• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Nurse Karen's Norway tales
 The three goats
 The breakfast song
 The nursery blacksmith
 Chickens in trouble
 Row, Row! A fishing go
 The wonderful hay-making
 Baby's ride
 The grateful sparrow
 What the cat said
 The story of the two dogs
 Feeding the birds
 A Christmas riddle
 My new day - I would be a...
 Santa's reproof
 The seasons
 All for baby
 The story of baby's shirt
 The story of baby's blanket
 The story of baby's cotton...
 The story of baby's shoes
 The story of baby's sasil
 The story of baby's mug
 The story of baby's plate
 The story of baby's bread
 The story of baby's play-thing...
 The story of baby's picture-bo...
 The story of baby's crib
 The story of baby's pillow
 Elsa's dolly
 The endless story
 The empty bird-house
 A wise fellow
 A little boy's joke
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: Nursery stories and rhymes for the home and kindergarten
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082530/00001
 Material Information
Title: Nursery stories and rhymes for the home and kindergarten
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Poulsson, Emilie, 1853-1939
Bridgman, L. J ( Lewis Jesse ), 1857-1931 ( Illustrator )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop Company
Place of Publication: Boston
Publication Date: 1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's stories
Children's poetry
Nursery rhymes   ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Emilie Poulsson ; fully illustrated by L.J. Bridgman and others.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in a color.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082530
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224587
notis - ALG4853
oclc - 23128524

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
    Nurse Karen's Norway tales
        Page 4
    The three goats
        Page 5
        Page 6
    The breakfast song
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The nursery blacksmith
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Chickens in trouble
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Row, Row! A fishing go
        Page 14
        Page 15
    The wonderful hay-making
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Baby's ride
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The grateful sparrow
        Page 21
        Page 22
    What the cat said
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The story of the two dogs
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Feeding the birds
        Page 27
        Page 28
    A Christmas riddle
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
    My new day - I would be a gentleman
        Page 32
    Santa's reproof
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The seasons
        Page 38
    All for baby
        Page 39
    The story of baby's shirt
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The story of baby's blanket
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The story of baby's cotton gown
        Page 45
        Page 46
    The story of baby's shoes
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The story of baby's sasil
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The story of baby's mug
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The story of baby's plate
        Page 53
        Page 54
    The story of baby's bread
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The story of baby's play-things
        Page 57
        Page 58
    The story of baby's picture-book
        Page 59
        Page 60
    The story of baby's crib
        Page 61
        Page 62
    The story of baby's pillow
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Elsa's dolly
        Page 66
        Page 67
    The endless story
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The empty bird-house
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    A wise fellow
        Page 73
        Page 74
    A little boy's joke
        Page 75
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
















































































A PLEASANT HOUR IN THE NURSERY.






NURSERY STORIES AND RHYMES


FOR


THE


HOME


AND


KINDER GA R TEN


Including "Nurse Karen's Norway Tales," and "All for Baby," complete; with
a collection of short stories and rhymes






BY

EMILIE POULSSON


AUTHOR OF NURSERY FINGER PLAYS


FULL Y


ILL US TRA TED


L. J. BRIDGMAN


AND


OTHERS


BOSTON
D. LOTHROP COMPANY
1893








































COPYRIGHT, 1893,
BY
D. LOTHROP COMPANY


All rights


reserved.














CONTENTS.


NURSE


KAREN'S


NORWAY


TALES


THE THREE GOATS
THE BREAKFAST SONG
THE NURSERY BLACKSMITH
CHICKENS IN TROUBLE
Row, ROW A-FISHING Go
THE WONDERFUL HAY-MAKING
BABY'S RIDE
THE GRATEFUL SPARROW
WHAT THIE CAT SAID
THE STORY OF TWO DOGS
FEEDING TIlE BIRDS
A CHRISTMAS RIDDLE
MY NEW DAY


SAN
THE
ALL


1TA'S R1
SEASON
FOR B
THE STO
TIIE STO
TIlE STO
THE STO
ITHE STO


TIlE STO
THIE STO
THIE STO

THE STO
THE STO
THE STO
THE STO


PROOF
iNS
SABY:


BABY'S


SHIRT


F BABY'S BLANKET
>F BABY'S COTTON GOWN
F BABY'S SHOES
F BABY'S SASH
F BABY'S MUG
)F BABY'S PLATE
F BABY'S BREAD
F BABY'S PLAY-THINGS
F BABY'S PICTURE-BOOK
F BABY'S CRIB
F BABY'S PILLOW


. ELSA'S DOLLY
. THE ENDLESS


VIII.
IX.
X.


STORY


THE EMPTY BIRD-HOUSE
A WISE FELLOW
A LITTLE BOY'S JOKE



















NURSE KAREN'S NORWAY TALES





THE


THREE


GOATS.


THE


THREE


GOATS.


Now you shall hear said
Nurse Karen one day to Bobby


and Sue and the Baby


you
'The


shall


hear


"Now


story


Three Goats.


" There was once a Boy who


had


three


Goats.


One


night,


when he went to meet them, the


frisky things


nip
then


field and
I out.


leaped


into a tur-


could not get


Then


Boy sat


down on the hillside and cried.


"A
came
cry ?'
"' I


there


along. V
asked the F
cry because


Hare


Vhy
I are.


can't


you


get


Goats


out


field,'


answered the Boy.


"''ll


would
Hare,


tried,
not c


said
but


ome.


the
the


Hare.
Goats


Then


too, sat down and


cried.


"Along came a Fox.


" Why


you


cry


asked


the Fox.


"'I


Boy cries,


Boy is


cannot


gcet
S^


crying


because


aid the Hare;


cryinl
the


'and


because


Goats


out


the turnip field.'


"' I'll do it,


" So


said the


Fox.


Fox tried, but




THE


THREE


GOATS.


Goats would not come.


Then


the Fox also sat down and cried.


" Soon


alone


asked the


becau


the Fox
because


after,
'Why
Wolf.


the
anc
the


Boy cries


Hare
1the
Boy


Wolf
you


came
cry ?'


(I am crying


crle


said


Hare cries


cries;


because he


and
can't


get the Goats out of the turnip


field.'
Wolf.


'I'//
He


tried;


said
but


Goats would not leave the field.


Wolf.


Fox


crie


and the


Boy


cries;


because


crying
and


Hare


Hare cries


cries


because


and


the


because


Fox
cries :


because the


Boy


cries


he can't get the Goat


out of the turnip field.'


said the


"'I'll Thendo it!'
" Then the b


Boy


moment


Bee.
they


He
could


Bee.


ig Animals and


stopped


crying


laugh


do
not


tiny


it, indeed,


But the


when
tiny


down


beside


others and began to cry too.
b~III1V ~ VV


After


over the hill


little,


and


sitting there crying.


you


cry?'


said


Bee


aw them


flew
all


'Why do


Bee


Bee
field
Goat


flew awav into


and


upon


the
one


turnip


and said,


"' Buz-z-z-z-z!'


" And


every one!"


out


said


Nurse


Goats,
Karen.





THE


BREAKFAST


SONG.


THE


BREAKFAST


SONG.


(Nurse


Karen 's


Norway


Tales.)


Don't you know a song for
breakfast time, Nurse Karen ?"


asked
and t


Sue


one morning, as she


Baby sat


the little


nursery table.


" Ah,


yes


she said.


my country we have a little


about


the milk.


ready to eat this ni


Are
ce p


you


'orrid


" In
song


all
ge?


Well, then, now you shall hear:


Nurse


Karen smiled.


She


was just bringing in the pitcher
of milk.


five


o'clock


he milks the


cow,
The busy farmer's man.





THE


BREAKFAST


SONG.


o'clock


strains


milk


And pours it in


the can.


feet.


And


when


she


sang


the last verse she poured some


more milk into


Baby's cup.


seven


o'clock


milk-


man's horse
Must go to town--'get up!'


At eight o'clock


Nurse


K aren


pours


The milk in


When


about


Nurse


Baby's cup.


Karen


sang


the milkman's horse she


made a great tramping with her


"Oh!


Sue.


do sing it again,


Nurse


K aren


said
sang


it again, and when she came to


the
cup


last
was


verse thi


empty


time
so


Sue


Nurse


Karen sang:

" At eight o'clock Nurse Karen
pours
The milk in Susie's cup."




THE


NURSERY


BLACKSMITH.


THE


NURSERY


BLACKSMITH.


" Pitty, patty,


polt,


Shoe the wild colt;


Here a nail, and


there a nail,


atty, polt.


Pitty, p;

See
Nurse,


said E
baby's
Karen
crib.


Goose book


how
when


3obby,
pink
was


as
feet


Baby
play


laughs,
this !"


patted


while


opening


Nurse


little


" It's out of my Mother


and mamma used


to play it with me when


little.
Mother


was


Do the children have a


Goose


way, Nurse


book


Nor-


Karen ? "


"Not like yours,


Karen ,
something
"Oh!


us! "


" but we


said Nurse


have


play


like that one.


show


us!


said Sue and


So Nurse


Do


show


Bobby.


Karen took Baby


in her lap and patted


the soles


of her feet in time to the music
as she sang:


" Shoe


Dobbin


shoe


Dobbin!


With hammer and tongs;
Such shoeing as this


To the


blacksmith


"Shoe Dobbin!


shoe


belongs.

Dobbin!


The nails must be tight,
For we've a long journey
To travel to-night."


"There! "
the crib. "


tossing


Baby into


Now go your long


journey through Dreamland, lit-


tie dear.
be on the


Sue and
way soon,


Bobby will
she said,


" And play we are little, and


' Shoe
we go,


Dobbin
will you,


for


before


Nurse ? "





THE


NURSERY


BLACKSMITH.


" We'll


play that undressing


is having the harness


Bobby


pony who


said


a
can


s taken off.


wonderful
unharnes


Nurse


" but


trick
him-


Sue is


being shod was


Then
Bobby's


Nurse
bed,


1 jolly process.
Karen went to


where


waving his feet in the air.
The trick pony's shoes must


not trained yet, so


I will attend


to her; after that I will be the
blacksmith and shoe you both."



-hoe Fobin. in


very firm,


said Nurse;


ing the little rhyme again


sing-
she


Sue was soon ready, and had


thrust
tween


her
the


feet


Nurse had time


you


hall


squeals of


out


blankets


to say,
" and


hear;


from


before
" Now


Sue


that


delight showed


patted


and


thumped


sturdy feet, and


sharp


ing them


tight.


little
to


Oh!


blacksmith,


gave


tweak, a


see
she


if t
was


Bobby's
each toe
is if try-
ey were
a merry


can tell you!


__


(
k


self,"


:h




























.1 I L I
rir, 1~ II I I




iIJ
I *; ~ II





-1I~'4





































TII ,EVrNIIGI I' YER.
-'r
II .t







'I












4;~







II
I -1











































THE EVENING- PRAYER.




CHICKENS


TROUBLE.


CHICKENS


IN


TROUBLE.


While chicken


fourth, of


tired


wings,
Kept up a constant groaning.


And,


mother


have


such


"0O


mother,


mother


I'm


cold


One little chicken grumbled.


And, mother!"


cried a second


chick,


" Against a stone


I've stum-


bled."


"And


sleepy


now,


Another


chick


was


moan-


ing


a pain "


Peeped


out


chicken


baby;


" That


yellow


meal


did


taste


so good,
I've eaten too much, may be.


And


there's


black,


black


cloud up there,"
Cried all in fear and wonder;





CHICKENS


TROUBLE.


-.


O--


mother
jour win


dear,


And let us all creep


There, there, my


little


spread


under."

dears,


come here;
Your cries are quite distress-
ing,
The mother called, and spread
her wings
For comfort and caressing.

And soon beneath her feathers
warm,


The


little


chicks were


hud-


died


know what


ailed


you


all,"


she said,
"You wanted to be cuddled."

And as they nestled cosily
And hushed their weak com-
plaining,


She told them


that


black,


black cloud


Was


quite


small


raining.


C--
v-N


And


one


'" .' T
f .2 .'^ i' f
-,< J^
-" ^ f^


one


they all were


soothed,
And out again went straying,
Until five happy little chicks
Were in the farmyard plav


-/


1 *


ing.




ROW,


ROW!


A-FISHING


SUE AND BOBBY CATCH FISH.


ROW


ROW


A-FISHING


GO.


"What are
Nurse Karen ?"


came


where
singing-


had


just


she


as s


lntc
at


you
asked
) the


mendi


he worked.


singing,
Bobby,
nursery
ng and
Baby


been put into the crib


for a nap.


" It


sing


only


little


song


sleepy children


my own
Karen.
to you? "


country,
" Shall


please,


said
I


Nurse


sing


Nursie.


the queer words first, and then
tell what it means."


Nurse


Karen


sang without
" queer words,


smiled,


and


delay, first in the
" as the children


,,"Y





ROW,


ROW!


A-FISHING


called


her


own


language,


and


then in words they could under-
stand:


" Row, row
How many


A-fishing go
*.


fishes,


pray, can


you show ?"
" One for the father,
And one for the mother,
One for the sister,
And one for the brother


One


little fish i


still


left,


you


see,


And


that


one


fisherman


share shall be.


The


with


mediatel


children
Song, ,
y said
s play


were


and

it,


pleased


Bobby im-


Sue


go fishing, and you can ask me


how many fish


" 0,


caught."


Bobby!


to go in the boat with


want


you and


help you row.


"And


with 3
Nurse


you


your


can


fish,


come to
Bobby,"


me
said


Karen.


So Sue and Bobby sat down


on the floor


and


pretended


row and catch fish, and then


row


home


again.


They had pieces of paper for
fishes.


The
caught
little f
share
took c
every


first
four,


ish


time
so


Bobby


there


was


)nly
no


fisherman's


but you may be sure he


are


have


five


fishes


time after that.


" Let'





THE


WONDERFUL


HAY-MAKING.


THE


WONDERFUL


HAY-MAKING.


>9

--
I- "/2&-"


_- -
0 -/1'^.
'

-a~ ~ -


"Oh


do you, Nursie?


will you sing it for us?


And


down


Bobby


close


And


Please


and


Nurse


Sue
Ka-


side.


And
" Yes,


you


I.


Nurse


K aren


yes, good children


shall


hear about


said,
now


the won-


derful hay-makin


"Oh


we've


afternoon,


said


had
Nurse


such


fun


K aren,


Bobby.


"So?"


said


Nurse


" And what did you
"We didn't play;


Sue and


just


Karen.


play ? "


we worked,


like


men.


We worked in the hayfield, and
then rode into the barn on top
of the big load of hay."


"In my country,


Karen,


a wonderful


said Nurse


" we have a song about


hay-making.


The squirrel went


out


meadow to mow,
So merry and blithe,
With his glittering scythe ;


And still as he mowed, he was
chattering so.




- -


-4 ... ,3


II









/ilt ,i











1 2















LTL EOL O TEE1'RY

LITTLE PEOPLE OF TIlE NURSERY.




THE


WONDERFUL


HAY-MAKING.


Oh


the


squirrel went


out


the meadow to mow.


" The raven went with


rake up


him


the hay,


The rake in his claw;


The crow dragged the cart
And the cat did her part;
For she drove the hay-cart, and


said,


Oh


" Mew, mew, mew !


crow and


the meadow went,


too.


Such a sight you ne'er


And still


as he


raked


aw!
was


croaking away.


Oh


the raven


went with ,.him


to rake up the hay.


"The


crow and


the


cat to


meadow went, too,


"The children went out in the


meadow to


But squirrel was done,
And the raven was gone.


crow


and


the


pussy


The


cat,


where could they be?


Oh


the children went


the meadow to


out


see.





BABY'S


RIDE.


BABY'S


RIDE.


Bobby and Sue were going
to a picnic with their papa and


mamma.


ting
the


about
time


dressed to go


been


happy


playthings,


what


called
horses


Then
derstand
lightful
She


They had been chat-


in great


they


were


; but
enough


glee


beingg
had
her


Baby
with


paying no attention


was


out


said,


There


Hurry,
indeed
that


was


scrambled


until
3 are


Sue
the


Bobby !"


did


Baby un-


something
prospect.


her


feet


and trotted towards the nursery


door,
wide "
" Ride
But


not
must


calling
which of


out


course


" Wide.!


meant


ride


poor
go


Baby !


this


confess


she


time


that


she


was


and


cried


loudly after
away, till I
" Who will
house ?" ar


the carriage drove


Nurse


Karen


ride to the


id took


said,


miller's


Baby upon


her knee.


Baby forgot


her disappoint-


ment in an instant, for


to the miller's
favorite play.


Trot


trot


house


Riding


was


trot


they went at a fine


Nurse Karen


pace,


her


Away
while


sang


Ride, and ride away
Till we reach the miller's house;
No one is at home,
But a morsel of a mouse.

The miller grinds the corn


For


Bobby and for Sue


The rooster flaps his wings,
Singing' Cock-a-doodle do!' "




BABY'S


RIDE.


i. '























RIDING TO THE MILLER'S HOUSE.


You
end of
Nurse


may


imagine


ong


Karen


was


flapped


that
jolly,


the
for


her arms


against
as much
she cou]


her


like


Id.


a rea
Baby


and crox
1 rooster
enjoyed


ved




THE


GRATEFUL


SPARROW.


iv'i
'Jl I I


IN THE STALL.


THE


GRATEFUL


SPARROW.


Bobby had
But although


stopped h
it should
was a goo<
Now
Nurse K;
forefinger,


had
the


the earache.


pain


e had to lie still


begin


had
lest


again ;


time for a story.


you shall


aren,


hear,


putting up


" now


you


said
her
shall


hear how kind two friends were


to each


other,


though one was


and the other little.


" The big horse was standing


quietly in his


thinking


stall,
going


resting, and


sleep,


when suddenly he heard a whirr
of wings, and the next moment


a tiny sparrow


perched on


edge of his manger.




THE


GRATEFUL


SPARROW.


" Chee chee! How hungry


am!'


' Your


chirped


the wee thing.


manger is so full,


dear,


won t


you


have some of your oats?


little


one
there


will


little


grain


for
or
)lentl


you- more than yoi


me !
two;
y lef
i can


And the sparrow hovered


the


tempting


oats,


looking


Dob-
t me
Such
Just
and
t for
eat.'
over
g up


coaxingly at the big horse.


'

bird,'
We


Take all
said


you wish, little
Dobbin kindly.


may both feast, and there


will still :
Then


and
till


)e some left.


the two


friends


delicious


they both


ate
oats


were satisfied.


" By and by the summer came.


Even in


very hot, and


dim
oh!


stable it was
how trouble-


some


flies


were.


Dobbin had no rest from


stinging and


biting.


Poor
their


But one


day he heard a whirr of wings,
and the next moment his little


friend


Sparrow perched on the


edge of his manger.


"'I


this time,


chee


not


come


she chirped.


No,


indeed.


get my own living in tl


mer


time.


show what


But


now


begging
'Chee!
I can
he sum-
I will


can do for you.


" Then you should have seen


how the sparrow


and
flies.


how


she


And


darted


about


snapped


every day through


the whole summer the sparrow


came and
ing flies s


hurt


and


caught


torment-


o that they could


tease


Dobbin


not
any


more.


t
*




WHAT


THE


CAT


SAID.





L


WHAT


THE


CAT


SAID.


Bobby


Baby


and


Sue


and


had had their tea, and


was now almost bedtime.


What
Bobby ? "
Bobby


flat on


shall
asked
had th
floor,


play,


Sue.
.rown
and


himself
lay there


lazily stretched out.


said he.
said he.


just


don't feel


like


" It's warm


had


tea,


playing,"
and I've


and


feel


lazy and sleepy.


Aha!"


" that
said."


" What


story,


said Nurse Karen,


just


cat ? "


story !


what


and
said


"Oh


Bobby


and Sue together.


" Not much of a story,


Karen ;
rhyme
Off wi


and


"but


funny


written by a great


th


will


your
tell


clothes,


you


about


said
little
man.
now,
Sthe


I cat as soon as you are in bed."


ja





WHAT


THE


CAT


SAID.


very


children ,
Now


said


Nurse


little


while


were ready.


you


shall


hear


Karen:


The sun in the west


Was sinking to


rest,


Four big bits of fish
Cut up on a dish,


found


cook's


pantry


shelf


When the lazy
Half-asleep on


the mat,


Began thus to talk to herself.

" Two fat tender mice,
And cream sweet and nice,


good


meal.


Now,
But


not a bit hungry


lazy


and


feel


sleepy and


very well fed,
The cat said."


~




THE


STORY


THE


TWO


DOGS.


THE


STORY


OF


THE


.TWO


DOGS.


Bobby and Sue had been in


the


house


of the rain.


day


account


They had had all


the old toys down from the top


shelf
played(
think


what
Kare
with


of the toy closet, and had


d


everything


of, and


were


next when


came


into


they


could


wondering


Nurse
nursery


Baby.


" Oh!


us something


couldn't


little


you


you


play


with


while ?"


This
know


Nur-se


things


busy


, children,


Karen.


ready for


time,


answered


mus
the


get


night


now


" But I


and


Dogs,


can


sing


can play
If you


and


'The
wish.


shall ride on the rockin


and
tie
dog.


Sue
dog,


" O,


shall
and I


goody !"


3obby


said


work,
Two
Baby
horse,


the
the


lit-
big


Bobby


" and what shall we do? "


" You must be


then do


just as


chained, and


song


tells


you.


When
Baby


they
on


were


the


horse


ready
and


play,


N ursie,


Sue ;


Bobby


and


Sue


chained




THE


STORY


THE


TWO


DOGS.


window


seat


Nurse


Karen sang:


a big horse


and a child


is astride,


The


bigger


dog


barks with


very loud noise,


'Bow,


wow,


wow


And where, and oh


where


shall


little one ride ?

"Away to the palace


gallops


afar,


And out to the park
where the royal
dogs are.


There under


a bench, gnaw-


ing hard at their chain,
They bark and they growl and
then both bark again.


" The little


dog barks in a fine


little voice,


Sue


"fine little voice


such a funny little


Nurse
finish
while
wow!'


Karen


song


was


squeak, that


could
for


Bobby's "
was as noi


scarcely
laughing;


Bow,


wow,


and gruff


as any one could wish to


hear.


'Bow-wow-wow !'


,,,




FEEDING


THE


BIRDS.


FEEDING


THE


BIRDS.


Sue
window


stood


watching


snowflakes.


there


Papa


was


the
the


nursery
falling


had
big


said
snow-


storm.
Karen, everything is white


now,


and


so deep!


And,


some bird
So?"


she


snow


Do come
Karen!


, too.
said


getting


and
there


Nurse


went


see!
are


Karen,
window.


" Then you have the little win-


ter
love


birds


then


Amlerica ?


much


Norway,


and our little children are very
kind to them."
"What do the children do?"
asked Sue.


" That


story,


said


shall


you


Nurse


hear


Karen


tak-


ing Sue in her lap.


" It was a


bitterly cold win-


ter, and everything was covered


with
girl
day


snow
named


crumbs
poor


gcet
over


and


Inga,
bread
the s


hungry


little


used
and


every
scatter


now for


birds.


would fly down in great


about


nearly froze


her.


I nga's


as she


icy wind


stood


but


shb


They
flocks
hands
there
e was


so happy that she never thought


the cold.
" Inga's


father


and


mother


were glad to see that their little


daughter
thoughtful
her father
do that, Ir
"'Oh!'


much


was
for
said,
iga ?'
said
snow


so
the
'W


Inga,
that


kind
birds,
hv do


and
but
you


'there is


birds


can find nothing to eat.


(
%.




FEEDING


THE


BIRDS.


"' Yes;


sibly


feed


but you cannot pos-


them


all,'


said


her


father.


" Little


said


'No


but


Inga


smiled


can't feed


and
them


there


many other little chil-
dren all over the world


have


some


bread


give-


them ?"


After


that


Sue


used


often


S-5
- -


S-- A'
'~~- ->.^:^^
y.<-- r^^^


who will


them.


like to feed


And so, father,


give


crumbs


birdies here, and


other


children


give


crumbs


other


places,


the


dear


little birds will be fed,
won't they, father ?'


" And


whole


that
the


story,


believe,


concluded


Karen.
Sue looked up into her face,


and then ran


towards


the win-


dow.


" O,


Nursie !"


said


" the birds are here yet.


she,
May


HELPING INGA FEED THE BIRDS

to scatter crumbs on the snow,
and liked to call it helping Inga


feed the


birds.


-


J


7^ rB





CHRISTMAS


RIDDLE.


CHRISTMAS


RIDDLE.


Listen, listen, children dear,
Now a riddle you shall hear.


As you hear it ponder well,


See who can


the answer tell.


There's a tree so dear to all,
-J


Sometimes


large


and


some-


times small.


Forests may be dull and drear,


This


tree


a-bloom


with


cheer.


Fresh


and


green


branches


show


Though


world


white


with snow.


Birdies find a shelter warm


'Mong its boughs


from wintry


storm.


Trunk it has, but has no roots,


Yet


bears


most


wondrous


fruits.


Some delicious are and sweet;
Some no one could ever eat.





CHRISTMAS


RIDDLE.


'Uvt/ondrous %oo .
Fruits ._-:











All the fruit is in
its prime .,,
At one certain happy t "
time. .-
J


Oh


what


Joy


and


mirth


abound


Where


this


wondrous


tree


found


'Round it pretty


'Tis
Can


a joy

the c
you t


old


children


tell


ongs
and


sung


young.


's special


its name


tree
me ?


,o -1



























/ w~/^




1A


'. /^ '-
/^ i/ i
---4,




>4k> a
'- > /





















'Kr n 1 '- } i/ \
,~2,_











?//








Crc- tC o v 90'II TbaCI(


THE BABIES' CORNER.





NEW


DAY.


WOULD


GENTLEMAN.


MY


NEW


DAY.


To-day


In
To


this
do


has
new
with


come


day


and


will


earnest


mind


Whatever


all
try


my
my


work

work
r best


entleness


find.


and


play


to-day
speak,


For

And


others


'joy


whole


seek.


day


ong


keep


I'll try
Ly spirit


with
true,


purpose


strong,


And


deeds


love


WOULD


Oh


One


And
Is to


BE i

would 1
without


way,
each


GENTLEMAN.


allo
they


gentleman,
v;
say,


day


gentlemanly


boy.




SANTA'S


REPROOF.


\
'^\


SANTA'S

(Before


REPROOF

Christmas.)


"Hurrah


think


hurrah


said r
old
begin


Christmas


nerry


little


Santa


time,


Jack.


Claus


will


soon


pack.


hope


he'll


bring


a lot


things,


espe-


cially


for me,


And


stockin


top


as full


But


then,


stockings


don't


as ful
hold


can


much;


they're


too


small,


declare!


giant


Now
He


Jimi


hangs


stocking we
my Jenkins


would


has a


grandma's


grand.
S


plan


stockings


get
up.


wish


a good
But


had


a pair.


supply:


I'm


afraid


try,




SANTA'S


REPROOF.


For Santa might forget,


you


see,


with so much on his mind,


And


leave


grandma' s


things


which


should


hate


to find.
Perhaps a case for spectacles, a cap and darning ball,


pincushion,


neckerchief,


little shoulder shawl.


yes


know


things that
each year;


kind


grandma gets


And


though
well,


they


they'd


suit h,
make


er very


boy


feel


last, one


glee,
suits:


queer.


day, Jack


have a plan


said with


that


On


Christmas


Eve


hang


both


new


long


rubber


boots.


(Christmas Eve.)


Well


Christmas


Eve came on apace;


and


over all the land


The children


hung


their stockings up.


And


Jack, as


had


planned,


Hung up his great long rubber boots; then v
With only selfish, greedy thoughts still in his


vent away to bed


little


head.


And when the children all had gone to slumberland away,
Then merrily did Santa Claus jump in his loaded sleigh.




SANTA'S


REPROOF.


"Get up, my little reindeer, now!


Bestir your tiny hoofs!


Now gallop at your swiftest pace till we're among the roofs.


A bound, a whizz, a whirr


and then beside a chimney top,


In less time than it takes to wink, these


knowing reindeer stop;


For


they


shod


with


shoes and run at fairies


Else


how


night


could


leave


Santa


gifts


fairy
pace,


one


every


place ?


Thus speeding on, the rein-


deer


reached


that sheltered


the roof
Jack,


And


Santa


knowing
something


Claus,
look,
from


with
drew
his


pack.


A cloud came o'er his jolly face, so ruddy and


so 'glad.


"This


kind


work,


" he


sighed,


"that


makes


body


sad.


But still,


really must try my little friend to cure,


For greediness is such a fault


and one I


can't endure.


I know it's not quite delicate-the way that I


But


have planned-


'tis a way the little chap will surely understand.


And though I give him all the toys


can from out my pack,


He'll know


greediness.
6


Poor, foolish little


Jack! "


Then down into the chimney-pop!


and up and out-and then


The reindeer, Santa Claus and all were on their way again.





SANTA'S


REPROOF.


(Christmas M'Iorning.)


Ho, ho!


the merry Christmas shouts, the racket and the noise


As all the stockings are unpacked by eager girls and boys.
Jack tumbled out of bed in haste and to the chimney ran


the splendid lot of toys


he'd gained by hi


new plan.


Right eagerly he plunged his hand into the boot with glee,


And pulled out never would you


guess!--a great big


paste-


board


"What's


that


for?"


wondered


little


Jack;


"well,


see


and by;


And


then


hand


brought from


boot a great


big


paste-


board


" Perhaps


some


new


game!"


said


Jack,


puzzled


could be;


"I'll try again!


and next he got a great big pasteboard


The


letters,


sprawled


upon


the


floor,


too


plainly


spelled


word -


The strangest gift from Santa Claus of which


ever heard!




SANTA'S-


REPROOF.


Jack


looked


and


looked;


then


once


came


into


mind


Just why old


Santa Claus had left these letters three behind.


So Jackie sadly turned away, repentant and ashamed;
But, looking toward his other boot, he suddenly exclaimed:


"Why


that boot's full of


toys and things !-oh, Santa


Claus,


To give me


you dear!


something, after all, besides those letters queer!"


And


now


I've told


Christmas tale and


kept


no sad


truth


back,


That children may a warning take from greedy little


Jack,


And hang their stockings with content however small they be,
That Santa never more may need to use those letters three.





THE


SEASONS.


January, February,


Winter


months


are they;
Then comes on


springtime -


March


, Apri


May.


June,


gust,
Thus tl


summer


speeds


Next we gre


et the au-


tumn


Gay
1


September
eads.


October and Novem-
ber


Follow


train


Then


with


white


December


Winter


r^ -p., ;"-u^';c. : ",- r T yrA S L"' u.ury-5
*-- .- -" ^
/ rA T J/'K H


comes


again.


-.i Ni T- -- r "
U--.. '41 t IN i __.- ,c


' -tA!1^ **Tt~>"?
rr1P'rc--^-^"*^*


yr \/ 1\. -r\ .^i^g^




















ALL FOR BABY





THE


STORY


BABY


SHIRT.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


SHIRT


field


the


flaxplant


grew,


Decked with blossoms brightly
blue;


And the flax all


Laid


fibres


summer
straight


long
and


strong.


and


reapers


there


Gathered all the flax with care;
And the spinner said with glee,
" Here at last is work for me."


Then the


spinning-wheel went


round


With


busy


whirring


Changing, changing as
All the flax to linen


Then


weaver


sai(


sound,
it sped
thread.


i with


glee,


" Here at
All this t


last is work for me;


read


will


combine


Into


linen


soft


and


fine.





THE


STORY


BABY S


SHIRT.


loom


the


threads


placed,


ossed


shuttle


through


umIHR
== dlip^ 0^


Treading


too


with


busy


feet,


Till


Then


web


the


was


merchant


complete.


with


light


Bought


linen


fine


and


white
shop


And


linen


Sweb
soon


unrolled,


was


sold.


Some


the


Baby's


mother


bought,


Then


with


tender


loving


thought


Shaped


Set


So


Baby's


shirt


small,


witi


the


love


little


Ready


But
Not


the


shirt


stitches


Baby
story


thing


Baby


here
dear
true


knew!


haste,




THE


STORY


BABY'S


BLANKET.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


BLANKET


Once
On
Out


little
sunny


among


Took
Little 1
In ti


ti
h


ambs


field


Baby,
day,
ie daisies
appy way.
were frisking
s so green,


While the fleecy mothers


All


For


rest


while


Played


and


wern


the


seen.


Baby


played


and


played;


Then
In


he
the


Soon a


and


pleasant


heep


caim


rested
shade.
e near him,


Growing very bold,


And
To


this
the


wondrous


Baby


story


told:


70i (lfp





THE


STORY


BABY


BLANKET.


" Baby's
Socks
Winter
And


And


Warm


Once
On



" And
For
These
By
Such


That


Did


Not


little
and
cap
his


the
his
were


e


cosey
also


v-


ball


ens


afghan


soft
were
k of



:bed


friends, t
wondrou
e Baby


fine,


growing


mine


blankets,


sleep,
given


:he
s


sheep.


story


heard


Id it?
word!


blanket,


I worsted
and mitt
flannels ,


"-- -~
Ct,"'-
r-.'Sr^-4., LW.a





CC










ii
I-i -
tw^r/^i -^ -





















~~Fl,
rh f^^. ^ ^
r^^^




*^/ -^B^^I/^^i


pretty;
and
wool


bac


and


his
the


understar


single


1


soft

























































































THE LITTLE STRANGER.




THE


STORY


BABY'S


COTTON


GOWN.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


COTTON


GOWN.


Sing ho


for the planter


Who planted the cotton,
Sing ho! for the sunny fields
Where it did grow!


Sing ho! for the workers
Who gathered the treasure
From all the big buds
As they burst with its snow!


Sing ho


the good spinner


Whose busy wheel turning
Then spun out the cotton
To thiead strong and thin





THE


STORY


BABY S


COTTON


GOWN.


Sing


ho!


Who
Within


Oh


Sing i


Who
To mai
In ci


Sing he
And


For
In


for the


wove


their


great


weaver
n together
loom -


clatter and


! for the


sold


ny
ty

}l


din


merchant


new


cotton


a mother


and


town.


for the


babie


baby is
a new


mothers


together,


; dressed


cotton


gown.


a .' ,



I I //
m

I(






I
/ -
.1 1






i' ,{

'I


S/ t/ \\ -






-C-'
"~ l z H-^

i- [ ? '
\*i I \ I


5


I





THE


STORY


BABY S


SHOES.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY


SHOES.


'Mong the
Nibbling,


Lived


mountains far away,


browsing


kid


with


the day,


fine


soft


skin


Good


shoes


farmer,


Sent
Then


kid


for


first,


Babykin.


with


Baby's


tanner


speed
need :


tanned


skin


For the


sake


Babykin.


LEL-^D WHH-E
TAPFEG t'-"-?'
- i
- --- -----.-^y


v p
c_, f1 .,0


[I I iI~ I
IT l
. I'^ twfr1' i^
--^V- ,- ;


~u'
a- -- L.A


Clip


cobbler


shears


did


Clip


clip


clip


round


top


1




THE


STORY


BABY S


SHOES.


So he cut the leather thin


Shaping shoes for


Tap!


tap


tap


Stitch and stitch


Babykin.


upon the last;
so strong and


fast;
Thus the cobbler made the skin


Into shoes for

And when Ba


Babykin.


Iby's toes


peeped


through


Dainty socks of


pink and blue,


Kid shoes, shiny, soft and thin,


Mamma bought for


Babykin.


'ta/f





THE


STORY


BABY'S


SASH.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


SASH.


Grandmamma


has


brought


gift


Beautiful


Such


We


"No


as may


a dainty


must


thank


be-


silken


her,


sash


Baby.


,"said Grandmamma,


From the
"Thank


Merchant


not,


"for I


bought it.


the


Mer-


chant said,


"'Twas the


" Thanks


Weaver brought it.


me !"


Weaver


cried


can


Twas
And t



To th
Many


scarce


the
did


believe


Dyer
but


: Dyer,
thanks


gave
weave


then,


it!
the
it."


silk,


we'll


bestowing




THE


STORY


BABY


SASH.


" For the sash/


Why,


gave


naught
But its colors glowing.


"Nor


your


thanks


long,"
Quickly said the Spinner


" But I
Who sA


think I
would b


know the one
e their winner.


" All the silken thread so fine-


Listen now I


found it


In a Silkworm's small


And


cocoon,


from there unwound it


Here, then, was the sash begun;
So, though strange it may be,
'Twas the Silkworm, after all,


Gave the sash to


Baby.


__




THE


STORY


BABY


MUG.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


MUG.


Silver comes tc
Silver mug and
Sing a son


Baby soon -
ilver spoon:
of silver!


With a mountain first begin,


Where the silver hid
Sing a song of


Dull and


rough


within:


silver


rocks


Who


pear;
would
here?


think


treasure


Sing a


Sing


song of


mines


silver !


dark


night,


Sing the miner's little
Sing a song of


light:


silver


Digging, digging, day by day,
So the miner works away:


Sing a song of


silver





THE


STORY


BABY S


MUG.


Swinging, from


the


mines


low,
Up the loaded baskets go:


Sing a song of


silver


Sing the fire's flash and roar,


Silver


gleams


melting


ore:


Sing a song of


silver


Silver sleeping in the mould,
And the rest is quickly told


Sing a song of


silver


Shapen is the silver soon-
Silver mug or silver spoon:


Sing a song of


silver!




THE


STORY


BABY


PLATE.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY


PLA


TE.


Near


and


away


The


Til


And


Potter
the fin(
this fir


Then, wit
Measured


Softened
Mixed ai


oiled


sought
g


had


iest.


h c


finer


areful


marl
with


nd ground,


and


clay


found,
ground.

hand,


sand


water,


then


and ground


again.


Ready
Tough


then
and


Till beside
Where he


, the clay


plastic
s wheel


lay,
he stood


shaped


would.


Swift


Shaping


whe(
vase
Potte


Shaping pitcher,

When they all


Then


-I


he dried


el


did


turn,


or urn;
:r, early, late,


cup or plate.

were done,
each one;


est


Qi.










*^ r __________- -




THE


STORY


BABY S


PLATE.


Packed
Harder


ovens


still


Harder
While,
Faithful n


all, to


the clay to


grew


both
men t


bake-
make.


clay,


night and


day,


fires fed,


Kept them glowing fiercely red.


When
Firm
'Neath


the clay


and
the


hard
Potter


had


grown


is stone


hand


there


grew


Other


wonders


strange


and


new.


Dipped


glazing white


Soon


the ware shone


bright


Decked


with


patterns


gilt


and


gay


One


could


clay!


Furnace h
Hardened


scarcely



teat again


and


Finished was the labol


There was


Baby's


think


then
r great--


China Plate


I,,
U I', 'I /
I *' I,/ :
Ilt,
I, M .' j .


^n~_ liff.





THE


STORY


BABY


BREAD.


THE


ST


ORY


OF


BABY


BREAD.


mo/ler


Help,


speaks.)


Neighbors,


help


For our bread, good Neighbors,


Please


Help,



Drive


Keep
Make


the
th(


Drive,



Speed,
Sow the


lend


your


Neighbors,



Plowman,
Splowshare


2e


M


Speed,



Grind.


wheat


field


Plowman,



Farmer, s
heat and
[iller send
Farmer,


Miller,


labors
help!



drive!


steady,
I ready


drive


Speed
tend
it--
soeed


grind


mill-stream's power


Grind


Grind,


wheat
Miller,


flour-


grind!


(The


^'r L- V-V^
--
.. -7 ) -.
.,- A -^ ^ ,
-7 U 7 '






%; ,,7





d; -






II
-^ i. *'-^'x f ^;

A^ \ ^- ^72
te^^y'


-^ -

-. \ NI







-3A^ -'Nr^^ f"f l '


^





THE


STORY


BABY


BREAD.


Haste,


Baker,


haste


Here's t
Sift and


H aste,


(The


Se


0


flour- take


mix


and


Baker


neighbors sp

:e, Mother,
ur labors g


I bake it-
haste!


H ere
Se<


's the bread you wanted -


e


Mother,


(The


mother


speaks


again.)


Thanks,


Baby


too,


Many than


N neighbors, thanks
un-knowing,
ks is owing -


Thanks,


Neighbors,


thanks


;eak.)


{ranted,


w- r-- ----'--1(





THE


STORY


BABY


PLAY-THINGS.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


PLAY-THINGS.


Ivory


Rin


canl


a stran


thing


That


perhaps


you


don't


know


Bul
In


- a long


an Ele
ivory


tim


.phant'
grow.


e ago
tusk


did


this


Said
With


If
Yo


new


Noah's Ark


animals


your wooden


u.


must


"Hark


toys


thank


please,


good


Trees,


For they
make


Said
" Yes
For
Gave


and


give


wood


such things as these.


Rubber


that


Tree


sap


Ball


is not


away


- SO


they


say-


make


soft


rubber


wee


Babies


play.


t





THE


STORY


BABY S


PLAY


-THINGS.


Said
"And
'Twas


Me at
And t
IT


:he


little


now


the


Pail


a tale


Miner who


found


first underground,


he
ie


Tinsmith


so shiny


who


and


made


round


^,T\\ \\Q' \f


THE WORD
FR ABAY


if*l, ~ _


Said


the


pretty pink


Shell


" Many things


the


Where


And


who


Bab
All
And
And
One


y


wonderful


home


queer
once 1:


dear,


mankind
the Cre
the Ear
. and all
the Bab*


could


Sea


used
little


ived


is true
works


creature


in me


for you


atures and


andi


Trees,
Seas,


give up something


y


please.


"r^~~, '\, ^S


I*
* ''.


-th





THE


STORY


BABY S


PICTURE-BOOK.


THE


ST


ORY


OF


BABY


PICTURE-


BOOK.


One d;
And


man


They


a


SI
wha
whc


busy



called


And all t
He could xw
Most cur



Cats. kitten


Birds
Hens, c
Alnd


went
It did
was
could



1him


hat
4ith


mingly


and


butterflies,
chickens and
flowers and


strolling


busy
be.


an Arti


saw
pencil


draw


doggie


bees,
horses,
trees,


2>


+ -


----------- ---r




NO>-
nV








.-
---N
\ ^
-^*- ^^7 y



^, ^j \ r
'&J "<^ t S
fr^^_ ^ j ^j? I *^-







tvt


v





THE


STORY


OF BABY


PICTURE--BOOK.


And


house


and


church


And


sun


moon


and


stars


And


sailboats and


And


engines


and


steamships,
cars.


And


people and


At work
This Artist


and


could


children,


play,
draw


a wonderful


way


And


why was


From


working


morning till


night?


Why,


just


make


pictures


For


Baby's


delight!


-r


,'^ '. -


-Q




THE


STORY


BABY S


CRIB.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY'S


CRIB.


There once was a


Tree,


Baby


dear,
And it grew and grew
Till the sky so blue


Seemed right at


top, Baby


dear.


Man


brought


ax, Baby


dear,


And


chopped


and


chopped
Till the branches dropped


And crash!


fell the tree, Baby


dear.


Away to


Did


the


the


, Baby


dear,


Tree go then,


And the busy


Men


Sawed it up into boards, Baby
dear.





THE


STORY


BABY'S


CRIB.


The


Carpenter


worked,


Baby


dear


With a


saw again,


And his hammer and plane,


And


made
dear.


you


a Crib,


Baby


Papa


brought


horne,


Baby


dear:


And so, from the
There has come,


Tree
you see,


Your


own


little


Crib,


Baby


dear!





THE


STORY


BABY


PILLOW.


THE


STORY


OF


BABY


PILLOW


These at
put


The


se are


low


This


All t


:he


the


Eggs


that were


in a nest;


the


down


the


living in


. you
Sto b



the
dling


up



Here's


Goslings


in yel-


drest.


Farm-yard


where,


peace,


lings


grew


Geese.


Goos


e-family


wad-


about


procession


walk


This


is the


" Every


Now


has


they


always


out.


Farmer


who


said,


Goose


some


feathers


ready for use.


S* -
,d
-^ -
i^f
--- -y 2. /^
.: '*. /; ^A ^









-L
/9
4j-f -a-







-.
-



-





THE


STORY


BABY


PILLOW.


This


the


Farmer's


Wife,


plucking with care


All of


feathers


Geese


can well spare.


This


the


Pillow


Mer-


chant displayed


the


feathers


finest
made.


Goose-


This is the Mother who put on
its case,


Laid


the wee


Pillow


away


its place.


This


the Crib with


fur-


nishings white,


This the dear


Baby who


bids


you


" Good-night."


"Y



















UV4Ir


j yrI

4 i *~Ih


MiIIII W


taUE-
; ^ 1


ana


nT- ,.f-


- L


THE SURPRISE.


?E


' I


""IIIIIIJIJ/IItJ"lJ


11 r 1


ic^;'




ELSA'S


DOLLY.


ELSA'S


DOLLY


"WV hat is it, my darling?


Why do you


cry ?


happily
mother,
window.


though
with
putting


On the
apron up to


would
limp 1


you


Nero,"
P her


were p
called
head


lawn stood a little


her


break.


body of


eyes,


From
a doll,


crying as


one
while


laying
little
out


tag so
Elsa's
of the


girl with her
if her heart


hand


hungo
u


the


romping


dog stood


waggin


his tail and looking


as if eager to have the fun begin again.


But


N ero's


fun


had caused great


grief


Elsa, and when


voice
Julie


she


sobbed


she
out,


bitten her head


heard


her


"Nero


mother's


has


bitten


dreadfully!"


"Julie's
shame


any


head


But,


harm.


, my precious?


dearie
Dogs


Nero!


didn't


don't


mean


understand


about dollies.


Bring Julie in and let me


Elsa went into the hou


her.


while Nero strayed off


to the


kitchen door and laid himself


down in the sun.


Ah


what a beauty poor


Julie


had been,


with her beautiful


wax


could


head


open


crowned


and


with


shut!


golden


Elsa


curls!


used


And


put


her


her


eyes,
sleep


that
and




ELSA'S


DOLLY.


wake


her again


many


times


a day,


just


pleasure


seeing the sweet


blue eyes close and


then open again.


Could


that


delightful


Julie
touch


this


being


nicely


then


paint, so


happiness


mother


her


lips


that the


was


and
face


end ?


Elsa's
cheeks
looked


mother


and


But


first


eyebrow


smiling


what


washed


had


and


rosy


as before;


last of


and


all, the


next


, the yellow hair was


head was


fastened


on;


brushed


and


and


there was


curled;
Julie as


fresh


and


When


soft


glance


sweet
Elsa


and


as ever.


took
Elsa


her, Julie's


eyes


turned


upward


with


cried


mamma


She


well


again -


She


has


opened


her


eyes
you


Now


must


put


her


to sleep.


What a good


mamma


are!


"But


little


will


Julie


He


never


is a fine


Nero


old


play


with


you


fellow to play with


again,


little


poor
girls;


but he is too rough for dollies, isn't he?


--


"0,


~, :~
Y"
-J




THE


ENDLESS


STORY.


THE


tiny


ENDLESS


drop


STORY


water


Within
coaxing


And


bore


ocean


sunbeam


her


caught
away;


her


Up,
With


up and
I gentle r


higher


notion


still they


soft


and


slow.


little
Upon


But i
As
And


clouc
the


soon
cold
cried


azure


fell


the wirn


and


sleeping
sky;


a-weeping
d rushed by,


cried


herself


away-


was


The


a very


little


rainy


raindrop


day


sinking


Ran


And


trickling


root


through the
:lets drinking


ground,


country


round;


But


some


" We'll


with


farther


laughing


go;


and


murmur
on they


said,
sped.




THE


ENDLESS


STORY.


little
The


spring


moss


came


and


ferns


dripping


among,


silver


went tripping


An
And
Until


singing


calling


sweet


others


rolled a


along,
its side,


river's


tide


And


with


last


"Then


ocean
waters


story


blending


run.


ending? "


Why,


no!


just


begun -


For


the ocean


before,


The drop


water


once


more.





THE


EMPTY


BIRD-HOUSE.


THE


EMPTY


BIRD-HOUSE.


I.- The Little Boy Wonders.


wonder


why


the


birds


won't


come


And live in their nice little


'Twas


really
know -


built


home.
them,


You


know,


mamma,


you


told


so--
It's snug and pretty as can be


And


why


they don't


come, I


can't


see.


"WHY DON'T THE BIRDIES COME, MAMMA?"


" They know we haven't any cat,


So they can't be afraid of that
And nobody would harm them here,
For we all love the birdies dear-
It's surely safe as safe can be;


And why they don't come,


can't


see.


" What feasts of


crumbs I'd often give


If they would but come here to live,
And water always fresh and clear
Is in the lovely lake so near;


Just what they like i


here,


you


see


Whatever can the trouble be ?"




THE


EMPTY


BIRD-HOUSE.


- The Little Bird


Explains.


"O!


such a pretty house,


I know!


My mate and


would love to go


And live in it the whole year long
And pay the rent with sweetest song
It's snug and pretty as can be;


BUT


-it's too near the nursery!


"Why, every morning, noon and night
The noise would drive us crazy quite.


So empty must the
For not a bird in al


bird-house stand,
1 the land


Would ever come in it to stay


While there's such crying


every day.


"It isn't both the little boys,


But only


one


makes such a noise.


They


say


five


years


old


and


more -


"BUT IT'S TOO NEAR THE NURSERY!"


But if


you chanced to


hear him roar


Whenever he is washed each day,


'A


bzt,


bzg


you would say.


" And crying at hi


bath


A bird


Thinks that of all things most absurd.


Why!


any birdie, children dear,


Would be ashamed to shed a tear


rA


%a-~






THE


EMPTY


BIRD-HOUSE.


And so we couldn't bear,


you


see,


To live so near this nursery.

" We wouldn't mind the happy noise
Of fifty little girls and boys -
We love to hear them laugh and play;


But naughty


screams drive us away.


So if you wish to win the birds
Keep back the angry cries and words.

"And we will surely find it out
As we go flying all about,
And gladly will we flutter near


When only pleasant sounds


we hear,


And then


some day


perhaps


you'll


The bird-house will not empty be.






68:9-
\









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\'C



i"N .- 2_/-
p -



\ \' "
rJ '/ ^" ,.. ,> '' ^ -





WISE


FELLOW.


WISE


FELLOW.

Buttercup yellow,
You're a gay fellow!


Does


she


like


butter ?


You


must


now


show.


Don't make a blunder!
I'll hold you under -


Right


underneath


her


chin.


There


you


are-- so!


Yes, it


yellow !


, you wise fellow


She does


like butter-but how


did you know ?


DOES SHE LIKE BUTTER?






















































































BABY WANTS TO PLAY.




LITTLE


BOY'S


JOKE.


LITTLE


BOY'S


JOKE.


A hungry old spider, her web all complete,


Was


waiting


one


morning


something


eat.


Far back in the corner,
She hid herself thinking


so cunning and sly,
, "A bug or a fly,


Or some other insect will soon pass this way,


have him for dinner


So there sat the spider,


- I'm hungry to-day.


with sharp appetite,


Far back in the corner, away out of sight.
Not very long after she felt the web shake,
And went in a hurry, her dinner to take.


A big fellow


surely


I'll have a great feast,


He'll do for a dinner and breakfast at least."


The hungry old spider, so cruel and sly,


Now reached the web center-but what did she spy?
No poor little insect is caught in her snare,


'Twas only a


rose


she found hanging there.


And


just at that minute a little boy spoke:


"Aha


you old spider!


I've played you a joke!"




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