• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 What happened to Molly Ray
 A drawing lesson
 In the park
 Snowflake's bad dream
 Pussy's thoughts
 The gingerbread cat
 A jingle for little puss
 Little crib-curtain stories
 Pussy Meek's lesson
 Policeman cat
 The twin kittens
 Pret's dinner party
 Another queer policeman
 The story of Pussy Gardner
 Miss Pussy's sickness
 The naughty cat
 Who played the piano?
 Homeisck Sue
 Why the clock told stories
 Where ti-ny Tab was found
 The spot-ted kit-tens
 How Jet be-came a white cat
 Nel-lie's cats
 Paint-er Pe-ter-kin's cats
 Pink-ie sup-pos-es
 Three dreams
 Grand-pa's val-en-tine
 The Christ-mas kit-ty
 The white hen and her pets
 A Thanks-giv-ing gift
 How Dai-sy got her wish
 Snow-ball's ex-pe-ri-ence
 Out-wit-ted
 Jumper's strange fish
 A les-son in man-ners
 Al-most a sad sto-ry
 The his-to-ry of Nan-cy Lee
 Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
 Put-ting kit-ty to bed
 Noll
 Pussy's choice
 A catastrophe
 Kitty in the cradle
 An-oth-er friend
 Back Cover














Group Title: Cat tales : : interesting and instructive stories of our favorite household pet
Title: Cat tales
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082544/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cat tales interesting and instructive stories of our favorite household pet
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Lothrop Publishing Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Lothrop Publishing Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Cats -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: fully illustrated.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082544
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223099
notis - ALG3347
oclc - 214285124

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
    What happened to Molly Ray
        Page 4
    A drawing lesson
        Page 5
    In the park
        Page 6
    Snowflake's bad dream
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Pussy's thoughts
        Page 9
        Page 10
    The gingerbread cat
        Page 11
        Page 12
    A jingle for little puss
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Little crib-curtain stories
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Pussy Meek's lesson
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    Policeman cat
        Page 26
    The twin kittens
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
    Pret's dinner party
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Another queer policeman
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The story of Pussy Gardner
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Miss Pussy's sickness
        Page 37
        Page 38
    The naughty cat
        Page 39
    Who played the piano?
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Homeisck Sue
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Why the clock told stories
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Where ti-ny Tab was found
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The spot-ted kit-tens
        Page 51
        Page 52
    How Jet be-came a white cat
        Page 53
    Nel-lie's cats
        Page 54
    Paint-er Pe-ter-kin's cats
        Page 55
    Pink-ie sup-pos-es
        Page 56
    Three dreams
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Grand-pa's val-en-tine
        Page 61
        Page 62
    The Christ-mas kit-ty
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    The white hen and her pets
        Page 66
        Page 67
    A Thanks-giv-ing gift
        Page 68
    How Dai-sy got her wish
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Snow-ball's ex-pe-ri-ence
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Out-wit-ted
        Page 73
        Page 74
    Jumper's strange fish
        Page 75
        Page 76
    A les-son in man-ners
        Page 77
        Page 78
    Al-most a sad sto-ry
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
    The his-to-ry of Nan-cy Lee
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
        Page 85
        Page 86
    Put-ting kit-ty to bed
        Page 87
        Page 88
    Noll
        Page 89
    Pussy's choice
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
    A catastrophe
        Page 93
    Kitty in the cradle
        Page 94
    An-oth-er friend
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
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CAT


TALE


INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE STORIES
OF


OUR FAVORITE HOUSEHOLD
i


PET-'


FCLL Y ILLUSTRATED


BOSTON
LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY


S










































COPYRIGHT, 1887 AMD 1898,
BY
D. LOTI'no ComArMx



























WHAT HAPPENED

Oh Molly Ray, what have
you done! Arrested by the
cats Guilty, or not guilty,
Molly?" Not guilty? Ah,
those twelve jury-cats know
you are guilty by your looks.
The lawyer says to the
jury: Gentlemen, look at.


TO MOLLY


with
That
rubs
pulls
mew,
Ther
girls.
of thi,


RAY.


the red ribbon bow!
Girl cuffs her ears,
her fur the wrong way,
her tail to make her
neglects to feed her.
e are many, many such
Let us make an example
s one!" Oh, Molly Ray!


that poor, dear little kitten what will the cats do to you I









A DRAWING LESSON.


O, baby, baby, come to me!
O baby, baby, look and see!
A little baby drew this cat!
What does my baby think of that?


You first mark round a button big, O


SAnd part way round a button small,


And then mark so each cunning ear,


) And now a quirky tail right here,


And then, my baby has it all!

My baby laughs a soft ha-ha! .
"I did, I did draw it, mamma!
It was an easy, easy cat!
And babies all can draw like that!"








IN THE PARK.

I'm a rich little kitten:
I live at my ease,
-.. I keep my own carriage,
A-" ;t I go where I please;
,'-- My turn-out is stylish,
'1..- I nothing neglect,
And often I notice
That all recollect
That a rich little kitten
SDeserves much respect.



SNOWFLAKE'S BAD DREAM.


Once there were three White
Cats that lived neighbors.



&I



SNOWFLAKE RELATES HER DREAM.
They usually spent their even-
ings together, and sat up late,


and ate late suppers, and often
sang very loud, and danced,
and behaved noisily. So you
will not be surprised to hear
that these White Cats had
bad dreams. They had; they
had very bad dreams indeed,
so that it was a common
thing for them to meet in the
morning to relate what they
had dreamed the night before.








IN THE PARK.

I'm a rich little kitten:
I live at my ease,
-.. I keep my own carriage,
A-" ;t I go where I please;
,'-- My turn-out is stylish,
'1..- I nothing neglect,
And often I notice
That all recollect
That a rich little kitten
SDeserves much respect.



SNOWFLAKE'S BAD DREAM.


Once there were three White
Cats that lived neighbors.



&I



SNOWFLAKE RELATES HER DREAM.
They usually spent their even-
ings together, and sat up late,


and ate late suppers, and often
sang very loud, and danced,
and behaved noisily. So you
will not be surprised to hear
that these White Cats had
bad dreams. They had; they
had very bad dreams indeed,
so that it was a common
thing for them to meet in the
morning to relate what they
had dreamed the night before.






SNOWFLAKE S BAD DREAM.


I overheard one of Snowflake's
dreams.
I dreamed," said she, that
I was asleep on a roll of
Enchanted Carpet. I could


feasted. Each moment they
grew whiter, fatter, plumper,
more delicious. Oh,my friends,
how fat those mice were!"
Not one of them had evel


THE DREAM.


not stir, could not lift a paw.
Around me, with squeals of
glee, pranced a ring of white
mice Rich cakes, soft cheese,
sweet jams stood all about.
On these the white mice


tasted white mouse, and no
doubt it was exasperating;
but still I wish it were not
possible for cats to me-aw
in the way those three Whitb
Cats me-awed over that dream.















PUSSY.

PUSSY'S THOUGHTS.


My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about ?
Thinking when the cows will come home,
Thinking how the milk will foam,
Wondering if Mattie will give me some;
That's what I am thinking about.

My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about?
Thinking about the beautiful snow,
Thinking how my kittens would grow
That lie in the river just below;
That's what I am thinking about.

My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about?
Thinking about that ball of yarn,






PUSSY S THOUGHTS.


And if you'd sit and smile and dar
If you had to sleep in the barn;
That's what I am thinking about

My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about?
Thinking how many mice I'll catch,
How many chickens biddy will hatch,
Wishing you would let me scratch;
That's what I am thinking about

My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about?
Thinking about the cellar-way,
Wondering if you had steak to-day
And if you gave a piece to Tray;
That's what I am thinking about

My kitty has her thought-cap on.
Pussy, what are you thinking about?
Thinking what you're going to do
When your darning is all through;
Don't put me out-Mew-mew, mew-mew!
Please, my mistress, don't put me out.

sm








THE GINGERBREAD CAT.


A baby-girl, on Christmas night,
Had filled her little apron white
With all a happy child could take
Of Christmas toys and Christmas cake;
But on the stairway she let fall
---- The chiefest treasure of them
all
A little cat of gingerbread
.All frosted white from tail to
___ head.
Now in the moonlit midnight
time,
M When merry mice do run and
climb,
A plump gray mouse came down the stair
And saw the Christmas cake-cat there.
She stood still in her cruel fright
And gazed upon the monster white
Who seemed to feel as great surprise,
And stared with both his raisin eyes.
Poor mousie dared not, could not stir!
Her little brain was in a whirr!
Five minutes-ten -but not a paw
Had puss put forth! "I never saw






THE GINGERBREAD CAT.


A cat like this!" the poor mouse said.
A brave bold thought came in her head-
Her wee heart beating pit-a-pat,
She moved her own paw touched the cat--
Then sprang upon it with a squeal
And made a most delicious meal.
Ho! ho !" she cried. "Sugar! spice!
And everything that's good and nice-
Thats what cats are made of,
The cats that we're afraid of!"
Then up the stairs she madly pranced,
And o'er the attic floor she danced,
And then she stood upon her head
And to her 'stonished friends she said,
"0, joy to every mouse and rat,
For I have eaten up the cat!"


7
mif ^L--^































A JINGLE


1 saw you by the cupboard -
You thought bye-and-bye
Through the crack in the panel
A mouse you would spy!


FOR LITTLE


PUSS.


You heard the wee creature
As gay as you please
Nibble, nibble its dinner
Of bacon and cheese.






A JINGLE FOR LITTLE PUSS.


I'm ashamed of you, kitty!
I know without doubt
Why you want to see Mousie
Come peeping about!
Now how would you like it
Supposing a bear
Should hide in the hay-mow
To give you a scare ?
Be content, while a kitten,
To play and to purr,
And to keep very tidy
Your beautiful fur.
When you're big as old Maltey,
The best of old cats,
You may sit in the kitchen
And watch for the rats.
There's the milk in your saucer,
Go drink it up all;
Then spring and run after
Your pretty red ball.


You may please little baby
With frolic and freak,


But leave the poor mousie,
To nibble and squeak!






























































































SOME CA" Y#I6 OMTER BABIES DREW.








LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


THE CAT THAT SANG LULLABIES.


HE LED THE OTHER CATS INTO TROUBLE.
Spry Cat, Sly Cat and Pry
Cat lived in a house with a
small yellow-haired girl. They
were that little girl's cats and
she named them those names.
Her own name was Betty.
Pry Cat was blue-gray, and
he was always making mischief
in the Dolls' room; he pawed
the lace spreads off the Dolls'
beds, and he clawed their best


dresses and hats, and had sport
with Betty's thimble and threads
- he would get into work-bas-
kets whenever he could, and he
would go to tables and steal
and upset dishes and lead the
other cats into trouble.
Sly Cat was white and wore
a pink ribbon. She it was who
would run and tell. If she saw
Pry Cat go into the Dolls' room
she would scamper to find Betty
and hold up one paw as if to
say "O you just ought to see
what Pry is up to now!"
Spry Cat
was brown-and-
white. She it
was who was at
the gate to wel- -_
come everybody. SLY CAT.
She it was who came first when
you called Kitties! Kitties!"






LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


She was first up a tree or a post,
and you never could catch her
only when she pleased to let
you. She was also first in the
heart of her little mistress. Betty
had taught Spry Cat many pret-
ty tricks; for one thing, she
would pick up the Dolls in her
mouth, and carry them and drop
them on their little beds.
One day a funny thing hap-
pened with Betty and her cats.
Some little girls came to see
Betty and she ran and left the
Best Doll on the floor, she was
so glad to see them. She was
at play in the garden with them
when Sly Cat came on a run
and held up her paw. Oh! "


cried Betty, I know Pry Cat
is at the Dolls!" and she ran.
But it was not Pry Cat. It
was Spry Cat- and how Betty






SPRY CAT HUSHES THE POOR BEST DOLL
laughed! It was Spry Cat in
the small rocking-chair. She
had the Best Doll in her arms,
and she was rocking and mew-
ing with all her might.
Betty always said that Spry
Cat was singing a lullaby to
hush the poor Best Doll









LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


THE PRINCESS OF WHITE SUGAR.


THE TWO ROGUES AT BREAKFAST.
Dotty had long wished for
a pet cat, and one day her
mamma said she might have
one and she might choose it
- a white one, or a black
one, or a gray one, or a
kitty with spots, or a kitty
with stripes. So Dotty sat
and thought what kitty she
would like best. "A white
kitty," she said, for she will
look sweet with a blue bow."
So a white kitty came and
a blue bow.
When Dotty saw the cat's
soft golden eyes and heard


her purr, she named her The
Princess of White Sugar."
Mamma said, Nonsense,
Dotty!" But Dotty said that
was her name.
Now a cat will like a
little girl if the little girl's
voice is sweet, her hands
soft, and if she feeds her;
and Dotty's voice was very
sweet, she touched the small
cat in a soft way, and gave
her milk often, so the Prin.
S7,


THE PRINCESS CLAWS THE PIANO.
cess of White Sugar liked her
very much. But the truth is






LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


the Princess liked her most
for another cause. The Prin-
cess was a great rogue, and
as soon as she saw Dotty she
said to herself, "She is a
rogue, too." The cat was
right. When they were alone
Dotty poured her milk out
over the table in a stream
and let the Princess lap it
up; and she let the Princess
sit on the piano and claw it
with her claws while she
played, and Dotty also encour-
aged her to jump from shelves
down on people's heads.
One day Dotty said to the
Princess, "Would you like to
see how you would look if
you were a black cat ?" The
Princess said she would, and
Dotty took coal from the
hod and drew black cats on
the wall paper, while the
Princess stood on the hod and
saw the black cats and liked
them. Then Dotty turned


round and tried to make the
Princess herself black, and she
told her that she would change
her name and call her the
Princess of Jet Black Charcoal.


THE PRINCESS LOOKS ON.
Just here Dotty's mamma
came in. And what do you
think Dotty's mamma did?
She undressed Dotty, and
talked to her, and washed her
and put her in bed to stay
all day. That is what she did.
But as soon as she could
she gave away the Princess
of White Sugar to a kind-
hearted grocery-man.
One rogue is enough, quite
enough, for one house," she
said, "at least for my house."







LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


THE SMALL CATS VISITOR.


THE STRANGE BEING.


One day three good and
handsome Small Cats' sat at
dinner in the grape-vine shade.
I said they were good Small
Cats. I mean by this that
they stayed at home and
kept the mice away.
As they staid at home
they had not seen many of


the Strange Beings that lived
outside of the garden. But
that day, as they ate their
milk, a Strange Being came
with a soft step and with
one leap stood on the edge
of their pan. The Small Cats
sat still. They were too full
of fear to stir. The Strange
Being was large and fat.
His skin was brown and
green and
gold in soft
spots and P
shades, and
his eyes
were large.
"Kee-junk,"
he said at
last in a
THE CAT THAT SLEPT IN THE
deep voice. ARM-CHAIR.
The Small Cats did not speak.
They were still more full of






LITTLE CRIB-CURTAIN STORIES.


fear. All at once the Strange
Being leaped into the milk. At
that the Small Cats ran.
By and by they
stole back. The
Strange
Being
was gone.
... All day
theytalked
of it in
THECATTHAT SLEPT IN THE CRADLE. low tones.
"Who was it? What was
it ?" They thought of what
they had heard their Mis-
tress read in the Baby's
story-book. "It may be the
Fairy Prince," said the first
Small Cat. "Or the Giant,"
said the second Small Cat.
" Or it may be the Santa Claus,"
said the third Small Cat.
All day long they talked
about it, but at night the
first Small Cat said, I know
it was the Fairy Prince,"
and went to sleep on her


rug. But the second Small
Cat who slept in the arm-
chair, and the third Small
Cat who slept in the Baby's
cradle, were not sure, and they
thought about it all night.
What was it? Well, that
night the Big Frog at the pond
said to his friends, "I have
a good joke to tell you. I
hopped, ker-splash! into the
milk of Three Cats to-day.
You ought


run
So you
and I know
the Strange S
Being was
a Big Frog. -
But the
Small Cats
believe to -
thIs day THE BIG FROG TELLS THE JOKE
that it was the Fairy Prince,
the Giant, or the Santa Claus,











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CIICKY FLUFF'S PROTECTOR.










PUSSY MEEK'S LESSON.


Pussy Meek is my neighbor.
Pussy Meek always wears the same


dress.
It is
and very


black, spotted with white,
silky.


NAUGHTY PUSSY MEEK.


Pussy Meek is selfish.
Pussy Meek wishes to sleep on
the best bed in th)e house.
Pussy Meek wishes to sit in the
cushioned rocking-chair.
She never gets up to offer it to
grandma, when grandma comes into
the room.


Last summer Pussy Meek wished
to dine on birds every day.
Last summer Pussy Meek liked
bob-o-links for breakfast,
Pussy Meek often sat under the
garden trees and
wished for the ori
oles she saw as they
flew into their nests.
But Pussy Meek
learned a lesson last
S summer about catch-
ing birds.
Pussy Meek's mis.
tress is fond of birds
in her garden. She
feeds them every day.
The robins are very
tame.
One large robin has
built her nest in the same spot for
many years.
When this robin sees a cat, or is
in trouble, she makes a loud sound.
She does, this to call Pussy Meek's
mistress.
Then the lady goes out in the
garden.






PUSSY MEEK S LESSON.


"What is the matter, Robby?"
she says.
Robby answers as plain as he can,
Cat, cat, cat!"
One day she heard all the birds
making a pitiful noise.
She ran out.
It was not a cat this time.
She found a baby robin on the
ground.
She could not find the nest where
the baby belonged.
She put it on a piece of plank, in
the sun, that it might get warm.
Pussy Meek was lying in the
asparagus bed all the time.
She saw her mistress place the
little bird in the sun.
Pussy Meek began to feel hungry
at once.
She ought not, for she had eaten
a large breakfast of fish and milk.
But she rose and left the aspara-
gus bed, as soon as her mistress
went in.
She walked toward the plank.
At the same moment the lady
heard the birds call her.
She threw down her book and
ran out.
She was just in time. Pussy


Meek had just leaped up to get the
robin.
She took the bird into the house
with her, this time.
She began to read once more.
Soon she heard the lady next door
call to her loudly. The birds were
calling, too. She ran out.
Your cat has caught one of your
robins, I fear," said the lady.
At that moment Pussy Meek ran
away for some deep grass as fast as
she could.
In that deep grass her mistress
found one of her beautiful robins,
dead.
She went back into the house very
sad.
What do you think she saw, when
she opened the door?
She saw Pussy Meek in there.
She was playing with the little baby
robin, as she would play with a
mouse. The baby robin was crying.
Pussy Meek tried to run away.
But her mistress caught her, a9d
whipped her.
She had never whipped her before,
Pussy Meek felt ashamed.
She seemed to understand why
she was whipped.







PUSSY MEEK'S LESSON.


The little robin was kept in the
house until he was well. Pussy
Meek was whipped, if she walked
near its little box.
At last Pussy Meek would walk
through the room without looking
toward the robin's box.
This summer Pussy Meek tries
to behave well.
When she goes into the garden
she tries to not look up into the
trees.
When her mistress feeds the birds
Pussy Meek sits down on the walk
and shuts her eyes.
Once, when the birds were eating,
the lady saw one eye open a little.
Pussy shut it up quick, when she


saw her mistress looking at her, and
turned her head away.
Now," said her mistress, you do
try hard to be a good cat. I will
buy you some meat and some fish.
You shalL have oysters next winter,
too, if you try to be a good cat all
summer."
Pussy Meek is doing her best to
be a good cat.
She tries so hard, that when she
catches a mouse she brings it and
lays it down at her mistress' feet.
She will not touch it until her
mistress says Yes."
I think Pussy Meek will have
oysters next winter. Don't you ?










POLICEMAN CAT.


This is the Watchman!
See the big green eyes!
Not a beast that walks,
Not a bird that flies,

Not a man or a mouse,
By day, or by night,
Escapes the notice
Of the eyes so bright.


THE TWIN KITTENS.


Last. summer a good many rats
came to live in our barn.
They ate the oats and corn.
Papa said he could not have that.
He wanted the oats and corn for
his two horses.
"We must get a trap and catch
the rats," said papa.
"0 papa!" said Tommy, -get a
trap with four legs, please; get a
pussy. That's the best kind of a
trap."


Papa said Tommy was a very wise
little boy.
He said he might get that kind of
a trap just as soon as he liked.
So that very afternoon Tommy
called at Mr. Brown's house.
Mr. Brown is our neighbor.
Tommy knew very well that there
were four kittens at Mr. Brown's.
Nelly Brown had shown them to
him.
The kittens lived in an old basket










POLICEMAN CAT.


This is the Watchman!
See the big green eyes!
Not a beast that walks,
Not a bird that flies,

Not a man or a mouse,
By day, or by night,
Escapes the notice
Of the eyes so bright.


THE TWIN KITTENS.


Last. summer a good many rats
came to live in our barn.
They ate the oats and corn.
Papa said he could not have that.
He wanted the oats and corn for
his two horses.
"We must get a trap and catch
the rats," said papa.
"0 papa!" said Tommy, -get a
trap with four legs, please; get a
pussy. That's the best kind of a
trap."


Papa said Tommy was a very wise
little boy.
He said he might get that kind of
a trap just as soon as he liked.
So that very afternoon Tommy
called at Mr. Brown's house.
Mr. Brown is our neighbor.
Tommy knew very well that there
were four kittens at Mr. Brown's.
Nelly Brown had shown them to
him.
The kittens lived in an old basket







THE TWIN KITTENS.


in the wood-shed. They slept in the
basket.
When they were awake they had
great frolics.
They scrambled out and in;
sometimes they upset the basket.
Then they rolled out on the floor.
Nelly was very willing to give
Tommy two of the kittens.


tail, and a gray spot between hei
ears.


A FROLIC.


The other two were pure white,
and they looked exactly alike.
At last Tommy said he would
take the two white kittens.
Nelly felt that she could not have
chosen.
He carried them home, and Nelly
said she should come very soon to
visit them.
Grandmamma found an old basket
for them to sleep in.


NELLY AND HER KITTENS.


Nelly is a very generous little
girl, and she told Tommy he might
have the two he liked best.
They were all so pretty that Tom-
my found it difficult to choose.
One was gray, with rings on her
tail.
Another was white, with a gray


''HE BASKET IS UPSET.


The kittens did not catch any
rats.







THE TWIN
We thought they would like it bet-
ter than a box because they had
been used to it.
The basket was carried out to the
barn.


FAST ASLEEP.

I do not think they could have
caught any barn-rats if they had tried.
The barn-rats were as big as they
were.
But the rats did not like the kit-
tens.
They knew the kittens grew every
day.
They knew they would soon be
big enough to catch them.
So the rats moved away.
I suppose they have gone to liv*


KITTENS.
in a barn where there are no twin
kittens.
Every morning John goes to the
barn early to feed the horses.
Every morning he finds one of the
white kittens cuddled on the back of
the black horse, fast asleep.
You can see in the picture how
they look.
But the picture is not half as
pretty as the real black horse with
the real white kitty on his back.
We never know which kitty is on
the black horse.
They look so much alike we can-
not tell.
Perhaps they take turns.
The kittens are growing very fast,
and Tommy wants a name for
them.
Papa says he must take a long
name and divide it between the kit-
tens.
Then the twin kittens will have a
twin name.
I think Rosemary would be a good
name.
One can be called Rose, and the
other Mary.
What do you think?















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THE DINNER PARTY IS A SUCCESS.


PRET'S DINNER PARTY.


Pret was a large, handsome, grey
cat.
lie was a great favorite in the
house. He was not often scolded.
Pret liked to have company. He
was always glad when other cats
came to see him.
Pret was sorry for cats who were
not so well-fed as he was.
One day Pret made up his mind to
give a dinner party.
He invited his poorest cat-friends.
I will tell you how Pret did his


marketing for this dinner party.
When Hannah, the cook, went
into the pantry, he went too.
He crept along close to Hannah's
feet. He was hidden by her dress.
Hannah did not see him.
The cupboard door was open.
There was a large mutton bone on
the cupboard shelf.
Hannah wished to make a soup
of this mutton bone.
But Pret wanted it for his dinner
party.


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PRET S DINNER PARTY.


I He seized it in his mouth. He
pulled it off the shelf. He drew it
along to the stairs.
Hannah had gone out of the room.
He pulled it up one step, then up
another, then up another.
Thump, thump bump, bump! the
mutton bone went up the stairs.
Pret's master heard the noise.
He opened the door to see what
was the matter.
But Pret was a great pet, and his
master did not take the mutton bone
away from him.
He wished to see what Pret would
do with such a big bone.
So he let him go on with it. It
was so heavy Pret had to stop and
rest very often.


But at last he got it up stairs, and
out into the yard.
Five cats sat waiting there.
Pret laid the bone down before
Them.
How those five cats sprang to get
the first mouthful !
Then Pret sat down.
He washed his paws and watched
the fivecats eat their dinner. Hedid
not touch one mouthful himself.
Pret thought it was a very pleas-
ant dinner party.
Pret's master thought so, too.
The five cats thought so, too.
Those five cats did not often get
mutton bones with meat on them.
This is a true story.









ANOTHER QUEER POLICEMAN.


A GOOD POLICEMAN.


DID you read the story called, A
Queer Policeman," in the March
Little Folks' Reader ?
I did.
It made me think of another queer
policeman,
This other policeman is a tortoise-
shell cat.
Tortoise-shell cats are black, with
yellow spots.
This policeman keeps the peace
between my baby brother and a big
red rooster.


My mother puts Baby in his little
carriage.
She gives him a piece of bread.
She draws him out into the green
yard under the trees.
The tortoise-shell cat always fol-
lows them out into the green yard.
Now, Puss," my mother says,.
" you must take care of Baby I"
Then she goes into the house.
The tortoise-shell cat sits down,
beside the carriage.
She looks as stern as any police-
man you ever saw.
By and by the big red rooster
comes up to the carriage.
He stretches out his long neck,
He tries to take away Baby's bread
Then the tortoise-shell cat springs
up at him, and drives him away.
The hens stand at a distance and
look on. They dare not come neai
the carriage.
The red rooster walks round and
round, but he does not dare come
back.
It is always safe to leave Baby
with the tortoise-shell cat. She






ANOTHER QUEER POLICEMAN.


clever scratches, nor bites him. She
never takes away his bread.
Is not the tortoise-shell cat a good
A liceman?


I think she ought to have a shiny
collar to wear on her neck. Don'l
you think she deserves it ?






















It is din-ner-time. But din-ner isn't read-y.


THE STORY OF PUSSY GARDNER.


CHAPTER I.- PUSSY'S HOME.

Pussy Gardner is a large black
and white cat.
She is Grandma Gardner's cat.
She has lived with Grandma Gard-
ner all her life, except one day and
one night.
Grandma Gardner says she is a
nice comfortable cat to live with.
Pussy knows every room in the
Gardner house.


She can unlatch the doors; and
she goes in and out as she pleases.
There is only one place where she
cannot go.
That place is the cake closet. A
big button has been put on the cake
closet door.
Pussy knows the button was put
on to keep her out of the closet, and
she never tries to open that door.
If she was a naughty cat, she
would try, every day, to jump up and







THE STORY OF PUSSY GARDNER.


turn the button and get in.
Then Pussy Gardner would not be
a nice comfortable cat to live in the
house with, would she ?


PUSSY GARDNER AMONG GRAND'S FLOWERS.
PUSSY GARDNER AMONG GRANDMA'S FLOWERS.


Pussy Gardner knows as much
about the barn as she knows about
the house.
She has caught many rats and


mice at the barn in the course of her
long life.
But now she leaves this work for
the two young cats to do.
Yet if a mouse comes
-_- into the house and fright-
ens grandma, she is always
ready to hunt it out and
kill it.
In winter she lies on
the rug before the fire.
In summer she likes
to sit out doors among
grandma's flowers.


CHAPTER II.-PUSSY'S
GREAT TROUBLE.


Last summer Robby
Gardner came to visit his
grandmamma.
Robby Gardner is the
same age as Pussy Gard-
ner.
Both Robby and Pussy
are nine years old.
Robby at once called
assy his cat.
He did not tease her, or hurt her,
.t Pussy did not want to be Robby's.


cat.







THE STORY OF PUSSY GARDNER.


Robby did not let her have time
enough to sleep.
When Robby talked about his cat,
Pussy said, "No, I am Mrs. Gard-
ner's cat."
When Robby went home ne asked
his grandmamma to let him carry
Pussy with him.
Grandmamma said he might take
her.
Pussy was astonished when grand-
ma said that.
Grandpa put Pussy in a basket, and
tied the cover on.
Then he put the basket in the
wagon. Robby got in. They drove
away to Robby's home.
Pussy did not enjoy the ride.
She said just what she thought
about it. She said it in very loud
tones.
By and by they came to Robby's
house.
Robby shut all the doors. Then
he took Pussy out of the basket.
He gave her a good dinner of
bread and milk.
But Pussy would not eat a mouth-
ful.
He made her a soft bed.
But Pussy would not lie down.


She went and sat by one of the
doors. There she staid.
Pussy did not like the looks of
things in Robby's house.
The doors had knobs instead of
latches.
Pussy was sure she could not learn
how to turn knobs.
They put her dinner in a hand.
some bowl.
There was a bright blue picture on
this bowl.
But Pussy wanted her old tip
basin.

CHAPTER III. PUSSY'S ESCAPE

Robby said everybody must be
careful to keep the doors shut. They
must not let his cat out.
But Robby's papa sat up late to
read that night.
He forgot what Robby said.
He opened the back door too wide,
and Pussy stepped through.
The next morning Robby could
not find his cat, and he felt very
sorry.
But Grandpa Gardner found her,
and he felt very glad.
When he opened the door, there







THE STORY OF PUSSY GARDNER.


was Pussy on the door-stone ready
to come in.
Grandma took her up in her arms.
* I don't see how we ever let her go
away she said.
I don't either," said Pussy. For
this is my home just as much as it
is yours.


They never gave Pussy away
again. But Pussy does not seem
at all glad when Robby comes for
a visit.
She is never seen on the morn-
ing when he goes home until after
he is gone.


MISS PUSSY'S SICKNESS.


DR. GREY'S PATIENT.


MIss Pussy is ill;
She lies very still


In her snug little bed,
With a pain in her head.

" 0 doctor!" cries she,
" Pray what can it be
That gives me such pain
On the top of my brain ?"

Says old Doctor Grey,
"Excuse me, I pray,
For seeming so rude,
But it is for your good;

" I really do think "
(This he says with a wink I)
" You have eaten a slice
Too muck of young mice 1"







THE NAUGHTY CAT.


"Where have
you been, you
Snaugh-ty cat ?"
says the cat's
lit-tie mis-tress.
"Guess!"says
kit-ty.
"Have you
been catchn-ng
birds, bad cat?-tell me and
I'll take you down."
No," says kit-ty.
Have you been chas-ing a
but-ter-fly?"
"No," says kit-ty.
"You are all wet," says the


lt-tle mis-tress, feel-ing his fur.
"You have been hunt-ing for
baby mice, or scar-ing rob-ins."
"No," says kit-ty. "Guess
some-thing good now."
Kit-ty's mis-tress takes him
up un-der her dim-pled chin,
and bur-ies her white nose in
his wet fur.
"Ah," says she, "I have
smelled it out-you have been
a-sleep in your lit-tle nest un-
der the cat-nip!"
"Yes," purrs kit-ty, "and I
want to go in and have some
milk now."


WHO PLAYED THE PIANO?


"Go up stairs, Perry dear, and see
who is in the parlor," said mamma.
Perry's mamma was making cake
doivn in the kitchen.
She heard some one playing do,
re. mi,fa, sol," on the piano up-stairs.


Who could it be ?
The boys were in school. Mary
had gone down town. No one of the
family was up-stairs.
Do, re; mi, fa, sol," said the piano,
very distinctly.







THE NAUGHTY CAT.


"Where have
you been, you
Snaugh-ty cat ?"
says the cat's
lit-tie mis-tress.
"Guess!"says
kit-ty.
"Have you
been catchn-ng
birds, bad cat?-tell me and
I'll take you down."
No," says kit-ty.
Have you been chas-ing a
but-ter-fly?"
"No," says kit-ty.
"You are all wet," says the


lt-tle mis-tress, feel-ing his fur.
"You have been hunt-ing for
baby mice, or scar-ing rob-ins."
"No," says kit-ty. "Guess
some-thing good now."
Kit-ty's mis-tress takes him
up un-der her dim-pled chin,
and bur-ies her white nose in
his wet fur.
"Ah," says she, "I have
smelled it out-you have been
a-sleep in your lit-tle nest un-
der the cat-nip!"
"Yes," purrs kit-ty, "and I
want to go in and have some
milk now."


WHO PLAYED THE PIANO?


"Go up stairs, Perry dear, and see
who is in the parlor," said mamma.
Perry's mamma was making cake
doivn in the kitchen.
She heard some one playing do,
re. mi,fa, sol," on the piano up-stairs.


Who could it be ?
The boys were in school. Mary
had gone down town. No one of the
family was up-stairs.
Do, re; mi, fa, sol," said the piano,
very distinctly.






WHO PLAYED THE PIANO.


Run, Perry dear, and see who is
in the parlor," said she again.
" Mamma will come up soon."
Perry was only five years old. He
was very fat, very slow, and he did
not like to go up-stairs alone. He
was afraid of strangers.
But when his mamma spoke so
kindly he went up.


TH ROGUE.-
THE ROGUR.


He put down his feet very hard on
every stair to frighten away anybody
who was up there.
He looked in the parlor. He did
not see any one.
He went back into the hall and
called, No, mamma, it is nobody!"
Nobody could not play the piano,"
said his mother.
As soon as Perry was back in the
kitchen, they all heard the piano
again.


"Do, re, mi, fa, sol," it said; and
then a "do" sounded up very high.
Some one is trying to play a joke
on us," said Perry's mamma.
Then Bridget went up to see who
was there.
All was still.
She looked behind the doors.
She looked under the sofa.
No one was there.
"The child is right," she said,.
"Nobody is in the room."
But all the time two bright eyes
were peeping out from behind a long
lace curtain.
This curtain hung at the window
near the piano.
As soon as Bridget was down-stairs
again, do, re, mi, fa, sol, si," went
the piano.
I will go up myself this time,"
said Perry's mamma.
She went very fast and still.
She heard a noise like some one
running softly.
But she could not find any one.
I will stay outside and watch,"
she said.
She went out softly and stood be-
hind the door.
Very soon she heard the piano







WHO PLAYED THE PIANO.


again, do, re, mi, mi, mi."
She peeped in.
There was Perry's own pet kitty
standing on the keys of the piano.
She was looking at her face in'the
shining wood, and stepping about.
Oh, you little rogue! said she.
Then Pussy sprang down and ran
behind the curtains. Her eyes shone.


She knew that she was a rogue.
Pussy was fond of music. Mary
often had played for her. So when
she saw the piano open she thought
she would make music for herself.
After that, Perry often put her up
on the piano keys.
He called her "The Musical Cat."


HOMESICK SUE.


Splash! came
the big raindrops
on the window
pane.
Splash I came
Sthe big tears down
on Sue's white
apron.
Sue was home-
sick.
Sue was a long way from home.
Sue was a little American girl.
Her home was in Boston. Now she
was in London. The big gray ocean
lay between London and Boston.
She wished she had never come to
England to visit uncle John.
It rained almost every day in Eng-
land.


Hark Raf rat! raft! tap tap tapf
There was uncle John at the door.
Sue did not like the big brass
door-knockers.
She liked door-bells, such as they
had in America.
She ran down to let uncle John
in.
There he stood, dripping wet.


OUT OF UNCLE JOHN'S HATI


What was the matter with uncle
John's hat ?. What made it stir and
jerk so?







HOMESICK SUE.


Mew, mew, mew/ "
Where did the little mew" come
from ?
Sue looked about the hall. She
peeped out into the street.
Just then uncle John's hat almost
tumbled over. Uncle John put up
both hands and lifted it off.
He set it down on the floor.
Out leaped a kitten.
I've brought you a tabby cat,"
said uncle John.
This kitten was not at all like Sue's
handsome Tabby at home.
It was not like any Tabby she had
seen.
It was gray, an odd reddish gray,
marked with broad dark stripes.
Uncle John said tabby was not
short for Tabitha."
He said "tabby" meant brin-
dled."
He said tabby" was a name given
to all cats of that kind of gray.
The little London tabby sat and
purred in Sue's arms.
But now the mews came again
as loud as before.
Uncle John laughed.
He put his hands down in his big
overcoat pockets.


He brought out two more cats.
Sue jumped away from the first
one.
It looked so strange.
It had no tail !
It was a Manx cat.
Uncle John told her that Manx
cats never had tails.


A MANX CAT.


But Sue would not have a cat
without a tail.
So back Mrs Manx went into
uncle John's overcoat pocket.
The other cat was odd, too.
But Sue liked it.
It was an Angora cat.
This Angora cat had a tail long
enough and big enough for herself
and for the Manx cat too.
She had beautiful hair.
It was creamy white, and so long,
and so silky.
And, 0, how pretty her shaggy
tail was I







HOMESICK SUE.


Sue liked her better than any cat
she had ever seen.
But this lovely Angora cat had one
-fault.
She would not be petted.
Sue gave her two cats some milk
and some meat.
After this dinner, Miss Angora
curled herself up on the sofa pillow,
and went to sleep.
Uncle John carried the Manx cat
toff in his overcoat pocket.
The little London tabby came


up to her mistress. She jumped up
in her lap and wanted to play.


--THE AN A CT.
THE ANGORA CAT.


They had a long frolic together
Sue forgot she was homesick.










WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES.


Mintie was a kitten.
Her hair was white.
Mattie was a little
girl.
Her hair was yellow.
Grandpa gave the kit-
ten to Mattie before her
eyes were open.
As soon as she could eat milk for
herself, Mattie took her home.
Mattie thought her the cunni igest
kitten in the world.
She named her Snowflake at first
because she was so white.
But after she meddled with the


minutes Mattie changed her name
from Snowflake to Mintie.
Mintie is short for minute.
Do you wonder how Mintie could
meddle with the minutes?
I will tell you.
Mattie lived in the country.
Her papa went to Boston every
day.
He always got home at six
o'clock.
So they had six o'clock dinners.
There was a large carved Swiss.
clock in the sitting-room.
Every day, toward night, Mattie
watched the long minute-hand very
closely.
And always, just as the clock said'
it was six, Mattie met papa at the
door with a kiss.
,But one day she did not meet
him.
The long ,iand said it was twenty
minutes of six. Mattie was romping
with her white kitten.
All at once the door opened, and
there stood papa.
Mattie jumped up. She ran to







WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES.


papa for her six o'clock kiss.
Then she looked at the clock.
Papa looked at the clock too.
He said it must be slow.
But no one had touched the clock.
It was very strange.
The dinner was late.
The next day Mattie was at the
door when the Swiss clock struck
six silver chimes.
But no papa!
Mattie waited five minutes.
Still no papa!
Mattie waited ten, fifteen minutes.
Still no papa! -,
Dinner was on the table. Dinner
was growing cold.
Mattie waited twenty-five minutes.
Mamma was waiting too.
Just then papa came I
He said the clock must be fast.
So they all went and looked at the
clock.
It seemed all right.'
No one had touched it.
But it told stories every day for a
week.
Mamma said she didn't know
when to have dinner.
Papa said he should have to get a
new clock.


But one day Mattie found out the
trouble. The clock was not to
blame.
Mattie had gone to the sitting-
room very quietly.
The door was open.
In the middle of the floor sat
Snowflake. She was very still,
except her tail. That was moving
slowly. Her eyes were very bright.
Mattie thought she was watching
a mouse, perhaps. So she kept still
herself and waited.
All at once the kitten gave a
spring toward the long weight of the
Swiss clock.
Up she went, up to the very top
of the clock!
She looked about very proudly for
a minute.
Then she reached down quickly
with her fore-paws.
She rested the left paw on the
pivot.
With the right paw she pulled the
long minute-hand up, up from figure
eight to figure eleven.
Suowflake had set the clock fifteen
minutes ahead.
"Mamma! mammal" Mattie fairly
shouted. I've found it out I "







WHY THE CLOCK TOLD STORIES.


Mamma came. Then Mattie told
her how the white-haired kitten had
neddled with the minutes.
They thought it the funniest thing
a kitten ever did.
That night dinner was just ready,
and Mattie and mamma both were


at the door, when papa came.
How papa did laugh when they
told him!
And they tied a tiny toy watch
around Snowflake's neck, and named
her Mintie.


__
























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WHERE TI-NY TAB WAS FOUND.


Jan et was go-ing home from
grand-pa's. It was cold, and
she went with a hop-skip and a
trip. It was just a mile from
the red house on grand-pa's
hill to the white house on pa-
pa's hill, and half-way there
was a piece of woods, where
Jan-et knew ev-er-y leaf-y hol-
low, and where there were
al-ways man-y squir-rels. It
was grow-ing dark fast, but she
stopped and called: Gone to
bed in there, squir-ries ?"
No squir-rel called back.
In-stead, some-bod-y or some-
thing an-swer-ed:
Mew! mew-mew !"
"Why !" said Jan-et, "that's
a kit-ty!"
So it was; a soft, white lit-
tle crea-ture came press-ing
through the fence and out to
the road. Why, you lit-tle


dar-ling," said Jan-et, stoop-ing,
" Such a lit-tie ti-ny Tab!"
Two soft, pink eyes looked
up, a lit-tle white back arched
to meet her hand,, and then,
what do you think? Why,
that kit-ty jumped right up-on
Jan-et's muff and stood there;
and when Jan-et rose up to
go on she stayed right on the
muff.
Oh, you dear lit-tle Tab,"
said Jan-et to her; some boy
has brought you here and
thrown you a-way! But you
shall go home with me."
Kit-ty seemed to know. She
sat down on the muff and rode
a-long, pur-ring sweet thanks.
" And yes," purred she, it
was a boy! No girl ev-er car-
ried a kit-ty off and threw her
away-now, did she?"
No," said Jan-et, nev-erl"





































































TI-NY TAB RIDES HOME ON THE MUFF.






I
THE SPOT-TED KIT-TENS.

I went to grand-pa's barn to hunt for eggs the oth-er day,
And what do you guess I found ly-ing cud-died in the hay ?
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens -such ti-ny, dar-ling kit-tens
The dear-est lit-tie kit-tens that you ev-er saw at play.

They scampered and they capered, rolled and rolled a-round!
They pulled each other's tails and they tumbled on the ground!
Oh! the jol-ly, jol-ly kit-tens the mer-ry mites of kit-tens-
Such rol-lick-ing and frol-ick-ing! the like was nev-er found.

I laughed, and I laughed a-gain, and still I laughed with glee,
For grand-pa said: "I don't know what to do, with three;
So you shall have a kit-ten, which-ev-er lit-tie kit-ten
You choose, when they are big e-nough to take a-way, you see."

Which would you choose ? There's one as shi-ny black as jet,
With his rogu-ish lit-tie eyes, and spots of buff -a pret-ty pet.
He's a fris-ky lit-tle kit-ten--a sau-cy, cun-ning kit-ten,
I like the black-buff kit-ten-but I haven't cho-sen yet.

For there's a lit-tie gray thing with soft and silk-y fur,
I hugged her in my arms and she nev-er tried to stir,
And she is spot-ty too-a beau-ty of a kit-ten,
Such a co-sey lit-tie kit-ten and you ought to hear her purr .


































lip















1,54 11111


pi






It~

it I Isl






HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.
But when you see the third one you can-not help but know
How hard it is to choose when I love the oth-ers so,
She's the sweet-est lit-tie kit-ten-the down-i-est of kit-tens,
And her dain-ty tor-toise fur is flaked with soft-est snow.

What shall I do a-bout it? I can-not choose, you see!
Which-ev-er one I take I can-not let the oth-ers be!
Oh! the kit-ty kit-ty kit-tens, the bon-ny, bon-ny kit-tens!
Oh! grand-pa dear, now couldn't you give them all to me?




HOW JET BE-CAME A WHITE CAT.

Jet has had a good din- squash pie. Up he jumps,
ner, chick-en and tur-key both, and-ah! slip! splash! Is
and gra-vy. But Jet is a bad this scared, wet, white lit-tle
lit-tle peep-cat. He wish-es ob-ject, spring-ing for the
he could know what is in cel-lar-door is this Jet ?
that dish. He hopes it is Yes, this is Jet.





JETr'S AD-VIEN-TURE IN THE PAN-TRY.








N EL-LIE'S CATS.


Nel-lie loves cats. She has
eight. She is a-wak-ened each
morn-ing by a gen-tle scratch-
ing at the win-dow, that grows
to be a big scratch and a
loud me-ow if she doesn't an-
swer.
It is fun-ny to see four of
them sit-ting on the win-dow-
sill, and four on the rail-
ing of the porch a-wait-ing a
re-ply to that scratch.
When Nel-lie o-pens the
win-dow they all bounce in
pell-mell, and race o-ver the'
bed and play hide-and-seek be-
hind the pil-lows.
These cats are named Eliz-
a-beth, Liz-zie, Bet-sey and
Bess, James, Jim-mie, Jam-sie
and Jim, aft-er Nel-lie's pa.pa
and mam-ma.
Eliz-a-beth is the lead-er in
,nis-chief. She taught the oth-


ers how to scratch at theI
win-dow.
James is the high-mind-ed cat.
He sits on the dic-tion-a-ry on


top of the book-rack and some-
times on the man-tel. But he is
care-ful not to whisk his tail
and break the or-na-ments.










PAINT-ER PE-TER-KIN'S CATS.


Great beau-ties, great rogues
too, are Paint-er Pe-ter-kin's
five cats. Paint-er Pe-ter-kin
tries to keep them out of his


door a-jar and the five rogues
stepped in, and the mam-ma-
cat rogue sat down and saw
four kit-ten rogues climb and


GREAT BEAU-TIES AND GREAT ROGUES.


stu-dio, where he has a great
ma-ny things that tip o-ver
ea-sy and run out and spoil.
But one day he left the


whisk, and claw, and do things
- six-teen naugh-ty paws -
do-ing things, with brush-es
and bot-ties and paints.








PINK-IE SUP-POS-ES.


When I run out in the snow,
S'po-sin' I should have to go
'Out no shoes,
'Out no hat,
Like my lit-tle pus-sy-cat!

S'pos-in' I should say meow,
'Stead of talk-ing's I do now,
'Out no play-things
'Cept a ball,
'Cept a spool, or-that's all.

S'pose my dress was on-ly fur,
And I al-ways had to purr,
And had claws
To catch mice-
I don't think wouldd be real -,
nice!
THIS IS PINK-IE.

S'pose I was a tru-ly cat
Ly-ing on the kitch-en mat,
'Out no crib
White and pret-ty,
Who d' you s'pose would feed that kit-ty?








THREE DREAMS.


Oft-en when Cat Silk-y-soft
and her daugh-ter-cats woke


like
are


mam-ma's dreams, they
al-ways fun-ny."
So mam-ma told
first, and it wzas
fun-nv, as us-tI-al.
"I dreamed," said
Sshe, that I was
a great com-mon
black cat, and that
I lived up in an
at-tic, and that ev-


CAT SILN-Y-SOFT AND HER DAUGH-TEE.OATS.


in the morn-ing they would
tell each oth-er their dreams;
for cats are great dream-
ers. So the oth-er morn-
ing, Let's tell dreams," said
Pet.
Let's," said Prink, and
mam-ma shall tell first, for I


It
er-y day at noon I put on a
blue cra-vat and gave an ice-






THREE DREAMS.


cream lunch to
eight rats!"
That'llnev-
er come to pass, i:
mam-ma," said
Prink. And
I," Prink went
on, I dream- :'
ed I was grown
up, and was a "
great beau-ty,
and a paint-er
paint-ed me, PINKS
and I was hung in the pict-ure
store in a most el-e-gant frame,
with the most el-e-gant rib-
bons and gold-en tas-sels."


You vain,
puss! tkat' L
nev-er come to
p ass, said
mam-ma.
"And I,"said
Pet, gig-gling
right out, "I
dream-ed I was
I'; a an old danc-ing-
mas-ter, and the
chil-dren here
DREAM. had to take les-
sons of me and did-n't I
pay them out for mak-ing
me stand on my hind paws
yes-ter-day -yes, I did!"



1/


POP'S IBREAM,


I,
13






















I. 'ii,



C.. t..t ;~

I5 "F.
F'~~i jj,.i

i"~'"~:
i ci 1-i


2 7W


.:v


SV



..............-

------- -------








0171Th1.1 liD JUS-SY Ar JEll.


it









GRAND-PA'S VAL-EN-TINE.


Grand-pa's ver-y least lit-tie
grand-daugh-ter was a ver-y
pret-ty child, but she was a
ver-y self-ish one, too. Her
nurs-es did not like her, and
her mam-ma did not know
what to do with her. Grand-
pa said it was be-cause she
was the on-ly pet-ted creat-ure
in the house; be-cause ev-er-y-
thing dain-ty and pret-ty was
giv-en to her. She had all
the can-dy, all the bon-bons, all
the love and kiss-es. Grand-
pa said she ought to have some
pets, some-thing small-er than
her-self to care for, and to be
kind to.
On St. Val-en-tine's Day,
grand-pa sent Nel-ly a fun-ny
val-en-tine, and she was to have
it for hers just as long as she
took good care of it. So mam-
ma -ame up in-to Nel-ly's


room on St. Val-en-tine's morn-
ing, and she said: "There is
a love-ly val-en-tine for you
down-stairs, dear. If you are
good, and dress quick-ly, you
may see it be-fore break-fast;
but not if you are naugh-ty."
Nel-ly did not wrig-gle or
kick e-ven once while Ma-ry
but-toned her boots, did not run
off e-ven once when the lit-tie
skirts went o-ver her head, held
her face up sweet and qui-et
to be washed, stood still to be
brushed, and have her col-lar
pinned, and then a-way she
tripped down-stairs.
Mam-ma o-pened the par-lor
door.
Run in," she said, "and
see your val-en-tine."
Nel-ly looked all a-round,
but she saw noth-ing new.
"Why," said mam-ma, "I






GRAND-PA S VAL-EN-TINE.


left her here-where is she ?"
She?" said Nel-ly. And
then she laughed and ran to
the big chair in the cor-ner, and
mam-ma ran af-ter her, laugh-
ing too. There was grand-
pa's val-en-tine a trick-sy lit-
tle pus-sy-cat; and she had crept
in-to mam-ma's muff, and there
she sat, her soft lit-tle head
peep-ing out, and pur-ring
sweet-ly.
And did this kit-ty make
Nel-ly a good lit-tle girl?
Well, I think her in-flu-ence
was what grand-pa ex-pect-ed,
for Nel-ly was ver-y kind and
po-lite to her cat, brushed her,
and fed her, and let her in
and out, and spoke soft-ly
and kind-ly, and kit-ty went
ev-ei y-where with her, e-ven
to church one day, and in-to
the c oun-try when the fam-i-ly
weni; and Nel-ly has been
hear 1 to give her much good


ad-vice-not to catch birds,
and not to growl and spit at
oth-er cats, but to. share her
sau-cer of cream and her chick-


-V-


NELI-LY AD-VIS-ES HER CAT.


en bones with those oth-er cats,
and nev-er, nev-er to mew to be
served first at ta-ble-and this
ad-vice could have come on-ly
from a good, thought-ful lit-
tle girl.


s.:I;D









THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.


One time Fan and Fay
al-most did-n't have a-ny
Christ-mas. They did be-fore
night, though; but they would-
n't if it had-n't been for a
lit-tle stray kit-ty. You see
San-ta Claus was to send
pres-ents by pa-pa, and pa-pa's
train was snowed in, and there
would-n't have been any-thing
but just
r,, rai-sins if
S it had-n't
::. been for
S-that kit-
S .. ty-cat.
It was
'a- a-bout
noon,and
TIP-O-VER-THINGS PLAY. they were
look-ing out at the storm,
big, cold tears run-ning down
their nos-es, when they


a-bout as loud
They harked


as a pi,
a min-ut'


...were "The looked a
.eah oth-er -there was so,

WORK-BASK-ET PLAY.
Then they heard it a-g-ii
as wee and fine as if a fair-\
were there. They looked al
each oth-er-there was some
thing so live in the sound the3
did-n't dare go to the door
" Mew! said a small voice:
and this time there was ,.
great deal of scratch-ing, at
least two lit-tie feet. The)
ran to the door, and 1.
pranced a jet-black kit-ten,
She shook the snow off with,
a jerk, sneezed, looked all


heard a scratch on the door, a-round with two great, bright,






















































h.- -:


/



ii




THAT 1 K ITMADE C S A NOU FO T HOUSES


A






THE CHRIST-MAS KIT-TY.


gold-green eyes for a sau-cer
of milk, purred, and then rub-
bed her head a-gainst Fay.
No more big. cold tears!
that jol-ly kit made Christ-
mas e-nough for two houses.
She knew all a-bout work-
bask-et play, and spool-of-
thread play, and tip-o-ver-
things play, and chase-her-tail
play, and roll-a-ball play-
there could be no doubt that


she was no com-mon kit, but
a true Christ-mas-pres-ent-
cat, left there a-pur-pose when
San-ta Claus drove by with
the rein-deer sleigh; but, 0,
she was too sweet to de-scribe
at all when by-and-by in the
soft, snowy, fire-lit twi-light she
crept up in-to their laps, and
purred and went to sleep,
while Fan and Fay sang low
kit-ty-bye-lows.


Z-
-.-- _-- ..._ .


F--'" A1
-.-p:-.:: :r ,-.':;-..i; co -. --..- _

a..7
SLATE .. .T o-,URF-
.... .: .. .. ,, ; "'-:...-- '. 'r a .:-. '.-. .". .'-. 7: .. : _- "




~ i4>



SLATE PICTURE TAK ING KIT"TYS PICT--RE"









THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.


It was Peg-gy's
work to hunt the
eggs. But the
WhiteHenwould
al-ways have her
nest un-der the
porch, and that
,. made it hard for
PEG-GY. her, for she had
to lie down flat and crawl in.
One night af-ter school, she
found the White Hen on the
nest, and ver-y cross in-deed.
She tried to shoo her off, but
she would not move. So she
pushed her a lit-tie and then she
saw-not a plump white egg,
but the soft, fur-ry heads of two
lit-tle black kit-tens; and they
both said Mew! to Peg-gy.
But the White Hen was cross
and pecked, and Peg-gy had to
come out and leave her.
That same night Tab-by


came in with a kit-ten in her
mouth; soon she came a-gain
with an-oth-er; then with an-
oth-er; but she seemed un-eas-y
and Peg-gy saw her go un-der
the porch, and heard her mew.




M~ 4


HOW FUN-NY SHE LOOKED!
The next morn-ing, Peg-gy
took a stick and crept un-der
the porch. She made the White






THE WHITE HEN AND HER PETS.


Hen step off her nest, and there
were two more kit-tens.
Peg-gy gave Tab-by a nice
box on the porch, but in a few
min-utes the White Hen came
up, cluck-ing as loud as she
could, and sat down by the
box, and when the kit-tens
mewed she would cluck.
Peg-gy put some crumbs on
the floor to see what she
would do; and she broke the


crumbs with her bill and
called the kit-tens to eat, as
if they were chick-ens, and if
Tab-by tried to come near
she made her-self as big as
two hens and drove her a-way;
and when she nes-tled the kit-
tens up in her feath-ers, how
fun-ny she did look! 'Then
Peg-gy had to car-ry them
where the White Hen could
not come.


CHILD-LIFE ON THE FARM.- THE FIRST LES-SON.










A THANKS-GIV-ING GIFT.

giv-ing gift
fro m Grand-
ma ? You nev-
er could guess.
It was a bas-ket
of French kit-
tens. The y
reached the lit-
tie Greys' home
just in time for
the great din-
ner.
"French
cats!" said
Dick, we can
nev-er un-der-
stand them or
they us!"
But they
found their
What think you came to pret-ty pet kit-ties mewed in
the lit-tle Greys all the way A-mer-i-can, and knew ev-er-y
o-ver the o-cean as a thanks- trick A-mer-ican cats play.









HOW DAI-SY GOT HER WISH.


Dai-sy had three kit-tens -
Puff, who was cream-col-ored,
Beau-ty, drab, and Midge
gold-col-ored-three new, lit-
tle, sleep-y, hap-py kit-tens.
I wish my kit-ties had
some stock-ings!" Dai-sy said
to her aunt-ie the day be-fore
Christ-mas.
"Their feet are not cold,"
said aunt-ie. "They are all
cov-ered with soft fur."
"But to hang up, you
know," said Dai-sy. "San-ta
Claus might bring them some
neck-rib-bons."
Dai-sy's own stock-ing was
brim-ful of pres-ents the next
morn-ing, and they were so
very pret-ty, that she nev-er
thought of her kit-tens till
near noon.
She found them all a-sleep
in grand-ma's easy-chair with


its black-and-green striped
dam-ask cov-er, and the dia-
mond-shaped ti-dy on the back,
made in crim-son-and-white
checks.
And what do you think?
There were the kit-tens, all
three, in new sat-in neck-rib-
bons tied in beau-ti-ful bows
on the back!
Lit-tle cream-col-ored Puff's
was scar-let; drab Beau-ty's
was pink; and gold-col-ored
Midge's was blue 0, so
ver-y be-com-ing!
"San-ta Claus must have
been ver-y near when I wished
that wish to aunt-ie," thought
Dai-sy. And O, what good
taste he has !" she ad-ded
as she looked a-gain at the
gay lit-tle pus-sies. I should
like to have him pick out my
next new dress, I think."


















































































DAI-SY'S KIT-TENS AND THEIR CHRIST-MAS GIFTS.









SNOW-BALL'S EX-PE-RI-ENCE.


Snow-ball is a ver-y young
kit-ten in-deed. She has lived
just one sum-mer. She is fond
of the sun-shine. She curls
her-self up on the pi-az-za
where the sun shines warm
and sleeps for hours. She
likes rain-y days, too, for then
she climbs up to the top of
the wood-pile un-der the shed,
where it is warm and dry,
and sleeps for hours more.
But the oth-er day some-
thing hap-pened to Snow-ball.
She was out walk-ing and
found it ver-y cold. She was
think-ing that she had bet-ter
run home, when she felt some-
thing cold hit her on the nose.
She lift-ed her head quick-ly,
to see what it was, and some-
thing else, ver-y cold, flew
right in-to her eye. When she
winked that off she found one


more on her lit-tle soft paw.
Be-fore she could find out what
it was, ex-cept that it was white
and cold, it was gone, and her
fur was wet where it had been.
Then she looked up and saw
that the air was full of these
queer lit-tle things which were
so cold and wet and white, and
that they were fall-ing ev-er-y-
where. So she grew ver-y
much fright-ened and ran home
as fast as she could.
"Mew! mew! dear moth-
er," she cried, what is it that
is com-ing down from the sky
and that makes me so cold ?"
Why, you fool-ish kit-ten,"
said the wise old moth-er-cat,
tak-ing off her spec-ta-cles,
"don't you know that it is SNw ?"
Snow-ball looked out of the
win-dow. I don't think I
like SNOW," she said.




































































































" WHAT'S THIS SO COLD ON MY PAW? SAID SNOW-BALL.


..<,r-^-,:'
l!''']lj(l ^ **
*ii- *ty _








OUT-WIT-TED.


Three lit-tie tab-by-coats all in a row,
Moth-er Puss loves them, this I know;
Pet nam-ed them Pearl-y, Fred and Dick -
Nice lit-tle tab-by-coats, so smooth and slick!
"You can't keep them," broth-er Ned said,
Fold-ing his arms, and shak-ing his head;
" Our fish they'd catch, our birds they'd kill,
I'll find them a place by the old red mill!"
In-to his lap lit-tle Pet climbed,
Round his neck her chub-by arms twined,
But coax-ing was vain, though a close em-brace
Drew the ro-sy mouth to her broth-er's face.
Ned was gone, on-ly Pet and Puss,
To guard the dar-lings, but now, for-sooth!
Where should they go, to be safe from harm-
Up-stairs, down-stairs, or in the big barn?
No trace of tab-by-coats, in-doors or out;
Moth-er Puss stares at this bust-ling a-bout;
Pet smiles de-mure-ly when none can see,
Whis-pers, No-bod-y knows, Tab, but you and n
Mam-ma found in her hat-box three fun-ny things,
All curled up in soft, wool-ly rings;
Called, "Pet, Pet! Oh look! oh do!"
Laugh-ing, she said: "Tab lugged one, and I lugg


red two!"


e!'r


























JUMPER'S STRANGE FISH.

Jumper is Willie Watson's little for rats and mice, as cats usually
white cat. do.
The house where Willie and Jum- When she is hungry Jumper goes
per live is near a large stream of to the stream to catch a fish.
water. Jumper takes her seat among some
Cats do not like to wet their stones near a still place in the stream,
leet. where a great many little fish swim
They will never step in the water by.
if they can help it. When one comes near, Jumper
For this reason, you might doubt snatches it out of the water with her
what I am going to tell you about paw.
Jumper. Then she takes it in her teeth and
But every word of this story is runs into the house with it.
true. But one day Jumper made a mis.
Little white Jumper does not hunt take in her fishing.







JUMPER S STRANGE FISH.

A man had left a basket on the Oh I how mad. Jumper was then
stones and gone away. She jumped, and she mewed.
She tried hard to shake off the
ugly creature.
-. ... But she could not get away from
S-t it until Willie came and helped
her.
-.-..i' .He opened the close-shut claws
of the crab.
Then how fast little white Jumper
ran off I
Her paw was hurt so badly that
she was quite lame for many days.
"- Still Jumper often goes fishing.


JUMPER.

There were crabs in the basket.
Jumper looked at the crabs.
She thought they were very
strange fish.
But they looked good.
They smelled good.
At last she pulled one out of the
basket.
Jumper felt very proud of such
a large fish.
She dragged the crab to the house
to show to Willie.
But, as she was playing with it,
the crab caught hold of her paw.


V-





JUMPER AND THE STRANGE FISH.

But she never looks for fish in
baskets now.







A LES-SON IN MAN-NERS.
1 1 THE moth-er-cat rose up out of her
sleep;
S She called to her kit-tens, so shrill and
deep
That in they pranced, all three in a heap.
Si Kit-tens!" said she, in a tone so grave
That each lit-tle tail for-got to wave,
It's time I taught you how to be-have.
All el-e-gant cats mind cer-tain laws-
Know va-ri-ous styles of hold-ing paws,
And dain-ty ways to man-age claws.
tl "Nice well-bred kit-tens walk side by

Be-hind their moth-er, with gen-tle
glide-
Not scam-per and roll and hop and
hide.
S"I wish you to learn to give a paw
lo, With a soft and el-e-gant me-awv
VOW\,,, V And the sweet-est smile one ev-er saw..
*q "And a bow--a real-ly grace-ful bow
Is what few cats ev-er learn how
.l ^To make-I'll train you my-self. See
now-
Not a nod -but slow and deep- tis
way-
Bra-va, my beau-ti-ful dears! Go play!"
Three whisks and a whirl! off and a-way!
No irqre Be-hav-ing hur-rah! to-day !





















AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.

BY E. F. P.


GRAND-PA and Grand-ma
Hall lived all a-lone.
They had chick nor child,
not ev-en a cat; and they didn't
know there was e-ven so much
as a mouse in the house.
But there was one, a lit-tle
fel-low with the lov-li-est brown
fur, that lived all by him-self
be-hind the win-dow cur-tain mi
the par-lor. He al-ways had had
a good time and al-ways ex-pect-
ed to ; for you must know that


this lit-tie brown mouse had
nev-er ev-en heard of a cat!
But one day the lit-tle grand.
daugh-ter, Beth, came to live
with Grand-pa and Grand.
ma Hall. She brought all
her birds and her dolls, and,
a..as, all her cats ; and the ver-y
first night the cats there were
four of them -came troop-ing
in-to the par-lor, and be-fore he
could wink or think or ev-en
hold up his lit-tie pink paws in






AL-MOST A SAD STO-RY.
as-ton-ish-ment, they had Mr. qui-et-ly. Not so her three
Mouse stand-ing up be-fore bois-ter-ous sons.
them. All he could do was to "0 please not to!" said the.
hold up his paws and say, lit-tle brown mouse a-gain.
"' Please, please not to!" Shall!" said Mid-night.
Old Mis-tress Cat looked on "Will!" said Spot-ty.


"0, PLEASE NOT TO "
Must!" said Snow-flake. as it washer mouse it wouldn't
" That's what mice are for! be po-lite. Be that as may,
And then-well-bless her Mous-ie ran out the o-pen door
heart! grand-ma ap-peared, and was nev-er seen or heard
and the cats looked a-round of a-gain-not by lit-tie Beth's
and per-/has they thought that cats at least.











-S- 0
7. 110-0"

-77
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t. -. .- .- ,-.. .



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l .; .. '.--" '":.. _. .\ -::; :.....






^-*^a- : .... '. .---,-
A--I ,THE- -- O. T RD
I)~~ ~ ....- ,
t <. "- .. ..- "...-" -., -'. ,' 7.-7: -
.-.-'- "& : =- -*7. '" -.. ": '
I," '. "" : : L. : 7. -" : -1:


THE RAT SKETCH-ING THE CATS.


THE CATS CATCH-ING THE RAT.









THE HIS-TO-RY. OF NAN-CY LEE.


BY A. W. A.


One time there was a lit-tle
black kit-ten named Nan-cy
Lee. Nan-cy was-n't want-ed
where she lived.
The cook was a big cross
wom-an, who said she did-n't
want that good-for-noth-ing kit-
ten a-round un-der her feet."
So she picked up a broom
and scat-ted Nan-cy Lee out
doors.
The poor kit-ten cried a-loud
" Me-A-ow!" But that did-n't
dry her soft fur. She was so
fright-ened that she hid a-mong
the bush-es for a long time.
Af-tei a while she raised her
head an i looked a-round for a
friend. But she saw on-ly a big
black bee-tie.
Then she jumped into the
road, and sat down on the grass
to smooth out her wet fur.
She had nev-er washed her


own lit-tie coat be-fore, for her
moth-er had al-ways done it for
her; but she was do-ing the
best she could, when a-long
came a big dog. And what do
you think he did ?
Just as Nan-cy was go-ing up
to him to ask him to let her
warm her-self by him, he
o-pened his big mouth and said,
" B-r-r-r-r bow wow! "
Oh! how Nan-cy Lee did
run !
Next she saw a large red
cow. This cow was walk-ing
a-long the road eat-ing grass.
The cow looked so nice and
kind that Nan-cy ran and sat
down right un-der her.
The cow did-n't drive her
a-way, nor say "scat! nor
"bow! wow!" but still she was
walk-ing a-long a lit-tle bit at a
time, and the kit-ten sat so close






THE HIS-TO-RY OF NAN-CY LEE.


to her feet that she was in
dan-ger.
Just then a lit-tle girl with
long yel-low hair looked out of
the house near by.
"Oh, mam-ma!" said she,
" out there's a lit-tle black kit-
ten, sit-ting un-der a big cow.
She looks so cold, poor thing!
I'm 'fraid the cow will step on
her! Look, mam-ma."
So the la-dy looked too, and
saw them. She liked kit-tens
as well as her lit-tle girl, but
she did-n't want a-ny more, as
they had three al-read-y.
Still the lit-tle girl begged
hard to have the kit-ten brought
in, and at last the la-dy went
out and got her. The lit-tie
girl took her lit-tle broom and
brushed her, and then she sat
by the warm stove and washed
her rough dir-ty coat, while the
la-dy went out and warmed
some milk. She gave, it to
Nan-cy Lee in a teen-ty, ween-ty


lit-tie pan, just big e-nough for
her. Nancy drank just as fast
as she could, and then had a
lit-tie bit of Char-lotte Russe
that the lit-tie girl was eat-ing.
Was-n't that a fun-ny din-ner
for Nan-cy?
Then Miss Lee be-garn to
sing for the girl-ie. Did you
know kit-tens could sing?
She sang P-r-r-r-r" so soft-
ly! The lit-tie girl laughed,
and Nan-cy stopped.
Then the lit-tie girl said,
" Mam-ma, she looks just as if
her name was Nan-cy Lee.
Now, kit-tie, if that's your
name, sing more, but if 'tisn't,
keep still."
Then the kit-ten began a-gain,
and purred and purred like
ev-er-y-thing, and so they called
her Nan-cy Lee.
Nan-cy Lee still lives in her
new home, and has all the new
milk she can drink out of the
teen-ty, ween-ty lit-tie pan.


























































































NAN-CY LEE SEES THE BIG BLACK BEE-TLE.





















- f F/--= -
yw^^t^^S- =- ~ -- ^ --- ~/raI ^ -


A Moth-er's Lul-la-by.


HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!


LIT-TLE Mar-ger-y Daw,
who us-u-al-ly sang "see-saw"
when she sat in her rock-ing-
chair, one day took it in-to
her cur-ly head to sing a new
song. Hick-o-ry, Dick-o-ry,
Dock," she sang as she rocked
to and fro;


" Hick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
The mice ran up the clock!"

She sang it o-ver and o-ver,
un-til, all at once, Puss, who
lay doz-ing on the win-dow-
sill, found her-self purr-ing it
too:


___






HICK-O-RY, DICK-O-RY, DOCK!


" l ick-o-ry, dick-o-ry, dock!
The mice ran up.the clock!"

Well, the next thing Puss
knew she was rub-bing her
vel-vet paws in her eyes, and
wak-ing up from a nap, and
Mar-ger-y gone, and noth-ing
stir-ring in the room but the
rest-less sun-beams and the
tick-ing clock. She jumped
down and walked a-round the
table, and mewed, and felt
ver-y hun-gry. But there was
noth-ing on the ta-ble but the
vin-e-gar cru-et and a knife,
and so she sat down and
wait-ed. She was still rath-er


sleep-y, and Mar-ger-y's song
be-gan to hum it-self in her
ears.
"The mice-the mice-
mice the clock the clock
- clock!"
All at once she sat up
straight and rubbed her eyes.
"Yes, they did!" she said,
"they ran up the clock! I'll
have 'em I'll have 'em for
my dinner! I'll run up the
clock my-self!"
She sprang light-ly on one
of the long weights, and-
well, look at the pict-ure, my
dears, and you can see just
what hap-pened:


WHAT HA-1PENED.









PUT-TING


KIT-TY

BY M. E. S.


TO BED.


KIT-TY, Kit-ty, go to sleep,
Shut your eyes, and don't you
peep,
Sing with me your.lit-tle song,
We will not make it ver-y long.


And while I rock you in my
chair,


You must purr
prayer.
Al-tho' you say it
'Twill all be just


your lit-tle

soft and low,
the same you


know.


Mam-ma makes me bend my
knee,
But Kit-ty dear, you can't, you
see,
For you're too lit-tie yet to try-
See! I'm so big, and tall, and
high.


Hur-ry Kit-ty,
MIam-ma soon


for you see


will


me,


And then you can't
words,


say any


come for No more than chicks, or lit-tie
birds,


And I must see you safe in bed But I have heard the Bible tell


All cov-ered
head.


up ex-cept your That e-ven birds are cared for
well.











































SS .. ...E ... ....









NOLL owns a dear pus-sy.
Noll is sure she is one of
the fa-mous Three lit-tle kit-


tens who lost their mit-tens "-
at least she had none on the


LL.
first time Noll saw her, and
has nev-er worn a-ny since.
And af-ter los-ing her mit-
tens she must have lost her-self
for Noll found her one
spring twi-light down by the
hedge, all a-lone, cry-ing for
her sup-per that's what' Noll
said the" me-ows" meant.
And Noll, hap-py, ten-der-
heart-ed Noll, has the gift of
know-ing what the "me-ows,"
the ba-ba-as," the "moo-oos,"
the bow-wows and the bird.
chirps mean; and pus-sies,
lamb-kins, cows, dogs, bird-ies,
Sand e-ven wee down-y chick-ies,
seem ver-y hap-py when she
pats them with a ten-der coo.
Noll says she has taught
pus-sy to tell her A B C's-
not as you do, but by pat-ting
them soft-ly with her vel-vet
paw, one at a time, as Noll
Names them o-ver.
But I think Noll's chub-by
hand must help the vel-vet
paw don't you ?





















PUSSY'S


CHOICE.


PussY slept in the barn with her
three kittens.
They had a nice hay nest. This
hay nest was warm and soft.


MARS PET.


The kittens were comfortable.
But mother Pussy was not satis-
fied.
She knew about a place which she


thought the kittens would like better.
This place was a little girl's trun-
die-bed.
Do you know what a trundle-bed
is ?
Perhaps you never have seen one.
Trundle-beds are not much used
now. Long ago they were common.
Then the bedsteads for grown peo-
ple were higher than they are now.
A trundle-bedstead was like a low
square box, with four feet.
It had casters fitted into its four
feet, so that it could be rolled, or trun-
dled, under the large bed.
It staid under the large bed in the
daytime.
It was pulled out at night.
The little children slept in this
trundle-bed.






PUSSY S CHOICE.


Mary's trundle-bed was soft. It
had a white pillow.
It had a silk bed-quilt, made from
one of mamma's dresses.
This silk bed-quilt was quilted in
little squares, like a checker-board.
In every square there was a blue
flower.
Little Mary liked this silk bed-
quilt very much.
It was so soft and so pretty.
Pussy liked it too. She was al-
lowed to lie on it sometimes.
One day Pussy ran into the house.
She came from the barn. She had
something in her mouth.
She went through the kitchen so
fast that the cook did not see what
she had in her mouth.
The cook thought pussy had caught
a mouse.
Pussy ran right through the kitch-
en, into the hall, and up-stairs.
She crept under the big bed.
She jumped up into the trundle-
bed.
She put something down on the
soft, silk quilt.
Then she jumped out and ran
down-stairs.


After she had gone, something said,
" Mi-ew, mi-ew I"
That was what Mary heard. 0,
such a little mi-ew I
Mice don't mew.
So it was not a mouse.
The mi-ew came from under the
big bed.
Mary pulled out the trundle-bed.
She saw a tiny kitty on her pretty
silk quilt.
It was a lovely white kitty, with
black spots.
Mary ran back to the window.
She saw pussy going straight back
to the barn to get her other little
kitties.
But mamma said that this couldn't
be allowed.
This is what mamma sang to her
little girl:
Puss and her kittens
Must sleep in the hay;
And the bed be kept tidy
For my little May !"


But the
the house.
around its
Mary's pet.


first little kitty staid in
Mary tied a blue ribbon'
neck, and it always was


















































































READY FOR BATTLE.
















A CATASTROPHE.


One little black cat, one little gray-
Two little funny cats having such a play!
Over goes the gray cat sticking out her toes;
Down tumbles Blackie, right upon her nose
Here comes the mamma-cat, straight across the floor;
There go the kitten-cats scrambling for the door;
Up pops a brown mouse, coming through a crack I
Jump goes the mamma-cat before it can get back I
Funny little black cat, funny little gray--
How they let the brown mouse try to run away I
Off goes the brown mouse, in among the pails
Then how the mamma-cat pulls their little tails I










KITTY IN THE CRADLE.

SI want a live baby," said Jenny one I'll fasten a pretty lace cap on youi
day; head;
'A baby that knows how to frolic I'll rock you to sleep in my dolly's
and play; soft bed."


"ROCK-A-BY. BABY. OH ROCK-A-BY-BY."

My doll can do nothing but just
wink her eyes,
And all the day long in the drawer
she lies.


Come here, little kitty, I'll feed you
with milk;
I'll wrap you in dolly's best blanket
of silk;


Then kitty purred gently, as if she
would say,
"I think wouldd be nice to be treated
that way; "
And she tried very hard to be patient
and good,
And let Jenny do with her just as she
would.



She lay in the cradle dressed up in
a cap;
She soon went to sleep and had a
long nap;
While Jenny like any small mother
sat nigh,
And sung, Rock-a-by, baby, oh I
rock-a-by-by."




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