• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 A child's dream of a star
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Group Title: Collection of "masterpieces"
Title: A child's dream of a star
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082522/00001
 Material Information
Title: A child's dream of a star
Series Title: Collection of "masterpieces"
Physical Description: 43 leaves : ill. ; 15 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870
Tucker, Elizabeth S ( Illustrator )
Frederick A. Stokes Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: Frederick A. Stokes Co.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1894
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Heaven -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children -- Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Grief -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1894   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1894
Genre: Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Charles Dickens ; with numerous original illustrations by Elizabeth S. Tucker.
General Note: Publisher's advertisements follow text.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082522
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225401
notis - ALG5676
oclc - 02429338
lccn - 06035895

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Half Title
        Page 3
    Frontispiece
        Page 4
    Title Page
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    A child's dream of a star
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Advertising
        Advertising 1
        Advertising 2
        Advertising 3
        Advertising 4
        Advertising 5
        Advertising 6
        Advertising 7
        Advertising 8
        Advertising 9
        Advertising 10
        Advertising 11
        Advertising 12
        Advertising 13
        Advertising 14
        Advertising 15
        Advertising 16
        Advertising 17
        Advertising 18
        Advertising 19
        Advertising 20
        Advertising 21
        Advertising 22
        Advertising 23
        Advertising 24
        Advertising 25
        Advertising 26
        Advertising 27
        Advertising 28
        Advertising 29
        Advertising 30
        Advertising 31
        Advertising 32
        Advertising 33
        Advertising 34
        Advertising 35
        Advertising 36
        dvertising 37
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text
















































e i llb
b; 4:::- .; ,














CbiiOWz Drcani of a
!5tar.









CollAciion of" 1fasteri'ces"

CHARLES DICKENS


A Child's

Dream of a Star

WitA numerous original
illustrations by
ELIZABETH S. TUCKER














NEW YORK
FIREDERIuCj A. STOKES COMPANY
PUBLISHERS






























Cofiylight, -894, 1y
Feredeick A. Slokes Coifiny















t CNiVb's IDream of

a star.


THERE was once a child, and
he strolled about a good deal,
and thought of a number of
things. He had a sister, who
was a child too, and his con-
stant companion. These two
used to wonder all day long.
They wondered at the beauty of
the flowers; they wondered at
the height and blueness of the



















Ubep wonbereo at
tbhe Mcautp of tbe fIowets.








A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

sky; they wondered at the depth
of the
bright I
water; t e
they won-
dered at
the good- ,






the lovely / "


/'

They used to say to one an-
other sometimes, "Supposing all
the children upon earth were to
the children upon earth were to



















Ubep2 wonberet at the iieptb
of tbe Brigbt Water.












.. rfl


bin..- -









A CHILD'S E Id.11 A .'.

die, would the flowers, and the
water and the sky be sorry? "
They ,
believed '
they -.
would u
be sorry.
For,' I
they, "tl.. .. I I
are the c,,Il, .
of the II
and the ,il.
play f i
streams 1H, o
gambol d.. t .
the hill-sides
are the chil- TH A LT,.LE Lav:tL
STRrAMIS THAT GAMBOL
dren of the DOWN THE HILLSIDES.
water; and the smallest bright





















and-seek in
the sky all night, must surely
be the children of the stars;
and they would all be grieved
to see their playmates, the
children of men, no more."
There was one clear,
shining star that used to
come out in the sky before
the rest, near the church
spire, above the graves.


1




















ZEverp 1Ritbt tbep WIIfatcbeb
for it, Etanbing lbawi
in 1banb.









A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

It was larger and more beautiful,
they thought, than all the others,
and every night they watched for
it, standing hand in hand at a
window. Whoever saw it first
cried out, I see the star !" And
often they cried out both together,
knowing so well when it would
rise, and where. So they grew
to be such friends with it, that,
before lying down in their beds,
they always looked out once again
to bid it good-night; and when
they were turning round to sleep,
they used to say, God bless the
star!"
But while she was still very
young, oh very, very young, the





















Wbflien Ubep were turning
rouuZ to ZIeep, Zbep
use0 to fan,
Oo IeVe the Btar!"













11 ~Y~










A CHILD S DREAM OF A STAR.

sister drooped, and came to be
so very weak that she could no
longer stand in the window at
night; and
p then the child
i' looked sadly
S out by himself
and when he
saw the star,
S4 turned round
S and said to
the patient
THE CHILD LOOKED pale face on
SADLY OUT BY
HIMSELF. the bed, "I
see the star !" and then a smile
would come upon the face, and a
little weak voice used to say, "God
bless my brother and the star!"


















anb tben a Smile would l come
upon the face.







A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

And so the time came, all too
soon when the child looked out
alone, and when there was no
face on the bed; and when there
was a little grave among the
graves, not there before; and
when the star made long rays
down toward him, as he saw it
through his tears.
Now, these rays were so bright,
and they seemed to make such a
shining way from earth to Heaven,
that when the child went to his
solitary bed, he dreamed about
the star; and dreamed that, lying
where he was, he saw a train of
people taken up that sparkling
road by angels. And the star,







A CHILD'S DRFAM OF A STAR.

opening, showed him a great
world of light, where many more
such angels waited to receive
them.
All these angels who were
waiting turned their beaming eyes
upon the people who were carried
up into the :tar; and some came
out from the long rows in which
they stood, and fell upon the
people's necks and kissed them
tenderly, and went away with
them down avenues of light, and
were so happy in their company
that, lying in his bed, he wept
for joy.
But there were many angels
who did not go with them, and





















"1s min JS3rotber come?"








A CHILD S l)IRE.\iM OF A STAR.

among them one he knew. The
patient face that once had lain
upon the bed was glorified and
radiant, but his heart found out
his sister among all the host.
His sister's angel lingered near
the entrance of the star, and said
to the leader among those who
had brought the people thither:
Is my brother come? "
And he said, No."
She was turning hopefully
away, when the child stretched
out his arms and cried, 0,
sister, I am here! Take me!"
And then she turned her beam-
ing eyes upon him, and it was
night; and the star was shining









A CHILD S REA.\M OF A STA.\.

in the room, making long rays
down toward him as he saw it
through his tears.


v --.--- -^,r.













THERE WAS A BABY BORN TO BE A
BROTHER TO THE CHILD.

From that hour forth, the child
looked out upon the star as on
the home he was to go to when








A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

his time should come; and he
thought that he did not belong
to the earth alone, but to the star
too, because of his sister's angel
gone before.
There was a baby born to be
a brother to the child, and while
he was so little that he never had
spoken a word, he stretched his
tiny form out on his bed, and died.
Again the child dreamed of
the open star, and of the com-
pany of angels, and the train of
people, and the rows of angels
with their beaming eyes all turned
upon those people's faces.
Said his sister's angel to the
leader:



















Ube Cbilb bebe1O bio
I.Srotber'o Enclet in ber Eirms.








A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

Is my brother come ? "
And he said, "Not that one,
but another."
As the child beheld his brother's
angel in her arms, he cried, 0,
sister, I am here! Take me! "
And she turned and smiled
upon him, and the star was shin-
ing.
He grew to be a young man,
and was busy at his books, when
an old servant came to him and
said :
"Thy mother is no more. I
bring her blessing on her darl-
ing son "
Again at night he saw the star
and all that former company.



















" UbI Ilotber is no more. 11
bring bet ~Besing on ber
battling son!"








A CHILD) S )DREAM 1 A STAR.

Said his sister's angel to the
leader:
Is my brother come ? "
And he said, Thy mother "
A mighty cry of joy went forth
through all the star, because the
mother was reunited to her two
children. And he stretched out
his arms and cried, 0, mother,
sister, and brother, I am here!
Take me And they answered
him, Not yet," and the star was
shining.
He grew to be a man, whose
hair was turning gray, and he
was sitting in his chair by his
fire-side, heavy with grief, and
with his face bedewed with tears,


















Ube lUotber waz reu11fteb to
ber two CbiA[rent.







IKta


I.rV
^ ^


r v i
.^ .\. -











A CHILD S DREAM OF A STAR.


when the star opened once

again.


HE WAS SITTING IN HIS CHAIR IIY HIS
FIRE-SIDE, HEAVY WITHIN GRIEF.

Said his sister's angel to the

leader: Is my brother come? "









A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

And he said, "Nay, but his
maiden daughter."
And the
man who
had been ,
the child
saw his
daughter,
newly lost
to him, a
celestial
creature
among
-,
those three,
and he HIS MAIDEN DAUG(ITER.
said, My daughter's head is
on my sister's bosom, and her
arm is round my mother's neck,



















I"?IR Vatiibter'o 1beab io on
nn ip Zter'o iJ30o0o0n, an
Ier B1tni is rounO mnp
l~otbcrl!3 lech,
ani at ber feet there t6 the
l3ab-p of olb Mite.





















:I



'1n. *







A CIIILDS DREAM OF A STAR.

and at her feet there is the baby
of old time, and I can bear
the parting from her, God be
praised !"
And the star was shining.
Thus the child came to be an
old man, and his once smooth
face was wrinkled, and his steps
were slow and feeble, and his
back was bent. And one night,
as he lay upon his bed, his chil-
dren standing round, he cried, as
he had cried so long ago:
I see the star !"
They whispered one another,
He is dying."
And he said, I am. My age
is falling from me like a garment,

















"11 ee the Star!"





























Ih
:I 2'

i .



i"' ~
p~









A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR.

and I move toward the star as a
child. And 0, my Father, now I
thank Thee that it has so often
opened to receive those dear ones
who await me "
And the star was shining, and
it shines upon his grave.














COLLECTION OF MASTER-
PIECES.

This Collection of certain of the most
successful and best-loved works by vari-
ous authors has been entered upon by its
publishers with the intention of making
it as exquisite and perfect in form as
possible. Each volume contains a large
number of original illustrations by well-
known artists, made especially for the
Collection, and printed with the utmost
care.
The typographical details are some-
what in the best modern French style,
and the paper is of the highest grade,
and has been manufactured especially
for this Collection, which is issued in a
variety of beautiful bindings, to corre-
spond with the dainty interiors of the
books.
The following volumes are ready, each
of which can be had in either of the
bindings described:

Masterpieces of Prose and Verse.
SELECTIONS FROM POINT LACE AND DIA-
MONDS." BAKER. Illustrated by C.
Moore-Smith.











"A CHILD'S DREAM OF A STAR." DICK-
ENS. Illustrated by Elizabeth S.
Tucker.
LTHE DAY DREAM." TENNYSON. Illus-
trated by W. St. John Harler.
1 EVANGELINE." LONGFELLOW. Illus-
trated by Charles Howard Johnson.
" THANATOPSIS." BRYANT. Illustrated
by Corwin KtnaoP Linson.
"SONGS OF SEVEN." INGELOW. Illus-
trated by Kirk EstI.
"Violet" binding, with backs of can-
vas, richly ornamented in gold, and with
outer sides illuminated with design of
purple violets, with gold background.
Gilt top. In a box.
Per volume, 75 cents.
Full dull brown cloth, or full white
cloth, with artistic ornamentation in
gold. Gilt top. In a box.
Per volume, 75 cents.
Half calf. Gilt top. In abox.
Per volume, $1.50.
Limp calf. Red-under-gold edges.
In a box.
Per volume, $2.00.
Other volumes in frefaration.
















Specimen Pages,

"Evangeline." Long-
fellow.
Collect/io of .Tasterfieces.'






































TIe -p, r. .t r, e, ad












































L' PATIENCE TIE PRIEST WOULD SAY./
























;p~

t',* *


HUNTING FOR FURS IN THE FORESTS."









34 EVANG LINE.


Silenced, but not convinced, when the
story was ended, the blacksmith
Stood like a man who fain would
speak, but findeth no language;
And all his thoughts congealed into lines
on his face, as the vapors
Freeze in fantastic shapes on the win-
dow-panes in the winter.

Then Evangeline lighted the brazen
lamp on the table,










S O T









wi WROTE W\VITI A STEADY HANbD.")















Fe -,-. r l











HIOLUDL \I.NG F IN HII SHANDS, \\WITI 11S SEALS.
THE ROYAIl L COXIAIISNION."









74 EVANGELINE.


Over the watery floor, and beneath the
reverberant branches;
But not a voice replied ; no answer came
from the darkness;
And, when the echoes had ceased, like a
sense of pain was the silence.
Then Evangeline slept; but the boatmen
rowed though the midnight.
Silent at times, then singing familiar
Canadian boat-songs,




,- .-- ---------- -

'/ --r ,';' LI =.. .




"WATER-LILIES IN M1\YIAl)S.

Such as they sang of old on their own
Acadian rivers,
And through the night were heard the
mysterious sounds of the desert,
Far off, indistinct, as of wave or wind in
the forest,















Specimen Pages,

"The Day Dream."
Tennyson.
Collection of "' AIfasfe'rieces."








~wrm : ~I~
~J..,. V --









I
i
n',,
I ; .1
i


:~r
y)


77, P,










THE DAY-DREAM.


III.

'0 eyes long laid in happy
sleep !'
'0 happy sleep, that lightly
fled !'





'-4t




SAND O'ER THEM MANY A FLOWING RANGE
OF VAPOR BUOYVD THE CRESCENT-BARK."

'0 happy kiss, that woke thy
sleep !'
'0 love, thy kiss would wake
the dead !'









Ell,

I, .I .





[ 41











THE DAY-DRE AM.


Each baron at the banquet sleeps,

Grave faces gathered in a ring.


"AND I L 'I I.
'NVITHl NO1 EL WVIN .








































Jr


i.

















Specimen Pages,

"Songs of Seven." In-
gelow.
Collection of Afasterfpieces."








I II
J9










LBUT I1 I1 ILOVE HIAI MORE'F, MIORl TIAN,' NNIl WITFN
I.(I ON D1 11I 01- II II N I)AYS DARl K ORB11 RIIHT."'



















BY THE SYCAMORE
PASSED HE, AND THROUGH
THE WHITE CLOVER.









SONGS OF SEVEN.


IV.

A song of a nest:-
There was once a nest in a
hollow :







!* I > *-




'I PRAY YOU HEAR MV SONG (OF A NEST,
IOR IT IS NOT LONG."

Down in the mosses and knot-

grass 'pressed,
Soft and warm, and full to the
brim-
















I:









SONGS OF SEVEN.





'R A V I -,LI O


'0 VLVET I13E YOU 'E A DULbTY FELI-O\".

0 velvet bee, you're a dusty fel-
low,
You've powdered your legs
with gold!
0 brave marsh marybuds, rich
and yellow,
Give me your money to hold !

0 columbine, open your folded
wrapper,
Where two twin turtle-doves
dwell !















Specimen Pages,

"Selections from Point
Lace and Diamonds."
Baker.
Collection of Masterfieces."


















-9


' r


NWN TWO '1TOO0 POSSESSION OF T111- ST'MIRS."
I',. 8.










20 FROM POINT LACE AND DIAMONDS."

.. . . . . .. -. ... .. .. .


Hli FIACI IS SAINT-LIKE "

That bright young creature kneel-
ing there
With every feeling, every thought

Absorbed in high and holy dreams
Of-new Spring dresses, truth to
say
To them the time is sanctified
From Shrove-tide until Easter
day.





















































1, HELENA, TAKE THEE-LOVE-CHER-
ISH-AND--WELL, I CAN'T HELP
IT,-' OBEY.










CHlVALRI IE.


i HER FAI HER'S VOICE CAME THROUGH THE
WOOD, HE I) MADE A FORTUNE
TANNING LEATHERl.'

Above, the heavens aglow with
light,
leeneath our feet the sleeping
ocean,
E'en as the sky my hope was bright,
Deep as the sea was my devotion.

Her father's voice came through
the wood,
IIe'd made a fortune tanning*
leather ;
I was his clerk; I thought it good
To keep on talking about the
weather.









A LEG.IIND OF SI. VALENTINE, 73

Quite a heavy piece of work.
So when I had got them done-
Why I thought them much too good
Just to waste that way on one.
Jack, I told you, didn't T,
All about that black-eyed girl
Up in Stratford-last July-
Oh you know ; )ou saw her curl ?
Well, old fellow, she's the one
That this row is all about,
For I sent her-who'd have thought
Maud would ever find it out-
Those same verses, word for word-
Iang it, man you needn't roar-
'Splendid joke!" well, so I
thought-
No, don't think so any more.
Yesterday, you know it rained,
I'd been up late-at a ball-
Didn't know what else to do-
Went up and made Maud a call.
Found some other girl there, too,
They were playing a duet.
Fred, my cousin, Nelly Deane,"-










































L---J



"'SPLENDID JOKE !' VWEL, SO I THOLGHT--
NO, DON't THINK SO ANY IlORE."

















Specimen Pages,

"Thanatopsis." Bry-
ant.
Collection of A4a sterpieces."


















W


I- *
I 1 .. ; '














*'iI* ~ I










THANATOPSIS.


Nor in the embrace of ocean,
shall exist
Thy image. Earth, that nour-
ished thee, shall claim
Thy growth, to be resolved to
earth again,

















"THE SLUGGISH CLOD. WHICH THE RUDE
SWAIN TURNS WITH HIS SHARE, AND
TREADS UPON."

31



















K -









I'll A N A TO I'S IS.

Of ages glide away, the sons of
men,
The youth in life's green spring,
and he who goes


I


" i E


In the full
strength of
years, mat-
r o n an d
maid,
S And the sweet
babe, and
t h e gray-
h e a d e d
headed
N TI HV SUMMONS
n,an--
CO( i S."
Shall one by one
be gathered to thy side,










T H A NATO1' IS.


Like one who wraps the drapery

of his couch





















SUSTAINED AND SOOTHED BY AN UN-
IALTIEIING TRUST.'"


About him, and lies down to

pleasant dreams.

IINIS.






















'"I

















j:7-

'*1''





.,I, I :IJ '

: : i i:









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