• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Foreword
 Table of Contents
 Advertising
 The brownies in January
 The brownies in February
 The brownies in March
 The brownies in April
 The brownies in May
 The brownies in June
 The brownies in July
 The brownies in August
 The brownies in September
 The brownies in October
 The brownies in November
 The brownies in December
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: The brownies at home
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082529/00001
 Material Information
Title: The brownies at home
Physical Description: 6, ix-xi, 1, 144 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Cox, Palmer, 1840-1924
Century Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Century Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Months -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Family -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Elves -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Ethnic groups -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Seasons -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Sleighing -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Valentine's Day -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Fourth of July celebrations -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Liberty Bell -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Orchards -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Thanksgiving Day -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Charity -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Juvenile poetry -- Brooklyn Bridge (New York, N.Y.)   ( lcsh )
Juvenile poetry -- Mississippi River   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1893   ( local )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
Family stories   ( local )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Summary: Relates in verse the adventures of the Brownies during each month of the year.
Statement of Responsibility: by Palmer Cox.
General Note: Illustrations by Palmer Cox.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements precedes text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082529
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002223301
notis - ALG3550
oclc - 214285130

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Front Matter
        Page iii
        Page iv
        Page v
    Title Page
        Page vi
        Page vii
    Foreword
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
        Page xi
    Advertising
        Page xii
    The brownies in January
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    The brownies in February
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
    The brownies in March
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
    The brownies in April
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    The brownies in May
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    The brownies in June
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
    The brownies in July
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
    The brownies in August
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
    The brownies in September
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
    The brownies in October
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
    The brownies in November
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
    The brownies in December
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text








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.......... ...........................................







THE BROWNIES


90 AT


HOME &


BY


PALMER


COX


PUBLISHED BY
THE CENTURY CO.
NEW YORK



































Copyright, 1891, 1892, by THE CURTIS PUBLISHING COMPANY;
Copyright, 1893, by THE CENTURY Co.





































LIKE fairies and goblins, are imaginary lit-
tle writes, who are supposed to delight in
harmless pranks and helpful deeds. They
work and Sport while weary households
sleep, and never allow themselves to be seen
by mortal eyes.

















CONTENTS.







PAGE.
BROWNIES IN JANUARY.
THEY TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE SNOW-AND GO 1
ON A SLEIGH-RIDE-WHERE THEY HAVE A LIVELY
TIME-BUT ENJOY THEIR EXPEDITION.




BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY. >
TURNING THEIR ARTISTIC SKILL TO MAKING 13
VALENTINES-THEY DISTRIBUTE REMEMBRANCES
FAR AND WIDE-THUS ASTONISHING THE NATIVES. -





i t tie BROWNIES IN MARCH.
WHITE
HOUE THE BAND VISITS THE NATIONAL CAPITAL-
SAND MAKES A RAID UPON THE WHITE HOUSE-- 27
AFTER A DANCE IN THE EAST ROOM-THEY
lir VENTURE INTO THE STATE BEDROOM.











PAGE.
BROWNIES IN APRIL.
',s SPRING GIVES THEM NEW LIFE-THEY BEGIN
TO ROLL HOOPS-AND MANY HAIRBREADTH ES- 42
..~.. CAPES GIVE CHANCES TO SHOW THEIR DEVOTION
TO ONE ANOTHER.




BROWNIES IN MAY.
MOVING TIME ENABLES THE BAND TO PROVE
ITS GOOD WILL-A NEW HOUSE PUT IN OR- 57
DER-AND NO TRACE FOUND OF THE KINDLY
HELPERS.




BROWNIES IN JUNE.
UPON' THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE-A GRAND RACE
OVER THE LOFTY ROADWAY- SOME SEEK THE TOP 71
OF A TOWER-OTHERS DESCEND TO THE BOTTOM
OF THE RIVER.




BROWNIES IN JULY.
VISITING THE OLD STATE HOUSE IN PHILADELPHIA,
THE BAND EXAMINES THE RELICS THERE-THEY
REFLECT UPON THE LENGTH OF THE REVOLUTION-
AND REJOICE OVER ITS RESULT.




BROWNIES IN AUGUST.
A BOAT-RIDE UPON THE GREAT FATHER OB
WATERS BRINGS THE BAND TO THE SUNNY
W j- ~ SOUTH-WHERE THEY DELIGHT IN FRUITS
.'"- "." AND FLOWERS-BUT ARE NOT PLEASED WITH
.. -,.... ~ ALLIGATORS.












7 L.'houmbid ,PAGF.
ExpostoR. BROWNIES IN SEPTEMBER.
ADIu 0e THE BAND JOURNEYS TO CHICAGO-
AND LENDS A HAND TOWARD PREPAR- 1
| ING THE WORLD'S FAIR-AS A FIN-
SI FISHING TOUCH, THEY HOIST THE STAR-
i SPANGLED BANNER AMID CHEERS.




BROWNIES IN OCTOBER.
AGRICULTURE ENGAGES THEIR ATTEN-
TION-PRESSING OBSTINATE ANIMALS INTO 115
SERVICE, THEY PUT FRUIT AND VEGETABLES
OUT OF JACK FROST'S REACH.





BROWNIES IN NOVEMBER.
COLLECTING ALL THE DELICACIES OF THE SEASON 124
-THE BAND PREPARES A SUMPTUOUS FEAST--AND
THEN ENJOYS NATURE'S BOUNTY.





BROWNIES IN DECEMBER. -
THE BROWNIES SELECT A FINE CHRISTMAS TREE-
WHICH IS LOADED TO THE TIP TOP WITH GIFTS- 134
AND THE HEARTS OF POOR CHILDREN ARE MADE
GLAD.











BOOKS BY PALMER COX:
,, PUBLISHED BY THF CENTURY CO.
THE BROWNIES: THEIR BOOK
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards. $1.50
ANOTHER BROWNIE BOOK
SIr Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50

THE BROWNIES AT HOME
9- Quarto, 150 pages. Price. in boards. $1.50
THE BROWNIES AROUND -
THE WORLD
rALS Quarto, 150 pages. Price. in boards ,$.50
THE BROWNIES THROUGH
THE UNION
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50
THE BROWNIES ABROAD
SO:-arto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50
t THE BROWNIES IN THE
PHILIPPINES
S Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards. $1.50 0
THE BROWNIES LATEST
ADVENTURES
Quarto, 150 pages. Price. in boards. $1.50
STHE BROWNIES MANY MORE
NIGHTS
Quarto, 150 pages. Price, in boards, $1.50
THE BROWNIE CLOWN OF
O TH BROWNIETOWN
Oblong, 103 pages. Price, in boards, $I.oo
THE BROWNIE PRIMER
f w 12 nmo, o18 pages. Price, in cloth, $ .40 net.




















THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.



WTe January laid the snow
On mountain high and valley low,
And gliding sleigh and jingling bell
Showed folks improved their chances well,
The Brownies planned, with language bold,
A ride across the country cold.
Said one: "No cutter frail and light
Will answer our demands to-night;
We must have something large and strong
To carry all the band along,
And stand the strain of going fast
On wintry roads where drifts are cast."
Another cried: "I know a place
Where rests a rig to suit the case;
'T is like a life-boat, long and wide,
In which the sailors brave the tide:
'T will hold us all. I well believe
Full half the band can seats receive,
1








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


While those who are a seat denied
Can in some other manner ride.
It has the plumes, all blue and red,
To stream so gaily overhead.
There 's nothing lacking there, I know,
That we require to make a show."
A third remarked: "To make it grand
A splendid team is near at hand;
They will not take a second lash
Before the harness goes to smash,
But, treated skilfully, will glide
As fast as you will care to ride.
It matters not how hills may rise,
Or how the snow before them lies,-
Once on the road, you may depend,
They 'll strive to find the other end.
When going fast the lines I '11 hold,-
More teams than one I have controlled
While comrades trembled in their places
With bristling hair and pallid faces."
Another spoke: "Excuse my smile;
No disrespect is meant the while;
But, sir, to state the matter plain,
You 're hardly fit to hold a rein.
You may have strength, and courage too,
And in your way may wonders do.
But t is not all in pull and haul,
Some judgment there must be, withal;
And that 's a quality or crown
With which you are not weighted down."
2








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


Then brief
In settling


discussions started there
which the whip should bear;


Ii


, *i 4I 'fi. u Vw ii ll ii ,l~ "Ull1wi, Va fll, '








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


For half a dozen filed a claim
To wield that implement of shame.
Said one: "I '11 make it snap so loud
'T will wake an echo in the cloud."
But others said: "You 're far too bold;
S No hasty hand the whip should hold,
That in each trivial action may
See cause to bring it into play.'
Those who have seen the Brownie band
In other scenes by sea or land,
Know how the cunning rogues agree
Upon a scheme, whatever it be;
While those who have not studied o'er -
Their wondrous doings, heretofore,
Will learn, if they pursue the rhyme,
How much the Brownies value time.
In twenty minutes by the clock
SThat in a steeple on the block
SBoth day and night
its visage showed,
Some The happy band
to the team was on
attention lent, the road.
And on the harness
were intent.
More through the yard as
sprightly sped,
To drag the cutter from the shed,
The seats to portion or divide
So every one could share the ride,-








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


The Brownies when occasion calls
Can almost roll themselves in balls,
In order to conform aright
To places that may crowd them tight.
But one by one the seats were jammed,
And spaces in between were crammed
With Brownies well content to seat
Themselves among the others' feet.






















A picnic party on a barge
That floats, a puffing tug-boat's charge
Upon the river or the bay,
When workers take a holiday,
Could hardly show such faces bright
As from the sleigh peeped out that night.








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


For several miles, with nothing wrong,
Behind the team they slid along.
But, though the start was all indeed
That one could wish for sport and speed,
They found mishaps, you may depend,
If you pursue them to the end.


Some, rather than to be left out
At such a time, had crawled about








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


Until they found a friendly brace
Or rail that offered them a place;
While, disregarding pride and ease,
Some rode on rattling whiffletrees,
And kept their seat through jolts and jogs,
And sudden turns round stumps and logs,-
Content to be, as it would seem,
At least the nearest to the team.
More rigged a board they chanced to find,
Which, like a rudder, reached behind,
And formed a seat and "teeter" gay
Unknown to makers of the sleigh.
At certain bends and gravel banks
The wind had played its winter pranks,
And turned a road as smooth as glass
Into a choked and dangerous pass
Where walls and ditches hidden lay
And caused the Brownies great dismay.
Sometimes a jolt would cost the string
Upon the plank an upward fling
That seemed to roughly set aside
Their claims to any farther ride.
They bounced in air as though to seize
The moon, that sailed above the trees,
And drag it from its heavenly way
To be a head-light for their sleigh.
A shout would rise from all the crew,
But loudest from the hapless few
Who thus appeared to be consigned
To trouble of the gravest kind.








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


But through agility so grand
'T is seldom found outside the band,
They held their own while in the air,
And, chasing after the affair,
The plank was soon regained by each
Before it passed beyond their reach.
They circled round the country wide,
And then commenced their homeward ride
But as they near the city drew,
The road divided into two.
Some thought the right-hand one the best.
The left seemed better to the rest;
And each one pulled, to reason blind,
According to his turn of mind.
Too many cooks around the pot
Will spoil the broth, now doubt it not:
Too many hands to reins applied
Will surely spoil the finest ride.
The team was not inclined to wait
Until they settled their debate,
But an impartial spirit showed,
And did not take to either road,
But carried out the neutral plan
And straight ahead between them ran.
Now some pulled left, and more pulled right,
While those who could not manage quite
To reach the lines from where they stood
Gave free advice to those who could.
But counsel was not worth a pin,
For some fell out, and some fell in,








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


And all that showed above the seat,
At sundry places, were the feet;
While those who took the outward fall
Had all the field in which to sprawl,
And nobly strove to do their share
In covering'all the ground was there.





























But those who had the team to drive,
And to their duty were alive,
.. o








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


Had barely time a glance to throw
At comrades tumbling in the snow,
When to a sloping place they drew
Where danger more apparent grew.
Then followed soon a sudden pitch,
And sleigh and load went in the ditch!
Now every one began to find
A chance to exercise his mind,
For speedy action wins the prize
At such a time, you may surmise.
Some grabbed the team without delay,
And some began to right the sleigh,
While others dug to bring to light
Companions who had gone from sight.
It was no easy task to know
Just who was missing in the snow,
For when the sleigh was overthrown
Each thought about himself alone,
And took small heed, as o'er he Went,
How friends made out in their descent.
They had no time to call the roll,
But here and there a sunken hole
.Would to the anxious searchers tell
--- -- .. Where some one in the snowdrift fell;
A foot would next uplifted be
And tell who struggled to be free.
But when they came at length in view
A bosom friend one hardly knew,
So fearfully the smash had told
On garments fine and bearing bold. .
10








THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


Thus was distress much quicker found
Than in these lines I now compound.
But as they had no time to spare
To talk about the mishap there,
They turned the team the proper way,
And gained the road that nearest lay.
Although the shaking up was bad,
They thought the pleasant ride they had
Did more than pay for the upset
Which at the forking road they 'd met.
Each horse again had found its stall,
Was watered, fed, rubbed down, and all,
Before the lagging winter day
Began to drive the night away.








Then through the fields and down the road
A rapid gait the Brownies showed,-
Now through a place where gas-lamps shone,
Now through a tunnel made of stone,
That briefly hid them all from sight;
Then, breaking out into the light,
With equal interest, equal speed,
Each struggled hard to gain the lead,
While bright and brighter spread the glare
Of morning as they scampered there,
11







THE BROWNIES IN JANUARY.


Till needed shelter came in view
And secret haunts that well they knew.
Then Brownies found a place to hide,
And chat about their splendid ride.







FROM THE ARROWS OF THE SUN (I
1NOW THE BROWNIE SAND MUST RUN


1111~. 4;7











Ajouare ne
r am thine
A rmy one sweet



THE BROWNIES


IN FEBRUARY.



February rolled around,
An early chance the Brownies found
To meet and talk about the way
The people toil from day to day,-
Some piling up whatever they please
And turning it to gain with ease;
Some losing what they 've saved for years
In spite of all their care and tears.
Said one: "Through all the rack and strife
That may be found in human life
From year to year, the truth to tell,
They hold to ancient customs well;
And in this month some moments find
To keep St. Valentine in mind."
A second spoke: "Ah! Cupid's arrow
The hardest heart can deeply harrow.
The miser, tyrant, soldier, king,
Have felt its power, and its sting.
And after all 't is well indeed
That men should Cupid's arrow heed,








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


For love 's a gift that man alone,
As poets sing, can call his own,
And shall not Brownies do their part
To praise the true and loving heart?
Now we who note from day to day
Mankind at large, as well we may,
Can speak our minds both fair and free
On matters that we chance to see,
And this is plain as is the nose
On every face this meeting shows:
No sweeter sight can meet the eye
Than hearts bound in one loving tie,
Prepared to brave all kinds of weather
And, if need be, to bleed together."
A third remarked: "Your speech defines
The feeling in the poets' lines,
So count it not as odd if we
In sentiment and soul agree.
'T is strange to see a grasping man,
Whose mind to money-getting ran,
Devote his time and patient care
To rhymes in praise of woman fair.
How many thousands, great and small,-
Yes, millions,--on this earthly ball
Do find surprises in the mail.
Some stare thereon with anger pale,
Then crowd the documents from sight
Or hold them up for laughter light;
While more with pleasure and with pride
Display the gifts on every side,
14








THE BROW1E1ES IN FEBRUARY.


That prove without a doubt or fear
They still are loved and counted dear."
"Your glowing words have filled my head
With notions strange," another said.
"To-night the band will undertake
Some striking valentines to make,
And then to buildings low and high,
When all are done, we 'll quickly fly,
And leave them there to cause surprise
When people in the morning rise.
Those who delight to pick and choose
The words that best express their views,
Can as their part devote their time
To spinning out the strings of rhyme,
While others draw the pictures fine
Who to that special art incline.
Thus each will have a task assigned
Well suited to his turn of mind.
It won't take long, when once we start,
To prove we 're not devoid of art;
The work is done, 'right off the reel,'
In which all hands an interest feel."
"I know a place," another cried,
"Where we with paint can be supplied.
And paper, too, of every grade
For just such dainty painting made.
No other task, the truth to tell,
Could suit the Brownies half so well
As this which gives a chance to show
..And tell the people what we know."
15








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


To find the paint and paper, too,
And pen and ink the Brownies flew;
Then, safely housed away from sight,
Some painted pictures half the night,
While others matched the form or face
With verses full of wit or grace,
According to the kind required
To pique, or please, as they desired.























While more with sentiment divine
Poured love into each glowing line,
Until the ardent declaration
Was bound to start a palpitation.








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


They round the dictionary press'd
To choose the words that suited best
o oiwasree To tell of Love's undying flame
Aqs onecould be.
froW0e"' That at first sight or meeting came,
Ad splitiir ain a And ever warm and warmer glowed
As time still greater beauty showed.
A Brownie has a level head,
S- Although perhaps not college-bred,
And knows just when to stop and start,
Or round a phrase to catch the heart;
And though sarcastic flings at men
They may indulge in now and then,
The earnest, active Brownie mind
To thoughts of love is more inclined;
So hearts and arrows, in the main,
The Brownies' missives did contain.
When every picture was complete
And all the verses had their feet,
The Brownies wrote addresses down
And started promptly through the





To soon distribute, as they planned,
In humble homes and mansions grand,
The valentines that were designed
To mystify the human kind.
They climbed up winding stairs so high
Their breath gave out ere they were nigh
17








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUAT.Y.


The place they sought-
the upper flat;
So on the steps
in rows they sat
To pant a while
and moralize
How people from
low stations rise.
At other buildings
Brownies called
And in the
elevators crawled-




P Eii CO)


Then, shooting up from first to last, N
To all the floors they quickly passed,
And smiled to see how these affairs
Saved the long tramping
up the stairs;
And wished in every house
they 'd find
Some useful fixture
of the kind.
But fear at times
instead of fun
The Brownies knew
ere they were done.
One, slipping off
just as it rose,
Was caught by comrades "
by the toes, -, CO








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


And carried in that wretched plight,
At risk of being lost outright,
Till, at a halt, he had acquired
A situation more desired.
Few pleasures people here below
Can find unmixed with pain or woe.
Whate'er the sport, the pang is near
And has its inning, never fear.
And Brownies though on pleasure bent
Found some mishaps as on they went,
And trials that would soon disgrace
Or crush a less determined race.
While on a lone suburban road
The Brownies ran, each with his load,
A bridge that needed some repairs
Gave way and much increased their cares;
For though some held to stringers well
And broken planks that all but fell,
A number, tumbling from the path,
Were quickly treated to a bath.
No meditated leap was here,
With graceful pose from float or pier,
Into a summer flood that gave
Warm invitations to its wave;
But head and heels, just as they ran,
The Brownies' sudden dive began
To currents neither warm nor nice,
For here and there a cake of ice
Was drifting on the water chill
And proved that winter lingered still.
19








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


All out of practice
as they were,
Without a moment
to bestir
And with a stitch
of clothing part,
They had to try
the swimmers' art,
And, with their
valentines in hand,
As best they could,
strike out
for land. .i


U>


V

j


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L__ __i~i~=--=_~i3-
~----~-----~
TI- -~--~--
~-~, ----- ----
-=I
-=-







THE BROWNIES IN fEBRUARY.

Now mortal folk, as well we know,
Would soon have let their bundles go,
And troubled neither hand nor head
About the saints, alive or dead.
But, gentle reader, don't believe
That Brownies would their hands relieve &_b-,
Of loving missives made to cheer
The hearts of those they held so dear,
Till every valentine they made
Was in the right location laid.

o,








I 'T is hard enough in summer hours
To climb around on walls or towers,
When vines, perhaps, a hold supply,
And nights are fine, and stones are dry,
But harder still the task to climb
Around in slippery winter time,
When snow, or rain, or ice, or all,
May interfere with those who crawL
SThen wonder not if letters fell
And for a time were scattered well,
And with more cares the mind oppressed
That was disturbed enough at best.
21


CQ


cr








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


And though great care
the Brownies showed,
Some fell from buildings
with their load
To catch on lines
that stretched in air
And swing like
malefactors there,
Some by the heels,
some by the head
As chance the timely
net had spread,
Till friends
were forced
to stop their fun,
And here and there
for ladders run
So safe positions might
be gained
While yet
a spark
of life
remained.
Their breath
was short,
their necks
were long
Ere they
were freed
from wires
strong.








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


On fire-escapes they climbed about,
On brackets, caps, and trimmings stout,
And on the roof or window-sill
They kept their minds on business still,
Till verses of a tender strain,
And those of a more comic vein,
With pictures drawn to suit each case,
Could safely reach their proper place.
Said one: "But that delight it brings
To children to receive such things,
I 'd throw my packets in the fire
And to some hiding-place retire,
Because I 've hardly got a stitch
That is not torn with hook or hitch
While climbing round just like a mouse,
To slip them into every house."










At times a false alarm would spring
And wildest consternation bring,
Then into barrels and boxes near
At once they 'd dive and disappear
Till, reassured, at length they rose
To bring their labors to a close.
23








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


The valentines for old and young
Were into doors and windows flung;
The full-grown people, dames and misters,
The brothers and, of course, the sisters,
Were all remembered by the band,


And valentines reached every








^^s^^^~~~ ~~~ *^-'^B3^3 '^ w






Saw how the creature
The world is loath to


hand.


The people wondered-
well they might!-
How mail had got there
in the night.
For high and low
on every side
Were packages sealed up,
or tied-
The selfish man,
who did n't care-
For friend or neighbor,
got his share,
looks for whom
furnish room,


And learned in couplets scribbled free
Just what his epitaph might be.
But he who had a .noble mind,
With generous heart and. feelings kind,
Was told by picture and by verse
How tears would fall around his hearse,
And sweetest flowers strew the ground
When he his final rest had found.
The children to surmising fell,
Still wondering who knew them so well;
24











THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


.11/


A-


'rC


1 o -








THE BROWNIES IN FEBRUARY.


Knew every whim, and hope, and fear,
Like kind, observing mothers dear;
And in addresses full and plain
They studied hard the key to gain,
But every hand was strange and new,
And gave them not the slightest clue.
For Brownies study everywhere
To cover up their tracks with care,
And, crowded though they often are
For time to work or travel far,
Their hands and feet show extra power
To suit the lateness of the hour.
Then roads were filled from side to side
With Brownies as they ran to hide;
The weaker, aided by the strong,
Were hurried on their way along,
For it would ill become the band
To now deny a helping hand
To those on whom the manifold
Misfortunes of the night had told.



We are Aicd nust
crearures -uais
of at





















THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.



H Brownie band, while roaming round
In blustering March, one evening found
Themselves upon a windy height
That brought the Capitol in sight.
Said one: "That dome that looms so high
It seems to pierce the starry sky,
Proves we behold, from where we stand,
The central city of the land.
Here you the Mandarin may see
Who represents the Land of Tea;
The Russian from the vast domain
Where iron-handed despots reign;
The Pasha working for the weal
Of states beneath a neighbor's heel;
Outlying tracts, of which we hear
But little, have their lookouts near
To see that nothing wrong is planned
Or carried on against their land:









THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


Though it may seem scarce worth the show
To guard an iceberg from a foe,
28








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


Or come with feathers, frills, and style,
To represent some desert isle.
Now while we chance to be so nigh,
A trip into the town we '11 try.
Through its broad avenues we 'll race,
And gain some knowledge of the place;
And ere the night gives place to day,
A visit to the White House pay."
Another cried:
"The race begin,
And don't be slow
to count me in;
For I 'll be with
you to ascend
,,f '' The White House steps,
you may depend."
The city that before them lay
Was, after all, some miles away;
And though the Brownies travel fast,
Full half an hour or more had passed
While they were crossing country there
To reach a leading thoroughfare.
They clambered over walls of stone
With brush and ivy overgrown,
But neither thorns nor poison-vine
Could check their pace, or break their line.
Like soldiers charging some redoubt
When "Death or Victory!" they shout,
The eager Brownies onward ran,
So jumped and looked ahead to scan








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


The certain place they sought to win,
So plunged in ditches to the chin,
So scrambled up the slippery bank,
So, tumbling, to the bottom sank
To rise again and still renew
The struggle for the point in view.
Thus, at the start into the town,
Wet through and through from toe to crown
And dripping freely, on they hied,
Nor changed their plan nor turned aside,
For daring Brownies never dread
A cold from wetting foot or head.
No influenza, gout, or grip
Comes like a penalty to nip
Their operations through the year,
Or keep them muffled up in fear.
When town was reached, the Brownies tried
Their speed through streets both long and wide.
They spryly moved as locusts light
When fields of grain break on their sight,
And previous fasts have whetted keen
Their appetite for something green.
But nothing their attention drew
Until the White House came in view.
Then every foot came to a stand,
And every visage did expand
In giving freedom to the smile
That lighted up each face the while. Let tbe day
Said one: "A snow-white mansion, sure, beep tk or br17 lt
Designed some centlies to endure; u aht.
Designed some centuries to endure; witi72 youl ght.








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.



















Broad at the base, compact and low,
Built more for service than for show;
No peaks for thunderbolts to strike,
To tempt tornadoes and the like.
Those who of planning it had charge
Displayed good sense and caution large."
Another spoke, who ventured nigh
And scanned the place with searching eye:
"With bolts and bars some two or three
The doors are fast, as they should be
Where so much plate is lying round
As in this mansion may be found."
One soon replied: "We little care
How many bolts and bars are there,
Or heavy locks that would defy
The prowling burglar's pick or pry.








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


We pass inside a place at will,
In spite of all the care and skill


That may be spent in work about
A plan to keep intruders out.








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


The massive doors that may outface
The seeker after bread or place,
Can on their heavy hinges rest,
Because the Brownie band is blest
With powers that make the bolt and law
As worthless as a barley-straw.
For one, I 'm not content to go
Till more about the place I know
Than may be gained by just a sight
Of outer walls and columns white.
I neither seek a place of power,
Nor food to serve the passing hour;
But, all the same, I 'm bound to win
An entrance to the rooms within.
We '11 not disturb their silverware,
Nor furniture so rich ana rare;
We 'll simply all the paintings view,
And have, perhaps, a dance or two
In those historic rooms, to show
How we as well can trip the toe
As those who proudly gather here
To grand receptions every year."
Ere long they rambled round with ease,
As if they had a bunch of keys.
The President was not around,
And those in charge were sleepers sound,
So they were free to dance or run
From room to, room in search of fun.
Upon the library they made
A full advance, or rather, raid;
33








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


The volumes there the Brownies found
From hand to hand were passed around,
Until each member wise could tell
The author, and his views as well
There on all sides they bent to pore
O'er books on tables and on floor,
Engaged in reading long debates
About the laws or rights of States,
To find if prophecies were true,
Propounded when the land was new.
Some read of long-forgotten things:
Of wars with neighbors and with kings;
Of rows with tribes of Indians red,
In forest, swamp, and lava-bed.
Like students thirsting after fame,
o ~They took the pages as they came,
While more stood round and listened well,
,As if a sermon on them fell
With all the earnest, striking power
That turns to gloom the brightest hour.
Then in the largest room they found
They danced in sets both square and round.
Oh, could the portraits on the wall,
That many an honored name recall,
Have glanced down through the lifelike shade
Of lashes that the brush had made,
They would have witnessed more than we,
While in the flesh, can hope to see;
Or had they tongues, and cared to speak
About each frolic, prank, or freak,









THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


They could more wondrous tales relate
Than stirred them in their mortal state:


* rj,

are
-: _~11~: ID4LAP4lhl COX


For never since that house first stood
On its foundations firm and good,
Was such a scene enacted there
Of dances round and dances square;
Strange dances that are only seen
In Asiatic groves, I ween,
35








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


By streams that water far Cathay,
Or through Japan's rich valleys stray,
Were introduced and formed aright
Upon that carpet soft and bright;
Now whirling round, now squatting low,
Now bounding like the startled doe,
Until their heads came very near
To contact with the chandelier.
For Brownies have elastic toes,
As he who reads their history knows,
And not a rabbit of the plain,
Or acrobat who jumps for gain,
Or spry performers anywhere,
Can spring more lightly in the air.
Odd figures, that are only found
Where ice forever coats the ground
And people wade around in snow,
And dances therefore must be slow,
Upon the programme found a place;
And thus with dignity and grace
The cunning Brownies took in hand
The dances of the frozen land.
Then came the barn-door jig, and reel,
And fling that tries the Highland heel,
The contra-dance, fandango too,
And ghost-dance of the painted Sioux.
All changing partners every set,
They bowed and scraped, and crossed and met,
And carried through in lively way
The figures of the present day.
36








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


On ornaments and trimmings stout
Some climbed, to keep a sharp lookout
In case while sport went on they 'd find
Surprises of a sudden kind,
And they some signal would require
Upon the instant to retire.


To try their
Although no
Ere morning


They sat in chairs
both new and old,
To prove how many
they would hold;
And on them jumped
for half an hour,
strength or springing power.
time they had to sleep
light would on them creep,


Some Brownies crawled, with laughter great,
Into the very bed of state,
Until some seven faces bright
Were peeping from the linen white.







Said one: "We wish to have it said
That we have tried the nation's bed,
And we can now aver with pride
That Uncle Sam does well provide
For those whom he is pleased to call
To Washington, to govern all."
37









THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


Alas! so many Brownies spry
Were anxious on that bed to lie,
Wherein great men had taken rest
When with their country's cares oppressed,
They broke it down, and tumbled through


o
,F~S~B~~:
--i;SJl








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


Upon the floor with much ado;
The splintered slats and parted wire
Gave evidence of ruin dire.
Those who by chance escaped the crash,i
Were nowise slow to make a dash
To aid the rogues who sank from sight
Enveloped in the bedding white.
And work enough they found to do,
As from the creaking wreck they drew
By hands and heels, for mercy's sake,
The hapless victims of the break.
Some Brownies, rolled into a ball,
Had scarcely strength for aid to call;
While more, half smothered in the bed,
Were dragged to light not far from dead.

Some gasped for water, some for wine
Brought from the vineyards of the Rhine,
And every sort of drink had found
A welcome there, had they been round,
To help the action of the heart,
And strength to nerves and brain impart.
The floor was littered all about
With those who had some cause to shout,
If bad contusion, break, and sprain
Gave them good reason to complain;
But other injuries they knew
Than outward bruises, black and blue.
Internal troubles, doctors say,
Are hardest ailments to allay;
39








THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


And now the doctors of the band
Had cases of this kind on hand:
Some swallowed feathers, hair, and dust,
And some had cotton down them thrust
So far, they doubted which was best-
To take it out, or let it rest.
And had the band surprises known
While in that wild confusion thrown,
While some were struggling in the hold
Of twisted wire, or blanket fold,
Or by the shock were senseless made,
And flat upon the carpet laid,
They might have found it hard indeed
To leave with all their wonted speed;
But, lucky for the Brownie force,
No trouble came from such a source.
When all at length were brought to view,
To work the active Brownies flew
To reconstruct the bed of state
That nearly proved a bed of fate.
Said one: "Ambition leads astray
Its ill-starred victims day by day;
The race for wealth, or social fame,
Oft ends in courts, or stripes of shame,
And even we may trouble find
Through an ambitious turn of mind."
But little time could they remain
At yoLLr task To moralize on longings vain.
be never late Because the eastern sky was spread
For til mornernts
wil not wait. With streaks of purple and of red,
40









THE BROWNIES IN MARCH.


Which told the sun was on its way
To open wide the gates of day,
And let the golden flood of light
Dispel once more the gloom of night.
So Brownies hastened from the spot-
Who took the lead it mattered not
So all could find a place to hide
Where they through day could safely bide;
And with a view of keeping clear
Of swampy fields or marshes drear,
Now dark against the brightening sky
They ran along on ridges high,
Where greatest speed could be attained,
And hiding-places quickly gained.


All the stdrs are gone Iuow!
We mustscamperfor it now.















THE BROWNIES


IN APRIL.



fri evening, when the fields were bare,
And milder grew the April air,
The Brownies met, with faces bright,
In pleasant sport to spend the night.
For hours they had been stowed away
In waiting for the close of day-
Some jammed in hollows of the trees,
More crouched upon their hands and knees
Behind the logs and boulders white
That hid them from the people's sight,
Who still were passing to and fro
Upon the wagon road below.
To see and not be seen they aim,
And squeezed in every shape the frame,
Like weasels in a fence of stone
They showed a nose or eye alone.
And every moment popped a face
Anew from some unlooked-for place.
The human kind both small and great
Can never truly estimate








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.

Ho)w ot, they are, ,.1 i .: 1 -
when 1passin'. by, i-'-1 .. -
P'it. ob je.ts for SN '
a Brownie's fye.
i I
Thev .s-e t.hm 1n: il -
in their ..busy .. ":-
is, '


.I. .'. ,~. ,.-,*o .. .i

.'\. ,t 1 j t
.,- ~ ) ) -_.]. -. '"" :;, ,',. },':I!; ._2. .
.--."-" .~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~. ... .-'I- '','I',.
""---""2 :... ,.,-- -, i "l~~ o t ''''t :'- -


When exercising all their powers;
They see them when they shirk their task,
Or for too much of others ask;








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.

SThey know the ones who freely give
That sick and orphan babes may live,
And see the hand withhold the cent
That for the heathen should be spent;
They know where frowns too much abide,
If HNo
topf t And where destruction follows pride;
ouLacd They know that underneath the smile
Us pward The villain oft may lurk the while;
ste pp i n
now beit, They know that lips may kisses press,
And pout displeasure none the less;
And Brownies do not soon forget
Impressions that are firmly set,-
What once they learn, you may be sure,
Will in their memory long endure.
But hands move round the dial-plate,
And hours will pass, if one can wait
Until the moving seconds slow
Shall file their records as they go;
So bright the sunny hours passed,
And flitting bats came out at last,
Then, with a whisper, sign, or call,
The Brownies soon commenced to crawl
From hiding-places here and there,
For evening pleasures to prepare.
Said one: The month at length is here,
To every youngster's heart so dear,
Because the country far and wide
Has flung its winter coat aside,
And they those pleasures can renew ,
That were denied the season through.








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


Again the sidewalk, marked with chalk,
Tells where to hop, or skip, or walk;
Again the hoops are rolling spry,
Again the kites are soaring high,
Again the tops on every street
Are spinning round the people's feet,
And Brownies should not be behind
At trying sport of every kind."
Another said: The truth you speak;
New life now glows in every cheek,
Penned up for months without a chance
9 In open air to run and dance:
They must, indeed, with pleasure hail
The time when outdoor sports prevail.
As for ourselves, we little care:
Through all the year we have our share
Of fun; however cold or hot
The months may be, it matters not.
But still some play may not be wrong
That to the present days belong.
The time of year is now at hand
For troops to march in order grand,-
To tramp about as soldiers do
Might well become the Brownie crew.
For me, I like that sort of thing,-
To step erect, to wheel, and bring
Myself around in proper pose
To either face my friends or foes.
But some, I know, would rather hop,
Or spin for hours a buzzing top;
45








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


While others still prefer to stoop
And chase for miles a rolling hoop.
There 's no accounting for one's taste:
Some like to skip, more like to paste
A kite, and watch it proudly sail
Above the town with streaming tail."
A third remarked: "We might indeed
To different kinds of sport proceed.
But I know where we can provide
Ourselves with hoops to roll and guide
With careful hand, until we prove
Who best can keep one on the move;
And if I don't mistake my man,
You '11 see me bounding in the van
Ere many squares are gone about,
Or many furlongs measured out,
Because I 'm neither lame nor blind,
Nor out of training, as you '11 find,
But can the highest speed maintain
Until a given point I gain."
This brought replies from half the band,
And all declared they could not stand
Such talk while they, themselves, were blest
With speed not second to the best.
This wordy war, as one might know,
Soon made them all decide to go
And get the hoops, and prove, indeed,
If one could all the others lead.
A building, standing near, that eve
Was promptly entered without leave;









THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


Z --


I TY-IV


-------
'f- .' ,==


But that is quite a common thing
With Brownies, who such power bring
47








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


That locks all prove of no avail,
And scarce need mention in the tale.
Soon barrels were rolled to open air,
Where each could get his proper share
Of work at stripping hoops away
To serve them through their evening play.
Ere long the Brownies' fun began
As in an anxious crowd they ran,
All striving to keep well controlled
The hoops that fast
1 A d 04, before them rolled.


Would try to hold the foremost place,
For in the height of all their pride,
48








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


Some feet would trip, or hoops collide,
Which often to a tumble led.
-- Then some one else would shoot ahead,
And those whose chance was counted poor,
Through slips or falls would thus secure
A place in front, and for a while
Be wearing a triumphant smile.
They rolled them up and down the hill,
Around the church and flour-mill,


And o'er the bridge, without a rail,
Where one misstep might woe entail
On half the band, so close they ran
Along the edges of the span.
One well may wonder, crowding so,
How hoops were kept upon the go.








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


But Brownies have a mystic way
Beyond the reach of mortal clay,
And we can only, wondering, gaze,
And feel impelled to lavish praise.
To be the first is much,
you '11 find,
With them as with
the human kind;
And though a second
place or prize
Is duly valued
in their eyes,
'T is only, speaking by the letter,
Accepted when they can't do better.
At times they left the dusty road
And through the fields endurance showed,
With many a tap and harder whack
To give the hoops the proper tack.
Thus sport went on, with here and there
An accident, or sudden scare,
Which still is likely to be found
Where daring Brownies scamper round.
Some broke their hoops, and had to stop
To mend, and far behind would drop;
Some lost their hats, and others tore
The strongest garments that they wore;
Until it seemed as if the play
Would prove expensive in its way,
And bring the tailors of the band
Next morning into good demand.
50








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


One strange mishap occurred that night,
For though the stars were shining bright,
While chasing hoops some Brownies fell
Head foremost in a curbless well.
The fearful downward dive was fast,
But water broke the fall at last.
'T is sad to gaze into a place
Where friends have met with sore disgrace,
And are immured in durance vile
Without a fee, a saw, or file,
Or aught that might assist them there f .
To breathe once more the open air.
But sadder still to see one's friend
Into a prison hole descend
Where neither saw, nor file, nor fee
Can be of use to set him free.
SSuch was the scene, and such the woe
That struck the band a telling blow,
And stilled the heart, and paled the face,
Of every Brownie in the race.
To think of friends who side by side
Had dared the steep toboggan slide; -77-
Had on the ocean spread their sail,
Had ridden on the spouting whale,
51








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


U~-.


And in a thousand other ways
Had won from all the highest praise-
Now taken quickly from their sight,
While fun was at its greatest height,
To struggle in a place that gave
Small promise but to be their grave!
So wild alarms were quickly spread,
And comrades gathered there in dread,
And for a moment tried in vain
A glimpse of those below to gain.
But though their eyes could naught behold,
The splashing and the shouting told
They still had life, and would be glad
If prompt assistance could be had.
Then for a time it looked, indeed,
As if the Brownies must proceed
Thereafter to their nightly pranks
With grievously diminished ranks.
But Brownies, bless them! how they spring
To save from harm the slightest thing,








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


Much more to rescue three or four
Whose loss they deeply would deplore.
No lengthy rope was thereabout
With which to 'draw their comrades out,
Who proved by many a thrilling note
They managed still to keep afloat.
But soon the cunning Brownies planned
A way to lend a helping hand;
Indeed, delay in such a spot
Would soon prove fatal to the lot,
Because the well was deep and old,
And water at the time was cold,
And would not please them as it might
Upon some sultry summer's night.
The lofty sweep that o'er them stood
Was made to render service good:
To this, ere many moments passed,
They made an empty barrel fast.
Meanwhile a few took time to throw
Encouragement to those below,
And told with words of hope and love
How work was going on above.
The active Brownies jumped around,
'Each aiding where a chance he found;
And soon the parts were well supplied,
And firm and fast the knots they tied;
Then lowered with a cheering yell
The life-preserver down the well.
The wretches who received the fall
Were glad enough in this to crawl,
53









THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


Then Brownies
A proper place
So, thus assisted
It might uplift
In fact, when
A mightier spirit
And quickens
With grand
Now up, no
The victims
And safe,
a dripping
In course of
came in
Then shouts
from all


res
soo:
of


climbed aloft to keep
upon the sweep,
S by their weight,
the burden great;
Comrades are distressed,
stirs the rest,
the inventive mind
sults, as oft we find.
ner than they wished,
the fall were fished,


though in
plight,
time they
sight.
went up
the band,


, ,


'_.
j' '-* i i ''
i *.:.,
, .' .,. .. t -- ..








THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


And many stretched a willing hand
To aid their comrades from the swing
That brought them from the icy spring.
Oh, happy hour! when they could find
Safe in their arms companions kind,
From danger that no life had cost,
Though all were looked upon as lost.
With feeling spoke a Brownie bright:
" Our friends we seldom value right,
However well they may be tried,
'Till they are taken from our side;
We then can estimate how blest
Were we who such true friends possessed,
And graces name and virtues find,
To which our eyes were wholly blind!"












Then all around the blazing wood
To warm themselves those Brownies stood,
Still thanking friends for timely aid,
And praising them for skill displayed;
And scarcely was their clothing dry
When signs of day showed in the sky.
55









THE BROWNIES IN APRIL.


But ere they sought a safe retreat,
Once more they hastened through the street,
To that deserted building bound
Where their supply of hoops was found,
To put them in their proper place
With willing hands in every case,
That never through the Brownies' sport
A dealer could a loss report.
Then hoops were set, as one may think,
Be f, r With many a hasty rap and clink;
but And barrels that had dropped apart
for most
i a e Were fixed with all the cooper's art,
"~dwta Until each one, as good as when
hold your
place. It outward rolled, was stored again.











Wier he~ircfs commence to chip
Thelt"le Brownie band must skip.

















THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


May brought gladness to the land,
And signs of life on every hand,
And tuneful birds poured out their song
In richest tones the whole day long,
The Brownies met to carry through
Some work they had that night in view.
They met, according to their plan,
Where turnpikes at right angles ran,
And so in several different ways
They hurried through the evening haze,
All straining every nerve and joint
To reach on time the meeting-point.


TWe busy i ac and Rind
Will Ileaue good works belliqdL








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.

They 're not the kind to careless be
-- Abhout appointments, as we see, :,- ,, -....
.a ,.a ,: -,, : -, -. .-
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--.... r.- -- r -- : '- -
: _- .' ,_ .'- :. '. I. ., ,'. : 4,, .
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= .., ,-=.,-.-- .. -.'." .T ,r~k. .~ '. : ,1 c,. .'.

-' -. : : / J r '", : .: _' ,,
,. :,,. o. ::' -: :=-. :,,. ,-: ,,::: ,:,. ;/ ., .'_, .' ..., .' ; ', : l ,








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


Nor think it right for some to play,
Or dilly-dally by the way,
While others stamp impatient feet
Or sit upon the anxious seat.
When Brownies say, "At six we 'll dine,"
They do not mean it shall be nine.
Because one's dressing is too slow,
Or he must chat an hour or so,
And stare in windows at the price
Of things so very cheap and nice,
The Brownie guest arriving late
Will not be troubled with a plate.
Or when they say, "At dark we 'll meet,"
On such a road, or such a street,
No tardy laundress makes them late;
No gaiters mourning for a mate,
No gloves misplaced by careless hands
Take moments that the trip demands;
But, with perhaps some time to spare,
The Brownie band will all be there.
All breathless with a lengthy race
The Brownies gathered at the place;
Then started off at once to find
The piece of work they had in mind,
And soon before a dwelling fine
The band drew up in double line.
Said one: "This house we stand about
SIs all in shape for fitting out.
The furniture is ready all,
The carpets lying in the hall,








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


The paper for the walls is there
In rolls, piled underneath the stair;
But trouble of a serious kind
Has much disturbed the people's mind
Who here intended to reside,
And so all things are laid aside.
Thus people oft a blank will draw
Though plans are laid without a flaw.
Yes, though they study day by day
And throw no precious hours away,
But lie awake of nights to plan
Some better way to cope with man,
Still unforeseen misfortunes rise
And every hope in ruin lies.
Sometimes a sharp decline in stocks
The bottom out of business knocks;
Sometimes a .conflagration dire
Sends fortunes up in smoke and fire;
Sometimes the one who was to tread
The altar steps, with flowers spread,
Alas! with trembling limbs has trod
The pathway to the broken sod."
Another said: "I think our skill
Will answer all demands that will
SBe made to-night, in every case,
While putting things in proper place.
If Brownies cannot drive a tack,
Put up a bedstead or a rack,
'T is time we should be bragging less
About the powers that we possess."
60









THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


A third replied: "I think so too,
And I, for one, my share will do.
I care not whether on the floor
I stretch the carpet more and more,
Or with the paste the walls I smear,-
I 'll do my portion, never fear.
At outdoor work I 've done my share,
As those who know me can declare;
I 've proved myself no nerveless boy
With hod, or pickax, spade or loy;
And those who '11 try me even now
Will have to wipe a sweating brow."
Another cried: "Whatever part
You take in hand to show your art,
Or mode of working, fast and free,
You 'l find, I think, your match in me.
I 'm not the one to advertise
What I can do when wants arise;
But if inventions are required
Just call on one who is inspired."
So chatting freely, plans were laid
And soon a move the Brownies made;
Some in the room spread carpets wide
And held them down at either side,
Still stretching them to suit the case,
While others tacked them in their place.
Some on the ladders stood to spread
The paste on walls high over head,
While others hung the paper there
Without a wrinkle, twist or tear;
61








STHE BROWNIES IN MAY.


And then the border pasted fast,
To make a fine effect at last.
What power lies in Brownies' hands!
What skill to answer all demands!
Outdoors or indoors, all the same,
The highest praise they rightly claim.
No old indentures can be found
To prove they were to masters bound,
Who boxed them well about the ears
For dulling saws or breaking shears;
No one has claimed in note or will
To him they owe their wondrous skill,
Or through his fostering care had gained
The honored place they have attained.
62








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


No strong trades-unions, old or new,
Their sheltering arms around them threw,
But through the dust of centuries dead,
With skilful hand and cunning head,
They rose equipped for every task
That night could bring, or need could ask-
A band, indeed, to which one turns
When hope into the socket burns,
And other hands than mortal may
Take up the tools we fling away.
So work went on
as moments flew,
SFor much the Brownies
had to do.
They put the hat-rack
in the hall,
The calendar

And hoisted up
the ancient clock
Into its niche
without a shock;
Then wound it up, and set it right,
According to the time of night;
For though the Brownies never bear
A watch, or any such affair,
The rooster knows not better when
To crow, and rouse the sleeping hen,
Than do the cunning Brownies know.
The flitting moments as they go.
63








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


Then busy hands the pictures found
That were to grace the walls around;
And with the rest, to their delight,
A Brownie picture came in sight.
And with discrimination fine
They hung it on the favor line,
Where the observing eye could rest
Upon it, from all points the best.













Then hammers for a time were still
As Brownies did the parlor fill,
All crowding there in great surprise,
The work of art to criticize.
One spoke, when he had looked with care
At every Brownie running there.
"But one," said he, "as far as known
Has to the world the Brownies shown
Drawn to the life, and all the band
Complete, as here to-night we stand;
And though the name is wanting here,
His style of handling us is clear."








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


No sooner was
the carpet laid -,
I k And paper on
the walls displayed.
Than they began,
with much ado,
All sorts of things lllll Illli "
1,A&MER coX
to bring in view.
And while they pushed, with eager haste,
A ladder was at times displaced
Whereon some stood to hang aright
The mirrors and the mottoes bright.
Then down would rattle, in a fall,
The Brownies, ornaments and all.
But many a man and wife can tell
How moving tries the patience well,
And how they are both lame and sore
When such a task
as this is o'er.
.. Then wonder not
that Brownies found






P,,U lyic --=---=--" --- .


Some hardships as they worked around.
Said one: "My friends, but that I grieve
65









THE BROWNIES IN MAY.

For people in distress, I 'd leave
The work just where it is, and go
To some retreat, and never show
The least concern in such a case,
Or knock my joints all out of place."








-=,I, _
_-.- ---.,


But though one here, and there would get
Discouraged at the ills they met,
The mass of workers were content
To finish all before they went,
And kept engaged without a rest
Arranging things as pleased them best.
Of course, slight accidents befell-
Some articles, however well
They worked to keep the pieces whole,
At times would get beyond control,
And overturned, or downward flew,
To cause alarms, and damage, too.
'T is true some things received a blow
That lowered them in price, you know,
But that might happen anywhere
66








TEE BROWNIES IN MAY.


With servants showing greatest care.
Said one: "There is a time for play,


And time for work, as writers say;
But work o'er which some make a fuss,
Or strive to shirk, is fun for us.
We Brownies don't spend all our hours
In secret caves, or shady bowers,
But now and then, as folks will find,
Come forth to render service kind;
And when we turn our hands to toil
There 's not a tiller of the soil
67








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


Or handicraftsman in the land
Can hold a candle to the band!"
But all the same, the truth to tell,
They found some things that tried them well.
Not used to all the ins and outs
Of modern furniture,
some shouts
Would now and then
from Brownies rise
That told of trouble
and surprise
Where through a sudden
heave or snap
They were reminded
of a trap,
.A c.. And, heads and heels,
in great dismay,
Were folded up and stored away,
While what to say or what to do
To liberate them no one knew.
As morning close and closer drew,
The Brownie workers faster flew
From room to room, above, below,
For they were neither slack nor slow.
As when some creature's passing hoof
Disturbs the ants' sand-castle roof,
And those aroused in fear and doubt
With bag and baggage run about,
So rushed each Brownie with his load,
Now blocking up a comrade's road,








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


Now tumbling over what he bore,
Or dropping that to run for more.
When everything, from first to last,
Had through their hands in order passed,
And all the house looked clean and new,
So they had nothing else to do
But quit the place, and get from sight
While there was yet a shade of night,
Said one: "I wish we could provide
A place near by this house to hide,
So we might watch the great surprise
That will enlarge the people's eyes
When they arrive and gaze around
And see that everything has found
Its place, as well as if their care
And skill had been exerted there.
But we must now be on the move
And every tick of time improve,
Or else not all our powers to run
Can save us from the rising sun."
But morning light
came on apace
And found the Brownies
in the place.
Then wild and stirring
scenes began,
As from the upper floors they ran:
Some took the steps with active spring,
As light as birds upon the wing,
While more, to save a moment's time,
69








THE BROWNIES IN MAY.


Upon the rail made haste


to climb,
Where lying down,
or else astride,
As fancy led,
they took
the slide,
And downward
shooting, to
the hall,
Slid over
newel post
and all!
When Brownies
reach the
open air,
Escaping after
some affair
That 's kept
them busy
till the day
Gives them
Short time
to flit
away,
It does
., not take
them
long
to cross








THE BROWNIES IN TUNE.


A street or square, or wildly toss
Their limbs above a fence or wall
Upon the safest side to fall.
And short the time they now required
To reach the hiding-place desired,
Where they could rest both hand and head
Till night once more her mantle spread.



.' a "~


Q.


THE BROWNIES IN


JUNE.


Tie wor
to those
le night in June, when skies were clear So keep
witl7 t1o
The Brownies sought a city near.
Right well their plans had all been laid
To reach the town at evening shade,
And spend the night in sporting there
Upon a bridge so high in air
That ships from every country ran
In safety underneath its span.
Impatiently, you well may think,
They waited for the sun to sink.
It seemed to loiter in the sky
And vexed them as the time drew nigh


Ild ;s cold
wfio fail
yoturlold
jotl ancl jail.








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


For them to start upon their way,
From stations that through all the day
Afforded them a resting place,
And screened them from the human race.








It has to be a gifted eye
That can the cunning Brownies spy;
No commonplace, plain business sight
Can bring the shadowy rogues to light:
It takes a vision stronger far
Than that to see them as they are
When by the rocks and trees concealed
They wait their turn to take the field.
One may be quick to note a flaw
In grammar, etiquette, or law;
Or in the ledger-column see
A numeral where it should n't be;
Find errors in the
grocer's bill,
Or lightness in' his weight,
but still
Lack special sharpness
-. to behold
The slightest glimpse of
Brownies bold;








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


For few there are among
the crowd
Whose optic nerves
are so n
endowed


That they through second-sight can mark
Their doings in the light and dark.
73












THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


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- --- -- --i ---
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-------- --- ~-= ---~-------~--~ ~i_--F
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i~==_
9


"z ^f p x Cox


The wished-for night soon made her call

And spread o'er land and sea her pall,
74








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


And scarce the bat had tried its wing
Before the Brownies in a string
Were skipping down the road in glee
To reach those cities by the sea.
They heeded not the buildings tall,
But to the bridge fast hurried all.
They reached it when the lamps' bright glare
Revealed its bowed proportions fair,
With ends well anchored either side
In cities spreading far and wide.
From roofs of buildings standing nigh,
The Brownies got a chance to eye
The structure stretched with graceful sweep
Across the river, dark and deep.
Said one: "We here can sport and play
Upon this bridge till break of day,
Of seeing wonders never tire,
Nor lack a chance to climb a wire.
In fact, each member here can find
A rope to suit his hand or mind,
On which to climb, or swing at ease
Like monkeys on Brazilian trees."
Now here and there the Brownies went,
On seeing all the bridge intent;
Some had the nerve
and strength
to crawl
At once upon
the towers
tall,


E


r









THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.

S And right and left
their glances
threw,
Of distant points
to gain
a view,
Or gaze upon the sea
of light
That through a city
spreads at night.
At times, while climbing
ropes of wire,
The topmost Brownie's
hands would tire,
And slipping back, his
weight would bring
No small distress to all
the string
That clung below with
might and main
To hold their own against
the strain.
Then down they 'd sit to
rest, or chat
In Brownie style, of this
or that,
Ot glances, on the flood
to throw
That lay so dark and
far below.
76








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


Then on the foot-path, long and wide,
For half an hour their speed was tried;
Sometimes in squads of eight or nine
They took their stations in. a line,
And back and forth between the piers
They ran a race, 'mid shouts and cheers
From those who climbed on cables high
To watch them as they scampered by.
Said bne: "I 've heard it said that men
Have come upon this bridge, and when
No officer did near them stand,
To interfere with schemes on hand,
They reached the center beam, or rail,
And jumped, yet lived to tell the tale."
Another said: "We cannot let
A human being ever get
The start of us in any way
Through daring deeds,
let come what may.








THE BROWNIES IN TUNE.


Now to the selfsame place we '11 go,
And take our places in a row;
And, at a given signal, spring
Like birds when taking to the wing,
And keep feet downward, if we can,
According to the jumper's plan
To be not turned awry in air,
But strike the water plumb and fair.'
A third remarked: "You argue well
And show your sense, for truth to tell
We may, if we but manage right,
Immortalize ourselves to-night.
One man may jump and still escape
Without a hurt of any shape,
Yet he is only one in all
The millions on this turning ball.
But where was ever seen a crowd
Like us, with fortitude endowed,
That makes us in a body go
Through greatest dangers one can know?
We 've gone through many startling woes
And trying scenes, as history shows.
If people doubt, let them but read
And learn how we take little heed
Of dangers that go hand in hand
With all the doings of the band,
And even now you 'll fnd that we
Are valiant in a high degree.
Instead of shrinking in disgrace,
Each one will want the highest place."








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


A fourth exclaimed: "There's fame, no doubt,
In such a jump, if well worked out;
But I, for one, here let me say,
Won't look for fame in such a way.
Let those who want to feed the fish
Jump from the structure, if they wish
But be assured the lowest plate,
Or wire, upon this bridge so great,
Will high enough from water seem
Before you souse into the stream.
Now those with me who do not show
A crazy wish to famous grow,.
Beneath the bridge in boats will keep,
And aid the ones who take the leap."
A fair division now was made:
Upon the bridge those Brownies stayed
Who did n't wish to have it said
That human beings were ahead;
While those who did n't care to seek
For fame through such a foolish freak
Went down for boats, and quickly ran
Beneath the center of the span,
To be prepared their friends to save,
When they should drop into the wave.
Now, dark against the starry sky,
All those who were the jump to try
Crawled out upon the cable dim,
And perched like birds upon a limb,
All waiting for the signal scream
That was to start them for the stream.
79









THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


Said one: "My word is still my bond,
So acts and words must correspond.
But had I not the utterance made
That I, for one, was not afraid,
And freely gave my name, I vow
I 'd hardly make the promise now!"
But one was quick to give the shout,
And at the cry they all sprang out
Like heroes bold, without delay,
And downward took their rapid way.
They struggled hard, while in mid-air,
To keep themselves erect and fair,
But quite a breeze was sweeping round
Between the ocean and the sound,
And as it o'er the river ran
It played sad havoc with their plan.
In spite of frantic kicks and flings,
And arms gyrating round like wings.
80








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


Some soon began to spread, or bend,
And some were capsized, end for end,
While more, through luck, or extra skill,
Kept going down, feet foremost, still.
Few words were passed between them there,
For little breath they had to spare;
But, judging by the look they wore,
If they were on the bridge once more
They 'd hardly take that daring spring
For all the fame that it could bring.
While striving for a balance good,
They caught each other where they could;
And once that nervous grip was gained,
Through fear or friendship it remained.
And thus, uniting firm and fast,
As rapidly they downward passed,
A chain was formed, while one could wink,
Composed of many a twisted link,
That lengthened as the flood they neared,
And, still unbroken, disappeared.
If Brownies in the boats below
Had twenty eyes apiece to throw,
They hardly could keep track of all
As through the air they whirling fall;
They splashing fell on every side,
All disappearing in the tide!
Those who had spread their very best
Went quickly under with the rest,
But first they rose again in sight,
And signaled boatmen left and right.
81








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.


Now had that daring Brownie crowd
Been just with mortal gifts endowed,
One half the band, or thereabout,
Would have been snuffed completely out;
And never more have brought a smile
On human face to play awhile.
But, thanks to their mysterious power
That stood them well in that dread hour,
They had no thought of ending here
For good and all their bright career.








Some stayed so long beneath the wave
Friends feared the river was their grave.
But pretty soon a distant yell
Would prove them safe, and swimming well.
They went so deep that when they rose
Some pounds of mud came with their toes,
And to the surface quite a few
Brought shedder-crabs, and lobsters, too,

to friends around
That they the river's
bed had found.
Though Brownies may
mishaps sustain
82








THE BROWNIES IN JUNE.

That cause some fear, if not some pain,
They seldom fail to carry through
The work laid out for them to do;

And though a few were somewhat sore,
And vowed they ?d take that leap no more,
Still, not a broken bone was there,
Or garment torn beyond repair.
Each was in trim to quickly crawl
In waiting boats, that took them all
Away as fast as oars could guide
The party to the nearest side,
And then the band had barely time
To quit the place ere morning prime.










WE TAKE OUR FLIGHT.














THE BROWNIES IN JULY.

T llf( happy
soon as sunny-faced July oan3ey
Brought round the time when banners fly ..',
On every pole, o'er every door, liberty
The country through from shore to shore,
The Brownies met to have their say
Respecting Independence Day.
Said one: "If I have reckoned right
The days as they have taken flight,
We stand upon the very brink
Of that great day when people think
Of heroes who so freely gave
Their sacred lives on field and wave,
That generations yet to be
Might live and move in liberty."
Another said: "My comrade true,
Your mental almanac won't do,
You 're just two dozen hours too fast,
I have the days from first to last
All jotted down in black and white
As plain as printer's ink can write;
To-morrow night will usher in
The time for banners and for din.
When children all are up and dressed
Before the stars have gone to rest,
84








THE BROWNIES IN TULY.


And when the sun looks
down at folk
The earth is blue with
powder smoke."
A third remarked:
"Then let it be
Our plan to-


night
to
see








THE BROWNIES IN JULY.


That city stretching in its pride,
With streets so long, and parks so wide,
That holds the Hall where Congress broke
To flinders fine the monarch's yoke,
To never after be resigned
Each To timber of that galling kind.
,o. Around the table we will stand
ledje
j.2 Where people signed, with steady hand,
bra The document that did declare
Their home and country free as air.
We know what that act brought about-
Each fight, surrender, siege and rout,
Which followed soon the declaration
To found a free and mighty nation,
That like a link now lies between
The oceans boisterous and serene;
And while one part is wrapped in snow
Till trees bend down to earth below
With loads that storms have on them laid,
Still other parts are all arrayed
In flowers that sweetest fragrance send
To sunny skies that o'er them bend.
The war was long, and many fell,
As history's pages fully tell.
No conflict of a year or two
Could such a commonwealth subdue,
Nor could it cause the king to say
Be bravue
The colonies might go their way. Bebroa
But seasons rolled, and still the fight o' yc
For liberty, or monarch's right,
86








THE BROWNIES IN JULY.


In icy fields through wintry days,
On scorching plains in summer's blaze,
Far off from land on ocean's wave,
Where hearts when few were doubly brave,
To bind in chains, or to be free,
The war went on by land and sea.
The child that stood upon the pave,
And saw his father, firm and grave,
With gun in hand and horn at side,
March off to stem tyrannic pride,
Grew up in time to take a hand
In battling for his native land-
To the same tune from drum and fife,
Went bravely forth to give his life."
That night, indeed, the Brownies' feet
Went pattering through the silent street,
Unnoticed by the men i4 blue
Who searching glances ever threw
As here and there with solemn round
They guarded people sleeping sound.
Said one: "This town is counted slow,
And fun is poked at it, we know,
About how gravely people move,
And how they never leave one groove.
But we, who have no ax to grind
Or boon to ask, can speak our mind;
And folk there are within our reach
Now fast asleep, that well could teach
The stirring, grasping populace
Of many a more ambitious place,
87








THE BROWNIES IN JULY.


The honest way to sell and buy,
The way to live, and way to die,
And other friendly hints L
supply." -I


The Hall was reached in half an hour,
As one might judge who knows their power,
88




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