to eat. But
when she saw the house so
still, and no one near, and the
silver spoons on the table, she
crept softly up to the door.
Then Polly began to scream:
"Get out! Get out! What
do you want? Go home!
Polly! Polly Pr-r-ry! I see
you! I see you! Toddlekins!


Polly wants Toddlekins now!"
How the gypsy jumped
She thought some one had
seen her trying to steal the
spoons, and she ran away as
fast as she could go. She did
not know that it was a parrot.
Hoo-ray! hoo-ray!" cried


THE GYPSY AT THE DOOR.
Polly, dancing on her perch.
"What a brave boy be I!"


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1 .hi


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.





WILLIAM McELROY S STORY.


WILLIAM McELROY'S STORY.


One day Dot sat down be-
fore the grate with her BABY-
LAND in her fat little hand, and
she said, "Now, mamma, if
you will sit very still I will
read you a story. It is called
'The Fox and the Rooster,'
and it is written by a little boy
named William McElroy, and
William McElroy is just five
years old."
This is the story Dot read
to her mamma.

One time there was a big,
fat Rooster oh he was very
fat, and he lived in a nice
farm-yard. A sly old red Fox
came into this yard, and he
saw the Rooster, and it made
his mouth water. The Rooster
flew into a tree, flapped his
wings, and said:
"You can't catch me! coo !


coo But the Fox was veq
sharp, and said, "Poor Mr,
Rooster he can never get
down from that high tree!"
Don't you think, that foolish
Rooster hopped right down
just to show how easy he


















right quick, and ran off to his
den oh!
























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WHAT HAPPENED IN THE NIGHT.


iii





A BOY IN A BUNDLE.


READY TO GO.


A BOY IN A BUNDLE.


Chester is three years old.
He is the boy who was done
up in a paper bundle.
When his mamma got ready
to move from their city home
to their summer cottage on
the seashore in June, Chester
was eager to go. He could
not remember being there last
summer because he was such
a baby then, but he thought
he was a big boy this sum-
mer, and could have a good
time digging in the sand and


sailing his little boat in the
water.
After packing the trunks,
his mamma wrapped up some
pictures and a clock and her
work-basket in papers to take
to the cottage, and Uncle
Tom helped her. When the
clock and the pictures and
the work-basket were all ready
to go Uncle Tom said to
Chester:
"Now come, my boy, and
let me wrap you up, too."






A BOY IN A BUNDLE.


So Chester lay down on the
sofa and Uncle Tom put a
sheet of paper around his legs
and tied it on with a string,
and then put another around
his body and almost over his
head and tied that on; and all
this time Chester was just as
still as a mouse.
Then Uncle Tom laid him
on the floor and rolled him
over by the work-basket, and
Chester never moved or made
a sound. He knew that the
bundles were going to the
country, and he thought if he
were a bundle he would be
sure to go too.


But after a while mamma
turned around and saw him,
and she was very much sur-
prised, and she said to Uncle
Tom:
Tom, what are you doing?
you will smother the child;
take those things off him."
But when Uncle Tom began
to untie him, Chester began to
cry very loud; he was sure he
could rot go if the papers
and string were taken off.
Mamma had to tell him that
ske was not going to be done
up like a bundle when she
weht, before he would stop
sobbing.


."-'. ?) -' -. ". "
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U2 B CrE
:':h .... .4,: ', '- 2: ,
OUR BABIES AT HOME.


OUR BABIES IN THE TABLEAU.






WHAT AUNTY LET BROUGHT GILLIS.


WHAT AUNTY LET

When Gillis' Aunty Let was
visiting in the country some
one gave her three little banties.
One was as white as snow, and
she named it Faith the
other two she called Hope"
and Charity." She brought
the banties home in a little
basket.
Aunty Let didn't know what
to do with them, but Grand-


mamma


sent for a man


BROUGHT GILLIS.

come and build a little chicken
coop.
Then some one else sent
Aunty Let a pretty banty
rooster, and she calls him
"Doctor F."
At night they all get on to
the roost close together, in a
row, to keep warm. They look
like dovies. Every day Aunty
Let finds dear little banty eggs
in the nest.


_n ,:
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SOH! WHAT FUN," SAID TOWSER. BUT-


"I AM HERE SAID BIDDY, WITH A SHARP pEC

































Ce


r~


A COOL SPOT.


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ii


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BABY'S STORY.


BABY'S


Now every one
For Baby is
And all to the
If they keep


keel
goint
store
very


Like a grave little judge he is
sitting,
He looks so sober and wise,
While the page that is open
before him
He studies with earnest blue
eyes.


STORY.


Very quiet,
g to read;
y may listen,
still indeed.


All listen, he's ready to read it.
Can you guess what the
story will be?
I've the boofullest mamma.
She loves Baby Paul and


I love her.
that's me."


Well, that is a very sweet story,
The sweetest that ever was read!
And Baby looks smiling upon us,
As he nods with his grave little head!






BREAKFAST TIME.


BREAKFAST TIME.


The turkeys and the ducks,
The geese and goslings ten,
The pigeons and the cows,
The chicks and mother-hen,
Are waiting in the yard
Beside old Grunty's pen.

Moo-o-o and quack-quack,
Baa-a-a and coo-o,
Gobble-gobble, cluck-cluck-cluck,
And cock-a-doodle-doo-o !

Each one of breakfast talks:
The pigeons beg for peas;
The turkey gobbler says,
"Some corn, Bess, if you
please;"
And each white duck gives
thanks
For every crumb she sees.

Moo-o-o and quack-quack,
Baa-a-a and coo-o,
Gobble-gobble, cluck-cluck-clck,
And cock-a-doodle-doo-o !


The rooster for his hens
Is asking, by his crow,
Why Bessie with the food
Should be so very slow;
The cows think hay will
come
If Bessie hears them "low."

Moo-o-o and quack-quack,
Baa-a-a and coo-o,
Gobble-gobble, cluck-cluck-cluck,
And cock-a-doodle-doo-o!

The sheep within the fold,
Ba-ba-a, just hear them
call!
Hear Dobbin whinny
For oats within his stall!
And Grunty, when he squeals,
Means everything and all!

Moo-oo and quack-quack,
Baa-a-a and coo-o,
Gobble-gobble, cluck-cluck-cluck,
And cock-a-doodle-doo-o!






POLLY PRY AND TODbLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-IX.


ES, Polly was
lost! There
was no doubt
f .' [ about it. Tod-
dlekins had

and low, up in
the garret, down in the cellar,
and out in the garden, and
still no Polly Pry was to be
found! All day Toddlekins
looked and cried, and cried
and looked.
At last, when night came,
there was a ring at the bell,
and in came Eliza, the washer-
woman. She had something
in a basket.
Is this your bird?" she
said, lifting the cover--and
Toddlekins caught her pre-
cious Polly in her arms!
What do you think that
funny bird had done? She


had crept into the basket of
clothes that were ready for
the wash, and the washer-
woman's little boys had car-
ried her home, and Eliza
found her there when the
clothes were taken out.


IT WAS POLLY PRY.


You funny
What will you
said everybody.


Polly Pry!
do next ?"















































t~ *r

Cf- in


C,-


THE COACH OF KING BABY.






BABY S CALLER.

BABY'S CALLER.

Our dear little Baby, alone in her chair,
Was thinking it time for mamma to be there,
When pit, pat, pat, with each little paw,
Came the smallest "kitty" that ever she saw.
It didn't purr, and it didn't
-R sing,
SBut it ran around into every-
,_ (*.;, "thing;
S^,- Under the table, then under
a chair,
"i And nibbled some crumbs that
were lying there.
':,. / Baby clapped her hands, and
Laughed with glee;
.''." 'She said Ah-goo" as sweet
_. ,as could be;
And the brightest eyes that
ever were made
"AH-GOO! SAID BABY, Looked up at her, not a bit
AS SWEET AS COULD BE.
afraid.
It whisked about in the funniest way,
As if 'twere having the merriest play;
And Baby, she crowed so loud to see,
That mamma said, "Now what can it be?"







THE CUT FINGER.

So she tip-toed in to see the fun,
But 0, dear me! the play it was done;
And the Baby cried, and cried, that day,
For the little mousie that ran' away.


Shouldn't cry, darlin
It's only a drop!


THE CUT FINGER.

P. Sister will kiss him,


And then it will stop!


0'







THE BELLE OF THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL.


THE BELLE OF THE SUNDAY-SCHOOL
(Stories About Sweetheart.)


When Sweetheart was not
yet three, and sister Hester
four and a half, they joined
he Sunday-school.
Sweetheart was the youngest


THE YOUNGEST OF HER CLASS.


one in her class, and the lady
teacher called her the baby of
the Sunday-school.
When she came home papa
took her in his arms and asked
her what she had learned.
She showed him a pretty


card, on which was printed
verse from the Bible, and
little story paper which
been given her; then s
gravely told papa that sheik
the belle of the Sunday-scho
That made papa laugh, a
he asked again what she
learned.
Then Sweetheart said:
"Vow s'alt not f'y dou
nuts on de Sabba' Day!"
The next day she was sta
ing on papa's knee, pinch
his nose and pulling his w
ers, when suddenly she ask
"Papa, did God make'0
Yes," said papa.
Well," said Sweeth
very decidedly, 'oo had
buy 'oo own coes (cloth
didn't 'oo ?"


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"LET ME TASTE "


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A RHYME FOR BABY'S FINGERS.


.. ,

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BABY TRIES IT.


A RHYME FOR BABY'S


This
This


p


This little birdie flew away;
This little bird staid at home all day;
This little bird caught a blue-bottled fly;
little bird found a stalk of rye;
little bird cried, "Tweet! tweet! tweet!
I can't find anything to eat."


FINGERS.


I~Bb





A QUEER LITTLE PLAYTHING.


r ry
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.-~:: LTt~-i.-*-_j ~


"WILL HE GROW BIG ? "


A little boy I know has
such a funny pet! It is a
small mud-turtle. He brought
it in his pocket in a match-box
all the way from Indiana,
where he had been at school.
It is quite tame and lives in
a big glass globe which his
kind mamma gave him for
his pet. It is growing very
slowly, but the little boy's
papa tells him that he has
seen turtles the size of the
dining-room table, and that
frightens the little boy; for
the little boy knows that then
he will have no dish big
enough to hold his pet.





POLLY PRY. AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.-X.


LL the Pollies. I
know except.
Polly Pry can
sing tunes,"
., said Toddle-
S1 kins. "Polly
S Pry must learn
to sing tunes."
So Toddlekins put a cap
on her curly head and took a
ruler in her hand and sat up
on a high stool with mamma's
old music-book. Polly sat on
her perch and listened with
her head on one side while
Toddlekins sang Pretty
Polly Hopkins" over and
over again in her sweet little
voice; but never one word did
Polly Pry sing herself.
"You are a bad bird," said
Toddlekins, "and you ought
to have a dunce-cap! But
you shall learn it yet!" So


day after day she sang and
Polly listened, until one bright
morning, Toddlekins woke up
to hear Polly's funny hoarse
voice singing at the sunny
window, all to herself:
"Pret-ty, pret-ty Polly Ho-


" POLLY PRY, SING NOW "


kins, how d'ye do-oo, how d'ye
do! 0, how d'ye do, pretty
Polly Hopkins!"


.4






























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"YOU TAKE MORE THAN YOUR SHARE, SIR!


8/ P /


rt=7 -





BABY BEE.


BABY BEE.

O what do you think our baby
did,
Our dear little Baby Bee?
She went steppitty, steppitty,
steppitty, step,
Till she came to her grand.
papa's knee.

O what do you think our baby
Or .thought,
Our dear little Baby Bee?
She thought the knee was a
h splendid horse;
"I will have a fine ride," said she.

0 where do you think our baby went,
Our dear little Baby Bee?
She went galloping, galloping, galloping off,
The beautiful world to see.

O what do you think our baby saw,
Our dear little Baby Bee?
She saw the nurse in a big frilled bib,
Crumbling bread into milk for tea.





WHAT SCARED KITTY.


O what do you think our baby did then,
Our dear little Baby Bee?
She came galloping, galloping, galloping home,
And got here in time for tea.


WHAT SCARED KITTY.


One day Kitty did not come
to her dinner, so I called her.
She answered from under the
corn-crib.
I went to get her, but she
would not come out. I peeped
in under, and there she sat, with
her tail as big as two Kitty's
tails; the hair was sticking
straight up on her back, and
her eyes were big and bright,


looking up into the sky. She
growled and growled. I
thought she was having a fit;
but, looking up into the sky too,
I saw a great kite over our
house. That was what scared
Kitty so.
I think she thought it was
the very biggest mouse with
the very longest tail that she
ever had seen.





WHAT THE ROSE TOLD THEM.


WHAT THE ROSE TOLD THEM.
(The Tiptoe Twins.)

blanket was opening. And
instead of the White .Caterpil-
lar there came out a Butterfly.
She stood on the leaf a mo-
S-<.., I, ment, and then spread her wings
S,' \ and flew away. I hope she
?'.I ,will come back. Good-by,"
P 0 'said the Rose,' I must at-
I." tend to that lazy bud that
S/ should have opened this
Sf morning with its sisters."
l'l/ Good-by," said the Girl
THE GIRL TWIN LISTENS. Twin.

"Such a wonderful thing.
has happened," said the Rose.
The White Caterpillar has
been sleeping on one of my '
green leaves. She was wrap- r
ped up in a blanket of white
silk, which she spun herself. 'f '
"This morning, I heard a /
little sound, and saw that the ON THE LEAF OF THE ROSE.


































































"er"















41,


BABY'S VICTORY.






HOW SHE CORRECTED SISTER HESTER.


HOW SHE CORRECTED SISTER HESTER.
(Stories About Sweetheart.)


One day Sister
Sweetheart stood
window watching
I 1r I


Hester and
at the open
the dancing


"BE A GOO' GIR'," SAID SWEETHEART.
leaves, which mamma had told
them were the trees' babies.
Sweetheart had a fashion of
pulling at the tangle of soft


curls on one side of her head.
She was doing this now,
when she heard a noise in one
of the houses down the street.
Some one was playing on a
violin, but Sweetheart did not
know this.
Hear de moo cow," she
said, looking with big, dreamy
eyes at the green trees.
Why, that isn't a moo
cow," said Sister Hester.
You see, she was almost
two years older, and knew a
great deal more than Sweet-
heart. That is a fiddle.
Don't you know the diffunce
'tween a moo cow and a
fiddle ?"
Then Sweetheart said stern-
ly: Hater, 'oo be a goo' gir',
or I tell 'oo fader "






IN MICELAND.


THE HARVESTERS.


IN MICELAND.

"Come," said Father Mouse, "Yes," said Grandpa Mouse,
"Come," said Mother Mouse, "Yes," said Grandma Mouse,
"We must fill the house!" We'll help fill the house!"

With a bag this Mouse, and a basket that Mouse,
And a barrow t'other Mouse, full they filled the house.







POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS.


POLLY PRY AND TODDLEKINS-XI.


HEN Toddle- Then she flew'd
kins and her other Polly with
mamma went claws. S1-lash!
.. ., to the country, turned around, and
,they took Polly Polly Pry struggle
\ 'F Pry. Polly water.
j_ did not like, the 0 what a poor, we
.;:: ....-....... noise and mo- Polly she was the r
tion of the cars, but she liked
the country when she got
there. One day she and Tod-
dlekins took a walk around the I
farm. They saw the cows and
the pigs and the chickens, and
at last they stopped at the horse-
trough to rest. There Polly "-,' :1,1
looked down into the clear water I i lir-
and saw another Polly looking --
up at her. :
"Peek-a-boo!" cried Polly,
" How de do!" But the water-
Polly did not speak and Polly OL P NO
Pry felt angry and began to day! She never wa
scream: Go away! Shoo a water-Polly again!


own at the
beak and
Foddlekins
there was
ig in the

t, unhappy
est of the


F, -


POLLY.

nts to see


I































































I,
i. p,,..
-AI~~~n B


LITTLE MISS GOLDENHAIR.


'



61




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