• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Where Santa Claus lives, and what...
 Cinderella, or the little glass...
 The frog and the mouse
 Little Red Riding Hood
 The three little kittens
 The story of the three little...
 Little Bo-Peep
 Beauty and the Beast
 The three bears
 Frisky, the squirrel
 Robinson Crusoe
 The five little pigs
 Jack the giant killer
 The robin's Christmas Eve
 The enchanted fawn
 The story of Robin Hood
 Hector, the dog
 The blue bird
 Dame Trot and her comical cat
 Blue Beard
 Back Cover
 Spine






Title: The Santa Claus story book
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082333/00001
 Material Information
Title: The Santa Claus story book
Uniform Title: Cinderella
Beauty and the beast
Little Red Riding Hood
Physical Description: 280 p., 2 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm.
Language: English
Creator: McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bro's
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Christmas -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's stories
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082333
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224620
notis - ALG4886
oclc - 38037002

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Where Santa Claus lives, and what he does
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Cinderella, or the little glass slipper
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    The frog and the mouse
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Little Red Riding Hood
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
    The three little kittens
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    The story of the three little pigs
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Little Bo-Peep
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Beauty and the Beast
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
    The three bears
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Frisky, the squirrel
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
    Robinson Crusoe
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
    The five little pigs
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
    Jack the giant killer
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
    The robin's Christmas Eve
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
    The enchanted fawn
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
    The story of Robin Hood
        Page 212
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
    Hector, the dog
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
    The blue bird
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
    Dame Trot and her comical cat
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
    Blue Beard
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
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Copyrignt by
McLOUGHLIN BROTHERS,

1893-





















CONTENTS.


WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.
CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.

THE FROG AND THE MOUSE. . .

LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD. .

THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS. .

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS. . .

LITTLE BO-PEEP. .
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. .
THE THREE BEARS. .

FRISKY, THE SQUIRREL. .
ROBINSON CRUSOE. .

THE FIVE LITTLE PIGS. .

JACK THE GIANT KILLER. .
THE ROBIN'S CHRISTMAS EVE. .

THE ENCHANTED FAWN. . .
THE STORY OF ROBIN HOOD. . .

HECTOR, THE DOG. .
THE BLUE BIRI). .
DAMME TIROT AND HER COMICAL CAT. .
BLUE BEARD.. .


PAGE
5
i9

S37

43
56
. 46

69

8o
* 80
85
o6

123

135
152
66

184

197
212
.226

237
252
268











Una Ujware Loes.


AT the top of the earth, which they call the North Pole,
Is where Santa Claus lives, a right jolly old soul!
And the ice and the snow lie so thick on the ground
The sun cannot melt them the whole summer round.

All wrapped up in fur from his head to his toes,
No feeling of coldness dear Santa Claus knows,
But travels about with a heart full of joy,
As happy as if he were only a boy.

His cheeks are like roses; his eyes are as bright
As stars that shine out overhead in the night,
And they twinkle as merrily too all the while,
And broad as a sunbeam is Santa Claus' smile.

He never is idle, except
when asleep,
And even in dreams at his
labors will keep, / "\
And all thro' the day and /
the night, it is true,
He is working and plan- .I
ning, dear children, '
for you.
5






WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.
On top of his tower with
spy-glass in hand,
He goes every morning to
look o'er the land,
L And though there are hills
all around, I suppose,
SHe sees, oh, much further
j than any one knows

He peeps into houses whose doors are tight shut;
He looks through the palace, and likewise the hut;
He gazes on cities, and villages small,
And nothing, no, nothing is hidden at all.

He knows where the good children live beyond doubt,
He knows what the bad boys and girls are about,
And writes down their names on a page by themselves,
In books that he keeps on his library shelves.

For good little children, the gentle
and kind,
The prettiest presents and toys
are designed,
And when Christmas comes round,
as it does once a year,
Tis certain that Santa Claus then
will appear

His work-shop, is oh! such a wonderful place,
With heaps of gay satins, and ribbons, and lace;
6







WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.
With houses and furniture, dishes and pans,
And bracelets and bangles, and all sorts of fans.

There are horses that gallop, and dollies that walk,
And some of the pretty doll-babies can talk,
There are pop-guns, and marbles, and tops for the
And big drums and trumpets that
make a big noise.


SANTA CLAUS IN HIS LIBRARY.
7


boys,


, %~'






WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.
There are games for all seasons, the base-ball and kite,
And books which the children will seize with delight,
And the skates and the sleds, far too many to count,
And the bicycles ready for wheelmen to mount.
There are farm-yards in plenty, with fences and trees
And cows, sheep, and oxen, all taking their ease,
And turkeys, and ducks, and fine chickens and hens,
And dear little piggies to put in their pens.
There are gay Noah's Arks,
just as full as can be
S"_ Of animals, really a wonder
to see;
I' 'i a I" "' There are lions, and tigers,
_-- and camels, and bears,
-: And two of each kind, for
they travel in pairs.


There are elephants stretching
their noses quite long;
And reindeer and elks with
their antlers so strong,
And queer kangaroos all the
others amid,
With their dear little babies in ." 'T
pockets well hid. .

Is Santa Claus happy ? There's no need to ask,
For he finds such enjoyment indeed in his task,






WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND WHA T HE DOES.


SANTA CLAUS IN HIS WORK-SHOP.


That he bubbles with laughter, and whistles and sings,
While making and planning the beautiful things.

The dear little Brownies, so nimble and fleet,
Will run on his errands with tireless feet,






WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND IWHA T HE DOES.
And carry big bundles and boxes, because
They want to be friendly to good Santa Claus.
H e's a jolly good fellow, but
ever so shy,
And likes to do all his good
deeds on the sly,
So there's no use of spoiling
a nice winter's nap
For you'll not catch a glimpse .
of the jolly old chap.
When Christmas Eve comes, into bed you must creep,
And late in the night, when you all are asleep,
He is certain to come; so your stockings prepare,
And hang them up close by the chimney with care.

The baby's wee stocking you must not forget,
For Santa will have something nice for the pet,
And those who are thoughtful for others
will find
The good saint at Christmas time has
them in mind.

There is Tommy, who tended the baby with care,
A nice train of cars he shall have for his share,






WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHA T HE DOES.
And how happy Eliza will be when she looks
For her presents, and finds such a budget of books.

For dear little Mary, a doll there will be;
And for Alice and Jennie a gay Christmas tree;
And wee little Georgie, the baby, will find,
A big stick of candy, just suiting his mind.


IN THE STABLE.






WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND NWHA T HE DOES.
Oh, a jolly good sight is this funny old chap
When he's dressed, in his bear-skin and fur-bordered cap,
All ready to start on his
---- ---- way through the cold,
\ / In a sleigh covered over
,- with jewels and gold.


READY TO START.
While his deer from the mountains all harnessed with care,
Like race-horses prance through the clear frosty air
12





-;HERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND WHA T HE DOES.
'Tis fun just to watch them, and hear the bells ring,
And the stars seem to think it a comical thing.

For old Santa is bundled so
close to the chin ,.
That there is not a chance
for the cold to get in, '
His cheeks are so rosy, his
eyes how they flash! / .,
No horses or driver e'er cut
such a dash "- .-". i-


He cracks his long whip, and
.,_,. he whistles a tune,
.,,' '. !i .' ,: W while he winks at the stars, and
.he bows to the moon,
',' .r' ",And over the tree-tops he drives
.. i like the wind,
And leaves all the night-birds a
long way behind.

His steeds speed away on their
journey so fleet,
That they seem to have wings to
their swift flying feet,
For there's work to be done by
the cheery old man,
And his coursers will help him
as well as they can.
13





WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.


His sleigh is with toys and with trinkets
well packed,
You never beheld one with treasures
so stacked;
And though of good children he has
such a list
Not one is forgotten; not one will
be missed.


An army he gives to the boy
who is neat,
And never is rude in the house
or the street;
And a farm to the lad who
goes smiling to school,
Who knows all his lessons,
and minds every rule.


And if ou would
And if you would


please him-dear Bertie and Jack-


And win a nice prize from the old fellow's pack,
Be good little children, your parents obey,
And strive to be happy at work or at play.


. ..


T I ?






WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND WHA T HE DOES.
At Christmas old Santa Claus
toils like a Turk,
For the cheery old fellow is
fond of his work,
With his queer-looking team
through the air he will go
And alight on the house-tops.
all covered with snow.

Then down through the chimneys he'll dart without noise,
And fill up the stockings with candy and toys.
There'll be presents for Julia, and Nellie, and Jack,
And plenty more left in the old fellow's pack.


And if Frank behaves well, and minds
what is said,
Quits teasing the cat, and
goes early to be I:
He'll find for his -
present a sled
or a gun,
A ready compan-
ion in frolic
and fun.

On Santa Claus hurries, and works with a will,
For many tall Christmas trees he has to fill,
And loads them with treasures from out his rich store,
Till they blossom as trees never blossomed before.





WHERE SANTA CLAUS LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOES.
Though round as a dumpling, and ever so fat,
In running and climbing he's spry as a cat,
And if the long ladder should happen
to break,
And he should fall down, what a
crash it would make!


LOADING THE CHRISTMAS TREE.






WHERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND WHAT HE DOl S.


I told you his home was up North by the Pole,
In a palace of ice lives this worthy old soul,
And though out of doors it may furiously storm,
Indoors as we know, it is sunny and warm.

When Christmas is over old Santa
Claus goes
To his home in the North, and his
well earned repose,
And when he is
rested and feel-and de
Ing tip-top,
The good-naturedi
workman goes
back to his
shop.
And there will he labor from morning till night,
To make others happy his aim and delight,
And if his good-will the dear children would earn,
They must strive to be happy and good in return.

He comes like an angel of light from above,
To do on the earth sweetest errands of love;
And our hearts and our homes to so fill with good cheer
That we cannot help knowing when Christmas is near.
17







TlH-IERE SANTA CLA US LIVES, AND ITHA T HE DOES.
Then let us be glad, so that Christmas may be
A real Merry Christmas to you and to me:
And now that the story is ended we'll give
Three cheers for old Santa Claus! Long may he live!


SANTA CLAUS RESTS AFTER HIS LABORS.






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.


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CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS
SLIPPER.

SHERE once lived near a great city a very worthy
gentleman and his charming young wife. They had
Married for love, and lived very happily together;
much more happily than some of their neighbors
who were far more wealthy. And when a baby girl was
born, who was the light of their eyes and the joy of their
hearts, they felt as if their home was a little heaven upon
19






CINDERELL4, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
earth; and, however cold and dark the world might be out
of doors, there was always plenty of warmth and sunshine
within.
But this state of things did not last long, for the young
mother fell ill of a fever, and died when her child was too
young to feel the loss of its kind parent.
The poor husband was at first almost distracted with grief,
and but for the presence of his dear little daughter would
have been very lonely indeed. Her pretty ways and soft
caresses had a soothing effect upon him, and he felt that he
had still something left to live for.
As time wore on he became quite cheerful once more, and
began to go into society, and to think of marrying again.
His daughter needed a mother's care, and his house was so
large that it seemed very lonely with so few people in it.
Unhappily, the choice the gentleman made this time was not
a good one, for the lady he married was proud, haughty, and
deceitful, and had a most violent temper. She was determined
to have her own way, and her good-natured husband let her
do about as she pleased. It was easier for him to put up
with an evil than to find fault, and perhaps bring on a quarrel.
Unfortunately, the new wife was a widow, and she brought
with her into the house two great rude girls, who had been
wisely kept out of sight until their mother was married and
settled in her new home. They were at least ten years older
than the gentleman's daughter, whose beauty and grace made
them appear even more homely and awkward than they
really were.
This made them jealous of the poor child, and they did all
that .they could to make her life miserable and unhappy.
20






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
They teased and tormented her from morning till night, and
when she bore patiently with them-for she was anxious to
win their love-they made fun of her, and were more dis-
agreeable than ever.
The poor child made no complaint to her father, for she
knew that it would only add to his unhappiness and discom-
fort, and if he interfered it would make matters worse. It
was not long before he fell violently ill; medicines could not
save him; and he died so suddenly that the shock almost
killed his poor little daughter, who knew not how she could
live without him.
After her dear father's death, the haughty sisters were uglier
than ever to the poor little girl. They never invited her to
share in their games, or their sports, or to join them in their
walks or drives. Their mother encouraged them in this sort
of treatment, for she seemed to owe the poor child a grudge
for being so much better looking than her own daughters.
It did not occur to her or to them that more than half their
ill-looks was owing to their ugly tempers. It is no disgrace
to be homely; and pretty manners will hide all defects of face
or form, and enable us to win hosts of friends.
But the sisters, as they grew up, gave all their thoughts to
dress, and much of their time to dress-makers and milliners.
They and their mother were always dressed in the latest style,
and held their heads very high, and would not condescend to
speak to poor people.
The young girl, who should have been treated as a daugh-
ter and sister, was made to do all the dirty work of the house.
In this way they saved the wages of a servant, that they
might have more money to spend on clothes and finery. She






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
made the fires, carried the water, made the beds, swept and
dusted the rooms, cooked the meals, and was as busy as a bee
from morning till night.
Her one comfort was to sit in the chimney corner when
her tasks were done, and lose herself in a dream of bright
fancies as she gazed on the glowing logs. They were warm
and friendly, though every one else was cold and unkind.
As the kitchen was her parlor, she was careful to keep it tidy
and neat, and was so often brushing up the hearth, and sitting
by the cinders, that the sisters gave her the name of Cider-
(wench, or Cinderella, which is much prettier.
Cinderella was never invited to sit in the parlor, and had
no clothes given her but such as were fit to work in. She
waited upon her sisters kindly, helped them to dress, and
admired all their new clothes, and longed, just as any young
girl would, to see how fine a bird she would be in such fine
feathers. But the selfish creatures never even let her try on a
bonnet or cloak, for fear that Cinderella might put on airs,
and refuse to be a kitchen drudge any longer.
Sometimes, when she was doing her best to please them,
they would speak harshly to her, and be so spiteful and ugly,
that Cinderella would go back to her dish-washing with tears
in her eyes, and her heart as heavy as a big lump of lead.
Now some folks would have grown cross and hateful under
such treatment as the poor girl received; but as gold when
put in the fire comes out more bright and beautiful, so did
Cinderella shine with a light that made her face at times like
that of an angel. She was pure gold through and through.
One day the two sisters received an invitation to a grand
ball to be given in honor of a Prince, who, being the eldest






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
son of the king, was expected, some day, to succeed his
father on the throne.
It was an honor to be invited to the palace, and the note
was eagerly read, and promptly answered by the proud sisters.
Go? Of course they would! But what should they wear?







d; ;, -T^. ,,











-f .... \ \ \ \

HER FAIRY GODMOTHER APPEARS TO CINDERELLA.

This ball was the event of the day. Nothing else was
talked about. Dress-makers had more than they could do,
and the sisters were fortunate in having such a handy person
about as Cinderella. They could not deny that she had good
taste in dress, and hard at work was she kept for at least






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
three weeks preceding the ball. Meals were eaten in haste.
Dishes were washed in a rattling hurry.
Cinderella had to cut, fit, and sew, and listen to all the talk
about the ball-who was to be there, and what So-and-So
was to wear-without daring to make a remark, or ask a
single question.
When the day of the ball came, oh, then, what a hurry
and flurry there was! nobody had any time to think of any-
thing else. The streets of the city were hung with flags, and
bands of music played from morning till night. Cinderella
was up early, for she had a world of work to do, and there
were some finishing touches to be put on the dresses the
sisters were to wear.
Cinderella felt a pride in having them look nice, and saw
that not a hair-pin or a hook was out of place. She arranged
their hair in the latest style, and while at this work, one of
the sisters said to her with a mocking smile,
Don't you wish you were going to the ball, Cinderella?"
Indeed, indeed I do! exclaimed the poor child, already
in a fever of excitement.
A fine figure you would cut!" said the other, and homelier
sister. Better stay among the pots and pans. That's the
place for you!"
Cinderella bit her lip, but said nothing, though she had
hard work to choke back the sobs that would keep rising to
her throat.
The sisters drove to the ball in a fine carriage, with coach-
man and footmen in livery, and when they were gone the
house was so quiet, that had any one been listening they
might have heard the rats playing in the cellar. But Cinder-
24






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
ella was too busy with her own thoughts to think of rats.
Now she could give vent to her tears, and she sat on her
favorite seat by the hearth thinking what a lonely life she led,
trying to imagine what a ball was like, and wishing, wishing,
wishing hard that she was there in the midst of the light,
the flowers, and the music.
As this wish rose from her heart, Cinderella looked up
and saw a strange-looking old woman, who seemed to have
come into the room without opening either door or window.
Her feet rested on a cloud, and a bright light surrounded her.
In her hand she held a long wand.





,. -. r // / ^ -. i- I, "f] i
ii~


/ -i II A
/~~~ ___ **-- __
_c- L-
I i






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
Cinderella scarcely knew whether she was asleep or awake.
The old woman drew near her, and said in.a kindly voice,
" What is the matter, dear child? Do you want to go to
the ball ?"
Oh, indeed I do !" answered Cinderella, tears filling her
eyes.
Well, be a good girl, and do as I tell you, and I'll send
you off in fine style. I am your fairy godmother. Bring
me the largest pumpkin you can find."
Cinderella was surprised, but the fairy godmother seemed
so much in earnest, that the poor girl dared not disobey, but
ran at once to do as she was told. As she carried the pump-
kin through the garden, she could not help smiling at the
thought of the funny figure she would cut sitting on top of
it, and speeding through the air. The fairy, however, touched
the pumpkin with her wand, and lo and behold in its place
appeared a magnificent coach lined with satin and plush, and
fit for Her Royal Highness to ride in.
"That is good as far as it goes," said the fairy; but it won't
go far without horses. Look in the mouse-trap, my child, and
see if there is any thing in it."
Cinderella ran quickly to do her bidding, and was delighted
to find eight plump mice caught in the trap. There they
were, poking their little noses through the bars and trying to
get out. And how they did squeal! Cinderella took care
that not one of them should escape, as she bore the trap in
triumph to her godmother.
The fairy told her to raise the wire door that the mice
might come out, one by one. As they did so, a touch of the
wand transformed them into handsome horses, with arching
26





CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.


/i'A "' S\ ^ -'-i~ j
/---- i" i : ,
,ki ^ ,',!/ / "\ "" _*'- -'.-,, '"- 1 ~ I* I,
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--_ .....-.. .-1 -


CINDERELLA AT THE BALL.
necks, shining manes, and long tails, and splendid harness all
plated with gold. It was enough to make one's eyes water
just to look at them.
Well, iny child(," said the fairy, this is a fine turn-out,
truly. But there are the finishing touches yet to be put on.
Go and see if there are any rats in the rat-trap !"
Cinderella ran with all haste, and soon returned bearing
the trap, which had in it two rats of the very best quality.
One was bigger than the other, and as he sprang out of the
trap, he was changed into a coachman, and took his place on





CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
the box as orderly as you please. The other rat was trans-
formed into a footman, and both were in splendid livery
ornamented with gold.
But this was not all. Bring me six lizards," said the
fairy godmother. "You will find them behind the watering-
pot in the garden."
The lizards were brought, and at once transformed into
pages, whose duty it was to run alongside or ahead of the
coach, and announce its arrival. These immediately sprang
to their places, and stood as if awaiting further orders.
"There, Cinderella!" exclaimed her godmother, gazing
with pride upon the equipage. "Could anything be finer
than that? Jump in, and be off."
Cinderella looked at her shabby clothes, contrasting them
with the splendor of the coach, and shook her head sadly.
The godmother understood at once, and said Oh, I see!
You think that dress is hardly fit to wear to a ball. Well, we
can easily remedy that. My dress-maker is wonderfully
skilful, and will fit you out in short order."
Saying this, she touched Cinderella with her wand, and
immediately the old clothes fell off the young girl, and she
stood arrayed in a beautiful dress that shone like cloth of
gold. Jewels sparkled here and there-on her hands-at
her throat-and on her waist; and to crown all, the fairy
brought a pair of lovely glass slippers-that shone like dia-
monds-for Cinderella to put on. How dressed up one feels
in a pretty pair of shoes!
The godmother paused awhile to admire Cinderella in her
new attire, and then she said, I have but one charge to give
you, my child. Leave the ball-room at twelve o'clock sharp!
28


!






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
If you remain a moment beyond that time, your coach will
become a pumpkin, your coachman, footman, and horses, rats
and mice, and your pages, lizards. Your beautiful dress, too,
will vanish away, and leave you in the shabby clothes of a
kitchen drudge."
Cinderella promised to be punctual, for twelve o'clock
seemed to her a late hour. But then she had never been to
a ball!
There was a great stir at the palace when the splendid
carriage drove up, and great was the interest displayed when


THE FLIGHT FROM THE BALL.





CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
Cinderella alighted. The Lord High Chamberlain himself
escorted her to the ball-room, and introduced her to the Prince,
who immediately claimed her hand for the next dance.
Cinderella was in a whirl of delight, the envy and admiration
of all the ladies and gentlemen. The hours flew all too fast.
At supper Cinderella was seated next her sisters, and even
conversed with them. The kind condescension of so distin-
guished a stranger was very flattering to them, and they were
on their best behavior.
When the hands of the clock pointed to a quarter of twelve,
Cinderella, mindful of her godmother's injunction, arose and
hastened to her carriage. The Prince hurried after her,
expressed his regret that she must leave so soon, and begged
her to visit the palace the next evening, when the festivities
were to be continued. He then returned to the' ball-room,
but found the place very dull indeed, now that the Princess
was not among the guests.
Cinderella reached home in good time, and was commended
by her godmother, who promised to look after her interests
in the future. Soon a loud rap on the door announced the
arrival of the sisters, and Cinderella made haste to let them
in, rubbing her eyes and yawning as if just awakened out of
a sound sleep.
As soon as they entered the house they began to tell of the
beautiful Princess, of the excitement she had created, 1and the
preference she had shown for their society. When they said
the Princess was expected to be at the palace the next evening,
Cinderella begged that they would lend her one of their cast-
off dresses that she might go and see the wonderful beauty.
The sisters laughed her to scorn, and the next day were uglier
30






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.


TRYING ON THE SLIPPER.
to her than ever, finding fault when they had no occasion,
and striking her whenever they had a good chance.
I'll teach you to have better manners, and to know your
place! The idea of you (daring to ask for one of my dresses,
or to think of( g-oinm to a ball! Take that!-and that!" said
the younger sister, who had the most violent temper. And
Cinderella bore their hard treatment with a meekness that
was really remarkable.
The next evening the sisters went again to the ball, and
Cinderella made her appearance there shortly afterwards,
dressed even more splendidly than on the first night. The
31





CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
Prince had been watching for her, and never left her side the
whole evening. The attentions he paid her would have
turned the head of almost any young lady, but Cinderella
received them all with a repose of manner that made the
Prince more charmed with her than ever.
But so happy was Cinderella that she forgot to look at the
clock, or to listen for its warning chime, and was greatly
surprised when the first stroke of twelve rang upon her ear.
She sprang up in haste, and ran from the ball-room as fast as
she could, never even waiting to courtesy to the guests, or to
say good night to the devoted Prince.
It was well she did so, for at the last stroke of twelve, the
splendid carriage, horses and all resumed their original forms,
her elegant clothes fell from her, and she found herself clad
once more in her old dingy working-dress. The Prince started
in pursuit, but lost track of her in the midnight darkness. In
her flight, however, she dropped one of her glass slippers,
which the Prince found and held to his heart as if it was
a priceless treasure.
Cinderella reached home panting and breathless, in very
different style from that in which she had left the first ball.
The Prince, in the meantime, had made inquiries of the
sentinels on guard, both inside and outside the palace, but
none of them could tell him which way the Princess went.
In fact, the only person they had seen leaving in haste was a
young girl poorly dressed, who looked as if she might be a
cinder-sweep.
Cinderella had not long to wait for the return of her sisters;
for the ball had closed early, as the Prince was so dull and
vexed. She again met them, rubbing her eyes, and yawning
82







CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
wearily, but managed to ask them if they had enjoyed them-
selves, and if the beautiful Princess had again made her
appearance at the palace.
Yes, they said, and more beautiful than ever, but at twelve
o'clock she suddenly started up and left the ball-room, where-


A PERFECT FIT.
A PERFECT FIT.






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
upon the Prince seemed to lose all interest in everything, and
the guests soon departed.
The Prince remained in a listless state for some time.
Night and day he thought of the charming Princess, with
whom he was madly in love, and sought in many ways to
find some trace of her. He sent agents far and wide to
search for her, but nothing came of it.
At last a bright idea struck him. He got up a proclama-
tion which said:
THE KING'S SON WILL MARRY THE LADY WHO IS ABLE TO WEAR
THE GLASS SLIPPER WHICH WAS DROPPED AT THE LATE BALL.
Then he sent out a herald with a trumpet to proclaim this
wonderful news, and great was the excitement it caused.
Such a squeezing of feet as there was! and such suffering
from corns! The herald had orders to stop at every house,
and every lady tried to put on the slipper, but all in vain.
At last he came to the home of Cinderella's sisters, who
endeavored to put on the lovely glass slipper! But it was
too short for one, and too narrow for the other, and they
were obliged to give it up.
Cinderella, who had been watching them eagerly, stepped
forward and asked if she might be permitted to try on the
slipper. The sisters exclaimed, What impudence !" but the
herald said his orders were to pass no lady by, and Cinder-
ella put down her scrubbing-brush and seated herself to try
on the slipper. There was no trouble getting it on; it fitted
her to a T. The sisters were speechless with amazement;
but imagine, if you can, their look of surprise when Cinder-
ella drew from her pocket the other glass slipper, which she
had carried about with her ever since that fateful night.
34






CINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SLIPPER.
Now the sisters could see in Cinderella's face some resem-
blance to the Princess who had taken so much notice of them
at the ball, and whose attentions they were so proud to receive.
How had it been brought about? As if in answer to their
thought the fairy godmother entered the room, and the blush-


MARRIAGE OF CINDERELLA.


ing maiden was transformed into the beautiful Princess. The
herald set off at once to bear the joyful tidings to his master
that the Princess was found.
You may well believe that the sisters were sorry enough


~





cINDERELLA, OR THE LITTLE GLASS SL.PPER.
that they had treated Cinderella so harshly, and they sup-
posed that now the tables were turned she would despise
them, and be glad of a chance to pay them back for their
ill-usage. Mortified and ashamed, they went down on their
knees and asked her forgiveness, and Cinderella, bidding
them rise, begged them to think no more of the past, or to
fear her hatred. She assured them that she should never
forget that they were her sisters, and would do all she could
to add to their future happiness and prosperity.
A royal escort was sent to conduct Cinderella to the palace,
and great was the joy of the Prince at beholding her again.
She consented to become his wife, and the wedding was con-
ducted with regal pomp and splendor, and there was no end
to the congratulations; and as for the wedding-cake! well,
there was no skimping there, I can tell you.
The sisters were assigned the place of honor at the ban-
quet, and owing to Cinderella's generosity were able to make
a very fine appearance. For among her wedding-gifts was
a large dowry from her godmother, and as Cinderella's hap-
piness consisted in making others happy, she did not hoard
her wealth, but spent it among the poor, after settling a large
sum on each of her sisters.
Cinderella made hosts of friends, and she and the Prince
lived happily together for many years, and among all the
treasures of the royal palace there was nothing quite so pre-
cious as
CINDERELLA'S GLASS SLIPPER.







THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.


THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.
There was a Frog lived in a bog-
A Frog of high degree-
A stylish youth, and yet, forsooth,
A bachelor was he.


He had not wed,
Because, he said,
e'd ne'er in all his life
Seen in the bog I
A pollywog /
6 1 He pas
e cared to make his wife. He pas,
ty ho
\ And th
the v
spied
A most
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But one
ine day,
when drest
ip gay,
sed a pret-
use,
ere beside
window

attractive
e.


H


H








THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.


'"/





i'' t


He raised his hat,
And gazing at
Miss Mouse, in suit of gray,
38


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He made a bow,
Likewise a vow
To marry her straightway.


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THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.
When he was drest
In scarlet vest,
And coat of velvet sheen,
With frills of lace, -
And sword in place,
His like was nowhere '
Sseen.'

His smile was bland; '
His style so grand,
He said with pride, "I :I -i '
know[
Miss Mouse so fair,

So suitable a beau!

-,i, -c .- ...

If she'll agree
To live with me,
And be my faithful wife,
S:' Oh, she shall dine
L- .. On dishes fine,
S- .' And lead an easy life."

S" When he went by,
Miss Mouse, so shy,
,. :.' Would hide her blush-
ing face;
But truth to tell
SCould see quite well
Through curtains of thin lace.

And from her nook! ah many a look
She gave, with heart a-stir;
And oft did she confess that he
Was just the beau for her.







THE FROG AND THE IMO USE.






/. "' i /












1ir W

















He passed the door,
And on the foor















At last so blue poor froggy grew, He knelt and kissed her hand *
He went up to the house Wilt marry me?" '
And rang the be ll, in haste to tell He asked, while she
His love for Mistress Mouse. Her burning blushes fanned
40- e
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He passed the door,
And on the floor
At last so blue poor fro gy grew, He knelt and kissed her hand;
He went up to the house "Vilt marry me?"
And rang the bell, in haste to tell He asked, while she
His love for Mistress Mouse. Her burning blushes fanned.
40







THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.


She answered "Yes," as you may
guess,
To Mister Frog's delight;
His arm he placed around her
waist,
And joy was at its height.

The wedding-day was set
straightway;
The town was all agog;
And gifts, not few, were sent
unto
Miss Mouse and Mister Frog.

And never yet
Was banquet set,
In country or in town,
With fare more rich
Than that to which
The wedding
guests sat
down. (W' .^






THE FROG AND THE MOUSE.


i '


-= --


-I


And, after all,
There was the ball,
For which the band was
hired !


And frogs and mice
Were up in a trice,
And danced till their toes
were tired.







LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


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ia


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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


)NCE upon a time, there lived in a small cottage on the
edge of a deep wood, a forester and his wife, and their
Iear little daughter. The little child was as lovely as a picture,
.1nd a great pet with everybody. Her mother liked to see
her prettily dressed, and made her a red cloak with a hood
to it, so that the neighbors gave her the name of Little Red
Riding Hood.
She was a merry little maid, and went about the house
singing and laughing the whole day long. She made friends
413


ip ~-r
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--- --- '





LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
with birds, and with beasts, and was not afraid of anything,
not even the dark.
One day Red Riding Hood's mother said to her, My
child, you may go to your grandmother's with this pat of
butter and bottle of blackberry-wine, for we have not heard
from her in some days, and she may be in need of some-
thing. Do not stay too long, for I shall be anxious to hear
how she is."
The old lady had not been well for some time, and some
days was so lame that she could not get out of bed, and had
to depend on the neighbors to come in and get her meals.
Red Riding Hood was delighted to do her mother's errand,
for she was fond of her grandmother, who always had funny
stories to tell, or something nice to give her when she went
there on a visit.
So her mother put on her scarlet cloak, gave her the well-
filled basket, kissed her good-by, and sent her off with many
loving messages for the poor sick grandmother.
Her way led through the lonesome woods, but Little Red
Riding Hood was not the least bit afraid, for she was used
to playing in them, and running races through them, never
minding whether she kept in the path or not. So she went
on as happy as a lark, looking back now and then, as long as
her home was in sight, to see if her mother was still at the
door, and to throw her a kiss from the tips of her fingers.
For a long, long time after Red Riding Hood had gone so
far that she could not see the house, her mother stood in the
doorway with a smile on her face, every now and then catch-
ing a glimpse of the bright red cloak that shone through the
trees, and thinking how pretty her dear little daughter looked
44





LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
in it, with her soft golden curls flying out beyond the cun-
ning scarlet hood.
How glad she was that she had such a dear little girl; and
how lonesome the house was when she was not in it! Why
it seemed as if all the sunshine had gone into the woods, and
was wrapped in under the pretty red cloak, that the very
geese knew enough to admire.
The birds kept Little Red Riding Hood company, and sang
her their sweetest songs. The squirrels ran up and down the
tall trees, and made her laugh at their funny antics. Now



-' -I --


i
" I.


RED RIDING HOOD IN BAD COMPANY.





LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
and then a rabbit would come across her path, and sometimes
Red Riding Hood would put down her basket, and give
chase to the bunnies, hoping she might catch one of the
pretty white pets. But they always managed to get out of
her way, for they could jump faster than she could run.
Butterflies darted here and there-some light yellow, some
with soft gray wings-and Red Riding Hood ran after these
until she was tired. Sometimes one would poise on a green
leaf close at hand, and just as Red Riding Hood was about
to seize the pretty thing, away it would go deeper in the woods,
and seem to urge her to follow.
By-and-by she grew hungry, and sat down on a flat stone
to eat the nice lunch her mother had put up for her, and oh,
how good it did taste!
The birds came round her for their share, and it was fun
to see them crowd on each other and squabble over the
crumbs. How they did chatter and scold! And what greedy
things they were You could almost hear them say, Let
that alone! That's mine! I was here first! O you pig!"
and when the crumbs were all gone they all cried, More!
more! more !" or at least it sounded as if they did.
It was so lovely in the woods that Red Riding Hood
was in no hurry to leave them. Wild flowers were plentiful,
and she said, aloud, Oh, I must stop and pick some for
grandmother, she is so fond of them!"
So she went out of the path to gather the fox-gloves, the
wild honey-suckles, and the dark wood violets that were
growing all around; and with these and some sweet ferns
and long grasses she made a very pretty nosegay.
But dear me! when she turned to go back to the path
46








LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.

she could not find it, and for a moment she was scared,

for she thought she was lost in the woods.

The birds knew of her plight, and as she had been good

to them, they would be good to her; so two of them flew

down, and calling to Red Riding Hood in their pretty,

coaxing way, led her out of the tangle of brush-wood into


F -'
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CHATTING WITH THE WOLF.


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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
the smooth path, and to the very place where she had left
her basket.
While she sat resting for a few moments, a wolf came up
and spoke to her; which did not seem at all strange to Little
Red Riding Hood, as wolves and fairies were quite common
in those days.
Good-day," said the wolf. "Where are you going all
alone by yourself, my pretty miss?"
I am going to my grandmother's," said Little Red Riding
Hood, "to take her some fresh butter and nice blackberry-
wine, for she is quite sick."
She ought to be proud of such a lovely grand-daughter,"
said the wolf. I don't know when I have met any one
quite so handsome."
Flattered by these compliments, Red -Riding Hood let
the wolf walk by her side, although the birds kept warning
her that he was a wicked rogue, and she'd better get rid
of him.
She had an idea that poor company was better than none,
which was a mistaken notion, for it is much better to be alone
than in bad company, as Little Red Riding Hood found out,
before a great while had passed.
"Where does grandma live ?" asked the wolf in as sweet a
voice as he could command.
"Just outside the woods. You can see her cottage through
the trees."
"Ah, yes;" said the wolf. "I think I'll call on the dear
old lady. She will certainly be glad to see me when she
learns how skillful I am in curing diseases. Just for the fun of
the thing, suppose you take the path to the left, while I follow
48






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
this one to the right, and we will have a little race to see
which shall get to the cottage first."
Now the crafty wolf knew that he was sure to win this
race, for he had chosen the shortest way, and, besides that,
he intended as soon as he was out of the little girl's sight
to go at a speed which she could not attempt to keep up
with. But Red Riding Hood suspected nothing. She was
so young that she did not know that though wolves might
appear to be as mild as sheep, they were still wolves at heart,
ready to bite and rend whatever came in their way. She was






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A RACE TO THE COTTAGE.
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A RACE TO THE COTTAGE.


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LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
kind and gentle herself, and thought everybody was the same.
She had yet to learn that often those who pretend to be our
best friends, turn out to be our worst enemies. They are fair
to our face, and false behind our back. They deceive us by
their sweet ways, and do their best to put us off our guard.
The wolf took a short cut out of the woods, and soon
came to the cottage of Red Riding Hood's grandmother. A
bird on a spray outside fairly screeched to give warning to
the old lady within, but if she heard it she did not know
what it meant.
The wolf rapped gently at the door, and the old lady, who
was in bed, roused herself and said, Is that you, darling?
Pull the string and the latch will fly up."
The wolf pulled the string, and stood still a moment ere
he opened the door. He thought he heard footsteps near,
for hunters now and then went through the woods in search
of game, but it was only the bird on the spray, who made a
frantic effort to scare off the wicked intruder.
But the wolf knew there was no time to waste, so he slip-
ped through the door of the cottage, which soon flew back
on its hinges.
I am ever so glad you've come, darling," said the grand-
mother, imagining that her visitor was Little Red Riding
Hood. I'm rather more poorly than usual, dear, and it
pains me to turn my head."
I'm so sorry," said the wolf, mimicking the voice of the
little grand-daughter. Mother's sent you something nice
in a basket."
Well, put it on a chair, dear, and take off your cloak;
and then come and give me a kiss."
50






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


y


S-_: a i -l I r .









RED RIDING HOOD ARRIVES AT THE COTTAGE.
"That I'll do at once !" said the wolf as he sprang on
the bed, and glared in the face of the grandmother, who
tried to beat him off with her crutch. But she had not
strength to battle with such a foe, and the hungry wolf,
with glaring red eyes, ate up Red Riding Flood's poor dear
grandmother, like the cruel monster that he was!
Oh, the blood-thirsty, horrible wretch
It makes one shudder to think of the terrible deed! But
this was not all! The taste of blood had made him thirst
for more; so he put on the old lady's nightcap and gown,
and snuggled himself down under the bed-clothes, to wait
for Red Riding Hood to appear.
51
atend h tonbattled with such ane foe, and -othes, to wait





~:r~ntnotcr ik tecrelmoserthth51a






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
What a slow-poke she was! It seemed as if she never
would come! and the longer the wolf waited, the crosser he
got! Several times he had cocked up his head, thinking he
heard her at the door, and still she did not come. He was
just beginning to think she never would find her way out of
the woods, when he heard a low rap at the door. The little
girl rapped softly, for she thought that grandma might be
asleep, and she didn't wish to disturb her, in that case, until
she awoke.
The wolf waited awhile, then called out as the old lady had
done: "Is that you, darling? Pull the string, and the latch
will fly up." His voice was rather harsh, but not unlike the
grandmother's when she had a bad cold.
So Red Riding Hood pulled the string, and went into the
house, set her basket on a table, and went up to the bed-side.
She was scared at the change that had come over her poor
sick grandmother. What could ail her to make her look like
this ? She must have some terrible disease!
The child stared and stared, and her breath came quick
and short.
Why, Grannie," she said, as soon as she could speak,
" what big eyes you've got!"
"The better to see with, my child," said the wolf, imitating
the grandmother's voice as much as possible.
And oh, Grannie," exclaimed the child, "what a great
long nose you've got!"
"The better to smell with, my child."
But, Grannie, what great big ears you've got!"
"The better to hear with, my child."
Red Riding Hood began to grow more scared than she
52






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


RED RIDING HOOD IS ALARMED.
had ever been in all her life, and her voice trembled when
she said,-
Oh, Grannie, what great-)ig-teeth-youve-got !"
"The )better to cat you up !" said the wolf, in his own
natural voice; and he was just about putting his long, sharp
yellow fangs in the child's soft white flesh, when the door was
flung open, and a number of men armed with axes rushed in
and made him let go his hold, and Little Red Riding Hood
fainted in her father's arms.
He was on his way home from work with some other
53






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
foresters, and was just in time to save his dear little daughter
from being eaten up by the wicked wolf that had devoured
her grandmother.
\With one or two strokes of the axe, the wolf's head was
cut off so that he could do no more harm in the world, and
his body was tied to a pole and carried home in triumph by
the foresters.
Friends from far and near came to see Little Red Riding
Hood, and to congratulate her and her parents. She had to
tell, over and over again, just where she met the wolf, how

--k- Ii iLL"iYLiLiJ


DEATH OF THE WOLF.






LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.


HOME IN TRIUMPH.


he looked, and what he said, until it seemed as if she never
got out of the woods at all, not even in her dreams.
When children were told the story it was always with
this word of warning: When you are sent on an errand, go
right along, and do it as quickly as you can. Do not stop
to play on the road, or to make friends with strangers, who
may turn out to be wolves in sheep's clothing.
And they promised to remember, and shuddered when-
ever they thought what might have been the fate of dear
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
55





THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


THREE little kittens
Lost their mittens, .-'
And they began to cry, '
SOh, mammy dear, we sadly fear
Our mittens we have lost!" -








S" What! lost your mittens,
You naughty kittens,
~Then you shall have no pie!"
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.

The three little kittens, without their mittens,
Began to feel quite blue.
Oh! mammy dear, Oh mammy dear,
Pray tell us what to do!"







THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


CiY


c;
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^- c.


48


I


-,,-, 1:1
l~iii
,1' ,1 i


" Go find your mittens, you silly kittens,

And be quick about it too!"
Miew, miew, miew, miew,

Miew, miew, miew, miew.


-- ----;- 1.~
: :r -1
'~eo


EIF, ,i'






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


The three little kittens
Then sought their mittens
Upon the table high;
In doors and out
They scampered about,
For they were very spry;
Now high, now low,
The three in a row,
And oh! how they made
things fly!
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.


The three little kittens
Found their mittens,
And they began to cry,
Oh! mammy dear,
See here, see here,
Our mittens we have found!"
68


"What! found your mittens,
You darling kittens,
Then you shall have some pie."
Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.


The three little kittens
Put on their mittens,
And soon ate up the pie.
Oh! mammy dear,
We sadly fear
Our mittens we have soiled."






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
"What! soiled your mittens, you naughty kittens!"
Then they began to sigh;
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew."


\ \\~ ~
i
i
\
r.


THE MITTENS FOUND.







THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


"II


The three little kittens washed their mittens,
And hung them up to dry.
" Oh, mammy dear, look here, look here,
Our mittens we have washed."





THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
S. "What! washed your mittens,
You good little kittens!
S But I smell a rat close by!
Hush! hush!" Miew,miew,
l Miew, miew, miew, miew.

B These kittens so gay
W ere invited one day
To feast by a running stream,
T,7'' \1 Where they had as much meat
As they wanted to eat,
And plenty of nice ice-cream,
And each went to sleep
Curled up in a heap,
And had a most lovely dream.
Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.

One night in the Fall they went to a ball,
And danced to a lively tune,
With a leap and a bound and a merry-go-round,
And the sound of a big bassoon;
And with holes in their mittens, those careless kittens
Came home by the light of the moon.
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.

These kittens-all three-were invited to tea
At Madame Angora's house,
Who wore her best silk, and served them with milk
And catnip on which to carouse;
61







THE YHREE LIT'YLE KITTENS.


1 j
it..l
ii ,

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! ', .. I,,-
i. I ;,.i y: :
\ ~ r ** /"7 *
\\
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G~i ~
~


And polite
When


as you please they were taking their ease,
they chanced to catch sight of a mouse.
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
The kittens gave chase-ran all over the place,
And up to the roof at a bound,
Their noses stuck in every basket and bin,
Till they were as black as the ground;
And the mouse so small
Had the best of it all,
For it hid where it couldn't be found.
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.


These kittens 'twas said
SWere soon to be wed,
The cards had been out
some days,







And cat-birds no doubt "
Spread the news about
As they flew o'er the
great highways;
And cats, one and all,
The great and the small,
Were loud in the kittens' praise.
Miew, miew, miew, niew,
Mliew, m1iew, miew, miew.






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
At last came the day, and in splendid array,
The guests soon began to arrive;
The aunts and the cousins by sixes and dozens,
All buzzing like bees in a hive;
And among them Sir Rouser, a famous old mouser,
And the handsomest maltese alive.
Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.









*X-" 41 &i






Then, after the marriage, each groom called his carriage,
And oh, they rode off in fine style;
The brides beaming brightly, and bowing politely,
To friends every once in a while;
Who kept up a squalling, and great caterwauling,
That might have been heard for a mile.
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


Iz,


The guests kept on dancing, now leaping and prancing;
The band still continued to play;
And Puss-in-the-corner," and Little Jack Horner,"
Were games very much in their way;





THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
With singing and
screeching,
And laughter far-
reaching,
They had a good '
time, I daresay. 7.
Miew, miew, miew,
iniew,
Miew, miew, miew,
miew. "'


Till suddenly-- ,
Hark !
There came a fierce
bark,
That made the cats u -
tremble with
fright;
Put an end to their fun, and made them all run,
Fear lending great speed to their flight,
And bow-wows, and spit-spits, from the puppies and kits,
Were heard all the rest of the night.
Bow-wow, miaow, bow-wow, miaow,
Bow-wow, miaow, bow-wow.


The three pretty brides, and their husbands besides,
Took rooms in a very nice flat;
Not a rat nor a mouse was e'er seen in the house,
Nor any one heard to cry Scat!
66






THE THREE ITYLE L KITTENS.
So they lived and looked pleased-they were petted
not teased-
Now what do you think of that?
Purr, purr, purr, purr,
Purr, purr, purr, purr.


i I
Si I
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.,-" : "/ .. .--i w "- .... --d
.,: : ; ; ,. .oe
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ASLA~L~






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.


The three little kittens who lost their mittens,
Those mittens had quite out-grown
Ere the year was out, and I very much doubt
That the mother her kittens had known;
And each of the three-'tis true as can be!-
Had dear little kits of her own !
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.


The motherly kittens began to knit mittens,
To put on the dear little paws;
And the kittens were taught to do as they ought,
And trained how to use their sharp claws,
And how to catch mice and rats in a trice,
And to keep out of traps with great jaws.
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew miew, miew, miew.


And as they grew old I've no doubt they told
This story-as now have I-
Of the three little kittens who lost their mittens,
And couldn't have any pie,
Till the mittens were found, and I'll be bound
They set up a mournful cry
Miew, miew, miew, miew,
Miew, miew, miew, miew.






THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.


T THREE U TT]LE FIGS.


_IT. INCE upon a time there was an old pig
with three little pigs, and as she had not
enough to keep them, she sent them out to
seek their fortunes.
The first that went off met a man with a bun-
dle of straw, and said to him, Please, man, give me that
straw to build me a house;" which the man did, and the
little pig built a house with it. Presently a wolf came along
and knocked at the door, and said,-
"LITTLE PIG, LITTLE PIG, LIT nME COME IN!"
To which the pig answered.-


'' '
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r .









THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.


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PLEASE, MAN, GIVE ME THAT STRAW."


No, No, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"

This made the wolf angry, and he said,-

"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in!"

So he huffed, and he puffed, and he blew the house in,

and ate up the little pig.


0 '






THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
The second little pig met a man chopping wood, and said,
" Please, man, give me some of that wood to build me a
house;" which the man did, and the pig built his house with it.
Then along came the wolf, and said,-
LITTLE PIG, LITTLE PIG, LET ME COME IN!"
"No, NO, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"
"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in!"
So he huffed, and he puffed, and
he puffed and he huffed, and at last
he blew the house down, and then ate
up the little pig.
The third little pig met a man with .
a load of bricks, and said, "Please,
man, give me those bricks to build a '
house with ;" so the man gave him the ..: ..-
bricks, and he built his house with -
them. Then the wolf came, as ,
he had done to the other little. .,._
pigs, and said,-


VIA

( '';;
N,


~-I, Qi~:- I



:II
-i '-I



I 'A
I>.' "A'
yr n ~ c







THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.


~V a~A'
i~


-~i
i\ \ ~ -'--~-- '
-7


THE SECOND LITTLE PIG AND THE WOOD-CHOPPER.


"LITTLE PiG, LITTLE PIG, LET ME COME IN!"

"No, No, BY THE HAIR ON MY CHINNY-CHIN-CHIN!"

"Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in."

Well, he huffed and he puffed, and he puffed and he
72


,i~:.- ~c~.~.

9.~






THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS.
huffed, and he huffed and he puffed; but he could not get
the house down. When he found that he could not, with all
his huffing and puffing, blow the house down, he said, Little
pig, I know where there is a nice field of turnips."
"Where?" said the little pig.
"Oh, in Mr. Smith's Home-field, and if you will be ready


"PLEASE, MAN, GIVE ME THOSE BRICKS."






THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will go to,
gether, and get some for dinner."
"Very well," said the pig, I will be ready. What time
do you mean to go ?"


I -




Ii



7-I "




----I

F


'Oh, at six o'clock."
Well, the little pig got up at
five, and got the turnips before
the wolf came-which he did
about six-and said, Little pig
are you ready ?" The little pig
said, Ready? I have been, and
come back again, and got a nice
potful for dinner."
The wolf felt very angry at
this, but thought that he would
be up to the little pig some how
or other, so he
said, "Little pig,
i I know where
,there is a nice
S,, '' pear-tree.
"... : -- ""'-" ;, "' W here? "
,", '/;. said the pig.
S" Down at
S. .Merry-garden,"
S '.' 1 ti replied the wolf,
and if you will
S'.,.. not deceive me,
'". I will come for
you at five









THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.

o'clock to-morrow, and we will go together and get some

pears.

Well, the little pig bustled up the next morning at four

o'clock, and went off for the pears, hoping to get back before

the wolf came. But he had further to go, and had to climb

the tree, so that just as he was getting down from it he saw


L99


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(-9
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9 1


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/y.' .9 ". 'v ^ ^ .
THE L E P T A P T ,O T W
THE L E -l T R W A; EA T THE WOLF .
\~ ~ ^ ;, '" *.,".? i''*"'. -^ ''* '



', ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ t ,'' C-^n,'

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THE LITTLE PIG THROWS A PEAR TO THE WOLF.


I


7'






THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
the wolf coming, which, as you may suppose, frightened him
very much. When the wolf came up he said, "What! are
you here before me ? are they nice pears ?" "Yes, very," said
the little pig. I will throw you down one;" and he threw it
so far that while the wolf was going to
pick it up, the little pig jumped down
and ran home.

,



R'Ve
e nxt day te wf ce ai
.-n ^ cS //Yj ^ /^




and said to the litte p/ L e pg,















there is a fair at Shanklin this after-
noon; will you go?" ?
Oh yes," said the pig, I will be ad to go; what time
will you be ready ?" '
'~7' '4V







THE THREE LITTLE /'IGS.


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THE LITTLE PIG AT THE FAIR.


At three," said the wolf.

So the little pig went off before the time, as usual, and got

to the fair, and bought a butter-churn, which he was going

home with when he saw the wolf coming.


,,





THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.
Then he could not tell what to do. So he got into the
churn to hide, and by so doing turned it over, and it rolled'
down the hill with the pig in it, which frightened the wolf
so much that he ran home without going to the fair.
He went to the little pig's house, and told him how
frightened he had been by a great round thing which came
down the hill past him.



_. _. -__
-'-h-,

A
," ''15_ .. /e^ ,, -









Then the little pig said, Ha!
I frightened you then. I had been to the fair and bought a
butter-churn, and when I saw you I got into it and rolled
down the hill."
Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he
would eat up the little pig, and that he would get down the
chimney after him.



Then the little pig said, at he was about, he h oa!
I frightened you then. I had been to the fair and bought a
butter-churn, and when I saw you I got into it and rolled
down the hill."
Then the wolf was very angry indeed, and declared he
would eat up the little pig, and that he would get down the
chimney after him.
\Vhen the little pig saw what he was about, he hung on







THE THREE LITTLE PIGS.











=" .. -
K --. _- ..--" '
_.= -. ,- _..,-- ,: i -. ^ .^ .'





-p "- ,:^ -' / "-





















the pot full of water, and made tp a blazing fire, and Just as
wolf! So the little p-- put on the cover again in an instant,

*i.. ,7- -
S*- ." ., 1 "

teowacigo, to ov ad i






LITTLE BO-PEEP.


LITTLE BO-PEEP.


LITTLE Bo-Peep has lost
her sheep,
And can't tell where to d- .
find them,
Let them alone, .
and they'll --
come home,
And bring their -L-
tails behind --
them.




Little Bo-Peep fell fast asleep,
And dreamt she heard
them bleating;

JIY.
,.,


'- -. "
;.. --- -"-' '----' -!* "2 -;' '. r' "









L/TI7LE BO-PEEP.


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But when she awoke, she found it a joke,

For still they all were fleeting.


7 (


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"THEN UP SHE TOOK HER LITTLE CROOK."


LITTLE BO-PEEP.


'I'
I,



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i(


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LITTLE BO-PEEP.


Then up she took
Her little crook,
Determined for to find them;
She found them indeed,
But it made her heart bleed
For they'd left their tails
behind them.

It happened one day,
As Bo-peep did stray
Into a meadow, hard by,






LITTLE BO-PEEP.
There she espied their tails, side by side,
All hung on a tree to dry.


She heaved a sigh, and wiped her eye,
And over the hillocks did race- O!
And tried what she could, as a shepherdess should
To stitch each tail in its place-O!


a
j,
I






BEA UTY AND THE BEAST.


BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.


fN a large city of the East, there once lived a very rich
merchant. He had a splendid home, and large ware-
houses full of costly goods; and a hundred guests bowed
themselves before him, and sat down at his table every day.
As his wealth increased, so did the number of his friends;
and at last it was difficult to tell which was the greater,-the
85





BEA UTY AND THE BEAST.
wealth of the merchant, or the amount of praise and flattery
bestowed upon him.
The merchant's family consisted of three sons and three
daughters. The sons were tall, well-grown, young men, and
the daughters were all handsome, dark-eyed ladies. But, as
frequently happens, the chief gifts of loveliness and grace
had been bestowed upon the youngest of them all; and so
bright and happy was her face, and so winning were all her
ways, that, as a child, she had been called the Little
Beauty," and the name still remained when she had become
a tall grown-up girl.
Happy indeed was it for the merchant that he loved his
sons and daughters better than his wealth; for he little
thought, as he sat at the head of his plentiful table, with his
smiling guests around him, that a terrible misfortune had
happened, and that he was, in fact, no better than a ruined
man. One of his largest ships, with a very costly cargo, was
miserably wrecked on the high seas, and only two of the
sailors were saved, after clinging for days to the fragment of
a mast. Another equally valuable vessel was taken by pirates,
and a third fell into the hands of the enemy's fleet. By land
he was equally unfortunate; his largest warehouse was burnt,
and the Bedouins attacked and plundered a caravan convey-
ing his goods across the desert. So, within a few months, he
sank from the height of wealth and honor to the depths of
poverty and want.
Very different from the splendid mansion they had inhab-
ited in the days of their prosperity, was the quiet country
house to which the merchant and his family removed when
the misfortunes he had met with by sea and land left him a
86






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
ruined and broken man. All the accessories of wealth had
disappeared. There were no extensive pleasure grounds, no
fountains, groves of trees, or ornamental waters. The once
wealthy merchant, whose capital had furnished the means of
employing hundreds of servants, was now reduced to labor
with his sons in the cultivation of their little farm, for on its
produce they mainly depended for their means of subsistence.
Hard as their lot appeared, the three sons manfully met the
reverses of fortune which had befallen them, and both by
word and deed they did all in their power to reconcile all the
members of the family to their sudden change of position.
But with the daughters it was far different; and here was
seen the benefit and advantage derived from habits of indus-
try. The two elder sisters were always fretting about their
losses, and their discontent rendered every privation doubly
hard for themselves, and embittered the lot of the merchant
and his sons. They could not enjoy the plain fare the others
ate with so much relish. They rose late, and spent the day
in bewailing their hard lot; and it is a remarkable thing how
much people find to bemoan when once they set themselves
to complain. The two sisters would sit down, one with her
head in tlie others laVp, crying and sobbing; while Beauty,
the younger sister, would be fully employed spinning; and
always had a smile for her father when he came home wea-
ried from his work. You may depend upon it there is noth-
ing like industry.
Labor is the proper lot of man; and whether it be work
in the fields, or work in the counting-house, or in the study,
it will always bring pleasure to the workman, if it be but
well and zealously done.





BEA UTY AND THE BEAST.
The merchant and his sons worked hard, morning, noon,
and night; and they were so hungry every day when they came
home to dinner, that they ate their frugal meal with keen appe-
tites; and so tired were they when they came from labor at
night, that they slept soundly and peacefully till morning;
whereas, during the time of the merchant's prosperity, he
had often been kept awake at night by anxious thoughts for
the safety of his ships, his warehouses, and his stores of gold
and silver. This thought often entered the merchant's mind,
and a feeling of gratitude for the comforts he still possessed
brought him as near contentment as possible.
Humble as their present residence certainly was, a person
unacquainted with their history would never have imagined
that the contented-looking toilers on the small farm were
persons who had held a high position in society. But the
merchant was a man who had pursued a strictly honest and
honorable course in all his dealings; no stain had been cast
upon his character by his loss of fortune, and having nothing
upon his mind connected with the past to awaken regret or
remorse, he regarded his present position as one still capable
of affording happiness.
But a change came upon their quiet life. One day a
messenger came to the merchant's gate with a most import-
ant letter. It contained great news. A ship, long given up
as wrecked and lost, had safely anchored in a distant port;
and the merchant was desired to go and take possession
without losing a day.
You may fancy what a stir this made in the little house-
hold. The merchant's sons looked hopeful, and the two
sisters were radiant with smiles. They quite gave up their
88






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
cheerful practice of crying in each other's arms, and were full
of plans and projects for the future. Beauty was glad too;
but she smiled because she loved to see her father look happy.
The merchant was happy and pleased at the prospect of re-
gaining a portion of his wealth for his children's sake; and


BEAUTY'S MODEST REQUEST.


he had a hundred projects for giving his daughters pleasure
by the pretty presents he should bring them on his return.
Before he started, he asked each of them in turn what
present he should bring her home with him when he had
received the money for his cargo. I am sorry to say that





BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
the two sisters had quite counted on being asked this ques-
tion, and were ready with a long list of the things they
wanted, chiefly fine dresses and jewels; and their requests
somewhat astonished the merchant, who promised, however,
that they should have what they wanted. Beauty had not
been thinking about herself all this while, and did not know
what to reply, as she had no wish for anything in particular;
so, in order not to disappoint her father's kind intention, she
begged him to bring her a full-blown rose, as there were none
in their garden. The elder sisters laughed in secret over
what they called her stupid choice; but they did not dare
to show their spite openly for fear of their brothers. So the
merchant rode off on a camel he had borrowed from a friend,
and the daughters stood at the door waving their handker-
chiefs and crying "good bye!" But it was Beauty who got
the last kiss.
The merchant's journey was not so prosperous as he had
hoped. The cargo, indeed, had been saved, and the ship was
safe in port; but a law suit had been commenced, and there
was so much to pay that the merchant set out for home not
much richer than he had left it. And it was on his return
that he met with the following tremendous adventure.
He was riding through a wood. Night had fallen, and
he had lost his way, though he fancied he could not be very
far from home. His weary camel still carried him gallantly
on, and he looked anxiously round for any building where he
could find shelter until the next morning; for the rain was
beating down upon him, the wolves howled in the dreary
darkness around, and the very trees seemed to take horrible
spectral forms, and make threatening gestures at him.






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.


T) T



THE TREES TAKE FRIGHTFUL SHAPES.


All at once he saw a light gleaming through the trees.
It proved to be a lamp, hung at the entrance gate to what
seemed to be a park surrounding a palace. WELCOME,
WEARY TRAVELER!" was written up in Eastern characters
over the gate. The merchant rode through the gate, and
following the stately avenue which it opened upon, he found
his way to a large stable, with every convenience for fifty
animals, but quite empty. The merchant put up his camel,
and fed him; and then went to find some one in the palace
which he saw near at hand.
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BEA UTY AND THEI BEAST.


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THE MERCHANT APPROACHES THE PALACE.
The doors were wide open, and he entered the vestibule,
which was very large, and had a basin with a fountain in the
middle; here he sat and washed his feet. Then he went
through many large apartments, all splendidly furnished.
There was no one in them; not even a servant to take care
of the house. But there was a very handsome supper laid
out in one of the rooms; and the merchant sat down, and
after waiting for some time for the host to appear, made a
hearty meal, all alone by himself, and drank his own health
afterward.





BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
In the upper floor were several bed-rooms, with large beds
and handsome wardrobes. In one of these beds the mer-
chant went fast asleep, and never woke till half-past six the
next morning. He felt quite refreshed after his night's rest,
and walked out in the grounds about the palace, in hopes of
meeting the owner. Everything here was in first rate order.
The flower beds were full of beautiful plants, and the walks
clean and hard, and the grass plats soft and smooth as a
velvet carpet. In one bed stood a splendid rose tree in full
bloom. This set the merchant thinking of his daughter
Beauty's wish for a rose: and he selected a very fine one and
plucked it. But the moment after he had done so, he heard
a tremendous roar, and a heavy hand was laid on his shoulder.
He turned, and saw a monster with the body of a man and a
beast's head and claws. The creature stood in a threatening
attitude over him and cried: Ungrateful man!-how dare
you repay my kindness by stealing the only thing I prize,
my beautiful roses ?-Now you shall die !" The merchant, in
utter terror, begged hard for forgiveness, calling the Beast
" my lord," and declaring that he meant no harm, but had
only plucked the rose for his youngest daughter, whom he
loved, and who had wished for one.
I will spare your life on one condition," replied the Beast.
" You must go home, and bring your daughter here in your
stead. If she refuses to come, you must promise faithfully
to be back yourself within three months; and don't call me
'my lord' for I hate flattery, and I am not a lord but a
Beast! (which was true enough). So promise, or die! and
choose quickly !"
The merchant with a heavy heart, consented to the Beast's





BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
conditions, and turned sorrowfully away. Go to the room
you slept in," cried the Beast after him, you may fill a chest
you will find there with anything you like, and carry it away
with you."
The merchant accordingly filled the chest with gold pieces,
and sorrowfully departed. When he reached his own house,


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THE BEAST SURPRISES THE MERCHANT.
his daughters came crowding round to welcome him, and
were struck with the settled melancholy in his face. In
silence he gave the elder sisters the presents he had brought
for them, and then sat down disconsolately on the ground.
The two sisters sat examining their presents, but Beauty
..'-4






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
went to her father, and threw her arms around his neck to
comfort him. Ah my dear Beauty, here is your rose," said
the merchant, but you little know the price your poor father
has promised to pay for it." And he told her everything
just as it had occurred.
The 'elder sisters came up to listen; and of course began
to throw all the blame on poor Beauty. "If the affected
little thing had only asked for presents like ours," they de-
clared, there would have been no such trouble as this, and
our father would not be in danger of his life."
He is not in danger now," answered Beauty quietly, "for
I will go to the Beast and bear the punishment of death in
his stead." The brothers offered to go, and begged hard;
but the merchant knew that the Beast would not be put off,
and that he would be satisfied with no one but Beauty, or
one of her sisters. He had also secret hopes that her life
would be spared; for the Beast's generosity had made him
think that, after all, the monster would not like to sacrifice
the life of a young and innocent creature.
I regret to say that the sisters secretly exulted at Beauty's
apparently sad fate; but the brothers were really and truly
grieved, and kissed their sister heartily before she set out with
her father on their sorrowful journey.
The domain around the Beast's palace was exceedingly
beautiful. Birds with splendid plumage flew about, and sang
merry songs as they built their nests in the thick trees. In
spite of the sorrowful nature of their errand, the two travelers
could not help feeling a little comforted by the beauty of the
scene around them, and the nearer they came to the Beast's
palace, the fresher became the verdure, and the thicker the
95






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
throng of chirping birds, so that it seemed as if Nature were
showing its joy over some happy event.
In due time they reached the palace, which they found
deserted, as on the merchant's first visit. But in the spacious
reception hall a magnificent supper was laid, with covers for
two persons. They sat down to table, but Beauty could hardly
eat a bit for terror, while her father was overwhelmed with
grief, and sighed deeply at each mouthful he took. When
supper was over, a heavy tread was heard sounding along
the corridor; and the door of the room was roughly opened
and the Beast came stalking in. And, Oh! he was far-far
uglier than Beauty had imagined he could possibly be! She
turned pale at the sight of him as he turned toward her and
asked, If she had come to him of her own free will." She
faltered out-" Yes, Beast," and the monster observed in a
softened tone-" Beauty, I am much obliged to you."
This mild behavior on the part of the proprietor some-
what raised the hopes of the merchant, but they were instantly
damped by the Beast's turning toward him, and gruffly com-
manding him to quit the palace, and never to return again
under pain of death. Having given this order in a tone which
showed that he intended to be obeyed, the Beast retired,
with a bow and a good-night to Beauty, and a glance at her
father which seemed to say-" Make haste off."
The merchant departed, after kissing his daughter a hun-
dred times, and weeping bitterly; while she, poor girl, tried
to raise his spirits by feigning a courage she did not feel.
When he was gone, she took a candlestick and wandered
along the corridor in search of her room. She soon came
to a door on which was inscribed in large letters-" BEAUTY'S






BEAUTY AND THE BEAST.
APARTMENT." This proved to be a large room, elegantly fur-
nished with book-cases, sofas, and pictures; and a guitar and
other musical instruments hung against the wall. Beauty
retired to rest; and exhausted with her journey and her grief,
she quickly fell asleep.
Next morning she examined her apartment more closely.
On the first leaf of an album was written her own name:-
" Beauty;" and immediately beneath it stood, in letters of
gold, the following verse:-
Beauteous lady--dry your tears,
Here's no cause for sighs or fears:
Command as freely as you may,
Compliance still attends your way. "
"Ah!" thought the poor girl, "If I might have a wish
granted it would be to see how my poor father is." She
turned as she said it; and in a mirror opposite, to her great
surprise, she saw a picture of her home, as in a magic-lantern
view. The merchant was lying on a couch, distracted with
grief; and Beauty's two sisters were at the window, one of
them sitting on a stool looking listlessly out, and the other
standing by assisting her. At this sad sight poor Beauty wept
bitterly, but after a time she regained her fortitude, and pro-
ceeded into the spacious dining room, where she found a
repast prepared for her as on the preceding day. The Beast,
too, came in, and asked permission to stay and see her eat.
Beauty replied Yes," and all the' while she was making her
repast the Beast sat by, looking at her with eyes of great ad-
miration. He soon began to talk, and astonished the young
lady by the extent of his information on various subjects. At
last he asked her suddenly "if she really thought him so
very, very ugly."
97




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