The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop

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Material Information

Title:
The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
Physical Description:
8, 26, 4 p., 16 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Myra & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Myra & Son
Place of Publication:
London
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dreams -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Repentance -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Insects -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Birds -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Title page printed in colors, text printed in red and blue borders.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
General Note:
Tommy is a little thug who drowns kittens, pesters puppies and decimates the lesser creation; he gets his comeuppance in a series of dreams in which the roles of tormentor and tormented are reversed as in The World Upside Down.
General Note:
The preface is signed M.B.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002225048
notis - ALG5320
oclc - 214285115
Classification:
System ID:
UF00082548:00001

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter 1
        Front Matter 2
    Half Title
        Half Title 1
        Half Title 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Title Page 1
        Title Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents 1
        Table of Contents 2
    Preface
        Preface 1
        Preface 2
    Day time
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 2a
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 4a
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 6a
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
    Night time
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 14a
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 20a
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 22a
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 24a
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 26a
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
    Back Matter
        Back Matter
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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THE TRIBULATIONS


TOMMY


TIPTOP,


J E PRAYETH BEST WHO LOVEST BEST,
fLL THINGS BOTH GREAT AND SMALL."
Co/kridgc.


LONDON:
MYRA & SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET,
UE NT GA RI )N.


- -- -- ----- 7- -- f









CONTENTS.


X FART 1. PAY TIME. TOMMY S TRICKS.
SART 2. EIGHT TIME. TOMMYIS TRIBULATIONS.

i-Tribulatin wh te Cs.
I-Tribulation with the Cats.
2-Tribulation with the Birds.
3-Tribulation with the Dogs.
4-Tribulation with the Wasp.
5-Tribulation with the Fowls.
j 6-Tribulation with the Butterfly, &c.
7-Tribulation with the Puppies.
8-Tribulation with the Fish.
9-Tribulation with the Doll.
Io-Tribulation with the Parrot.
I 1-Tribulation with the Daddy-Longlegs.
S12-Tribulation with the Mice.
I3-Tribulation with the Rabbits,
i4-Tribulation with the Muffin Boy.
S5s-Tribulation with the Beetle.
16-Tribulation at the Zoological Gardens.
9 Tommy's Awakening and Repentance.















PREFACE.



A Our duty towards others, and especially towards
Animals is now so seldom insisted on, that little
Apology is needed for bringing an old fashioned ,:
Principle before our readers. The object of this ~
R book is to show that all unkindness towards the
A animal creation merits -if it does not at once
A receive-punishment, and that to obey the law of
Kindness is our duty as well as our happiness.
M. B.
* ,
*

*










THE TRIBULATIONS



TOMMY TITOfo



CHAPTER I. DAY TIME.

n'I; E was not a really Bad Boy, our Tommy Tiptop,
IZ. he was only full of mischief, full of fun, and very
X thoughtless of any body but himself. Mrs. Tip-
,, ,_ top was a little bit to blame for this, for she had
," petted and spoiled Tommy until he was, as the
S maids said, "a dreadful trouble and worse than
any plague of Egypt," but that remark was made
the day he tried to poach eggs on a gridiron, which, as you
know, is not very well adapted for that purpose.
Tommy was her eldest child and he had no little brothers
or sisters until he was four years old, so that he had more toys,
more play, and more goodies, and a great deal more indul-
gence and treats than most little boys get, which is a little
excuse for some of his naughty ways.
Then too, he was always really sorry when his much too kind
mother showed him how naughty he was, but when she was not
there, he too often forgot her gentle words of advice and only
thought of fun and frolic, and did not think of the mischief he
did, or of the pain he caused to others. His little sisters ran
from him and hid their pretty little faces in nurse's gown ;
Nurse herself, though very fond of Tommy, put all the best
dolls and toys well out of his reach for she said she could not
answer for the safety of Miss Victoria and Ethereda's favourites










when Master Tommy was "in high spirits," which was under-
stood by all in the house to mean that Tommy was in one of
his very naughty fits of mischief. I dare not tell my dear little
readers one half of the naughty things which Tommy did,
S although I feel quite sure that they would not copy him in one
of them, but it is so bad for little people, or indeed for big
I people, to have naughty companions, that I know they would
S be sorry to even look at Tommy's pictures in this book, or to
S read all about the dreadful things which happened to him, and
which quite cured him at last of all his tricks. -
-.1 Mrs. Tiptop often told him in her gentle words that nothing
was more displeasing to the great God who made us than to be -
S cruel to his creatures, and yet this thoughtless boy was con-
stantly hurting some insect or animal. Mr. Tiptop was very
S fond of pets, and kept a nice Tabby cat and several nice large .
dogs in his stable yard; this yard was a great amusement to
Tommy, who was delighted to see some dear little kittens one
fine morning. He played for some time with the dear little
kittens, and gave them names, Spot and Bob, Jet and Snow. "
S The kittens were more pleased to see Tommy than their mother
was, as she well knew how very cruel he could be when he was
S inclined to be naughty, but the little kits purred and rubbed
S against his hands, and jumped over his shoes, and gambolled
S round him quite prettily. Presently he trod on one and it ^
squeaked so funnily that he trod on another just to hear it
S again. Their mother began to be cross, and Tommy thought it
best to retreat, but he said as he went, there are too many
of you kits, some of you must be drowned; why not this one?
His eyes are blue, a very ugly colour," and off he ran to find his
S playmate Johnny, who was older and much stronger than ,
Tommy.
Y When the two little lads returned together, the poor little
kittens felt uneasy; they did not understand what their little
master had said, but they very well remembered he had hurt
S them. The boys first shut up Mrs. Tabby in the stable, and

.. ..1 ,. .... ... .. .. .. .....-. .. .
.--
------------------------ -- J~~







3


then put all the kittens into a basket some distance away from
their mother, who mewed and cried bitterly; they then got a
pail of quite cold water, and began to drown the poor little kits. .
Jet was the first victim; her poor pretty little black head went
under the cold water, and though she struggled hard, down she
; went and soon all her sufferings were over, and poor little Jet
was dead. When Spot saw this, he struggled so when Tommy -
caught him up, that he slipped out of his cruel arms and ran
mewing to the stable door. We had better not drown all,"
said Tommy. No; we'll keep two for fighting," Johnny replied,
one is no good," so that one poor little kitten was saved for
S this cruel purpose, and Snow being gentle and peaceable, was
-: drowned on the spot, while Bob, after being well bathed in
S the pail, was allowed to run shivering back to his miserable
mother, who sprang out as soon as the stable door was opened.
She ran to the pail crying so sadly that John said they had
better take the dead kittens away and bury them, so they agreed
S to play at funerals, of which sport, however, they soon got very
S tired, and fought a little to settle a small quarrel as to which of
: the two naughty boys was to be the clergyman. This fight
together, with the fact that Johnny was so much stronger than
Tommy, and that he hurt most, reminded them that they meant
to have a cat fight, but on their return to the stable-yard, pussy
-.". had carried her kittens up to the loft to a place of safety where
)S the wicked boys could not find her, and there she hoped to bring
S up her sadly reduced family in peace.
These naughty boys then thought of the puppies, which
were now about six months old, and were very intelligent and
friendly.
It was easy enough to decoy them away from their mother,
S but far more difficult to make them fight, for they were dear
S good-natured little pet things, who were always playing
together. However, each boy took a puppy, and by holding the
little creatures and making them scratch each other with their
S little claws, the boys made them cross and savage, and they bit

"l'"o'f;.-....'..*. .... *.... ... .........-- .- -. --* .










and snarled for the first time in their innocent lives. Nor was
the mischief ended when the fight was over, for they went
growling and snapping at each other all the way back to their
mother, who wondered at their naughty tempers and scolded
them well.
Johnny next showed Tommy what he called "a jolly way of
catching flies and wasps" as they sunned themselves on the
garden wall, or walked along it for fruit, of which there was
plenty in that nice garden. Tommy soon learned the art, and
after some half-dozen attempts, caught a bluebottle fly and then
a wasp. Johnny, who was really a cruel boy, then pulled off the
fly's wings, and when Tommy said, How it must hurt them,"
replied, "They would squeak if it did," and foolish little
Tommy believed him, and pulled several Daddy-Long-Legs
to pieces because they are considered to be naughty insects by
many little ones on account of the nursery rhyme:
"Daddy, daddy long legs,
Would not say his prayers,
Take him by the right leg,
Take him by the left leg,
And throw him down the stairs."
After which cruel sport, Johnny told Tommy all about
birds' nesting, and climbing trees, and taking away eggs
and little birds, and related how he had taken a nest with five
little birds in it, and had fed them with bread, and how two
choked at once, and the other three birds died in the night: for
they cannot live without their dear mother's warm wings to
cover them up, and they are tender and chilly until after they
have all their feathers and can fly about and keep themselves
warm, as well as find their own food. Johnny also spoke of
shooting rabbits, and both these naughty lads fired off their
toy guns into the rabbit hutches, frightening the poor rabbits,
although they could npt kill them, and causing some tiny
rabbits, two days old, to die with fright. How the poor
rabbits did scamper about! And how their little hearts went
pit-a-pat!









Tired of this thoughtless sport, they rode Johnny's bicycle by
turns through the chicken yard, terrifying the fowls, and causing
them to fly in all directions. They disturbed an old hen who
was leading her young chickens to some grits which had been
thrown down for their benefit, and ran over several poor little
chickens, killing two and quite laming several others. Round
and round the yard they went in turn, frightening all the
peaceful hens, chickens, and ducks who felt quite surprised to
see the little boy who usually brought them food and was so
kind to them, mounted on a big wheel, and actually running
over them.
When Tommy saw the poor little chickens dead on the
ground he felt sorry, and he knew quite well how naughty
he had been, and he also thought how very sorry his dear
mother would be to find her pretty brood injured, for Mrs.
j Tiptop was pleased to have a brood so late in the year, for
the cold winds in spring had killed off nearly all the early
broods.
Tommy well remembered how delighted his mother was when
Sthe gardener, who looked after the fowls, told her that eleven
S chicks were hatched out by the old brown hen, who was always
a steady sitter, and how the chickens were brought in to the
house in a basket, and Tommy was allowed to see them and
Sto feed them with soft little seeds which his mother called
"grits," and when Brownie had finished hatching two more
S chicks, they were all placed carefully under her, and every
S day Tommy was allowed to feed the chickens.
And now he had killed two, and hurt many, and what would
his mother say? He could hardly bear to think of it, and
the tears came in his eyes, for he was not naturally a wicked,
cruel boy, but was so easily led astray by his companions,
S and he thought it was grown up, and grand, not to care,
and was too thoughtless to mind how he hurt others in
his amusements; all he thought of was Tommy Tiptop, and
when either boys or girls think too much of themselves they









are certain to become selfish'and cruel, for all selfishness is
S cruelty to others.
But now some words his mother had said came suddenly
into his thoughts:-
'Evil is wrought,
By want of thought,
As well as want of heart;"

and he began to look very sad.
When Johnny saw this, he asked Tommy what was the
matter, and Tommy pointed to the dead chickens, and Johnny
a only laughed in his rude way.
*" Pooh," he said, you are a baby." Now Tommy dreaded
of all things to be thought and called a baby, perhaps because
he often behaved like one, and cried for nothing, and so he
H quickly wiped his eyes and said boldly, What shall we do
next ?" as if all this naughty behaviour was not quite enough
for one morning, and yet, (though both boys felt hungry), it
was only half-past eleven o'clock, as they found when they 1
went into the house for something to eat.
S With a slice of plum cake in each hand, the little boys
S ran out again eagerly into the bright sunshine; the garden
looked bright with flowers, and over head were butterflies,
some white ones, and also a beautiful Peacock Butterfly. "I
must have that butterfly," cried Tommy. "I am collecting
butterflies."
So am I," replied Johnny. Off the boys ran, cap in hand,
after the lovely insect; Tommy's hat soon held the captive
which was roughly seized, and placed on a cork, the pretty
wings were blown open, and a cruel pin ran through the
quivering body, while the wings were spread open by bands
of postage stamp paper.
It will look nice when 'set' properly," Johnny said, with
a sigh of envy, for he longed for the butterfly.
"I will give you a Stag Beetle for the Peacock Butterfly,
~~*****g









and a Sun Fly out of the roses, and, let me see, a lizard-
-:, as soon as I catch one. Only think of a lizard, Tommy!"
Yes, but you have not caught it yet," replied Tommy,
who wished to keep his lovely Peacock ;" "and I don't know
that I shall collect lizards. I have never seen one yet in
This garden." By the time the poor Peacock Butterfly was
pinned down and set, the boys found that the white butter-
I flies had flown away, and so they had lost the pleasure of
catching them.
Little Frisk, the black and tan terrier, ran up to Tommy
at this moment, and was at once harnessed to a very large
cart which had belonged to Tommy when he was younger, and
S which he still called his own. Poor Frisk was not big enough
to pull the cart, but he had to submit, and a bit was put in
t his little mouth, and the reins were fastened, and he was well
S tied in to the cart, and made to draw it along the garden
path, whether he liked doing so or no.
Frisk did not like this at all, but it was worse when Tommy
got in the cart and Johnny ran alongside with a large stick
and gave poor Frisk a blow every time he stopped running,
Which hurt him dreadfully. Luckily for the poor little dog,
Nurse saw them from the nursery window, which overlooked
the garden, and came down at once to relieve the poor little
:i dog, and to scold the boys. She took Frisk indoors, after
S telling the little boys to wash their hands for dinner.
Mrs. Tiptop was extremely fond of plants and flowers of
all kinds, and her pretty conservatory was full of flowering
plants of great beauty. In the centre of the conservatory
was a small fountain, surrounded by a large stone basin, in .;
S which lilies and other water loving plants grew. The water
from the fountain fell into a smaller basin which overflowed
into the large one and fell on the plants. In the large basin
were gold and silver fish, which were very pretty and very
tame.
"Oh, what jolly fish you have got !" said Johnny.










"They are so tame they will eat bread; they come up as
soon as we throw crumbs in," replied Tommy. Stay, the
cloth is laid, and there is sure to be bread cut in the dining-
room, I will run and get some."
On Tommy's return, Johnny proposed they should fish.
Tommy did not like the idea of his poor mother's fish being
taken out of the water, and said so, but Johnny burst out
laughing, and again called him a baby and a coward, and
said, "You are afraid! afraid! afraid! I dare you to fish!"
and silly Tommy, who was so foolish as to mind being dared,"
at once consented. With a small hook which Johnny had in
a pocketbook, and a crumb of bread, it was easy to catch the
very tame gold fish, but how the poor fish wriggled and
writhed when the hook was taken out! And oh! how soon
the fish died, although Tommy held it in the water and tried
in vain to restore it to life: it was dead, and Tommy reflected
sadly that there was another dreadful thing to tell mother
on her return from uncle Richard's house, where she was
spending the day with his little sisters. He wondered what
she would say, and if his father would know of it, and he
wished he had not let Johnny "dare" him to fish.
Johnny in the meantime was fishing away without a word,
and a long row of struggling, dying fish met Tommy's eye
when he turned round.
Tommy flung as many as he could back into the water
before Johnny could stop him, and the two little boys had a
scuffle over the fish, which ended only when they were called
to dinner by Nurse, who waited on them and kept order during
the dinner. It was much too nice a dinner for such naughty
children, hot roast chicken and roly jam pudding, with. some
lovely peaches for desert.
The little boys enjoyed it all immensely, and were quiet
and good for some time afterwards; they went up into the
nursery to take the peach stones to the parrot, but they teazed
that poor bird dreadfully, they poked sticks through the bars









of the cage, and pelted Polly with marbles, teazing her until
she screamed for help, as well as annoying the poor bird by
calling her Ugly Polly! Nasty Polly! Horrid Polly! Polly
is an ugly bird !" with other remarks of a similar nature. Then
they took the dolls in hand and pulled off their hair, tore
their pretty clothing, and banged their faces with a hair brush.
W. Tommy pulled out the eyes of the lovely doll who opened
S them when she sat up, and closed them when she lay down,
for he had often longed to see what made them act so well,
and here was a good opportunity
Poor Dolly, of course, made no remark, but she felt bitterly
the loss of her two pretty blue eyes; she vowed vengeance,
but could not shed a tear, for she had no eyes to cry with.
S The naughty boys heard Nurse's footstep and hurried into
a large cupboard, in which brooms and brushes, pails and
S dustpans were kept, so as to be handy for the maids, and
here they found a mousetrap and a little mouse; they called
S "Puss, puss," to the terror of the little mouse, whose bright
little eyes showed how dreadfully frightened he was of the
boys, and still more so of the big cat which soon made an
J'" end of the poor little thing, for as soon as Johnny raised ^
the door of the trap, out ran mousie, and snip-snap went
the cat, and mousie lay dead on the floor.
The boys then ran down to see if Mrs. Tiptop was
coming home, then they went down into the kitchen and
teazed cook by taking a beetle out of the blackbeetle trap and
putting it on her neck. How she screamed and ran about
and flung the beetle off. Tommy saw it run towards him, and
so he stamped on it with his thick boot and killed it.
S Cook drove the naughty boys away out of the kitchen;
she was now very cross and angry, and they felt they had
S better run away, so up the kitchen steps they flew.
Just as they got up to the top, they met the baker's boy
with his tray of muffins; they heard his bell tingle, and
they asked him for a muffin.










Muffins are not good when raw and untoasted, and the
baker's boy told them so, but they did not believe him. We
will have some, we shall have some," they cried, and rushed
upon the lad who tried in vain to protect his tray from the
sturdy little robbers. Johnny pulled the end of the green
baize cloth, which kept the muffins hot, and down they fell
in a shower of round white dabs, all on the garden gravel
Sand then they went rolling down the kitchen steps.
The poor boy cried out, My master will beat me, he will
never believe two young gentlemen would behave so. Oh
Sdear, oh dear! What shall I do!" Tommy and Johnny
seized on the muffins, while the poor lad was thus lamenting,
" and began to eat them as hard as they could. The baker's
boy, with tears, picked up the cleanest, and went back to his
master and told him how Master Tiptop and his friend had
thrown down all his muffins, eaten some, and spoilt others;
Sbut the baker could not believe that a child of that nice little
Mrs. Tiptop would be so naughty, and told the poor boy he
must pay for the loss, so he would have hardly any wages
to take home to his mother, who was a very poor woman.
See what dreadful mischief these thoughtless boys did I!
The poor boy begged in vain to be believed, he cried and
sobbed and asked the baker to see Mrs. Tiptop on the
Subject, but he refused, saying, He must not risk offend- ,
ing a good customer, and that the boy must pay for his
Carelessnesss"
Meanwhile the two naughty boys had eaten the untoasted
muffins till they were tired of them, or rather until they felt
very uncomfortable, so that when tea time came they could
eat nothing at all.
About half-past six o'clock Mrs. Tiptop returned with
the dear little girls, and Tommy heard them run up to the
nursery at once to tell Nurse all about the pleasant day they
had passed at their uncle's house, while Mrs. Tiptop asked,
Where are the boys?" quite surprised at their absence.










"I expect they are quite ashamed to see you, ma'am," the
J housemaid said; they have been at mischief all day long."
Mrs. Tiptop at once sent Johnny home to his mother, and
S made up her mind not to again invite him to spend the day;
she ordered Tommy to go to her room, and when she had
taken off her things and put them by, she called to Tommy
^ to come to her, and asked him what he had done all day
in her absence. :
Tommy was a truthful child, and I am happy to say he
never once thought of not owning his faults, so he began
the sad list of wrong, of cruel, and of wicked things which :
he had done, and as he told her of-
His drowning the little kittens in the yard.
.:. Of setting the poor puppies to fight. :
-. Of catching the wasps and flies.
t" Of pulling the Daddy-long-legs to pieces.
Of running a pin through the lovely butterfly. -
Of killing the chickens.
Of driving the dog and beating it.
Of fishing for the poor gold fish.
Of breaking the dolls.
Of teazing the parrot.-'
Of giving the mouse to the cat.
Of frightening the rabbits to death.
Of "squashing" the blackbeetle.
And of upsetting the baker's tray, and eating his muffins.
The tears come into Mrs. Tiptop's eyes for she felt that
S her own little son was a cruel, bad little boy, and that she
could not love him again as she did before she knew how
cruelly he could behave. "
-2 When Tommy saw his mother cry, his little heart was :.
very sad, she was such a dear, kind, loving mother, and he
S felt so sorry that he cried too, and he promised her that he
S would never, never be cruel again, and that he would ask
the baker's lad to forgive him, and would pay for the muffins,
..<- /* .; ^Pa







l2



and would bear any punishment if she would only kiss and
love him once more.
"Ah, Tommy," his mother replied, "your sorrow will not
restore the little creatures to life, the little creatures God has
made for our pleasure and comfort, and which we keep for
our own amusement. I must punish you, my boy, and I
think the best way will be to send away all our animals, our
l dogs and cats, our birds and rabbits, our parrot, and our
fish, and not let you have anything at all to teaze."
"Oh no, dear Mother, don't do that, you will punish every
one for my fault, anything but that."
"Well, Tommy, then I think I must say you shall not go
to the Zoological Gardens with us all on Wednesday. Your
VI" uncle has promised to take us, and has asked me if you like
W, riding the elephants, and seeing the lions fed, watching the
monkeys, and giving buns to the bears, and looking at all
the curious birds and beasts which he knows all about, and ^
can tell you of."
Poor Tommy felt this was indeed a punishment, but he also
knew that he well deserved even a severer punishment than
this for his wickedness, and so he said Good night," and
went off to bed at once, sobbing and really sorry for his
faults.
As he was so truly sorry, Mrs. Tiptop gave him one kiss
S for good night in his little bed, but it was a very sad kiss,
S for she sighed and said, Oh, Tommy, Tommy, who would
have thought you could be so cruel; pray to God to forgive
you, my boy," and then she said:

S"He prayeth best who loveth best
_All creatures great and small;
For the Great God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all."

Poor Tommy sobbed himself to sleep.


(g^r ^^5
















H CHAPTER II.

NIGHT TIME.

S"My gentle boy, remember this is nothing but a dream."-Eugene Arami



0 ,-.- "1H dear! dear! What is this that is scratching
me so and holding me so hard and tight!
S Oh, how you hurt me to be sure," cried Tommy,
as he struggled in vain, for two large birds
-.i. were perched on the iron railings of his crib,
-:: and were pulling him out of bed. "Come
I along with us at once," and they pulled and
S pulled until they got him out of the soft and cosy bed where
he had been tucked up only an hour before. No nonsense !
S Come along, it is not worse for Tommy than it is for Dicky
to be pulled out of his nest; come along, your nest is
not half full enough of feathers like our nests are, and we
want you to play with and sing to us," and in a minute,
S they were flying along with poor Tommy, who was
frightened and giddy, and worse than all, very unhappy
at being taken away from his dear mother and his happy
home. The Birds, however, were rejoicing, and put him into
a box with bars in front, and placed worms and slugs and
snails for him to eat, the very sight of which made him feel
S sick, and they came and worried him to eat, and worried him
to sing, but all the time he tried to get out, and bruised his

|p... -..'t-f -3 X^^^o^^









arms and legs against the bars; all the while he felt very
S hungry and tired and weak, and then he remembered nothing
S more.

When next poor Tommy came to his senses, he found
himself cuddling up to his dear mother and feeling extremely
comfortable, when suddenly the door opened and an enor-
mous cat, followed by two kittens, came in. Tommy nestled
.2; closer to his mother, but the cat rudely seized hold of him
S saying:
There are too many of these children about; we must
drown some."
S Let us drown Tommy," one of the kittens said, "he is
m ugly, he is rude, he is no good at all; oh what ugly blue
eyes !" and the kitten scratched him.
Poor Tommy was carried off away from his mother, who M
sobbed and cried, and was taken into the yard close to the
S waterbutt, where a pail of water stood which he recollected
very well, much too well, for it was the same pail in which
he had drowned the kittens.
The cat held him by the feet, and the little kittens helped
to push him in, and down he went into the cold water, and
in spite of screams and struggles, shrieks and tears, Tommy
was held under the water until he lost his senses.

Suddenly he felt a sharp pain in his nose, and found himself
S hanging high out of the water, but in scarcely a better posi-
tion than if he had still been under it, for it is anything
S but comfortable to be hanging by the nose from a fishing rod.
Much to his surprise Tommy found that the fishing rod
was held by a large fish, who seemed delighted to have
caught the poor struggling boy. Mr. Fish hurt him so
much in taking out the fish hook, that Tommy struggled
still more, and was at last flung into a fisher's basket with
such a bang that he again became unconscious.
. ^ *;. ^:^^:G ; j;0^ (? Cn:^ ^;( ^
: :".. ::", ,.:.... : : i :, :--.:.-, : ,.. ., ''.:.- -., :.. :.v, t: L' ,d::.,.-:",... .r _









Aroused from this lethargy, Tommy found himself held -
by a big dog, and saw that his friend Johnny was in the
arms of a very large bulldog; the two boys, being always very
Friendly, began to talk, but the two dogs did not allow this
for one moment, but tried to make the little fellows fight; they
knocked their hands together and made them scratch each
other's faces with their nails, until the boys got cross with
:40 each other and began to call each other names, to double up
their little fists, and to strike out in earnest at each other's
face; Tommy felt red and angry, but he got the worst of
it; his eyes were blackened, his nose bled, and he lost his
dear little white front tooth.

Tommy's next adventure made him extremely uncomfort-
able; he was climbing a sunny wall in order to get some
ripe and tempting pears, and had nearly got to the top when
a large and fierce-looking wasp suddenly caught him in his
hand, exactly as Tommy caught flies on the garden wall, or
on the table cloth indoors; the wasp pinched his head hard
and hurt him so much that he shrieked out, when two large
Daddy-longlegs flew up to see what was the matter.
"Oh, this is the little wretch who pulled my sister's legs
J off, and my father's wings, and sang a rude song about
Daddy, daddy longlegs," instead of speaking of my respected
parents as 'D. Longlegs, Esq.,' as a gentleman should be
S addressed."
Let us pull him to pieces," they all shouted, and off went
a leg, and between pain and fright Tommy knew no more-

Until he found himself in a wooden box with one slanting
side, and iron bars at the top and on the other side. A
* strong smell of cheese pervaded the box.
Hush, be quiet till I fetch puss, she will soon finish -
him." The cat which the mice brought was as big as a
tiger, and Tommy had often seen tigers at the Zoological









Gardens and knew what he would do with him; he shut his
eyes, he felt the door of the trap open, and felt he was sliding
out, down, down into the big mouth and hot breath, which
'I: seemed to smother him.

Tommy tried to run; he started, got away for a moment,
and found himself in the yard with Johnny and a lot of
other boys; their mothers were at a little distance, and called
to the children to get out of the way of a large Cock-a-doodle-
) doo, which, mounted on a bicycle, was driving furiously round
S and round. The cock was flapping its wings, crowing and
making a hideous and alarming noise. Tommy ran on, but
X he was not quite quick enough; on came the bicycle, down
fell Tommy, and both his poor little legs were cut off by
the wheel.

N It was a relief to find himself flying about his garden, well,
and rejoicing in the sunshine; he was again a happy, thought-
M less little boy. I must have dreamt of that cock," and he ran
A round and round the house, not looking where he went, he
3 was caught in a large net of the same colour as the grass. A
S" Are you collecting boys only," said a big stag beetle close
W by him, "or do you collect girls as well ?"
S "I prefer urchins," said the butterfly, who held the net;
"and this is a fine specimen. Tommy belongs to the small
roguey poguey breed, and will look very nice when I 'set'
j him on cork. At present I shall just pin him down com-
N fortably; where is my little mallet? Oh, thank you," she
said, taking it from a lizard who had kindly carried it for
her. One, two, three, there Tommy will do nicely for the
present," and off they flew, leaving poor Tommy writhing in
pain with a large pin stuck right through him.

Almost a relief to find himself able to move, although
S placed in the most unpleasant position of being tightly

~I






17


fastened into a cart, with a bit in his little red mouth,
and being driven with heavy blows by a dog very much
like his own Frisk," while a fat healthy puppy was
S holding the reins and driving poor To mmy on at a pretty
S fast pace.
Oh dear, I cannot go any faster," sighed poor Tommy.
Beat him harder," said the Puppy. "Gee up, Dobbin,"
and on and on they drove the miserable little boy.

J Again a change, but not a change for the better. Oh dear
no Banging blows on the head, hair pulled, clothes roughly
Dragged about, Miss Dolly was taking her vengeance on
Tommy for all the cruel tricks he had played her. What
strong arms she had, and she hit him with a hair brush
S until her arms ran down with sawdust, which never happens,
you know, unless a doll is quite worn out and exhausted.
Just as Dolly was going to put Tommy's eyes out with the
nursery scissors, he sprang away with a cry and crept into
the parrot's cage, where he sat quietly for a time, too weary ]
Sto speak.

Tommy's quiet was speedily disturbed by the arrival of the
lawful owner of the cage-Pretty Polly herself.
-l "What fun!" she cried. "Teazing Tommy in my cage,
sitting in my ring, and I have no doubt eating my Indian
corn and sop;" but poor Tommy was only too glad to be
quiet, and he had no wish to deprive Polly of any of her
S provisions, he only asked to rest and sit in peace in the large
S ring in Polly's cage. But quietness and comfort did not suit
Miss Polly, she kept putting her claws in and scratching
the child, and also bit him with her sharp, strong beak, she
scolded at him in shrill tones which went through his head,
and made herself extremely unpleasant in every way. Still
S he was too tired to mind much, but cuddled down with his
little arm over his face, and went off to sleep as he had often







--^ .?., "" 'v .4 ': '; ;, ';'; ''"" ":; .";- .. .- ..,.-. .,., : .. : .." ..

S seen Polly herself do, when he had teazed and tormented her
too long.

S When Tommy again awoke, it was to find himself hurry-
S ing along in front of two rabbits, one of whom held a gun
just like his own toy gun, which kept popping away at him,
S while he ran wildly about here and there, to escape the shot
which he felt certain would strike him sooner or later. Oh
how much he wished he had never fired at his own dear little
S rabbits, and how frightened he was of these big ones!
Bang! Bang! And he rolled over and was seized and
S put in a bag by the biggest rabbit, who said, He is fat,
what a fine one. Shall we say curry or smothered in onions ?"
S Poor Tommy felt smothered enough in the bag without any
onions, and thought how good he would be if only once he |
S got back to his dear and happy home.

Strangely enough he was at home, and in the kitchen too,
he knew it well; he was just by the corner of the kitchen
clock, and here there are generally some blackbeetles if you
S go late at night, or early in the morning, and even one or
two in the afternoon, if the day is dull and dark.
Here was the place where Johnny and he had crushed the
S beetles in the afternoon, and now he saw a blackbeetle
:l coming towards him. As it approached, it grew bigger and
bigger, and at last it lifted up its foot, on which was a big
boot, and said, "Suppose I stamp on you, young man!"
Poor Tommy woke up with a start, thankful to have escaped
such a fate, and resolving never to tread on any beetle or
other insect again.

A bell ringing loudly in his ears, startled Tommy out of
: a quiet dose of a few minutes duration, and he saw before
: him the unfortunate baker's boy; the lad's eyes were swollen
with tears, and he balanced a large tray of muffins on his

'" -,''. :,.-,-,.. .. ........ .... ..... .. ,
............................









S head. As he came near Tommy's bed, he upset the whole
tray on the counterpane, all over Tommy, only a few muffins
S and crumpets remained on the tray, and these began to look
like people, and to smile and laugh at him.
All the muffins and crumpets on the bed ran about all
S over Tommy, and danced round him without a word.
Tommy implored the baker's boy to take them off him, but
the boy only said, "I wish I could get them back, but you
.- upset them, and only you can get them back." Tommy tried
in vain to catch the muffins and replace them on the. tray.
As soon as he got one up, down it ran on its quaint little
black legs, and then they all laughed so loudly that Tommy
woke with the noise.

What a bad night I am having," he said, and longed for
S the morning. He thought of the next day, and of how lonely
S he would be without his mother and sisters, for he well knew
., that Johnny would not again be asked to spend the day with
him, and he sadly thought that if he had but been good, he
S would have had a lovely ride on the elephant, and seen the
S lions fed, and given buns to the bears, and have passed a
really delightful day with his dear mother and little sisters.
Thinking of all this, he again fell off into a quieter sleep
than he had yet enjoyed, and he dreamed that he was riding
on the dear old elephant, and that the creature could talk,
and that he said, "Why, Tommy, I can hardly believe you
S are a cruel child, you were so kind and pleasant to me last
S time you came to the Zoo."
Tommy hung his head and felt ashamed that the clever
elephant should know of his bad conduct, he did not know
what to say in reply; the elephant continued, "You ought
S to be punished, so that you would never forget your duty to
dumb animals." But you can talk, I have no duty to you,"
said Tommy. You have duties towards all animal creation;
:" every man and every boy has his duty to do to every living
.-. "
. ... .






20


thing he meets, and has to do with. You must be taught
this if you do not know it," so saying, the elephant took
Tommy up with his trunk and dropped him into the bear's
den. In an instant he was surrounded by all the animals he
remembered to have seen; bears, the brown and the white
bear, the lion and the tiger, the wild boar and the monkey,
the kangaroo, the hyena; the giraffe stretched his long neck
down to him, and the elephant hung his head and trunk
down, while the large owl and the pelican flew down with a
great and hissing noise; thus he found himself completely
surrounded by animals and birds who closed round him and
asked him whether he was sorry for the past, and if he
intended to be in future kind and merciful, or harsh and
unkind to animals.
* Tommy at once said, "' I will be kind and good, do let me
go home to my mother."
No, Tommy," they all said; "you must show us you mean
to be kind. What is that you have in that plate?"
"Cake," said Tommy, "and only a little bit, not enough
for you all."
"Quite enough if given to me," they cried out, and came
nearer and nearer, while Tommy in his fright began to scatter
his cake eagerly among them.
More cake, more cake," they shouted, and pressed so closely
round Tommy that he shrieked with fright and woke.

He was in his own bed safe and sound, a light in the
room, and both Mother and Nurse at his bedside
S" Its those nasty muffins, mum," said Nurse. Master
Tommy has got a regular nightmare."
Tommy clung to his mother.
"I will be good and kind," he said, I will never hurt any-
thing again."
"That is right, Tommy," said his mother; "but now you
S must just take this little dose of medicine like a good boy."

*









Tommy drank down the medicine, which was very nasty,
without a word; his head ached, he had a lump in his chest,
and his hands were burning. His kind Mother carried him
into her own bed and held him in her arms until he fell
into a quiet sleep, and in the morning he woke up much better,
but still a little pale and very quiet, for him.
The little girls were sent off with Nurse to the Zoological
Gardens, and Mrs. Tiptop and Tommy passed the day alone.
It was not a dull day to Tommy, for Mrs. Tiptop read to
him and talked to him, and told much that was interesting
about the habits of animals.
3 As Tommy gradually recovered from the effects of his
ME naughty conduct, Mrs. Tiptop took him out with her into the
S garden; here he had the pain of seeing the rabbits frightened
at his appearance, and it was a long time before he could
coax them to eat the nice carrots he brought them. When
he went into the poultry yard, 'the fowls flew before him; in
S the stable the dogs ran and hid themselves, while pussey
looked out in alarm from the loft. One day's unkindness had
S frightened them, and they looked on their little master with
^ terror instead of affection.
The tears were in poor Tommy's eyes: "When will they
% love me again ?" he said, sadly.
"When you have again won their confidence," his mother
replied; "but you must be patient and quiet, feed them
regularly, and speak always very gently to them; and now
let us try to find the poor muffin boy, and tell his master the
whole truth."
Tommy felt in a great fright, but he knew that he must
XE obey, and he felt that his mother would understand how he
felt (for mothers always do feel for little boys and girls), and
would help him out of his difficulty. So he held his mother's
hand rather tightly, and they went off together to the baker. 3
Mrs. Tiptop entered the shop just as the baker was piling
up the. muffin tray with muffins and crumpets.
"h'W_)" 39






22


None o' your tricks to-day," said the baker, roughly; "just
you behave till your time is up on Saturday, or you'll be in
gaol before you know where you are."
The poor boy was just beginning to defend himself, when
he caught sight of Tommy and his mother, he crimsoned, and
remained silent.
My little boy has come to pay for the muffins he ate and
destroyed yesterday, and to say how sorry he is for behaving
so wrongly."
"Then it was true, Bob," said the baker, "that the young
S gentleman took your muffins, well I couldn't believe as how
young gentlemen could have stole yer muffins. Oh, ma'am, I
am sorry for you."
Tommy felt the colour rise up into his face and ears and
neck, and felt hot all over.
"I am really sorry," he said, Mr. Weighwell. I will pay
for them all, and I hope you and Bob will forgive me," and he
began to cry.
Looky here," said the baker, Master Tommy, what I feel
so is that I've been that unjust to Bob, and nigh broke his
mother's heart by sending him off with a bad character as a
thief and a liar, and 'tis you as stole my muffins."
S"I did not mean to steal them," said Tommy, sobbing.
If you take what don't belong to you its stealing, plain
enough," replied Mr. Weighwell, "you can't alter that."
It will be a lesson to Tommy for life," said his mother,
gently; "but I should be glad to know what Tommy can do
to make amends to Bob for the suffering he has caused him."
Oh, I'm all right now, ma'am," said poor Bob, who looked
bright enough. Master won't send me off now, and I'm sure
Master Tommy need need not cry so."
Tommy lifted his little face, all covered with tears, and said,
"Mother, I could help Bob, I could ring the muffin bell for
him, and perhaps carry the tray."
"No, Sir," said Mr. Weighwell, "but you could go some-
9" oZ









times and read to Bob's mother, who cannot read for herself,
and she would be very glad of a visit from you. Ringing the
bell is the best part of a muffin boy's work, and they never
shirk that, but reading aloud is another thing, and if you read
S the Bible once a week to an old woman, you'll be helping her
S and yourself too."
"Thank you, Mr. Weighwell, for the suggestion; I am
S only too glad if my little boy can do a kindness," said Mrs.
Tiptop; and now let me know what my Tommy owes you
for the muffins and crumpets, he has brought his money-
box and will be glad to get out of debt."
After some calculation and talk between Bob and his
master as to the number of muffins taken out and the few
brought home, and the three-pennyworths and the six-penny-
worths left at various homes before Bob had called at Mrs.
Tiptop's house, and the result was that Tommy had to pay 1
three shillings and tenpence, which he did cheerfully, although
his little store of savings was nearly exhausted by this outlay,
but he felt happier to see the baker put the money in his
till, and to see Bob look cheerful.
"Now remember," said the baker, very solemnly, "that
you took these muffins without paying for them, and you
could have been sent to prison, and that you must never
take anything which does not belong to you, nor use other
people's things without asking them,
It is a sin,
To steal a pin,
and I hope, Master Tommy, that this is the last trouble your
S poor Ma will have with you."
Will you forgive me, Bob," said Tommy, "I am so sorry ?"
es, my dear," said Bob, who felt quite happy, of course
I will, and Master Johnny too; it was all mischief and fun."
It is no fun to do wrong, Bob, 'the way of transgressors
S is hard,' and Tommy has been very unhappy for many hours
after his few minutes of 'fun."'









Mrs. Tiptop then took Tommy home, and the little fellow
was very silent and subdued, at last he said:
Mother, I don't think I read well enough for Bob's mother." .
No, dear, I do not think she would enjoy your reading
yet, but I will go and see her and read to her till you can
read well enough; in the meantime you shall read out loud
to me, and we will choose nice amusing books about animals,
and you will see how much there, is to learn about them if
you will only make them love you."
But how can I make amends to Bob, he was much kinder
than Mr. Weighwell."
Mr. Weighwell was your true friend, Tommy, for he
showed you how very serious a matter a piece of mischief
may become; you thought nothing of destroying and taking
I Bob's muffins, but he knew perfectly well that had you come
to his shop and taken a loaf, he would have sent for the M
police, and he wished to show you the danger as well as the
wickedness of your conduct."
"Mother, I will never, never take a crumb that does not
belong to me; do believe me."
My dearest boy, I always do believe you, for with all ^
your faults you are always truthful, and now you promise I
know I may trust you; but you must think, Tommy, before
you act, and consider others more and yourself less. For
instance, you are always taking your sisters' toys and dolls
and they do not belong to you; all the animals, except your
own rabbits and chickens and your own dog, are your father's
and mine, and you treat everything as if it is yours.
"When you want a sheet of paper you help yourself, you
run to my pincushion for a pin, you use my brushes or
your sisters' if they are handier than your own, you treat ;
everything as if it is yours by right, and it is only now
this dreadful thing has happened that I see how wrongly my
darling child has acted, and how wrong Mother has been to
allow Tommy's naughty ways.
N,









"All the nursery toys were all your own for so long, that
is the only excuse I can see for us both, Tommy, but we
don't want to excuse ourselves, we must do right and we
must pray to be guided in the right way; we must ask for
a right judgment in all things, and by being kind and
thoughtful for others, we shall cure our faults and avoid all
the errors of the past.
"And now, my darling boy, cheer up and begin to put
your good resolutions at once in practice to-day."
Mother," said Tommy, squeezing her hand hard, may
I give Bob a pair of my rabbits ?"
"Yes, dear, but they will be of no use to him without a
rabbit hutch."
"I will give him the hutch and all," said Tommy; or I
will try to make one for him."
Mrs. Tiptop smiled, but she was glad to see her boy really
wish by a little self-sacrifice to make some amends, however
small, to the boy he had injured.
When Tommy reached home he found his father was quite
willing to help him in making a nice new rabbit hutch for
Bob, and while they drew plans and made measurements,
Mr. Tiptop talked to Tommy about his friend Johnny, whose
father he had seen that evening, and who told him that
S Johnny was very ill indeed; the raw muffins had disagreed
With him, and he was in a violent fever, and did not even
know his mother when she spoke to him. It was many weeks
S before the little friends met, and they were both very much
surprised at the change which had taken place in each other.
^ During the long weary hours when Johnny was recovering M
from his illness, his great amusement had been a little puppy
si' who-thanks to his being kind and gentle with it-had learned
many pretty little tricks and nice ways, and Johnny was
proud to show Tommy that the puppy could beg, would
walk on his hind legs, would catch a piece of biscuit or
"trust" for it, and would pretend to be dead, and would
-1: .,: -b









fetch and carry at the will of his little master, and did every
trick of which a little dog is capable, Johnny had learnt
patience in his illness, which was entirely brought on by his
own fault, and both boys were not only truly sorry for what
they had done, but firmly resolved to be kind and good to
all around them, and especially to dumb animals who are
unable to complain of those who inflict needless sufferings
upon them.
That the two little boys were now much happier than when
they were always in mischief and trouble, is hardly neces-
sary to say. They were always delighted to see Bob, and
to hear his account of the rabbits in which they were very
much interested.
Time passed on, as time has a habit of doing, and the boys
^ grew better and wiser and kinder as each day went by; they .
tried to do one kind action every day to some person, or to
some thing, and soon they got into the habit of looking out
for chances of helping others, so that they were loved by all,
and they grew up good men and remained firm friends all
their lives. Being kind to all around them, they took happi-
ness with them wherever they went, and the world was happier
and better for their existence. It was but a small world at
first, just their home circle, then a larger world, that of school
life, and then the largest world of grown up, manly life. They
were quite happy, because they tried to make others happy, A
and never thought about themselves, which is the secret of
being happy. To make others happy is our duty, and brings
its own reward with it, and especially it is our duty to be kind
Sand merciful to all animals.


THE END,


--.

. -, ;'







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ORIGINAL POEMS for Infant Minds.
By ANN and JANE TAYLOR.

The Child's Guide to Knowledge, containing useful
lessons on every day subjects, and thousands of facts relating to the Arts
and Sciences.

HI STORY OF ENGLAND, from the Conquest of Britain
by the Romans, to the death of George III.

The Christian Year. Sunday and Holy Days.
Thoughts in Verse for Sundays throughout the Year.
By the Rev. JOHN KEBLE.

History, Habits, and Instincts of Animals,
as Manifesting the Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God.
FROM THE BRIDGE WA TER TREATISE.
By Rev. WILLIAM KIRBY. M.A., F.R.S.

MYRA AND SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON.


_ __._. :




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title The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
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The tribulations of Tommy Tiptop
author role Publisher Myra & Son
extent [8], 26, [4] p., [16] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
publisher Myra & Son
pubPlace London
c1893
type ALEPH 002225048
NOTIS ALG5320
OCLC 214285115
notesStmt
note anchored true Title page printed in colors, text printed in red and blue borders.
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Tommy is a little thug who drowns kittens, pesters puppies and decimates the lesser creation; he gets his comeuppance in a series of dreams in which the roles of tormentor and tormented are reversed as in The World Upside Down.
The preface is signed M.B.
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item Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction
Dreams -- Juvenile fiction
Animals -- Juvenile fiction
Repentance -- Juvenile fiction
Insects -- Juvenile fiction
Birds -- Juvenile fiction
England -- London
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893
Bldn -- 1893
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Frontispiece
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Page
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THE TRIBULATIONS
TOMMY
TIPTOP,
J E PRAYETH BEST WHO LOVEST BEST,
fLL THINGS BOTH GREAT AND SMALL."
Co/kridgc.
LONDON:
MYRA & SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET,
UE NT GA RI )N.
- -- -- ----- 7- -- f
9 00012.jpg
Table of Contents
10 00013.jpg
CONTENTS.
X FART 1. PAY TIME. TOMMY S TRICKS.
SART 2. EIGHT TIME. TOMMYIS TRIBULATIONS.
i-Tribulatin wh te Cs.
I-Tribulation with the Cats.
2-Tribulation with the Birds.
3-Tribulation with the Dogs.
4-Tribulation with the Wasp.
5-Tribulation with the Fowls.
j 6-Tribulation with the Butterfly, &c.
7-Tribulation with the Puppies.
8-Tribulation with the Fish.
9-Tribulation with the Doll.
Io-Tribulation with the Parrot.
I 1-Tribulation with the Daddy-Longlegs.
S12-Tribulation with the Mice.
I3-Tribulation with the Rabbits,
i4-Tribulation with the Muffin Boy.
S5s-Tribulation with the Beetle.
16-Tribulation at the Zoological Gardens.
9 Tommy's Awakening and Repentance.
11 00016.jpg
Preface
12 00017.jpg
PREFACE.
A Our duty towards others, and especially towards
Animals is now so seldom insisted on, that little
Apology is needed for bringing an old fashioned ,:
Principle before our readers. The object of this ~
R book is to show that all unkindness towards the
A animal creation merits -if it does not at once
A receive-punishment, and that to obey the law of
Kindness is our duty as well as our happiness.
M. B.
* ,
*
*
13 00020.jpg
Chapter
head Day time
14 00021.jpg
THE TRIBULATIONS
TOMMY TITOfo
CHAPTER I. DAY TIME.
n'I; E was not a really Bad Boy, our Tommy Tiptop,
IZ. he was only full of mischief, full of fun, and very
X thoughtless of any body but himself. Mrs. Tip-
,, ,_ top was a little bit to blame for this, for she had
," petted and spoiled Tommy until he was, as the
S maids said, "a dreadful trouble and worse than
any plague of Egypt," but that remark was made
the day he tried to poach eggs on a gridiron, which, as you
know, is not very well adapted for that purpose.
Tommy was her eldest child and he had no little brothers
or sisters until he was four years old, so that he had more toys,
more play, and more goodies, and a great deal more indul-
gence and treats than most little boys get, which is a little
excuse for some of his naughty ways.
Then too, he was always really sorry when his much too kind
mother showed him how naughty he was, but when she was not
there, he too often forgot her gentle words of advice and only
thought of fun and frolic, and did not think of the mischief he
did, or of the pain he caused to others. His little sisters ran
from him and hid their pretty little faces in nurse's gown ;
Nurse herself, though very fond of Tommy, put all the best
dolls and toys well out of his reach for she said she could not
answer for the safety of Miss Victoria and Ethereda's favourites
15 00022.jpg
when Master Tommy was "in high spirits," which was under-
stood by all in the house to mean that Tommy was in one of
his very naughty fits of mischief. I dare not tell my dear little
readers one half of the naughty things which Tommy did,
S although I feel quite sure that they would not copy him in one
of them, but it is so bad for little people, or indeed for big
I people, to have naughty companions, that I know they would
S be sorry to even look at Tommy's pictures in this book, or to
S read all about the dreadful things which happened to him, and
which quite cured him at last of all his tricks. -
-.1 Mrs. Tiptop often told him in her gentle words that nothing
was more displeasing to the great God who made us than to be -
S cruel to his creatures, and yet this thoughtless boy was con-
stantly hurting some insect or animal. Mr. Tiptop was very
S fond of pets, and kept a nice Tabby cat and several nice large .
dogs in his stable yard; this yard was a great amusement to
Tommy, who was delighted to see some dear little kittens one
fine morning. He played for some time with the dear little
kittens, and gave them names, Spot and Bob, Jet and Snow. "
S The kittens were more pleased to see Tommy than their mother
was, as she well knew how very cruel he could be when he was
S inclined to be naughty, but the little kits purred and rubbed
S against his hands, and jumped over his shoes, and gambolled
S round him quite prettily. Presently he trod on one and it ^
squeaked so funnily that he trod on another just to hear it
S again. Their mother began to be cross, and Tommy thought it
best to retreat, but he said as he went, there are too many
of you kits, some of you must be drowned; why not this one?
His eyes are blue, a very ugly colour," and off he ran to find his
S playmate Johnny, who was older and much stronger than ,
Tommy.
Y When the two little lads returned together, the poor little
kittens felt uneasy; they did not understand what their little
master had said, but they very well remembered he had hurt
S them. The boys first shut up Mrs. Tabby in the stable, and
.. ..1 ,. .... ... .. .. .. .....-. .. .
.--
------------------------ -- J~~
16 00023.jpg
17 00025.jpg
3
then put all the kittens into a basket some distance away from
their mother, who mewed and cried bitterly; they then got a
pail of quite cold water, and began to drown the poor little kits. .
Jet was the first victim; her poor pretty little black head went
under the cold water, and though she struggled hard, down she
; went and soon all her sufferings were over, and poor little Jet
was dead. When Spot saw this, he struggled so when Tommy -
caught him up, that he slipped out of his cruel arms and ran
mewing to the stable door. We had better not drown all,"
said Tommy. No; we'll keep two for fighting," Johnny replied,
one is no good," so that one poor little kitten was saved for
S this cruel purpose, and Snow being gentle and peaceable, was
-: drowned on the spot, while Bob, after being well bathed in
S the pail, was allowed to run shivering back to his miserable
mother, who sprang out as soon as the stable door was opened.
She ran to the pail crying so sadly that John said they had
better take the dead kittens away and bury them, so they agreed
S to play at funerals, of which sport, however, they soon got very
S tired, and fought a little to settle a small quarrel as to which of
: the two naughty boys was to be the clergyman. This fight
together, with the fact that Johnny was so much stronger than
Tommy, and that he hurt most, reminded them that they meant
to have a cat fight, but on their return to the stable-yard, pussy
-.". had carried her kittens up to the loft to a place of safety where
)S the wicked boys could not find her, and there she hoped to bring
S up her sadly reduced family in peace.
These naughty boys then thought of the puppies, which
were now about six months old, and were very intelligent and
friendly.
It was easy enough to decoy them away from their mother,
S but far more difficult to make them fight, for they were dear
S good-natured little pet things, who were always playing
together. However, each boy took a puppy, and by holding the
little creatures and making them scratch each other with their
S little claws, the boys made them cross and savage, and they bit
"l'"o'f;.-....'..*. .... *.... ... .........-- .- -. --* .
18 00026.jpg
and snarled for the first time in their innocent lives. Nor was
the mischief ended when the fight was over, for they went
growling and snapping at each other all the way back to their
mother, who wondered at their naughty tempers and scolded
them well.
Johnny next showed Tommy what he called "a jolly way of
catching flies and wasps" as they sunned themselves on the
garden wall, or walked along it for fruit, of which there was
plenty in that nice garden. Tommy soon learned the art, and
after some half-dozen attempts, caught a bluebottle fly and then
a wasp. Johnny, who was really a cruel boy, then pulled off the
fly's wings, and when Tommy said, How it must hurt them,"
replied, "They would squeak if it did," and foolish little
Tommy believed him, and pulled several Daddy-Long-Legs
to pieces because they are considered to be naughty insects by
many little ones on account of the nursery rhyme:
"Daddy, daddy long legs,
Would not say his prayers,
Take him by the right leg,
Take him by the left leg,
And throw him down the stairs."
After which cruel sport, Johnny told Tommy all about
birds' nesting, and climbing trees, and taking away eggs
and little birds, and related how he had taken a nest with five
little birds in it, and had fed them with bread, and how two
choked at once, and the other three birds died in the night: for
they cannot live without their dear mother's warm wings to
cover them up, and they are tender and chilly until after they
have all their feathers and can fly about and keep themselves
warm, as well as find their own food. Johnny also spoke of
shooting rabbits, and both these naughty lads fired off their
toy guns into the rabbit hutches, frightening the poor rabbits,
although they could npt kill them, and causing some tiny
rabbits, two days old, to die with fright. How the poor
rabbits did scamper about! And how their little hearts went
pit-a-pat!
19 00027.jpg
20 00029.jpg
Tired of this thoughtless sport, they rode Johnny's bicycle by
turns through the chicken yard, terrifying the fowls, and causing
them to fly in all directions. They disturbed an old hen who
was leading her young chickens to some grits which had been
thrown down for their benefit, and ran over several poor little
chickens, killing two and quite laming several others. Round
and round the yard they went in turn, frightening all the
peaceful hens, chickens, and ducks who felt quite surprised to
see the little boy who usually brought them food and was so
kind to them, mounted on a big wheel, and actually running
over them.
When Tommy saw the poor little chickens dead on the
ground he felt sorry, and he knew quite well how naughty
he had been, and he also thought how very sorry his dear
mother would be to find her pretty brood injured, for Mrs.
j Tiptop was pleased to have a brood so late in the year, for
the cold winds in spring had killed off nearly all the early
broods.
Tommy well remembered how delighted his mother was when
Sthe gardener, who looked after the fowls, told her that eleven
S chicks were hatched out by the old brown hen, who was always
a steady sitter, and how the chickens were brought in to the
house in a basket, and Tommy was allowed to see them and
Sto feed them with soft little seeds which his mother called
"grits," and when Brownie had finished hatching two more
S chicks, they were all placed carefully under her, and every
S day Tommy was allowed to feed the chickens.
And now he had killed two, and hurt many, and what would
his mother say? He could hardly bear to think of it, and
the tears came in his eyes, for he was not naturally a wicked,
cruel boy, but was so easily led astray by his companions,
S and he thought it was grown up, and grand, not to care,
and was too thoughtless to mind how he hurt others in
his amusements; all he thought of was Tommy Tiptop, and
when either boys or girls think too much of themselves they
21 00030.jpg
are certain to become selfish'and cruel, for all selfishness is
S cruelty to others.
But now some words his mother had said came suddenly
into his thoughts:-
'Evil is wrought,
By want of thought,
As well as want of heart;"
and he began to look very sad.
When Johnny saw this, he asked Tommy what was the
matter, and Tommy pointed to the dead chickens, and Johnny
a only laughed in his rude way.
*" Pooh," he said, you are a baby." Now Tommy dreaded
of all things to be thought and called a baby, perhaps because
he often behaved like one, and cried for nothing, and so he
H quickly wiped his eyes and said boldly, What shall we do
next ?" as if all this naughty behaviour was not quite enough
for one morning, and yet, (though both boys felt hungry), it
was only half-past eleven o'clock, as they found when they 1
went into the house for something to eat.
S With a slice of plum cake in each hand, the little boys
S ran out again eagerly into the bright sunshine; the garden
looked bright with flowers, and over head were butterflies,
some white ones, and also a beautiful Peacock Butterfly. "I
must have that butterfly," cried Tommy. "I am collecting
butterflies."
So am I," replied Johnny. Off the boys ran, cap in hand,
after the lovely insect; Tommy's hat soon held the captive
which was roughly seized, and placed on a cork, the pretty
wings were blown open, and a cruel pin ran through the
quivering body, while the wings were spread open by bands
of postage stamp paper.
It will look nice when 'set' properly," Johnny said, with
a sigh of envy, for he longed for the butterfly.
"I will give you a Stag Beetle for the Peacock Butterfly,
~~*****g
22 00031.jpg
23 00033.jpg
and a Sun Fly out of the roses, and, let me see, a lizard-
-:, as soon as I catch one. Only think of a lizard, Tommy!"
Yes, but you have not caught it yet," replied Tommy,
who wished to keep his lovely Peacock ;" "and I don't know
that I shall collect lizards. I have never seen one yet in
This garden." By the time the poor Peacock Butterfly was
pinned down and set, the boys found that the white butter-
I flies had flown away, and so they had lost the pleasure of
catching them.
Little Frisk, the black and tan terrier, ran up to Tommy
at this moment, and was at once harnessed to a very large
cart which had belonged to Tommy when he was younger, and
S which he still called his own. Poor Frisk was not big enough
to pull the cart, but he had to submit, and a bit was put in
t his little mouth, and the reins were fastened, and he was well
S tied in to the cart, and made to draw it along the garden
path, whether he liked doing so or no.
Frisk did not like this at all, but it was worse when Tommy
got in the cart and Johnny ran alongside with a large stick
and gave poor Frisk a blow every time he stopped running,
Which hurt him dreadfully. Luckily for the poor little dog,
Nurse saw them from the nursery window, which overlooked
the garden, and came down at once to relieve the poor little
:i dog, and to scold the boys. She took Frisk indoors, after
S telling the little boys to wash their hands for dinner.
Mrs. Tiptop was extremely fond of plants and flowers of
all kinds, and her pretty conservatory was full of flowering
plants of great beauty. In the centre of the conservatory
was a small fountain, surrounded by a large stone basin, in .;
S which lilies and other water loving plants grew. The water
from the fountain fell into a smaller basin which overflowed
into the large one and fell on the plants. In the large basin
were gold and silver fish, which were very pretty and very
tame.
"Oh, what jolly fish you have got !" said Johnny.
24 00034.jpg
"They are so tame they will eat bread; they come up as
soon as we throw crumbs in," replied Tommy. Stay, the
cloth is laid, and there is sure to be bread cut in the dining-
room, I will run and get some."
On Tommy's return, Johnny proposed they should fish.
Tommy did not like the idea of his poor mother's fish being
taken out of the water, and said so, but Johnny burst out
laughing, and again called him a baby and a coward, and
said, "You are afraid! afraid! afraid! I dare you to fish!"
and silly Tommy, who was so foolish as to mind being dared,"
at once consented. With a small hook which Johnny had in
a pocketbook, and a crumb of bread, it was easy to catch the
very tame gold fish, but how the poor fish wriggled and
writhed when the hook was taken out! And oh! how soon
the fish died, although Tommy held it in the water and tried
in vain to restore it to life: it was dead, and Tommy reflected
sadly that there was another dreadful thing to tell mother
on her return from uncle Richard's house, where she was
spending the day with his little sisters. He wondered what
she would say, and if his father would know of it, and he
wished he had not let Johnny "dare" him to fish.
Johnny in the meantime was fishing away without a word,
and a long row of struggling, dying fish met Tommy's eye
when he turned round.
Tommy flung as many as he could back into the water
before Johnny could stop him, and the two little boys had a
scuffle over the fish, which ended only when they were called
to dinner by Nurse, who waited on them and kept order during
the dinner. It was much too nice a dinner for such naughty
children, hot roast chicken and roly jam pudding, with. some
lovely peaches for desert.
The little boys enjoyed it all immensely, and were quiet
and good for some time afterwards; they went up into the
nursery to take the peach stones to the parrot, but they teazed
that poor bird dreadfully, they poked sticks through the bars
25 00035.jpg
26 00037.jpg
of the cage, and pelted Polly with marbles, teazing her until
she screamed for help, as well as annoying the poor bird by
calling her Ugly Polly! Nasty Polly! Horrid Polly! Polly
is an ugly bird !" with other remarks of a similar nature. Then
they took the dolls in hand and pulled off their hair, tore
their pretty clothing, and banged their faces with a hair brush.
W. Tommy pulled out the eyes of the lovely doll who opened
S them when she sat up, and closed them when she lay down,
for he had often longed to see what made them act so well,
and here was a good opportunity
Poor Dolly, of course, made no remark, but she felt bitterly
the loss of her two pretty blue eyes; she vowed vengeance,
but could not shed a tear, for she had no eyes to cry with.
S The naughty boys heard Nurse's footstep and hurried into
a large cupboard, in which brooms and brushes, pails and
S dustpans were kept, so as to be handy for the maids, and
here they found a mousetrap and a little mouse; they called
S "Puss, puss," to the terror of the little mouse, whose bright
little eyes showed how dreadfully frightened he was of the
boys, and still more so of the big cat which soon made an
J'" end of the poor little thing, for as soon as Johnny raised ^
the door of the trap, out ran mousie, and snip-snap went
the cat, and mousie lay dead on the floor.
The boys then ran down to see if Mrs. Tiptop was
coming home, then they went down into the kitchen and
teazed cook by taking a beetle out of the blackbeetle trap and
putting it on her neck. How she screamed and ran about
and flung the beetle off. Tommy saw it run towards him, and
so he stamped on it with his thick boot and killed it.
S Cook drove the naughty boys away out of the kitchen;
she was now very cross and angry, and they felt they had
S better run away, so up the kitchen steps they flew.
Just as they got up to the top, they met the baker's boy
with his tray of muffins; they heard his bell tingle, and
they asked him for a muffin.
27 00038.jpg
Muffins are not good when raw and untoasted, and the
baker's boy told them so, but they did not believe him. We
will have some, we shall have some," they cried, and rushed
upon the lad who tried in vain to protect his tray from the
sturdy little robbers. Johnny pulled the end of the green
baize cloth, which kept the muffins hot, and down they fell
in a shower of round white dabs, all on the garden gravel
Sand then they went rolling down the kitchen steps.
The poor boy cried out, My master will beat me, he will
never believe two young gentlemen would behave so. Oh
Sdear, oh dear! What shall I do!" Tommy and Johnny
seized on the muffins, while the poor lad was thus lamenting,
" and began to eat them as hard as they could. The baker's
boy, with tears, picked up the cleanest, and went back to his
master and told him how Master Tiptop and his friend had
thrown down all his muffins, eaten some, and spoilt others;
Sbut the baker could not believe that a child of that nice little
Mrs. Tiptop would be so naughty, and told the poor boy he
must pay for the loss, so he would have hardly any wages
to take home to his mother, who was a very poor woman.
See what dreadful mischief these thoughtless boys did I!
The poor boy begged in vain to be believed, he cried and
sobbed and asked the baker to see Mrs. Tiptop on the
Subject, but he refused, saying, He must not risk offend- ,
ing a good customer, and that the boy must pay for his
Carelessnesss"
Meanwhile the two naughty boys had eaten the untoasted
muffins till they were tired of them, or rather until they felt
very uncomfortable, so that when tea time came they could
eat nothing at all.
About half-past six o'clock Mrs. Tiptop returned with
the dear little girls, and Tommy heard them run up to the
nursery at once to tell Nurse all about the pleasant day they
had passed at their uncle's house, while Mrs. Tiptop asked,
Where are the boys?" quite surprised at their absence.
28 00039.jpg
29 00041.jpg
"I expect they are quite ashamed to see you, ma'am," the
J housemaid said; they have been at mischief all day long."
Mrs. Tiptop at once sent Johnny home to his mother, and
S made up her mind not to again invite him to spend the day;
she ordered Tommy to go to her room, and when she had
taken off her things and put them by, she called to Tommy
^ to come to her, and asked him what he had done all day
in her absence. :
Tommy was a truthful child, and I am happy to say he
never once thought of not owning his faults, so he began
the sad list of wrong, of cruel, and of wicked things which :
he had done, and as he told her of-
His drowning the little kittens in the yard.
.:. Of setting the poor puppies to fight. :
-. Of catching the wasps and flies.
t" Of pulling the Daddy-long-legs to pieces.
Of running a pin through the lovely butterfly. -
Of killing the chickens.
Of driving the dog and beating it.
Of fishing for the poor gold fish.
Of breaking the dolls.
Of teazing the parrot.-'
Of giving the mouse to the cat.
Of frightening the rabbits to death.
Of "squashing" the blackbeetle.
And of upsetting the baker's tray, and eating his muffins.
The tears come into Mrs. Tiptop's eyes for she felt that
S her own little son was a cruel, bad little boy, and that she
could not love him again as she did before she knew how
cruelly he could behave. "
-2 When Tommy saw his mother cry, his little heart was :.
very sad, she was such a dear, kind, loving mother, and he
S felt so sorry that he cried too, and he promised her that he
S would never, never be cruel again, and that he would ask
the baker's lad to forgive him, and would pay for the muffins,
..<- /* .; ^Pa
30 00042.jpg
l2
and would bear any punishment if she would only kiss and
love him once more.
"Ah, Tommy," his mother replied, "your sorrow will not
restore the little creatures to life, the little creatures God has
made for our pleasure and comfort, and which we keep for
our own amusement. I must punish you, my boy, and I
think the best way will be to send away all our animals, our
l dogs and cats, our birds and rabbits, our parrot, and our
fish, and not let you have anything at all to teaze."
"Oh no, dear Mother, don't do that, you will punish every
one for my fault, anything but that."
"Well, Tommy, then I think I must say you shall not go
to the Zoological Gardens with us all on Wednesday. Your
VI" uncle has promised to take us, and has asked me if you like
W, riding the elephants, and seeing the lions fed, watching the
monkeys, and giving buns to the bears, and looking at all
the curious birds and beasts which he knows all about, and ^
can tell you of."
Poor Tommy felt this was indeed a punishment, but he also
knew that he well deserved even a severer punishment than
this for his wickedness, and so he said Good night," and
went off to bed at once, sobbing and really sorry for his
faults.
As he was so truly sorry, Mrs. Tiptop gave him one kiss
S for good night in his little bed, but it was a very sad kiss,
S for she sighed and said, Oh, Tommy, Tommy, who would
have thought you could be so cruel; pray to God to forgive
you, my boy," and then she said:
S"He prayeth best who loveth best
_All creatures great and small;
For the Great God who loveth us,
He made and loveth all."
Poor Tommy sobbed himself to sleep.
(g^r ^^5
31 00043.jpg
Night time
32 00045.jpg
H CHAPTER II.
NIGHT TIME.
S"My gentle boy, remember this is nothing but a dream."-Eugene Arami
0 ,-.- "1H dear! dear! What is this that is scratching
me so and holding me so hard and tight!
S Oh, how you hurt me to be sure," cried Tommy,
as he struggled in vain, for two large birds
-.i. were perched on the iron railings of his crib,
-:: and were pulling him out of bed. "Come
I along with us at once," and they pulled and
S pulled until they got him out of the soft and cosy bed where
he had been tucked up only an hour before. No nonsense !
S Come along, it is not worse for Tommy than it is for Dicky
to be pulled out of his nest; come along, your nest is
not half full enough of feathers like our nests are, and we
want you to play with and sing to us," and in a minute,
S they were flying along with poor Tommy, who was
frightened and giddy, and worse than all, very unhappy
at being taken away from his dear mother and his happy
home. The Birds, however, were rejoicing, and put him into
a box with bars in front, and placed worms and slugs and
snails for him to eat, the very sight of which made him feel
S sick, and they came and worried him to eat, and worried him
to sing, but all the time he tried to get out, and bruised his
|p... -..'t-f -3 X^^^o^^
33 00046.jpg
arms and legs against the bars; all the while he felt very
S hungry and tired and weak, and then he remembered nothing
S more.
When next poor Tommy came to his senses, he found
himself cuddling up to his dear mother and feeling extremely
comfortable, when suddenly the door opened and an enor-
mous cat, followed by two kittens, came in. Tommy nestled
.2; closer to his mother, but the cat rudely seized hold of him
S saying:
There are too many of these children about; we must
drown some."
S Let us drown Tommy," one of the kittens said, "he is
m ugly, he is rude, he is no good at all; oh what ugly blue
eyes !" and the kitten scratched him.
Poor Tommy was carried off away from his mother, who M
sobbed and cried, and was taken into the yard close to the
S waterbutt, where a pail of water stood which he recollected
very well, much too well, for it was the same pail in which
he had drowned the kittens.
The cat held him by the feet, and the little kittens helped
to push him in, and down he went into the cold water, and
in spite of screams and struggles, shrieks and tears, Tommy
was held under the water until he lost his senses.
Suddenly he felt a sharp pain in his nose, and found himself
S hanging high out of the water, but in scarcely a better posi-
tion than if he had still been under it, for it is anything
S but comfortable to be hanging by the nose from a fishing rod.
Much to his surprise Tommy found that the fishing rod
was held by a large fish, who seemed delighted to have
caught the poor struggling boy. Mr. Fish hurt him so
much in taking out the fish hook, that Tommy struggled
still more, and was at last flung into a fisher's basket with
such a bang that he again became unconscious.
. ^ *;. ^:^^:G ; j;0^ (? Cn:^ ^;( ^
: :".. ::", ,.:.... : : i :, :--.:.-, : ,.. ., ''.:.- -., :.. :.v, t: L' ,d::.,.-:",... .r _
34 00047.jpg
35 00049.jpg
Aroused from this lethargy, Tommy found himself held -
by a big dog, and saw that his friend Johnny was in the
arms of a very large bulldog; the two boys, being always very
Friendly, began to talk, but the two dogs did not allow this
for one moment, but tried to make the little fellows fight; they
knocked their hands together and made them scratch each
other's faces with their nails, until the boys got cross with
:40 each other and began to call each other names, to double up
their little fists, and to strike out in earnest at each other's
face; Tommy felt red and angry, but he got the worst of
it; his eyes were blackened, his nose bled, and he lost his
dear little white front tooth.
Tommy's next adventure made him extremely uncomfort-
able; he was climbing a sunny wall in order to get some
ripe and tempting pears, and had nearly got to the top when
a large and fierce-looking wasp suddenly caught him in his
hand, exactly as Tommy caught flies on the garden wall, or
on the table cloth indoors; the wasp pinched his head hard
and hurt him so much that he shrieked out, when two large
Daddy-longlegs flew up to see what was the matter.
"Oh, this is the little wretch who pulled my sister's legs
J off, and my father's wings, and sang a rude song about
Daddy, daddy longlegs," instead of speaking of my respected
parents as 'D. Longlegs, Esq.,' as a gentleman should be
S addressed."
Let us pull him to pieces," they all shouted, and off went
a leg, and between pain and fright Tommy knew no more-
Until he found himself in a wooden box with one slanting
side, and iron bars at the top and on the other side. A
* strong smell of cheese pervaded the box.
Hush, be quiet till I fetch puss, she will soon finish -
him." The cat which the mice brought was as big as a
tiger, and Tommy had often seen tigers at the Zoological
36 00050.jpg
Gardens and knew what he would do with him; he shut his
eyes, he felt the door of the trap open, and felt he was sliding
out, down, down into the big mouth and hot breath, which
'I: seemed to smother him.
Tommy tried to run; he started, got away for a moment,
and found himself in the yard with Johnny and a lot of
other boys; their mothers were at a little distance, and called
to the children to get out of the way of a large Cock-a-doodle-
) doo, which, mounted on a bicycle, was driving furiously round
S and round. The cock was flapping its wings, crowing and
making a hideous and alarming noise. Tommy ran on, but
X he was not quite quick enough; on came the bicycle, down
fell Tommy, and both his poor little legs were cut off by
the wheel.
N It was a relief to find himself flying about his garden, well,
and rejoicing in the sunshine; he was again a happy, thought-
M less little boy. I must have dreamt of that cock," and he ran
A round and round the house, not looking where he went, he
3 was caught in a large net of the same colour as the grass. A
S" Are you collecting boys only," said a big stag beetle close
W by him, "or do you collect girls as well ?"
S "I prefer urchins," said the butterfly, who held the net;
"and this is a fine specimen. Tommy belongs to the small
roguey poguey breed, and will look very nice when I 'set'
j him on cork. At present I shall just pin him down com-
N fortably; where is my little mallet? Oh, thank you," she
said, taking it from a lizard who had kindly carried it for
her. One, two, three, there Tommy will do nicely for the
present," and off they flew, leaving poor Tommy writhing in
pain with a large pin stuck right through him.
Almost a relief to find himself able to move, although
S placed in the most unpleasant position of being tightly
~I
37 00051.jpg
38 00053.jpg
17
fastened into a cart, with a bit in his little red mouth,
and being driven with heavy blows by a dog very much
like his own Frisk," while a fat healthy puppy was
S holding the reins and driving poor To mmy on at a pretty
S fast pace.
Oh dear, I cannot go any faster," sighed poor Tommy.
Beat him harder," said the Puppy. "Gee up, Dobbin,"
and on and on they drove the miserable little boy.
J Again a change, but not a change for the better. Oh dear
no Banging blows on the head, hair pulled, clothes roughly
Dragged about, Miss Dolly was taking her vengeance on
Tommy for all the cruel tricks he had played her. What
strong arms she had, and she hit him with a hair brush
S until her arms ran down with sawdust, which never happens,
you know, unless a doll is quite worn out and exhausted.
Just as Dolly was going to put Tommy's eyes out with the
nursery scissors, he sprang away with a cry and crept into
the parrot's cage, where he sat quietly for a time, too weary ]
Sto speak.
Tommy's quiet was speedily disturbed by the arrival of the
lawful owner of the cage-Pretty Polly herself.
-l "What fun!" she cried. "Teazing Tommy in my cage,
sitting in my ring, and I have no doubt eating my Indian
corn and sop;" but poor Tommy was only too glad to be
quiet, and he had no wish to deprive Polly of any of her
S provisions, he only asked to rest and sit in peace in the large
S ring in Polly's cage. But quietness and comfort did not suit
Miss Polly, she kept putting her claws in and scratching
the child, and also bit him with her sharp, strong beak, she
scolded at him in shrill tones which went through his head,
and made herself extremely unpleasant in every way. Still
S he was too tired to mind much, but cuddled down with his
little arm over his face, and went off to sleep as he had often
39 00054.jpg
--^ .?., "" 'v .4 ': '; ;, ';'; ''"" ":; .";- .. .- ..,.-. .,., : .. : .." ..
S seen Polly herself do, when he had teazed and tormented her
too long.
S When Tommy again awoke, it was to find himself hurry-
S ing along in front of two rabbits, one of whom held a gun
just like his own toy gun, which kept popping away at him,
S while he ran wildly about here and there, to escape the shot
which he felt certain would strike him sooner or later. Oh
how much he wished he had never fired at his own dear little
S rabbits, and how frightened he was of these big ones!
Bang! Bang! And he rolled over and was seized and
S put in a bag by the biggest rabbit, who said, He is fat,
what a fine one. Shall we say curry or smothered in onions ?"
S Poor Tommy felt smothered enough in the bag without any
onions, and thought how good he would be if only once he |
S got back to his dear and happy home.
Strangely enough he was at home, and in the kitchen too,
he knew it well; he was just by the corner of the kitchen
clock, and here there are generally some blackbeetles if you
S go late at night, or early in the morning, and even one or
two in the afternoon, if the day is dull and dark.
Here was the place where Johnny and he had crushed the
S beetles in the afternoon, and now he saw a blackbeetle
:l coming towards him. As it approached, it grew bigger and
bigger, and at last it lifted up its foot, on which was a big
boot, and said, "Suppose I stamp on you, young man!"
Poor Tommy woke up with a start, thankful to have escaped
such a fate, and resolving never to tread on any beetle or
other insect again.
A bell ringing loudly in his ears, startled Tommy out of
: a quiet dose of a few minutes duration, and he saw before
: him the unfortunate baker's boy; the lad's eyes were swollen
with tears, and he balanced a large tray of muffins on his
'" -,''. :,.-,-,.. .. ........ .... ..... .. ,
............................
40 00055.jpg
41 00057.jpg
S head. As he came near Tommy's bed, he upset the whole
tray on the counterpane, all over Tommy, only a few muffins
S and crumpets remained on the tray, and these began to look
like people, and to smile and laugh at him.
All the muffins and crumpets on the bed ran about all
S over Tommy, and danced round him without a word.
Tommy implored the baker's boy to take them off him, but
the boy only said, "I wish I could get them back, but you
.- upset them, and only you can get them back." Tommy tried
in vain to catch the muffins and replace them on the. tray.
As soon as he got one up, down it ran on its quaint little
black legs, and then they all laughed so loudly that Tommy
woke with the noise.
What a bad night I am having," he said, and longed for
S the morning. He thought of the next day, and of how lonely
S he would be without his mother and sisters, for he well knew
., that Johnny would not again be asked to spend the day with
him, and he sadly thought that if he had but been good, he
S would have had a lovely ride on the elephant, and seen the
S lions fed, and given buns to the bears, and have passed a
really delightful day with his dear mother and little sisters.
Thinking of all this, he again fell off into a quieter sleep
than he had yet enjoyed, and he dreamed that he was riding
on the dear old elephant, and that the creature could talk,
and that he said, "Why, Tommy, I can hardly believe you
S are a cruel child, you were so kind and pleasant to me last
S time you came to the Zoo."
Tommy hung his head and felt ashamed that the clever
elephant should know of his bad conduct, he did not know
what to say in reply; the elephant continued, "You ought
S to be punished, so that you would never forget your duty to
dumb animals." But you can talk, I have no duty to you,"
said Tommy. You have duties towards all animal creation;
:" every man and every boy has his duty to do to every living
.-. "
. ... .
42 00058.jpg
20
thing he meets, and has to do with. You must be taught
this if you do not know it," so saying, the elephant took
Tommy up with his trunk and dropped him into the bear's
den. In an instant he was surrounded by all the animals he
remembered to have seen; bears, the brown and the white
bear, the lion and the tiger, the wild boar and the monkey,
the kangaroo, the hyena; the giraffe stretched his long neck
down to him, and the elephant hung his head and trunk
down, while the large owl and the pelican flew down with a
great and hissing noise; thus he found himself completely
surrounded by animals and birds who closed round him and
asked him whether he was sorry for the past, and if he
intended to be in future kind and merciful, or harsh and
unkind to animals.
* Tommy at once said, "' I will be kind and good, do let me
go home to my mother."
No, Tommy," they all said; "you must show us you mean
to be kind. What is that you have in that plate?"
"Cake," said Tommy, "and only a little bit, not enough
for you all."
"Quite enough if given to me," they cried out, and came
nearer and nearer, while Tommy in his fright began to scatter
his cake eagerly among them.
More cake, more cake," they shouted, and pressed so closely
round Tommy that he shrieked with fright and woke.
He was in his own bed safe and sound, a light in the
room, and both Mother and Nurse at his bedside
S" Its those nasty muffins, mum," said Nurse. Master
Tommy has got a regular nightmare."
Tommy clung to his mother.
"I will be good and kind," he said, I will never hurt any-
thing again."
"That is right, Tommy," said his mother; "but now you
S must just take this little dose of medicine like a good boy."
*
43 00059.jpg
44 00061.jpg
Tommy drank down the medicine, which was very nasty,
without a word; his head ached, he had a lump in his chest,
and his hands were burning. His kind Mother carried him
into her own bed and held him in her arms until he fell
into a quiet sleep, and in the morning he woke up much better,
but still a little pale and very quiet, for him.
The little girls were sent off with Nurse to the Zoological
Gardens, and Mrs. Tiptop and Tommy passed the day alone.
It was not a dull day to Tommy, for Mrs. Tiptop read to
him and talked to him, and told much that was interesting
about the habits of animals.
3 As Tommy gradually recovered from the effects of his
ME naughty conduct, Mrs. Tiptop took him out with her into the
S garden; here he had the pain of seeing the rabbits frightened
at his appearance, and it was a long time before he could
coax them to eat the nice carrots he brought them. When
he went into the poultry yard, 'the fowls flew before him; in
S the stable the dogs ran and hid themselves, while pussey
looked out in alarm from the loft. One day's unkindness had
S frightened them, and they looked on their little master with
^ terror instead of affection.
The tears were in poor Tommy's eyes: "When will they
% love me again ?" he said, sadly.
"When you have again won their confidence," his mother
replied; "but you must be patient and quiet, feed them
regularly, and speak always very gently to them; and now
let us try to find the poor muffin boy, and tell his master the
whole truth."
Tommy felt in a great fright, but he knew that he must
XE obey, and he felt that his mother would understand how he
felt (for mothers always do feel for little boys and girls), and
would help him out of his difficulty. So he held his mother's
hand rather tightly, and they went off together to the baker. 3
Mrs. Tiptop entered the shop just as the baker was piling
up the. muffin tray with muffins and crumpets.
"h'W_)" 39
45 00062.jpg
22
None o' your tricks to-day," said the baker, roughly; "just
you behave till your time is up on Saturday, or you'll be in
gaol before you know where you are."
The poor boy was just beginning to defend himself, when
he caught sight of Tommy and his mother, he crimsoned, and
remained silent.
My little boy has come to pay for the muffins he ate and
destroyed yesterday, and to say how sorry he is for behaving
so wrongly."
"Then it was true, Bob," said the baker, "that the young
S gentleman took your muffins, well I couldn't believe as how
young gentlemen could have stole yer muffins. Oh, ma'am, I
am sorry for you."
Tommy felt the colour rise up into his face and ears and
neck, and felt hot all over.
"I am really sorry," he said, Mr. Weighwell. I will pay
for them all, and I hope you and Bob will forgive me," and he
began to cry.
Looky here," said the baker, Master Tommy, what I feel
so is that I've been that unjust to Bob, and nigh broke his
mother's heart by sending him off with a bad character as a
thief and a liar, and 'tis you as stole my muffins."
S"I did not mean to steal them," said Tommy, sobbing.
If you take what don't belong to you its stealing, plain
enough," replied Mr. Weighwell, "you can't alter that."
It will be a lesson to Tommy for life," said his mother,
gently; "but I should be glad to know what Tommy can do
to make amends to Bob for the suffering he has caused him."
Oh, I'm all right now, ma'am," said poor Bob, who looked
bright enough. Master won't send me off now, and I'm sure
Master Tommy need need not cry so."
Tommy lifted his little face, all covered with tears, and said,
"Mother, I could help Bob, I could ring the muffin bell for
him, and perhaps carry the tray."
"No, Sir," said Mr. Weighwell, "but you could go some-
9" oZ
46 00063.jpg
47 00065.jpg
times and read to Bob's mother, who cannot read for herself,
and she would be very glad of a visit from you. Ringing the
bell is the best part of a muffin boy's work, and they never
shirk that, but reading aloud is another thing, and if you read
S the Bible once a week to an old woman, you'll be helping her
S and yourself too."
"Thank you, Mr. Weighwell, for the suggestion; I am
S only too glad if my little boy can do a kindness," said Mrs.
Tiptop; and now let me know what my Tommy owes you
for the muffins and crumpets, he has brought his money-
box and will be glad to get out of debt."
After some calculation and talk between Bob and his
master as to the number of muffins taken out and the few
brought home, and the three-pennyworths and the six-penny-
worths left at various homes before Bob had called at Mrs.
Tiptop's house, and the result was that Tommy had to pay 1
three shillings and tenpence, which he did cheerfully, although
his little store of savings was nearly exhausted by this outlay,
but he felt happier to see the baker put the money in his
till, and to see Bob look cheerful.
"Now remember," said the baker, very solemnly, "that
you took these muffins without paying for them, and you
could have been sent to prison, and that you must never
take anything which does not belong to you, nor use other
people's things without asking them,
It is a sin,
To steal a pin,
and I hope, Master Tommy, that this is the last trouble your
S poor Ma will have with you."
Will you forgive me, Bob," said Tommy, "I am so sorry ?"
es, my dear," said Bob, who felt quite happy, of course
I will, and Master Johnny too; it was all mischief and fun."
It is no fun to do wrong, Bob, 'the way of transgressors
S is hard,' and Tommy has been very unhappy for many hours
after his few minutes of 'fun."'
48 00066.jpg
Mrs. Tiptop then took Tommy home, and the little fellow
was very silent and subdued, at last he said:
Mother, I don't think I read well enough for Bob's mother." .
No, dear, I do not think she would enjoy your reading
yet, but I will go and see her and read to her till you can
read well enough; in the meantime you shall read out loud
to me, and we will choose nice amusing books about animals,
and you will see how much there, is to learn about them if
you will only make them love you."
But how can I make amends to Bob, he was much kinder
than Mr. Weighwell."
Mr. Weighwell was your true friend, Tommy, for he
showed you how very serious a matter a piece of mischief
may become; you thought nothing of destroying and taking
I Bob's muffins, but he knew perfectly well that had you come
to his shop and taken a loaf, he would have sent for the M
police, and he wished to show you the danger as well as the
wickedness of your conduct."
"Mother, I will never, never take a crumb that does not
belong to me; do believe me."
My dearest boy, I always do believe you, for with all ^
your faults you are always truthful, and now you promise I
know I may trust you; but you must think, Tommy, before
you act, and consider others more and yourself less. For
instance, you are always taking your sisters' toys and dolls
and they do not belong to you; all the animals, except your
own rabbits and chickens and your own dog, are your father's
and mine, and you treat everything as if it is yours.
"When you want a sheet of paper you help yourself, you
run to my pincushion for a pin, you use my brushes or
your sisters' if they are handier than your own, you treat ;
everything as if it is yours by right, and it is only now
this dreadful thing has happened that I see how wrongly my
darling child has acted, and how wrong Mother has been to
allow Tommy's naughty ways.
N,
49 00067.jpg
50 00069.jpg
"All the nursery toys were all your own for so long, that
is the only excuse I can see for us both, Tommy, but we
don't want to excuse ourselves, we must do right and we
must pray to be guided in the right way; we must ask for
a right judgment in all things, and by being kind and
thoughtful for others, we shall cure our faults and avoid all
the errors of the past.
"And now, my darling boy, cheer up and begin to put
your good resolutions at once in practice to-day."
Mother," said Tommy, squeezing her hand hard, may
I give Bob a pair of my rabbits ?"
"Yes, dear, but they will be of no use to him without a
rabbit hutch."
"I will give him the hutch and all," said Tommy; or I
will try to make one for him."
Mrs. Tiptop smiled, but she was glad to see her boy really
wish by a little self-sacrifice to make some amends, however
small, to the boy he had injured.
When Tommy reached home he found his father was quite
willing to help him in making a nice new rabbit hutch for
Bob, and while they drew plans and made measurements,
Mr. Tiptop talked to Tommy about his friend Johnny, whose
father he had seen that evening, and who told him that
S Johnny was very ill indeed; the raw muffins had disagreed
With him, and he was in a violent fever, and did not even
know his mother when she spoke to him. It was many weeks
S before the little friends met, and they were both very much
surprised at the change which had taken place in each other.
^ During the long weary hours when Johnny was recovering M
from his illness, his great amusement had been a little puppy
si' who-thanks to his being kind and gentle with it-had learned
many pretty little tricks and nice ways, and Johnny was
proud to show Tommy that the puppy could beg, would
walk on his hind legs, would catch a piece of biscuit or
"trust" for it, and would pretend to be dead, and would
-1: .,: -b
51 00070.jpg
fetch and carry at the will of his little master, and did every
trick of which a little dog is capable, Johnny had learnt
patience in his illness, which was entirely brought on by his
own fault, and both boys were not only truly sorry for what
they had done, but firmly resolved to be kind and good to
all around them, and especially to dumb animals who are
unable to complain of those who inflict needless sufferings
upon them.
That the two little boys were now much happier than when
they were always in mischief and trouble, is hardly neces-
sary to say. They were always delighted to see Bob, and
to hear his account of the rabbits in which they were very
much interested.
Time passed on, as time has a habit of doing, and the boys
^ grew better and wiser and kinder as each day went by; they .
tried to do one kind action every day to some person, or to
some thing, and soon they got into the habit of looking out
for chances of helping others, so that they were loved by all,
and they grew up good men and remained firm friends all
their lives. Being kind to all around them, they took happi-
ness with them wherever they went, and the world was happier
and better for their existence. It was but a small world at
first, just their home circle, then a larger world, that of school
life, and then the largest world of grown up, manly life. They
were quite happy, because they tried to make others happy, A
and never thought about themselves, which is the secret of
being happy. To make others happy is our duty, and brings
its own reward with it, and especially it is our duty to be kind
Sand merciful to all animals.
THE END,
--.
. -, ;'
52 00071.jpg
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EVENINGS AT HOME; or the Juvenile Budget Opened.
Consisting of a variety of Miscellaneous Pieces for the instruction and amuse-
ment of Young Persons.
By Dr. AIKIN and Mrs. BARBAULD.
ORIGINAL POEMS for Infant Minds.
By ANN and JANE TAYLOR.
The Child's Guide to Knowledge, containing useful
lessons on every day subjects, and thousands of facts relating to the Arts
and Sciences.
HI STORY OF ENGLAND, from the Conquest of Britain
by the Romans, to the death of George III.
The Christian Year. Sunday and Holy Days.
Thoughts in Verse for Sundays throughout the Year.
By the Rev. JOHN KEBLE.
History, Habits, and Instincts of Animals,
as Manifesting the Power, Wisdom, and Goodness of God.
FROM THE BRIDGE WA TER TREATISE.
By Rev. WILLIAM KIRBY. M.A., F.R.S.
MYRA AND SON, 39 & 40, BEDFORD STREET, COVENT GARDEN, LONDON.
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