• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 The frog he would a wooing go
 The three bears
 The story of the three little...
 The silly hare
 Cinderella
 Cock Robin
 Cock Robin
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Rays of sunshine
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082535/00001
 Material Information
Title: Rays of sunshine
Uniform Title: Cinderella
Goldilocks and the three bears
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: M'Loughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082535
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002232709
notis - ALH3105
oclc - 03039645
lccn - 44031648

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
    The frog he would a wooing go
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The three bears
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
    The story of the three little pigs
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The silly hare
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Cinderella
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    Cock Robin
        Page 61
        Page 62
    Cock Robin
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
    Spine
        Spine
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A Frog he would a-wooing go,
Whether his mother would let
him or no.


So off he set
And on the
a Rat.


with
road


his
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"Pray, Mr. Rat, will
with me,
Kind Mrs. Mousey for


opera-hat,
met with


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to see ?"


They soon
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arrived


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gave
gave a


a loud knock, and
loud call.


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"PRAY, MRS. MOUSE, ARE YOU WITHIN?"


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FROGGYY AND I ARE FOND OF GOOD CHEER.'


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A Frog He Would a- Wooing Go.


"Pray, Mrs.
within ?"
"Yes. kind s


spin.


Mouse,


irs,


are you


and sitting


to


"Pray,


Mrs. Mouse,


now give


us some beer,
For Froggy and I are fond
good cheer."


SPray,


Mr. Frog, will


you give


us a song ?
But let it be something


not


that's


very long.


"Indeed,


Mrs. Mouse, I


have to say No;
A cold has made me as hoarse


as a crow.


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"Since you have caught cold,
Mr. Frog," she said,
"I'll sing you a song that I have
just made."




















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A CAT AND HER KITTENS CAMvIE TUMBLING IN.



































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MR. FROG IN A TERRIBLE FRIGHT.





A Frog He Would a- Wooing Go.


But while they were making a
merry din,
A Cat and her kittens came
tumbling in

The Cat she seized the Rat by
the crown,
The kittens they pulled the little
Mouse down.


This put Mr.
fright,
So he took i
wished t


Frog


in a terrible


ip his hat, and he
hem good-night.


As Froggy was crossing a silvery
brook,
A lilywhite Duck came and gob-
bled him up.


























So this was an end of one, two,
three---
The Rat, the Mouse, and little
Frog-ee.


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NCE upon a time, in a thick forest, there lived
three bears. One was a great big father bear,
with a big head, and large paws, and a great
voice. The next was a mother bear, of mid-
dle-size, with a middle-sized head, and a middle
sized body, and a voice quite low for a bear.
-/ The third bear was a funny little baby-bear,
with a strange little head, a queer little body,
wee bits of paws, and an odd little voice, between a whine and a
squeak.
Now these three bears had a nice home of their own, and in it
was everything that they needed. There was a great big 'chair for
the big bear to sit in, a large porridge-pot from which he could
eat his meals, and a great bed on which he laid himself to sleep at
night. The middle-sized bear had a middle-sized porridge-pot, and
a bed and a chair to match. The wee little bear had a cunning little
chair, a neat little bed, and a porridge-pot that held just enough to
fill his little stomach.
There lived near the home of these bears a little girl named
Goldilocks. She was a pretty child, with bright yellow hair, that
shone and glittered in the sun like gold, and that is how she came
to be called Goldilocks.
One day, when she had run off into the woods to gather flowers,
she came to a queer sort of house; and she fell to wondering who
lived in it. She thought she would knock at the door: but as the
knocker was beyond her reach, she had to break a twig from a bush
to raise it. She knocked once-twice-thrice.


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The Three Bears.

There was no reply, so Goldilock's, after a while, pushed open
the door softly and timidly, and popped right into the bears' house.
But the bears were not at home. After they had made the porridge
for their breakfast, and poured it into their porridge-pots, they
walked out into the woods, while the porridge was cooling, that
they might not burn their mouths by beginning to eat it too soon.
Goldilocks was very much surprised when she came into the
bears' room, to see a great porridge-pot, a middle-sized porridge-
pot, and a wee little porridge-pot standing in a row.
"Well," thought she, I'm just as hungry as I can be, and I
guess I'll eat some of the porridge in this great big pot." She took
a taste, but the porridge was so hot that she screamed, and made a
spring that upset the pot, and it rolled on to the floor.
Then she took some of the porridge from the middle-sized pot,
but found it too cold.
There was only the little porridge-pot left, and Goldilocks tried
that. It was just right, and she liked it so well
that she ate up every bit there was.
S In the meantime she had been looking around
for a seat on which to sit down. She came first to
the great big chair, but that was too hard.
She next tried the middle-sized chair,
but that was too soft.
Then she caught sight of the chair of
S'\ i the little Bear, and that was neither too
S7- hard nor too soft, but just right. So she
seated herself in it, and there she sat till
the bottom of the chair came out, and
M down she came plump on the ground.
Presently Goldilocks looked around to
see if there was any room in which she
might lie down and rest. Sure enough
she found one, and in it were three beds























































"SHE THOUGHT SHE WOULD KNOCK AT THE DOOR."


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EATING UP THE LITTLE BEAR'S PORRIDGE.


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The Three Bears.

side by side. One was a great big bed; the next a middle-sized
bed; and the third a wee little bed.
First she lay down on the great big bed, but oh! it was as hard
as a rock, and the pillow was much too high. So she went and iay
down on the middle-sized bed. But, that was as much too soft as
the other was too hard.
There was only the wee little bed left, and Goldilocks tried that.
It just suited her in every way; so she covered herself up comfort-
ably, and lay there till she fell fast asleep.
By this time the three bears thought their porridge would be cool
enough, so they came home to breakfast. When the great big bear
saw his porridge-pot lying on the floor, he roared out in his great
rough, gruff voice:
"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE."
Then the middle-sized bear saw that her porridge-pot had been
moved from its place, so she threw up her paws, and cried out, in a
voice not quite so loud as the great bear's:
"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE !"
Then the little bear went to his porridge-pot in a great flurry,
and on finding it empty, cried out with a squeaking voice:
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The Three Bears.

"Somebody has been at my porridge, and has eaten it all up/"
Presently the big bear went to sit down in his
Great big arm-chair, and found it was not as he had
left it.
So the great big bear growled out:
S "SOMEBODY HAS BEEN
SITTING IN MY CHAIR!"
The middle-sized bear then went
Sto her chair, and found a
S"great hollow in it where
e little Goldilocks had sat
be 4: d down. So she scowled and
or to growled, very
angrily, but
St not so loudly
-o z as the big
bear:
"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN SITTING IN MY CHAIR."
Then up jumped the little bear, and saw at a glance what had
been done to the dear little chair of which he was so fond.
"Somebody has been sitting in my chair, and has sat the bottom out of it/ "
he squeaked with a doleful wail, and then sat plump down on the
floor to have his cry out.
Then the three bears thought it necessary that they should make
further search; so they went up stairs into their bed-chamber.
Now little Goldilocks had pulled the pillow of the big bear out of
its place. He noticed it at once, and roared out:
"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING IN MY BED!"
Then they went to the middle-sized bed, and that was full of
humps and hollows, and looked so untidy that the mother bear
scowled and growled:
"SOMEBODY HAS BEEN LYING IN MY BED!"







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The 7hree Bears.

Then they passed on to the third bed. The coverlet was in its
place, the pillow was there, and on the pillow lay the fair head of
little Goldilocks. And she was sound asleep.
"Somebody has been lying in my bed-and here she is "
shrieked the little bear in his shrillest tones.
The big bear, the middle-sized bear and the little bear stood with
their mouths wide open, staring with surprise at the pretty child
they found there.
The big bear had a tender heart, and felt quite ashamed of him-
self for having threatened to punish the one who had dared to enter
his house.
Mrs. Bruin said: "Poor child! I'd like to give her a hug and a
kiss, she looks so sweet and good." And she regretted having
made such a fuss over the porridge that had been touched, and
the chair that had been sat in.
The little bear, however, was in great distress at the way in which
he had been treated, and gave a most doleful whine.
Little Goldilocks had heard in her sleep the great rough, gruff
voice of the big bear, but she was so fast asleep that it was no more
to her than the roaring of wind, or the rumbling of thunder. And
she had heard the middle voice of the middle-sized bear, but it was
only as if she had heard some one speaking in a dream. But when
she heard the little, squeaking whine of the little bear, it was so
sharp, and so shrill, that it awakened her at once.
Up she started, and when she saw three bears on one side of the
bed, she tumbled out at the other, and ran to the window. Now
the window was open, because the bears, like good tidy bears, as
they were, always opened their bed-chamber window when they got
up in the morning, and with a
One, two, three, out goes she i
away went Goldilocks out through it, leaving a piece of her dress
in the paw of the great big bear, who tried his best to catch her.
She fell plump on the ground, and had to sit still a few moments







The Three Bears.

to find out where she was. But it
seemed as if the woods were full of
bears, and so she kept on running as
-hard as ever she could until she was
.I/ s. well out of the forest, and in sight of
Sher own home.
0 what joy it was to be safe inside
her own home! And Goldilocks made
up her mind never again to enter any
one's house without being invited, and
never tomake herself quite so much at
home as she did in the bears' house.
The three bears stared for some time
out of the window from whence Goldi-
Slocks took her flight; and though at
first they were quite angry with the little
/ girl and ready to eat her up, they soon
Sgot over these bad feelings, remember-
ing that it is wise to
BEAR AND FORBEAR.
And if you'll believe me, that little
/ bear, who had made the biggest fuss,
was just as proud as he could be to
think that such a pretty girl had eaten
his porridge -sat in his chair-and
slept in his bed! Why, he actually
hugged himself with delight! But as
this feeling might not last long, I
should advise you not to pry into other
people's affairs; and if you go in the woods keep away from the
house of
THE THREE BEARS.












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SNCE upon a time there was an old pig with
three little pigs, and as she had not enough
to keep them, she sent them out to seek their
fortunes.
The first that went off met a man with a
bundle of straw, and said to him, Please,
man, give me that straw to build me a house;"
which the man did, and the little pig built a house with
it. Presently a wolf came along and knocked at the
door, and said,-
"LITTLE PIG, LITTLE PIG, LET ME COME IN!"
To which the pig answered.-
"No, No, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"
This made the wolf angry, and he said,-
"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house
in!"
So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house
in, and ate up the little pig.
The second little pig met a man with a bundle of wood,
and said, Please, man, give me that wood to build me






The Story of the Three Little Pigs.

a house; which the man did, and the pig built his house
with it.
Then along came the wolf, and said,-
LITTLE PIG, LITTLE PIG, LET ME COME IN!"
"No, No, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"
Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house
.n in!"


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So he huffed, and he puffed, and he
puffed, and he huffed, and at last he
blew the house down, and then ate up
the little pig.
The third little pig met a man with
a load of bricks, and said, "Please,
man, give me those bricks to build a
House with;" so the man gave him the
bricks, and
4, 1l' he built his
k- y'" .t ,v house with
S-"^ithem.
......... .^ Then the
./' wolf came
,. t along as he
A ,,. had done
Stotheother
little pigs,
and said,--
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THE SECOND LITTLE PIG MEETS A WOODMAN.


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" PLEASE, MAN, GIVE ME THOSE BRICKS."


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The Story of the Three Little Pigs.


"LITTLE PIG, LITTLE PIG, LET ME COME IN !"
"NO, NO, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"
"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your
S4 house in."
Well, he huffed and he
r puffed, and he puffed and he
I huffed, and he huffed and he
f puffed; but he could not get
the house down. When he
S found that he could not, with
S all his huffing and puffing,


The Story of the Three Little Pigs.

blow the house down, he said, Little pig, I know where
there is a nice field of turnips."
Where?" said the little pig.
"Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if you will be
ready to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will
go together, and get some for dinner."
"Very well," said the little pig, I will be ready.
What time do you mean to go ?"
Oh, at six o'clock."
Well, the little pig got up at five, and got the turnips
before the wolf came (which he did about six), and said,


" Little pig are you ready?"
The little pig said, Ready ?
I have been, and come back
again, and got a nice potful for
dinner."
The wolf felt very angry at
this, but thought that he would


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THE LITTLE PIG THROWS DOWN A PEAR.


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THE WOLF STARTS DOWN THE CHIMNEY.






The Story of the Three Little Pzgs.
be up to the little pig some way or other, so he said,
"Little pig, I know where there is a nice pear-tree."
Where ?" said the pig.
Down at Merry-Garden," replied the wolf, and if
you will not deceive me, I will come for you at five
o'clock to-morrow, and we will go together and get some
pears.
\ Well, the little pig bustled up the
next morning at four o'clock, and went
S off for the pears, hoping to get back



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before the wolf came. But x', "
he had further to go, and
had to climb the tree, so
that just as he was getting down from it he saw the wolf
coming, which, as you may suppose, frightened him very
much. When the wolf came up he said, "What! are
you here before me? are they nice pears ?" "Yes, very,'
said the little pig. "I will throw you down one;" and







The Story of the Three Little Pigs.
he threw it so far that while the wolf was going to pick
it up, the little pig jumped down and ran home.
The next day the wolf came again, and said to the
little pig, Little pig, there is a fair at Shanklin this after-
noon; will you go ?"
Oh yes," said the pig, I will be glad to go; what
time will you be ready?" "At three," said the wolf.
So the little pig went before the time to the fair, and
bought a butter-churn, which he was taking home when
he saw the wolf coming. Then he got into the churn to
hide and by so doing turned it over, and it rolled down
the hill with the pig in it, which frightened the wolf so
that he ran home without going to the fair.
He went to the little pig's house, and told him how
frightened he had been by a great round thing which
came down the hill past him. Then the little pig said,
" Ha! I frightened you then. I had been to the fair
and bought a butter-churn, and when I saw you I got
into it and rolled down the hill."
Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he
would eat up the little pig, and that he would get down
the chimney after him. When the little pig saw what
he was about, he hung on the pot full of water, and made
up a blazing fire, and just as the wolf was coming down,
took off the cover, and in fell the wolf! So the little pig
put on the cover again in an instant, boiled up the wolf
and ate him for supper, and lived happy ever afterwards.











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THE SILLY HARE.



THE name of the silly hare was Bunny Long-ears, and he came
of a very respectable family. His parents were well off in the
world; and wishing that Bunny should start out in life with every
advantage that they could give him, they sent him to a nice private
school, kept by Dr. Owl, a very learned and skillful, although
somewhat pompous teacher.
The school was small, but of very high standing, and was patron-
ized by the best animal families of the neighborhood; as you will
know when I mention that at the time Bunny attended, it numbered
among its pupils young Chacem Curly-tail, little Bowwow Bark-
well, and Piggery Hogson, Jr., the parents of each of whom were
well known for their wealth and high social position.
SIf Bunny had not been a very silly hare, he would have known
what a lucky fellow he was to have such a chance to get a good
education, and would have tried hard that Dr. Owl's careful efforts
to instruct him should not be wasted. But unfortunately, as is
sometimes the case even with little boys and girls, he was exceed-
ingly silly. He studied just as little as he possibly could, and let
his mind run altogether to sport and play. He played truant fre-
quently, running off to the woods and fields, and getting into all
sorts of bad company.
After a while, such amusements as nutting, bird's-nesting, and
fruit-stealing began to seem too tame to him, and he made up his
mind that he must have some "real sport;" by which he meant
going off to shoot with his father's gun. He knew, of course, that
it would be of no use to ask leave to take the gun, for he was alto-
gether too young to be trusted with anything so dangerous; so
he planned to take it without leave.
He managed one evening to get out of the house with it, and hid

























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DR. OWL'S SCHOOL.









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OFF FOR A DAY'S SPORT.


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FALLING IN BAD COMPANY.


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The Silly Hare.

it near the school. The next morning, instead of going into school,
he shouldered the gun, and scampered out of sight with it, as fast
as his legs could carry him.
He had nearly reached a piece of woods in which he fancied he
would find something to shoot at, when he met a fox named Tuffy
Slydodge, a very bad fellow, whose company he had often been
warned to avoid. Tuffy stopped and asked him where he had got
the gun, and when Bunny told, with some little pride, of the cute
way he had stolen off with it, he slapped him on the back, and de-
clared that he was a smart fellow, and ought to join the Bravoes,"
which he explained, was the name of a band of "lively" fellows,
mostly foxes, that he belonged to.
Bunny felt flattered by Tuffy's compliments, and consented to go
with him to the meeting-place of the Bravoes, a cave in the woods,
to which Tuffy led him by a round-about path. Tuffy's real purpose
was to get the gun away from Bunny, for he had said to himself,
as soon as he saw it, that it was just what he wanted.
When they reached the cave, Bunny saw there a number of young
foxes, very hard-looking fellows, who were drinking and smoking
like old topers. Getting a wink from Tuffy, they received Bunny
very graciously, and made him sit down and drink with them.
Bunny not being accustomed to strong drink, it took only a few
rounds to make him helplessly drunk. This was what Tuffy had
looked for, and he intended, after securing the gun, to have Bunny
carried in his drunken condition to a distance from the cave, and
left there till he awoke. But something happened just in the nick
of time to prevent this part of the plan from being carried out.
The Bravoes were really a lot of young thieves and robbers of
the worst kind, and they had lately been carrying on a series of
burglaries on a big scale. At the last house they had broken into,
they had added murder to their other crimes, having killed Mrs.
Goose, the rich old lady who lived there. They had hitherto been
very successful in escaping detection, but this murder had roused














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BUNNY IS INTRODUCED TO THE BRAVOES.


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FOUND IN THE FOXES' CAVE.


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BUNNY'S TRIAL.


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The Silly Hare.

the police, who were all dogs, to extra effort, and they had at last
got a clue to the guilty ones, and the whereabouts of their head-
quarters. At the very moment the foxes were plying Bunny with
drink, a squad of police were on their way to the place.
But the foxes were wary, and, when in the cave, always kept a
sentry to watch for any one coming near. The sentry now rushed
in and told of the approaching police, and the Bravoes at once made
dff by a secret path they had very ingeniously contrived from the
back of the cave. For the time being they got away in safety.
But not so Bunny. The police, entering, found him lying in a
drunken sleep. They found hidden in the cave goods of all sorts,
including some of the things that had been stolen from Mrs.
Goose. Bunny, of course, was seized, and taken to jail.
The animals were very severe in their laws, and allowed no delay
in carrying them out, so Bunny's trial soon took place. He was
brought to court before Judge Jocko. Hardpate, who was noted for
the scant mercy he showed criminals.
Public feeling was so much excited by the crimes that had been
committed by the Bravo gang that no one against whom there was
the slightest proof of guilt could hope to escape. So, although
Bunny declared his innocence, and begged pitifully for mercy, the
jury that tried, him thought that the fact of his having been found
in the place where the plunder was stored, showed that he must have
had some share in the robberies, and they brought in a verdict of
guilty. The judge then sentenced him to be hanged, which was the
penalty the laws of the animals imposed, and in a few days the sen-
tence was carried out.
This, then, was the terrible result of poor Bunny's craze for
"sport." In spite of his idleness and disobedience he hardly de-
served so awful a fate. But a similar misfortune may happen to,
any one who trifles with evil, and seeks the society of the wicked.
All must expect to be judged by their company, and, if they asso-
ciate with wrong-doers, to share their punishment when found out




























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BUNNY ON HIS WAY TO EXECUTION.


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CINDERELLA.
--- = Z:7 ---

-' O NCE upon a time, a poor nobleman
Married a very rich but proud and
bad-tempered lady. She was his
second wife, and had two grown-
up daughters, of exactly her own
B disposition. The nobleman, too,
j,'.~ had a daughter-the loveliest girl
/ ever known. She had been brought
!____- "/ up by her godmother, who, as
hll[, hmi- sometimes happened in those days,
I was a Fairy.
i The marriage was no sooner over
t i than the step-mother began to be
very harsh and unkind towards this
young girl, whose gentle and loving disposition caused the behavior
of her own daughters to appear even more detestable than before
She made her do all the hard work of the house; scrub the floor
polish the grates, answer the door, wait at table, and wash up the
plates and dishes.
But the poor child would not complain, even to her father, who,
always showed the most anxious affection for her. She knew how
unhappy he, too, was in this second marriage, and how powerless
to help her. When her work was done. she would sit for warmth
in a corner of the chimney, among the cinders; and for this reason,
and to show how much they despised her, the unkind sisters gave
her the name of Cinderella.
One day the two sisters received an invitation to a ball that was
to be given at the palace of the King, in honor of his son, the Prince,
who had just come of age. An invitation to this ball being a great







Cinderella, or the Little Glass SiY er.

honor, the sisters were in high glee, and at once began making
preparations to appear there in grand style.
This meant a great deal more work for Cinderella. She had to
do all the sewing and ironing, to starch and plait the ruffles, to run
out three or four times a day to make purchases, and, when the day
of the ball came, to help her proud sisters dress, even to the arrang-
ing of their hair; for they knew she had excellent taste in all these
matters, although they would pot deign to admit it openly.
At last the time came to start, and the sisters rode off to the ball,
being mean enough at the last moment to taunt Cinderella with not
having been invited. The poor girl retired to her dismal kitchen,
and could not help weeping as she sat there, thinking over her
sisters' cruelty.
Suddenly, her Fairy
godmother stood by her
JJ, side, and asked what
was the matter. "I,-
I,--should so much have
-have liked "-sobbed
the broken-hearted girl,
but could say no more.,
N" Do you mean, you
Should like to go with
your sisters ?"
Oh! yes, I should,"
cried Cinderella.
rl I "Well, well!" said
/ her godmother, "be a
.__^ good girl, and you shall
--r .= go."
SCinderella soon dried
her tears; and when
THE SISTERS RECEIVING THE INVITATION TO THE BALL. her godmother said,











































































THE FAIRY APPEARS TO CINDERELLA.


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CINDERELLA ARRIVES AT THE BALL.


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Cinderella, or tke Little Glass Sl'pper.


Sf CINDERELLA'S CARRIAGE GOING TO THE BALL.
"Fetch me a pumpkin," she ran and got the largest she could find.
The Fairy scooped it hollow, touched it with her wand, and imme-
diately changed it into a magnificent carriage.
Then, seeing a mouse-trap in which were six live mice, she told
Cinderella to open the door of it; and as each mouse ran out, she
touched it with her wand; and so got as handsome a team of
mouse-colored horses as were ever harnessed together.
Then she made a coachman out of a rat, and six tall footmen out
of six lizards from the garden. Another touch from the wand
changed Cinderella's dingy clothing into a beautiful ball-dress, that
sparkled with diamonds. Last of all, the Fairy gave her a pair of
slippers made of glass, the smallest and prettiest ever seen.
Cinderella was now quite ready. Just as she was stepping into
the carriage, the good Fairy said, Mind, whatever you do, don't
be later than twelve; and warned her, that if she did not leave in
time, her carriage would turn back to a pumpkin, her horses to
mice, her coachman to a rat, her footmen to lizards, and her dress
to rags.
There was a great stir at the palace when the splendid carriage







Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slizper.

drove up, and great was the interest displayed when Cinderella
alighted. The Lord High Chamberlain himself escorted her to
the ball-room, and introduced her to the Prince, who immediately
claimed her hand for the next dance. Cinderella was in a whirl ot
delight, the envy and admiration of all the ladies and gentlemen.
The hours flew all too fast. At supper Cinderella was seated next
her sisters, and even conversed with them, they little thinking who
she was.
When the hands of the clock pointed to a quarter of twelve,
Cinderella, mindful of her godmother's warning, arose and hastened
to her carriage. The Prince hurried after her, expressed his regret
that she must leave so soon, and begged her to visit the palace
the next evening, when the festivities were to be continued.
The following night the two sisters went again to the ball, and
Cinderella's godmother let her also go; but in a much handsomer
dress than before.
The Prince waited for her at the door, at least three-quarters of
an hour, and when she arrived, led her into the ball-room. He


CINDERELLA'S CARRIAGE COMING FROM THE BALL.















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CINDERELLA'S FLIGHT FROM THE BALL.


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CINDERELLA IS ESCORTED TO THE PALACE.

CINDERELLA IS ESCORTED TO THE PALACE.






Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slfper.

danced with her every time, and kept by her side the whole
evening.
Cinderella was so happy, she entirely forgot her godmother's
warning, and the time had passed so quickly she did not think it
was more than eleven when the first stroke of midnight sounded.
She jumped up from her seat by the side of the Prince, rushed across
the room, and flew down stairs.
The Prince ran after her; but was too late. The only trace of
her was a glass slipper, which had fallen off in her flight. The
Prince picked it up, and would not part with it.
Poor Cinderella got home frightened and out of breath, with no
carriage-no horses-no coachman-no footmen-and all her old
clothes back again. She had none of her finery now, except the
other glass slipper.
The King's son made the strictest inquiries, but could get no
information from the servants of the palace, or the soldiers on
guard. The only person
that had passed them,
was a poorly clad girl,
.- .who certainly could not
/ have been at the ball.
The next day heralds
were sent through all
the Kingdom, proclaim-
ing that the Prince would
marry the lady who could
t wear the slipper that he
had picked up.
S _-_ The rivalry among the
< ladies was very great, but
their feet were all much
too large. When the
herald called on the two
THE PRINCE FINDS THE SLIPPER.








Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slpper.

sisters, Cinderella
opened the door,
and recognized the V
slipper at once. As
soon as her sisters
were quite tired out
with trying, she




seeing- wht ov-^^--,
said, May I see if
it will fit me ?"
They began to
laugh and sneer;
but the herald, look- r
ing very attentively '
at Cinderella, and
seeing what a love-
ly face and figure THE SLIPPER FINDS ITS OWNER.
she had, said, Everybody has a right to try."
He handed her a chair; and no sooner was the slipper tried, than
it fitted like a glove. The two sisters bit their lips in envy and
vexation; and they nearly fainted when Cinderella quietly put her
hand into her pocket, and brought out the other slipper.
The moment both slippers were on, the good Fairy appeared,
and, touching Cinderella's clothes with her wand, made them more
costly and dazzling than ever. Then the two sisters recognized that
the despised Cinderella was the beautiful Princess whom they had
seen at the ball; and throwing themselves on their knees, asked
her to forgive them the very many unkind things they had said
and done to her. She lifted them up, kissed them affectionately
and said she only wanted them to love her now. A royal escort
was sent to conduct Cinderella to the palace, where the King's son
met her; and in a very few days they were married.


























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DEATH OF COCK ROBIN.










Who killed Cock
Robin ?
"I," said the Sparrow,
With my bow
and arrow;
I killed Cock Robin."


Who saw him die ?


" I" said the Fly,
"With my little eye;
I saw him die."

Who caught his blood?
I" said the Fish,
With my little dish;
I caught his blood."








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Who'll make his shroud ?

SI said the Beetle,

\ith my thread and needle;

I'll make his shroud."


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Death and Burial of Cock Robin.


dig his grave?
"I," said the Owl,
my spade and shovel;
I'll dig his grave."


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Who'll be the
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Parson ?
said the Rook


"With my little book;
I'll be the Parson."


Who'll

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Death and Burial of Cock Robin.


Who'll be the Clerk?
"I" said the Lark,
"If it's not in the dark;
I'll be the ; Clerk."


Who'll carry the torch?
"I," said the Linnet,
"I'll fetch it in a minute;
I'll carry the torch."

Who'll carry him to the grave?
"I," said the Kite,
"If it's not in the night;
I'll carry him to the grave.









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Death and Burial of Cock Robin.

Who'll sing a psalm ?
SI," said the Thrush,
As she sat in a bush;
"I'll sing a psalm."


Who'll be
chief
Smourner ?
S "I" said the
Dove,
"For I mourn
I tl for my
love;
I'll be chief
motirner.'


Who'll toll the bell ?
I," said the Bull,
"Because I can pull,
I'll toll the bell."








Death and Burial of Cock Robin.


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When they
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For poor Cock
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All the birds of
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Fell a-sighing
and sobbing,


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