• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Advertising
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Off to the sea
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: Off to the sea
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082531/00001
 Material Information
Title: Off to the sea
Physical Description: 30, 2 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Shaw, C
Petnerick, H ( Engraver )
Publisher: s.n.
Place of Publication: S.l
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Sailing -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Shipwrecks -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Adventure and adventurers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Islands -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Friendship -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Letters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
 Notes
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Illustrations engraved by H. Petnerick.
General Note: Advertisements for pills, potions and food supplements precedes and follows text and on endpapers and back cover.
Statement of Responsibility: by C. Shaw.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082531
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224882
notis - ALG5154
oclc - 214285116

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
    Half Title
        Half Title
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Off to the sea
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Advertising
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



















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OFF TO THE


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LENA ACCEPTED THE OFFER OF A RIDE ON HER BROTHEL'S BACK.
.p. 16.
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OFF TO THE SEA.


H-IIS is what the moon rose on late one evening. There had beeh a
terrible storm, and the beautiful vessel had been driven by the force
of the wind far away from her proper course.
Though the captain knew that his ship was being hurried to the sands,
and must break to pieces there, and though he made every effort to save her,
it was of no avail; the wind and the waves were too strong.
There were sailors pacing up and down the shore a few miles off, with
the cold wind and rain beating in their faces.
ba0 1






A SHIP ON THE SANDS.

"A bad night," said one of them, as he stood with his sou'wester on,
trying not to think that he was wet and uncomfortable.
"A very bad night," echoed another gruff voice. "I doubt if that
brig that we saw over there will keep off the sands. But it's too thick to
see a hundred yards ahead, that it is."
They were quite right in
-. their surmises; for after a
.- while, as they walked to
and fro on the streaming
sea-wall, where the rain
poured down and the water
splashed up in sheets of
o W spray, there was heard above
Sthe noise of the storm a
sound which thrilled even
those sturdy sailors.
A boom from those far-
off sands! Again and again
it fell on the ear, now louder,
ft.. now fainter, as the wind
varied in violence.
Then there was a hurry
"- K of preparation, a rush of
men to the beach, and soon,
but none too soon, the life-
boat was on its way to save the men on that sinking ship.
The sound of the guns, and the rumour of the lifeboat having started,
soon spread through the town, and one and another came down to the beach
to hear for themselves all there was to hear.
The sailors .knew all about it, but to any stranger the short answer
was, A ship on the sands."







A NEW DAY.


"Will she get off?"
"Impossible to say."
Will the lifeboat get there in time ? "
Perhaps it will; it weren't long in starting, anyways."
So the stranger had to wait and watch too, while the darkness fell,
hiding sea and land alike.
"No moon to-night," said. -
the stranger again. _-I -"---_ -
"Not up yet; and too i-- -
thick besides; but by-and-by ii
she'll be out-and then what l
will she shine down on ?"
concluded the sailor as if to she- iI
himself. i
And what she did shine
down on when at last the
storm abated a little, was a
boat filled with men who had
been perishing, but were now
saved !
And she shone down on
gaunt timbers and spars of a
forsaken vessel, lying on the
treacherous sands, which begin
to gleam and shine in its still
light, as the tide leaves them n
more and more bare.
When morning dawned, a little girl sat at her window looking out on
the same scene, all sunshiny and beautiful now.
"I wonder whether they will come," she said to herself. "I wonder
whether my letter is getting there just now. Let me see, seven o'clock; no,









A JOINT INVITATION.


letters are not delivered at the Hall quite so soon as that. But presently


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they will get it. How glad I am mother let me write that letter I think

4


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u-







AT THE HALL.


Birdie was glad, too, for he sang me a lovely song while I was doing it.
How surprised mother was when I brought it down with me to breakfast,
all ready directed and stamped! But I could not wait a minute, after once
mother had said, You may write to-morrow.' Of course I could not, for who
could know that five or six cousins were going to be invited, and not be in
a hurry !"




S I i

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Yes, Rose's letter had reached as the clock was on the stroke of halF.
past seven, just as the prayer bell was going to ring, the postman's knock
was heard, and Christabel, the eldest girl, ran to the door.
"There's one for you, miss," said the man, who knew all the children by
sight, "and I daresay you'll be pleased with it!"
5







OUT OF DOORS.


Christabel smiled at his little joke, and ran back to her mother. From
Beachington," she said eagerly. "Must I wait till after prayers to open it,
mother ? I do long to know what Rose has to say! "
Yes, my dear," said her mother; "a few minutes will make no dif-
ference. You know we always do."
The shadows were still long on
S ^ '_ the dewy grass when Christabel
stood under the verandah and opened
her letter.
Mother! she exclaimed, when
her eyes fell upon the first few lines,
S- "come and look here."
'-- Her mother came to the window,
and looked over her shoulder. This was what she saw:
"MY DEAR CHRISTABEL,-
"Mother says I may write to-day to ask you all to come down to
Beachington for a month. She hopes Uncle and Aunt will say 'yes' for
all of you, and come, too, themselves; because we can't be so happy without
our parents, can we? At least, Harry and I and Lena always miss dear
father, since two years ago, especially if we have anything extra to enjoy.
And this is very extra, is it not ?-your all coming down
to spend a whole month with us ?
"I hope that I have written it-I mean the invitation
-as I ought; but if you knew how pleased we all are,
you would not wonder that I cannot write properly. ,,
"I remain, your loving Cousin,
ROSE."
"Pleased ? echoed Christabel's brother, when after
breakfast they all went into the garden to let their
parents talk the matter over. "Pleased! I believe I
shall jump out of my skin if father says yes."







A TALK.


"Well, I don't see that that would be of much use to any one," said
Christabel; "so do come, Alf, and sit down like a sensible boy! Look
there, I can see a shady place under the trees, where we can talk in peace
and quietness."
"Will they let us go ?" "
said Alf, throwing himself -
on his back, so as to rest .--- .--
himself as fully as possible, ---
"I do not know; but .
mother says I shall write '
to-day, and send the answer '"
to it." "
"I don't care a fig Ii
about that," said Alf; "writ- e hg.
ing isn't the fun, it's goiingi anIi lilll' I I -_
that is of consequence."
"Of course it is; but
I shall enjoy telling the t lo
news, if it's good. I shall
let mother write, if it isn't." i "p
You're very kind, I'm -
sure." "- Z
"She said so,-but -
anyway, I do not believe :. -
it will be bad, for father "-
said when he heard the
letter, 'There's a treat!'
and he would not have said that if he had been going to say no."
"I shall have to get out my swimming-belt and look it over."
"And I shall have to look for our bathing-dresses! I wish now that I
had taken mother's advice last year, and mended it before mine was put away."
5 a 7**







ADVICE.


You never do take advice," said Alf.
Oh, don't say 'never' "
_-_- -. "You never take my- advice, anyway."
"You give such strong advice, Alf; you almost
--- ..-...--,'. force a body to say as you wish."
ell--? "
-' "I do not call that advice, I call that force;
P and force I don't approve of, between brothers and
sisters.'
You're mighty wise--"
"I am."
Well," said Alf, raising himself to a sitting posture, "I did not come
out hero to get into a dispute, so I'll go indoors."
"Oh, don't!"
"Then be sensible, Christabel. If I'm masterful, I'll try to do better;
and if you're conceited-- "
He looked at her quizzically, and before she could answer gently, as she
had intended, "I'll try to do better," he had added,-
I'll-I'll take it out of you, if I can! "
"Oh, Alf !" she said, looking hurt.
Make up, then," he answered, and tell me what you want to see at
Beachington more than anything else."
Christabel decided that it was too good a
day to quarrel, and looked up with a smile of
peace. Her mind went swiftly to the cliffs and
blue sea; she pictured the boats, the fishermen,
the nets, and by the time she had made up her. I
mind what she did want to see, she came to
the conclusion that squabbling did not pay.
"Well," said Alf, ".what would you like .
to do best ? "







" TILERE'S ONE FOR YOU."


" I would like to see the old postman give the letter to Rose."







LATE.


"That is supposing that
mother lets us go?"
"Of course."
"And I should like to be
going out for a sail at this very
moment! Oh, won't it be jolly "
The next morning a letter
did travel to -Beachington, and
the old postman brought it to
the door as Christabel had sur-
mised.
But Rose did not take it in, for she had overslept herself. So when she
opened her eyes, the first thing they fell upon was something white lying on
the chair by her bedside.
Here it is she exclaimed. But who put it here? and whatever time
can it be, for the post to have come, and for me to be in bed ?"
She took It up, as people do who long to know the contents of a letter,
and yet somehow enjoy to play with their impatience.
She looked at the address; yes, it was for her. She turned it over, and
found it was her cousin's usual postmark from the Hall, where they lived, a
few miles from London.
Then at last she tore it open. It ran,-
DEAREST ROSE,-
I'm too happy to write, but mother will to aunt, and she says
that we may If you can make out what I mean, you will be clever, for
I cannot make head or tail of that sentence myself.
I mean, in sober language, that we are \


coming I


"Your loving
CHRISTABEL."


-j'I: --







FROM THE WINDOW.

S. Rose jumped out of bed. To-day she could hardly glance
-' out of the window, dearly as she loved the view from it.
The fisherman wending his way home with his shrimping-
net; the sailors in their boat seen against the sunshiny sea,
like a chasing on a silver shield;-all this at another time she
would have delighted in, but to-day her refrain was: Christabel
is coming! Oh, how glad I am! Christabel is coming!"
She hastened to dress, herself, and went down to make
her apologies to her mother.
I stayed awake so long last night thinking about them,
mother, that I never heard a sound of Lena's calling me, or anything," was
her excuse.
"There is a time for everything," said her mother gently, and by
your lateness you have made four people somewhat uncomfortable."
.' Oh mother, how ? "
First, your mother,,who had to breakfast
without her dear daughter, who usually waits *
on her. Second, your brother, who missed a
certain cheerful girl. Third, your little sister, S- -
who had no one to brush out her hair for
her, or help her to dress." .---_
"But who is the fourth?" broke in Rose,
who was smiling into her mother's half-smiling _
eyes, "I don't see who the fourth was." ,
Do you not? Then I will go on with .
my catalogue. Fourth, yourself; for you
lost the pleasure of being a com-
fort to us, and of sharing
your news, which you .
had all to yourself, up
in your room."







"TELL MOTIHE WHERE WE ARE."


"Dear mother!" said Rose, throwing her arms round her neck, "I am
so sorry. I do wish I did get up better."
Wishes are poor affairs when they are not acted upon," said her
mother. "' But now, my dear, we will say no more about it, but hasten to
do the next -duty that comes
-" 7 to our hands."
-!'. Have you heard when
.i they come, mother?" asked
--- Rose, "because they do not
say in my letter."
:"Next week."
A long week Only
shortened to Rose by her
Preparations for her cousins
comfort : for it needed a great
deal of management to pack
them all into the little house
in which her widowed mother
lived.
.' At last all was done, and
__~' the eve-ntful day dawned. "I
s,-:hall take my work out on
the cliff," she said to Harry,
"and you run back and tell
mother that we are going to
watch for the steamer there."
Meanwhile, at the station near to Christabel's home a great many good-
byes were beino said.
Though their father hoped to follow them to Beachington on the next
Saturday, still the children felt such regret that he could not share their
pleasure that very day, that the farewells were as tender as if they were for
12







WA TINcG.


a much longer separation than for three whole days. At last they were all
seated in the carriage, and their father had arranged their many packages
to the best advantage. The carpet-bag, which had been stuffed full of odds
13


06,a






GOOD-BYE I


and ends up to the last moment, was placed for their mother's footstool;
the basket with biscuits and fruit was given into Christabel's charge; the
umbrellas were laid in the netting; and then came the ticket collector, to
see if all in that carriage were really bound for the proper place.
I'm going to Beach-
ington," said Greta
Proudly, "and so are the
rest."
SThe man smiled at the
in ty h happy faces, as he an-
swered, Change at Ports-
mouth, ma'am, for the
steamer. Nice day, ma'am,
but rather rough."
With that he went off,
Sand the children set them-




their mother reminded them
that he might have heard
from some one who had
already come from Beach-
ington that day; or by
telegraph; and while they
were considering this, the
train began slowly to move,
and they had only time to wave a hasty good-bye to their father, before he
was hidden from their sight, and they felt they were off.
By-and-by they reached the end of the first stage of their journey, and
felt the fresh air of the sea blow across their faces; for this was the place
14






A NEAR VIEW.


from which they were to
proceed on the boat.
Directly they stepped
from the carriage, the wind
blew the girls' dresses hither
and thither; while, if the
boys had not held on their
hats, they would have been
blown right into the sea.
Rough! that it was!
Their mother looked with
dismay at the rocking
steamer, and wondered that
with so bright a sky the
sea could
S be so
boister-
ous.


\\\~//// \~ ,Y~ Q %




~ ~**Ji




I ~ *r, -


As to the young people, they were in the highest
spirits, and every wave that came splashing over the side
of the boat only increased their glee. There was perfect
fascination in watching them. But when a very large
one nearly drenched some of them, they thought "dis-
cretion was the better part of valour," and retired to a
part of the steamer where they could see without being
made uncomfortable.
Meanwhile, at Beachington a tiny black speck was
to be seen from the cliff, with a tail of smoke which
reached all along the horizon.


"- -------



~--,---I-~-------~
r----






SIR1UMPING.


Harry and his sister sat long
and watched the tiny speck in-
Screasing, till at length Rose jumped
Sup, exclaiming,-
Harry there's mother clap-
j ping for us, I do believe; I wonder
what it is ?"
"/, She caught up her work, and,
SI? followed by her brother, quickly ran
across the breezy bit of grass which
separated the shore from their house, and soon stood breathless at the
window where their mother sat working.
"Did you call us mother?" asked Rose.
Yes, my dear. Lena went on the beach with her shrimping-net when
you went to the cliff; I should like IIarry to run down to find her. Tip
went with her, but I cannot even see him."
Are you afraid about her, mother ?" asked Harry. She is so used to
it, that --"
"No, not exactly afraid; but if she is not home very soon, she will miss
seeing them arrive. The steamer will be in at Beachdowns in a very short
time, and a fly will bring them here before she
has time to get home, unless you find her at once.
Almost before the words were out of his ..........
mother's mouth, Harry was off to the shore -
and soon discovered his little sister deeply en- -- --
gaged in rifling the recesses of a particularly
rich pool. Her basket was by her side, and -
on his telling her what their mother had said, I
she quickly put in the few shrimps from her
net, and accepting the offer of a ride on her
brother's back, was speedily carried homewards, Harry looking eagerly along






NEARLY TOO LATE.


the water to see if the steamer had yet turned into the harbour at Beachdowns.






A MERRY PARTY.


They were, however, home in plenty of time. Lena could change her
dress and stand at the gate, the picture of a little country girl, smiling a
bright welcome when the fly from Beachdowns drew up at their gate at last.
Out of it stepped her aunt and two small cousins, one of whom was
__ supposed to be Lena's own

1: iiIK I II name; the rest had pre-
I ,i. I ferred to walk the two
i i11i i li miles, for they could not
i: I -1" lose one single moment at
i lii the seaside for anybody!
T ya, a at length all had air-
s- se'e te. vta rived; Rose took Christabel






10 'f -The Cranbournes bad
never seen Beachington
before, as their aun t had
Sroome there after their
uncle's death, and they had
never vito sited her since.
A merry party gathered
round the tea-table. Rolling
steamers and bustling sta-
tions were forgotten, by all
the young people at anyrate, and home-made bread and Lena's freshly boiled
shrimps seemed the very nicest things that could be.
If Mrs. Cranbourne could not but remember the fatigues of her packing
up and journey, she said nothing of them at. the time, but sipped her tea
s18







BEFORE BEDTIME.

Sand watched the happy faces,
I- trying to forget her headache in
S .:.:,. Ithe general joy.
S- After tea Alf came round to
/ his mother's side and whispered;
and then, after a moment's con-
S-:- sideration, she said to her sister,-
= Would you think it too late
Sfor them to have a run on the
cliff before they go to bed ?"
__ ... Mrs. Forde gave a ready
assent, for Rose and Harry had
--- already told her that they were
sure their cousins would not be satisfied to go to bed without running to
the beach to breathe in a real taste of the sea.
It did not need more than a word, before all the young people had
risen from their seats, and were searching for hats and shawls in hot haste.
While the hubbub was still at .its highest in the hall, the door opened,
and a quick, gentle step crossed the room.
Mrs. Cranbourne looked up as Christabel bent
eagerly and whispered: "You must not unpack
while we are gone! If you want to do that, I'll
stay; I would not have you do it alone for anything "
Her mother smiled as she answered: I will
wait for you then, my dear, at any rate for all the
boxes except the one containing the things for the
night. Those I can easily take out, so as to be
ready for the little ones when they come in. They
will all be tired."
Christabel was satisfied, and hastened off after
the rest, who were already, like impatient horses,
19









FROM THE CLIFF.


stamping about on the lawn in front of the house; Archie having untied

his spade and pail from the bundle, so as to begin digging as soon as

possible.

"Where shall we go ? they burst forth, looking to Harry for the answer

" Which way is it ? "


companions, There's to be a yacht race next

that."


-~--
------~:-
~---p
-- --
-2-
-
2~-,
-----~-----~
--
------
---~ ---
-_=-=
--
---;- --
----- -- --- c-.
--
=-~-=----- ---
~-s=-~---~-- --=-=- "
;----~-
--~--~--IC~"'~"1---~--'::---=- ~~
----- ----
-ii----
----~----~--~I~ ~' c''


)Z 1~
i!
----


"Is it?" asked Alf.

"Yes; Rose and I fix on a yacht that we call ours, and watch its

success or failure from our post on the cliff."
2u


They had turned in-

stinctively towards the blue

line that was just visible

from their aunt's garden,

with its white sails flitting

past.

This way," said

Harry; "will you go on

the cliff or on the shore ?"

"The shore for me,"

said Alf, for I like to help

the fishermen push off their

boats."

So do I," said

Archie, I think that's. the

greatest fun of all."

This was such a very

common event to Harry,

that, as he led the way

rapidly towards the beach,

he called to his panting

week! It's jolly fun seeing







"DON'T, BOB!"


The others not having seen such a race, wondered what it would be







A PLUNGE.


like, but at this moment they came to the rocky path which led down to the
beach, and all were too delighted at what they saw to pursue the conversation.
As they passed by some cottages, a young fisherman, whom they knew,
ran out of his door laughing heartily.
What's the matter, Bob?" asked Harry.
"Did you ever see the like, Master Harry ? said Bob. "I've had such
a lark! I told Jeanie just
\ now there was a fine gentle-
man a-coming to call on her;
and would you believe it, when
I showed him in at the door,
Youe .. she didn't like him, nor give
him the welcome I expected."
He held in his hand a
large crab, while his young
wife, smiling and rosy, came
outside too, to have a talk
with them.
"Are you going to bathe
to-morrow, Miss Rose?" she
asked.
"I do not know, Jeanie;
is it your turn to be in the
water?"
"No, it's mother to-
morrow," said Jeanie; "but
if you young ladies are coming down, I'll ask her to change with me."
"Oh, no," answered Rose; we shall have you another day, and your
old mother is very kind I've been telling Greta that she will not mind the
water one bit after the first plunge."
"You're quite right, miss. Now Bob, be quiet! I hate those crabs,







A SCRAMBLE.


and you know it; if you don't keep quiet, I won't boil them for you,-there,
that I won't!"
She ran in laughing, and Bob, not afraid of the threat, trudged down
over the shingle to pull his boat up out of the reach of the rising waves.
The next morning bathing was the first treat, and the children enjoyed
it to the full. The sea had
become calm, and now only- -
rippled in on the sands
which fringed the shingle
at low tide.
In the afternoon they
sat in a shady nook in
their aunt's garden, while
she and their mother read
to them; and after an
early tea they went for a
scramble on the rocks, till
the darkness warned them
to turn homewards.
A merry party they
were Up as early as they
were allowed, scampering .
down to the beach to pick
up the fresh seaweed and
tiny shells left by the re-
treating tide. Did ever air smell so fresh as that morning air ? Did ever
sand look so sparkling as thbse even stretches with the sun glittering on
every sharp-cut grain, like a row of diamonds ?
But sunshine does not last always; and storm and cloud have to remind
us that days of darkness must come, and it is as well to be prepared for them.
After a few stormy days, in which the children's patience was taxed to
23






A STORM.


the utmost by being kept indoors nearly the whole time, Harry and Alf
said they should brave the weather and go out. Their mothers made no
objection, for Harry always did go out in all weathers, and Alf thought
nothing could hurt him.
They were well rewarded, for after they had been on the beach for an hour
or two, -Bob came running
-- up to them, excitedly,-
S Master Harry," he
Exclaimed, there's a ship
on the sands again, and
the Beachdown lifeboat
is going off. There! don't
you see those dark spots
S over on the beach yonder,
Like a lot of black ants,
that's the lifeboat and
her crew! They'll be off
in a moment."
But though Bob was
much more interested in
the lifeboat than in any-
thing -else, the boys could
not help looking towards
the wreck, which was
--"- very near; for to them
it was an awful sight.
As they stood eagerly straining their eyes, to 'see as much as possible
between the clouds and rain which the wind was driving hither and thither,
a good many from the fishing village began to assemble on the beach, and
low-toned surmises were passed from one to another.
"Do you think there is any one on board?" asked Alf of Bob.
2-







TO THE RESCUE.


SOh, dear! yes, sir! Can't you see them clinging to the rigging? It's
a sad sight, sir, and her to go to pieces before the lifeboat can come up,
may-be."
Will she not be there in time ? asked Harry.
"Well, sir, as you know, it's a long pull from Beachdowns over to this
sandbank, and
we can't keep
up a lifeboat
here."
Wh' h y "
asked Alf.
It costs
too much, sir,
for a small
place like
Beachington."
What a
pity!" said
Alf, whose
eyes had never
moved from -
the vessel,
which could -
hardly be seen
in the fading
light, hidden as it often was by the driving rain and mist.
Beachdowns was growing indistinct, only now to be guessed at by some
little lights which here and there twinkled out from the growing darkness.
"She'll be along directly," said Bob, after they had watched in silence
for what seemed to Alf a very long time.' Let's give 'em a cheer, boys!"
It was too dark to see anything, but as the cheer from the sailors on






SAVED !


shore rang out, in the pause of the wind, a moment after, came a hearty
response of eight or ten deep-toned voices, at which the watchers standing
round felt their throats swell, and a mist come before their eyes.
They're close to them," said Bob, "and the poor fellows on the
wreck will have heard that cheer plainer than we did."
Still they waited, almost
unconscious of the driving
wind and rain, till after what
seemed to the inexperienced
S a very, very long time, they
heard another sound of cheer-
ing, repeated again and again,
Still it died away in the dis-
tance, as the lifeboat with its
precious freight got farther
away from Beachington and
nearer to Beachdowns.
The next morning, Alf,
-__ too excited to sleep, was out
on the cliffs before a soul was
stirring in the village, and as
She stood gazing on the wreck,
now almost covered by the
water, a sailor joined him.
Do you think they all
got off? asked Alf; for to him
this was the great question.
"Every man of them, as I've heard, sir; every man on board."
I'm so glad!" exclaimed the boy fervently.
"Ah I the joy of saving life is a great joy! I don't know nothing
like it, sir,-neither in things of this life, nor the next."
26







A FORGET.


"The next?" echoed Alf, for he hardly understood the sailors rapid speech.
"Aye, the next. This life ain't going to last always, young sir!"
"Oh, I know that," said Alf. "I think that-- I wish it were!"
Do you ?" said the sailor earnestly, looking down in the boy's fresh
face. "Now that's not a wish as I should have thought a sensible young
gentleman would have made. There is a next life, and the longer we live
in this one, the more we find
that we poor sinners are like the --
men on yonder sinking ship. -- :
We're going down, and down,
and down, and there isn't a bit -----
of hope for us, overtaken as we
have been by the waves of our
sins, if the Lifeboat don't come
and save us !-that there isn't."
Alf listened; his mind went
back to the storm of last night,
to the perishing men on the
wreck, to the battling lifeboat
coming nearer and nearer, to --
the cheers of joy which rent -
the air when the lifeboat had S
done its work. Then the sailor's
voice broke the stillness again,
and seemed to come like an
echo to his thoughts:
"There's no Lifeboat but Jesus for perishing men! There's no safety but
being in Him, when the storms of life come. There's no peace till we know
for a certainty that He's our Lifeboat, our Safety, our Saviour, our everything!"
The man turned away, and Alf was left to think of all he had said.
When, that next afternoon, they all went out for a row, to try to get
27







DOING THE NEXT THING."


a near view of the wreck, he felt very glad he had had that talk with the
kind sailor; for they had not long started, when Rose exclaimed: "I say,
Harry, this boat's dreadfully wet at the bottom; my shoes-- "
The rest looked down,
and what was their dismay
to see the water, which was
swishing about at the
bottom, rising and rising;
creeping up, moment by mo-
ment, with terrible rapidity.
"What can it be "
asked Christabel, turning
white.
But Harry was com-
manding Alfin quick tones to
turn towards shore and row
for their lives; while Rose
was crouching down in the bottom of the boat, stuf-
fing her handkerchief with all her might into the
hole from which the cork had somehow been left out.
That little piece of presence of mind probably
saved the whole party. But as AElf sat, straining
every power to reach the shore, he was very glad
that for his own part that great question had been .
settled that morning; that he really had committed
his soul's keeping to Him who said: "The Son of
Man is come to seek and to save that which was lost."
The next week was all sunshine and pleasure. Picnics and beach-teas
were the order of the day, and each day saw some fresh excursion.
A mile or two from Beachington there was a little bay full of rocks and
picturesque caves. One solitary fisherman's cottage was perched on a green
28






A SOUND FROM THE SEA.


ledge formed by an old landslip; and here a sailor boy, sitting basking






JUST IN TIME.


Siin the sun, heard a cry of distress
S--- from among the rocks below.
.. l l pi The tide was nearly up, and
,* i long ago he had watched the party
S*of children from Beachington,
S wending their way round the
corner of the Head. Was one of
Them left behind?
RH' 1e put down his boat and
Hurried to the edge of their little
garden, looking eagerly over the
S,_ broken stones. After a minute he
'* .saw a white little face belonging
S'to a venturesome little girl whom
S'". l. he had heard them calling Irene!
S- It did not take him long to
-- call his father to get a ladder,
for the child was separated from
the shore by a wide channel, into which the sea flowed deep and strong.
Not a moment was to be lost; but as soon as he saw his father bearing the
little girl safely towards the cottage, he took their donkey and galloped off
to tell her friends of her safety.
The fact was the children, never dreaming that they were leaving their
little sister asleep under a rock, wandered
home in twos and threes, supposing that
Irene was on in front.
How glad they were that the sailor
boy had heeded that poor little cry of -
distress Else the play by the sea would
have ended very differently from what it
did-such a very happy time !








M ELLIN'S FOOD
FOR IN FANTS AND INVALIDS.























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S : :: ...



IS ELECTRICITY A RESTORATIVE ?


IN these days of pressure, even a care-
ful study of hygienic laws does not
prevent rapid exhaustion of brain and
S nerve power, in a more or less degree.
How much more then must over-
taxed energy predominate amongst that
numerous class who, failing to comply
with the laws of health, give themselves
up to the pleasures of existence, and,
day by day, neglecting recuperative
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system at a dangerously low ebb?
Time was when medicinal remedies
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only when these had failed to bring
about recovery that the sufferer' would
ask the question, "Is Electricity a
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which Mr. C. B. Harness is the
President, will give all the corroborative
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after using oneli of these celebrated
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stairs, when previously he had to crawl
up, undoubted merit is surely, proved.
' Such a declaration, is that of Mr.'
"J. E., Taylor, 13, Sutton Street,


Holloway Road, Birmingham, who
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it. My previous one I wore daily for two
years, during which time I travelled through
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not having much faith in it, and in about
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description and trusted entirely to my Belt,
and now at the age of sixty-one I am a strong,
hearty man, suffering from neither ache nor
pain, and able to eat and digest anything. I
daresay you have a great many Testimonials
in regard to their excellence, but if a word
from me is of any utility you can make any
use of my letter you think fit."
This is one declaration out of the
thousands that have helped to build
up the present reputation of the Medical
Battery Company,. Ltd., 52, Oxford
Street, London, W. The natural tonic
and invigorating properties of Electricity
as brought scientifically into the service
of sufferers at this Establishment should
be taken advantage of by all who suffer
from any of the diseases over which
Electricity has been proved to have
successful control.


---- --- --

















60p













,.

PU RE
2'F TF R








?':
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