• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Dedication
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 The little men
 The lambs
 The hen and chickens
 The little plant
 The pigs
 A little boy's walk
 The caterpillar
 All for baby
 The mice
 The squirrel
 The sparrows
 The counting lesson
 Mrs. Pussy's dinner
 How the corn grew
 The mill
 Making bread
 Making butter
 Santa Claus
 Advertising
 Back Cover
 Spine














Title: Finger plays for nursery and kindergarten
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082327/00001
 Material Information
Title: Finger plays for nursery and kindergarten
Physical Description: 80, 4 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill., music ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Poulsson, Emilie, 1853-1939
Bridgman, L. J ( Lewis Jesse ), 1857-1931 ( Illustrator )
Roeske, Cornelia C ( Composer )
Lothrop, Lee, and Shepard Co ( Publisher )
Berwick & Smith ( Printer )
Norwood Press ( Printer )
Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Co.
Place of Publication: Boston
Manufacturer: Berwick & Smith ; Norwood Press
Publication Date: c1893
 Subjects
Subject: Games -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Games with music -- Juvenile poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1893   ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1893   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1893
Genre: Children's poetry
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Norwood
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Emilie Poulsson ; illustrations by L. J. Bridgman ; music by Cornelia C. Roeske.
General Note: "Sixty-fifth thousand."--t.p.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement: p. 1-4 at end.
General Note: Intended for juvenile audience.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy title page: "sixtieth thousand."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082327
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002224588
notis - ALG4854
oclc - 187381995

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Dedication
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Preface
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Table of Contents
        Page 7
        Page 8
    The little men
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    The lambs
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
    The hen and chickens
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The little plant
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The pigs
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
    A little boy's walk
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    The caterpillar
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    All for baby
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    The mice
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    The squirrel
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
    The sparrows
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    The counting lesson
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
    Mrs. Pussy's dinner
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
    How the corn grew
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    The mill
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
    Making bread
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
    Making butter
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
    Santa Claus
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
    Advertising
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
    Spine
        Spine
Full Text






































































The Baldwin Library
r Unvrda
FloB ^





r '
j* ~ r I


OUR NURSERY AND THE DELIGHT WE HAVE IN IT.


Awl.-


-e







FINGER


PLAYS


FOR NURSERY AND KINDERGARTEN





BY
EMILIE POULSSON


ILLUSTRATIONS BY
L. J. BRIDGMAN


MUSIC BY
CORNELIA C. ROESKE


SIXTIETH THOUSAND





BOSTON
LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO.








FINCER PLAYS.
TRADE-MARK
Registered in U. S. Patent Office.



























COPYRIGHT, 1893,
BY
D. LOTHROP COMPANY.

All rights reserved.


Printed by Berwick & Smith, Norwood Press, Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.



































DEDICATED
TO

LITTLE CHILDREN

AT HOME AND IN KINDERGARTEN

BY THEIR FRIEND,

EMILIE POULSSON.












PREFACE.


"WHAT the child imitates," says Froebel, "he begins to understand. Let him
represent the flying of birds and he enters partially into the life of birds. Let him
imitate the rapid motion of fishes in the water and his sympathy with fishes is
quickened. Let him reproduce the activities of farmer, miller and baker, and his
eyes open to the meaning of their work. In one word let him reflect in his play the
varied aspects of life and his' thought will begin to grapple with their significance."
In all times and among all nations, finger-plays have been a delight of childhood.
Countless babies have laughed and crowed over Pat-a-cake and other performances
of the soft little hands; while children of whatever age never fail to find amusement
in playing
Here is the church,
And here's the steeple,
Open the doors,.
And here are the people !"

and others as well known.
Yet it is not solely upon the pleasure derived from them, that finger-plays depend
for their raison d'etre. By their judicious and early use, the development of strength
and flexibility in the tiny lax fingers may be assisted, and dormant thought may re-
ceive its first awakening call through the motions which interpret as well as illustrate
the phase of life or activity presented by the words.
The eighteen finger-plays contained in this book have already, through publica-
tion in BABYLAND, been introduced to their especial public, and have been much used
in homes, though perhaps more in kindergartens. It will readily be seen that while
some of the plays are for the babies in the nursery, others are more suitable for older
children.
A baby-friend, ten months old, plays All for Baby" throughout, pounding and
clapping gleefully with all his might -while children seven or eight years of age
play and sing The Caterpillar," How the Corn Grew and others with very evident
enjoyment





PREFA C.


With a little study of the charming and expressive pictures with which the artist,
Mr. L. J. Bridgman, has so sympathetically illustrated the rhymes, mothers and kinder-
gartners have easily understood what motions were intended. To elucidate still
farther, however, the playing of The Merry Little Men may be thus described:
During the singing of the first verse, the children look about in every direction
for the "little men," but keep the hands hidden. At the beginning of the second
verse, raise both hands to full view with fingers outspread and quiet. At the words,
" The first to come," etc., let the thumbs be shown alone, then the others as named
in turn, till all are again outspread as at the beginning of the second verse. In the
last verse the arms are moved from side to side, hands being raised and fingers
fluttering nimbly all the time. When displaying the busy little men," raise the
hands as high as possible.
The music, composed by Miss Cornelia C. Roeske, will be found melodious and
attractive and especially suited to the voices and abilities of the very young children
for whom it is chiefly intended.
The harmonic arrangement is also purposely simple in consideration of the many
mothers and kindergartners who cannot devote time to preparatory practice.
EMILIE POULSSON.
Boston, 1889.

















CONTENTS.


I

II

I.'




V

vi:

vii:





XI


XII

XIII

XIV

XV

xVi

xVii


I. THE LITTLE MEN .

I. THE LAMBS . .

I. THE HEN AND CHICKENS

7. THE LITTLE PLANT

v. THE PIGS .

I. A LITTLE BOY's WALK

I. THE CATERPILLAR .

1. ALL FOR BABY .

.THE MICE ..

STHE SQUIRREL .

. THE SPARROWS. .

. THE COUNTING LESSON.

.MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER

HOW THE CORN GREW

.THE MILL . .

.MAKING BREAD. .

.MAKING BUTTER .


XVIII. SANTA CLAUS


. . . . 77


PAGE
. . 9
*

'. . 14

17

. . 21

. 25

S ,29

33

* * 37

. 41

. 345

* 49

S 53

* 57

. . 61

. 65

. 69

. 73


























I.

THE LITTLE MEN.





io NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


I.- THE LITTLE MEN.


Oh! where are the merry, merry


To join
And where
To help


Little Men


us in our play?


Share the
us work


busy, busy Little Men
to-day ?


Upon each hand
A little band
For work or play is
The first to come


ready.


Is Master Thumb;
Then Pointer, strong and steady;




NURSERY FINGER PLAYS.


Then Tall Man high;
And just close by
The Feeble Man doth linger;
And last of all,
So fair and small,
The baby- Little Finger. :





rO 1A- AWTALLP





Yes.! here are the merry, merry Little Men
To join us in our play;
And here are the busy, busy Little Men
To help us work to-day. -_-_


k'" 4





THE MERRY LITTLE MEN.


EMILIE POULSSON.


CORNELIA C. RoEsKm.


Oh! wheie are the mer ry,





THE MERRY LITTLE MEN.


UI o 1


N. 1


Tall Man high; And just close by The Fee ble Man doth lin ger; And last of all, So
____ ___ F -____-__


w W w


Sa s b by-L -e F t r

fair and small,The ba by-Lit tie Fin-ger. Yes I here are the mer ry, mer-ry Lit-tle Men To


-fi F -


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~~4L-zzi4E- r~[
~eQ


F f


k -k.-I-n--


TT4ZT .7 0


Sus our p ; And here are the bus y bus y Lit-tle Men To help us work to -__-- day.
join us in our play; And here are the bus y, bus y Lit-tie Men To help us work to day.
EzLL~+I


---i 1- -.* .


I


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e




14 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


II.- THE LAMBS.


This is the meadow where all the long day
Ten little frolicsome lambs are at play. ;:.i


These are the measures the good farmer brings
Salt in, or cornmeal, and other good things.


This is the lambkins' own big water-trough;
Drink, little lambkins, and then scamper off!




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 15


This is the rack where in winter they feed;
Hay makes a very good dinner indeed.


These are the big shears to shear the old sheep;
SDear little lambkins their soft wool may keep.


Here, with its big double doors shut so tight,
This is the barn where they all sleep at night.





THE LAMBS.


EMILIE POULSSON.


CORNELIA C. ROESKE.


1. This is the mead-ow where all the long day Ten lit tie frol-icsome lambs are at play.



I' 1 _
I *-~~-e- LIP ~_


Avr


2 This is the lambkins' own big water-trough;
Drink, little lambkins, and then scamper off!
This is the rack where in winter they feed;
Hay makes a very good dinner indeed.


3 These are the big shears to shear the old sheep;
Dear little lambkins their soft wool may keep.
Here, with its big double doors shut so tight,
This is the barn where they all sleep at night.
























III.

THE HEN AND CHICKENS.





18 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


III.--THE HEN AND CHICKENS.


Good Mother Hen sits here on her nest,
Keeps the eggs warm beneath her soft breast,
Waiting, waiting, day after day.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 19


COOP- ~t -m
Into the coop the mother must go;
But all the chickens run to and fro,
Peep-peep, peep-peep, peeping away.


Here is some corn in my little dish;
Eat, Mother Hen, eat all that you wish,






THE HEN AND CHICKENS,


EMILTE PoULssoN.


CORNELIA C. ROESKE.


Ilk-


1. Good Moth- er Hen sits here on her nest,
2. Hark there's a sound she knows ver y well:
3. Now they're all out, oh, see what a crowd


4 Into the coop the mother must go;
While all the chickens run to and fro,
Peep-peep, peep-peep, peeping away.


5 Here is some corn in my little dish;
Eat, Mother Hen, eat all that you wish,
Picking, picking, picking away.


6 Happy we'll be to see you again,
Dear little chicks and good Mother Hen I
Now good-bye, good-bye for to-day.


I
i

























IV.


THE LITTLE PLANT.





22 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 23


Then the little plant awakes!
Down the roots go creeping.
Up it lifts its little head
Through the brown mould peeping.


\" GR Oc y J-rTNG THE
Or t G RAISE,
f ri5 THUMv1
-rH9 HAND




High and higher still it grows
Through the summer hours,
Till some happy day the buds
Open into flowers.







THE LITTLE PLANT.


EMMLIE POUTLSSON.


C. C. ROESKE.


I,.


1. In my lit tie gardenbed Rak'd so nice ly o ver,
2. Then the lit-tle plant awakes Down the roots go creeping.


;I4.


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Y
1


- ~-i-;-'--~--~---~ I


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) .


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I I



























V.

THE PIGS.





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


I l l.


~F~--- -`--------~-
h
-L
4~L~-~1 ~:
~--=


Piggie Wig and

Hungry pigs as
For their dinner

Down behind th(


Piggie Wee,

pigs could be,
had to wait

Sbarnyard gate.


Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee

Climbed the barnyard gate to see,

Peeping through the gate so high,

But no dinner could they spy.

Ilk- --- ,, ,,- i ,I '. '


PIGS.


THROUGH


26


---
----~- --
-;e




NURSERY- FINGER-PLAYS. 27


Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
Got down sad as pigs could be.;
But the gate soon opened wide
And they scampered forth outside.


Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee, (
What was their delight to see
Dinner ready not far off-
Such a full and tempting trough!


I ;


Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
Greedy pigs as pigs could be,
For their dinner ran pell-mell;
In the trough both piggies fell.


)N
TnELLG-





THE PIGS.


EMILI~ POULJssoN.


CORNELTA C. ROESKE.


Hun-gry pigs as pigs couldbe. For theirdin-nerhad towait

-i ii-----r


Down behind the barn-yard gate.

-K ---Ia


___ ______


.-.- ..3 __ __
rI zzz __ __ ____
____ Izzzz ___


2 Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
Climbed the barn-yard gate to see,
Peeping through the gate so high,
But no dinner could they spy.

8 Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee
Got down sad as pigs could be;
But the gate soon opened wide
And they scampered forth outside.


4 Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
What was their delight to see
Dinner ready not far off -
Such a full and tempting trough 1

5 Piggie Wig and Piggie Wee,
Greedy pigs as pigs could be,
For their dinner ran pell-mell;
In the trough both piggies fell


IL I
























VI.

A LITTLE BOY'S WALK.




30 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


VI. A LITTLE BOY S WALK.

A little boy went walking
One lovely summer's day





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 31


The bridge above the water;
And when he stopped to rest,
He saw among the bushes
A wee ground-sparrow's nest.


- It\ DTHE




THE NEST


And as he watched the birdies
Above the tree-tops fly,
He saw the clouds a-sailing
Across the sunny sky.


ABOVE
S T RE E-
L f 'tif '

V^~u "~~ieTT- '.t --^^-<.


rNN5CT
PLAY IN &


W f=LOWEP.5


2.nC. I nTr: rr


I.C 3daw ilC iC111LLo- dy, liy ,
The flowers that summer brings;
He said, "I'll go tell mamma!
I've seen so many things!"


-r. W


(u
2~~

~h q






EMILIE POULSSON.


A LITTLE BOY'S WALK.


CORNELIA C. ROEBKE.


zp-~ Jf j _____ __


riv er Go wind-ing in and out, And lit- te fish-es in it Were swimming all a-bout.
wa ter;And when he stopped to rest, He saw among the bush es A wee ground-sparrow's nest.
play ing;The flowers that summer brings; He said, "I'll go tell MammalI've seen so man y things."
1 -A. 6- f


--, L. ,-1-
_M- -. L


IUa
























VII.

THE CATERPILLAR.





,4 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 35



SWhen the little caterpillar
SFound his furry coat too tight,
HIMSELF Then a snug cocoon he made him
AWAY
(- Spun of silk so soft and light;
the thumb, Rolled himself away within it-
the.n double
"a.) Slept there day and night.



S'G A HEAD WE SPY 0

S See how this cocoon is stirring!
Now a little head we spy-
What! Is this our caterpillar
Spreading gorgeous wings to dry?
Soon the free and happy creature
Flutters gayly by.

"0'L J






THE CATERPILLAR.


EMILIE POULSSON.


CORNELIA C. ROEBSE.


on the ground! Fuz zy lit. tle cat er pil lar, Nowhere,nowhere to be found,Tho' we've looked and
coat too tight, Then a snug co-coon he made him Spun of silk so .soft and light; Rolled himself a-
head we spy -What! is this our cat er pil lar Spreading gorgeous wings to dry ? Soon the free and
























VIII.

ALL FOR BABY.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


VIII.--ALL


Here's a
Big and
Here is
0, how


FOR BABY.


ball for Baby,,
soft and round!
Baby's harnmer -
he can pound!


Here is Baby's music-
Clapping, clapping so!
Here are Baby's soldiers,
Standing in a row!





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


Here's the Baby's trumpet,
Toot-too-toot! too-too!
Here's the way that Baby


Plays


at Peep-a-boo!"


f, Here's a big umbrella -
Keep the Baby dry!
S Here's the Baby's cradle-
Rock-a-baby-by!


a





ALL FOR BABY.


EMILIE POULSSON.


CORNELIA C. ROESKE.


1. Here's a ball for Ba by, Big and soft and round! Here is Ba by's ham-mer -






2,, -1--- __ __-____-_- _:p=t -_, Ii


2 Here is Baby's music
Clapping, clapping so!
Here are Baby's soldiers,
Standing in a row !


3 Here's the Baby's trumpet,
Toot-too-toot! too-too!
Here's the way that Baby
Plays at "Peep-a-boo !"


4 Here's a big umbrella -
Keeps the Baby dry!
Here's the Baby's cradle-
Rock-a-baby by!

























IX.

THE MICE.




42 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


43


But the big round eyes of the wise old cat
See what the five little mice are at. A


Quickly she jumps !-but the
And hide in their snug little


mice run away,
holes all day.


"Feasting in pantries may be very nice;
But home is the best!" say the five little mice.


.%i)UN-
\'AWAY"

Suddenly, LPounce oP the
ca.E]-R ih b ha.ac
jErougkt Lakimen tke
b a.ck LM ice r un. away


H OM


-





EMILIE POULSSOiN.


FIVE LITTLE MICE.


CORNELIA C. ROESIME.


SFive lit-tle mice on the pan try floor,
1 big round eyes of the wise old cat


12
Fe i i
,I"Feasting in pan tries may be ver -y nice; But home is the best! "say the five lit te niice.

~^I :zz00 = -m^ 1
= -^s =q^ s= E^3=^ =^























X.

THE SQUIRREL.





16 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


X. -THE SQUIRREL.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


"Little squirrel, I will bring '
In my basket here
Every day a feast of nuts!
Come, then, squirrel dear."

But the little squirrel said
From his hollow tree:
"Oh! no, no! I'd rather far
Live here and be free!"






j' "%"{ -

So my cage is empty yet,
And the wheel is still;
But my little basket here
Oft with nuts I fill.

SIf you like, I'll crack the nuts,
Some for you and me,
For -the squirrel has enough
_. X D In his hollow tree.





THE SQUIRREL.
EMILIE PourssoN.























XI.

THE SPARROWS.





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


"Here is some water,
Sparkling and clear;
Come, little sparrows,
Drink without fear.


"If you are tired,
Here is a nest;
Wouldn't you like to
Come here to rest?"


*


S All the brown sparrows
Flutter away,
Chirping and singing,
"We cannot stay;

"For in the tree-tops,
'Mong the gray boughs,
There is the sparrows'
Snug little house."


K, W A


30,


a


AV


.4 .


v9~





THE SPARROWS.


EMILJE POULSSON.


C. C. RoESKE.


1. "Lit tie brown spar rows, Fly,- ing a round,
2. "Here is some wa ter, Spark-ling and clear;
3. All the brown spar rows Flut ter a way,


Up in the tree -.tops,
Come, lit tie spar rows,
Chirp-ing and sing ing,
N ..


F1 W1 t--rwi 1 -i


-I


A _-- -- k N ._ r- -- ,I



























-. r



XII.. .

THE COUNTING LESSON.





'~~P. E.' 'l,' *'i.fi:





NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


XII. THE COUNTING LESSON.


(Rizkt hand.)
Here is the beehive.


Where are the


Hidden away where nobody sees.
Soon they come creeping out of
One!- two!- three! four! five!


bees ?


the hive-





(Left hand.)
Once I saw an ant-hill
With no ants about;
So I said, "Dear little ants,
Won't you please come out?"
Then as if the little ants
Had heard my call-
One! two! three! four! five came out!
And that was all!


&WtlL


as-- ^(-^^s-


J1 -


ANT-HILL 55
5X 410


W'1'
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~ ~L;al


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;6 THE COUNTING LESSON.
EMn E POULssoN.
-/ 1ST VERSE.

fcj"-I- I_-+


C. C. ROESKZ.


LU__d


1. Here is the beehive.Where are the bees ? Hid-den a way where no-bod- y sees.
4-- -4- ---4- 4. -0- 0- -B-
_ F I


Ujl


on/ T t .-.
Soon they come creep-ing out of the hive One!- two! three!, four! five!

--f Il .- .-. .- -


I I


ND VERSE.
z ----N -


2. Once I saw an ant hill With no ants a bout;


So I said,


L~rnzfz


i.-,


'-U-


F


I= t-


h-\l


Av-S-W-9
























XIII.

MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.




58 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


XIII.- MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.

Mrs. Pussy, sleek and fat,
With her kittens four,
Went to sleep upon the mat
By the kitchen door.


R4W




1E i UMFD


Mrs. Pussy heard a noise-


Up she jumped


in glee:


"Kittens, maybe that's a mouse!


Let


us go


and see!"


A~ anZ
$'


CFi~pN&


C-a r-(,J2


(lefthand) fA~1
44) HOL,


a I:.


Creeping, creeping, creeping on,
Silently they stole;
But the little mouse had gone
Back within its hole.


MiR). 5US 5y
(7ight han4)


Ils~




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 59

STHE "Well," said Mrs. Pussy then, -:- .
( .i "To the barn we'll go; .
SWe shall find the swallow there TAN
Flying to and fro."




So the cat and kittens four
Tried their very best;
But the swallows flying fast
Safely reached the nest!
/







S And her kittens four;
Found their dinner on a plate
By the kitchen door.
S;As they gathered round the plate,
They agreed 'twas nice
.i e That it could not run away
Like the birds and mice !
~ ~ i *B th kItce or




MRS. PUSSY'S DINNER.


EMMnC PoULssoN


C. C. ROEsxz.


_._ -isrnz-- -- i --T- !i


1. Mrs. Pus-sy, sleek and fat, With her kittens four,










Went to sleep up on the mat By the kitchen door.

-006^=^ ^^=^ f


2 Mrs. Pussy heard a noise -
Up she jumped in glee:
Kittens, maybe that's a mouse!
Let us go and see! "

3 Creeping, creeping, creeping on,
Silently they stole;
But the little mouse had gone
Back within its hole.

4 "Well, said Mrs. Pussy then,
"To the barn we'll go;
We shall find the swallows there
Flying to and fro. "


5 So the cat and kittens four
Tried their very best;
But the swallows flying fast
Safely reached the nest

6 Home went hungry Mrs. Puss
And her kittens four;
Found their dinner on a plate
By the kitchen door.

7 As they gathered round the plate,
They agreed 'twas nice
That it could not run away
Like the birds and mice!























XIV.

HOW THE CORN GREW.




52 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


XIV. -HOW THE CORN GREW.


There was a field that waiting lay,
All hard and brown and bare;
There was a thrifty farmer came
And fenced it in with care.


-7HARROW
STHE PLOW

SThen came a plowman with his plow;
From early until late,
Across the field and back again,
He plowed the furrows straight.

The harrow then was brought to make
The ground more soft and loose;
a. ..'.. And soon the farmer said with joy,
r 1, "i My field is fit for use."
J ^ ,,, I __________


-I




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 63


For many days the farmer then
Was working with his hoe;
And little Johnny brought the corn
And dropped the kernels--so!

And there they lay, until awaked
By tapping rains that fell,
Then pushed their green plumes up
to greet
The sun they loved so well.


-D.AO'PPD
THE KERNELS


GR-mN PL!VIES p


Then flocks and flocks of hungry crows
Came down the corn to taste;
But ba-ang! went the farmer's gun
And off they flew in haste.
Then grew and grew the corn, until,
When autumn days had come,
With sickles keen they cut it down,
And sang the "Harvest Home."


I v~fiwffi


TnHOE.






HOW THE CORN GREW.


EMILIE POULSSON.


CORNELLI C. RoSKBI.


1. There was a field that wait ing lay, All hard and brown and bare; There










was a thrif ty farm er came And fenced it in with care, There







wh- --- e- _re.

was a thrif ty farm er came And fenced it in with care.


h1 =


2 Then came a ploughman with his plough;
From early until late,
Across the field and back again,
He ploughed the furrows straight.
3 The harrow then was brought to make
The ground more soft and loose;
And soon the farmer said with joy,
"My field is fit for use."
4 For many days the farmer then
Was working with his hoe;
And little Johnny brought the corn
And dropped the kernels so!


5 And there they lay, until awaked
By tapping rains that fell,
Then pushed their green plumes up to greet
The sun they loved so well.
6 Then flocks and flocks of hungry crows
Came down the corn to taste;
But ba-ang! went the farmer's gun,
And off they flew in haste.
7 Then grew and grew the corn, until,
When autumn days had come,
With sickles keen they cut it down,
And sang the "Harvest Home."













i










XV.

THE MILL.




66 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


UR$ERYF NGERpLAY$


i M


merry
Went


little river


singing


Until it reached


day by day,
a mill-dam


That stretched across its


And there


it spread its waters,


A quiet pond, to wait
Until the busy miller


Should


lift the water-gate.


Then, hurrying through the gateway,
The dashing waters found
A mighty millwheel waiting,


it swiftly round.


way.


I '


And turned




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


But faster turned the millstones
Up in the dusty mill,,
And quickly did the miller
--- ------- -
With corn the hopper fill. ,

And faster yet and faster MILLS
The heavy stones went round,
Until the golden kernels
To golden meal were ground.

"Now fill the empty hopper
With wheat," the miller said;
"We'll grind this into flour
To make the children's bread."




And still, as flowed the water,
The mighty wheel went round;
And still, as turned the millstones,
The corn and grain'were ground.

And busy was the miller
The livelong day, until
The water-gate he fastened,
And silent.grew the mill.






THE MILL.


EMMLI POULSSON.


5 k.- -


- h-P--------- --I-4---- -~. I ---I i I "-


49-


1. A mer ry lit tie riv er Went sing-ing day by day,

N -e -t A
ss : .- -- i- r- -- i j -- f -- --- T i N -


__ I ~ V


Un til it reached a

-$_- ,--


H--~-~-t I-


mill- dam That stretched a- cross its way. And there it spread its wa ters, A
A ______-*


-7 -4P-






qui et pond,to wait Un til the bu sy mil ler Should lift the wa- ter gate.

4, N-_ A___ -- -_:


N -~
-4


V --


2 Then, hurrying through the gateway,
The dashing waters found
A mighty millwheel waiting-
And turned it swiftly round.
But faster turned the millstone
Up in the dusty mill,
And quickly did the miller
With corn the hopper fill.
3 And faster yet and faster
The heavy stones went round,
Until the golden kernels
To golden meal were ground.


Now, fill the empty hopper
With wheat," the miller said;
We'll grind this into flour
To make the children's bread."
4 And still, as flowed the water,
The mighty wheel went round;
And still, as turned the millstones,
The corn and grain were ground.
And busy was the miller
The livelong day, until
The water gate he fastened,
And silent grew the mill.


CORNELTA C. ROESKE.


K'


hLL\~


C-C-~- ~ --Of


6


Ra I. f I


4






















XVI.

MAKING BREAD.




70 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


XVI. MAKING BREAD.


"The farmer and the miller
Have worked," the mother said,
"And got the flour ready,
So I will make the bread."
She scooped from out the barrel
The flour white as snow,
And in her sieve she put it
And shook it to and fro.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 71

Then in the pan of flour
A little salt she threw; PASALT
A cup of yeast she added, (
And poured in water, too. SH
To mix them all together
She stirred with busy might, P c V
Then covered it and left it Ti'i' .R,
Until the bread was light. /'



'ING







More flour then she sifted
And kneaded well the dough,
And in the waiting oven
V The loaves of bread did go.
KNEAbNG TURNED The mother watched the baking,
THE
LOAVES And turned the loaves, each one,
S .-- j Until at last, rejoicing,
She said, "My bread is done!"





MAKING BREAD.


EMIIE POULSSON.


i-N--N---I--i-_------- -_--- ----- -----
__ -5- --- -e *_-. "" T T "" -, -e -- -^ --.
flo-ur white as snow, And in her sieve she put it And shook it to and fro.

i l I 7.=17 7I


2 Then in the pan of flour
A little salt she threw;
A cup of yeast she added,
And poured in water, too.
To mix them all together
She stirred with busy might,
Then covered it and left it
Until the bread was light.


3-1-=-I--IO-=H -----I---


3 More flour then she sifted
And kneaded well the dougu,
And in the waiting oven
The loaves of bread did go.
The mother watched the baking,
And turned the loaves, each one.
Until at last, rejoicing,
She said, My bread is done!"


LI ~L~I_l


C. C. ROESKE.


I m


I I























XVII.

MAKING BUTTER.




74 NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS.


XVII. MAKING BUTTER.




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 75


Press, press, press;
All the milk must be
From the golden butter now
Pressed out carefully


-IIOWL













or pre- Make it smooth and round.
See! the roll of butter's done-
Aft --- Won't you buy a pound?
O_ BSJ^ .UTTER
"AT, PATI PAT1" Taste, oh! taste,
This is very nice;
^REAE.INC Spread it on the children's bread,
SGive them each a slice.




76 MAKING BUTTER.
Ehmnai POULssoN. C. C. ROESKE.




1. Skim, skim, skim, With the skim -mer bright;









Take the rich and yel low cream, Leave the milk so white.





2 Churn, churn, churn,
Now 'tis churning day;
Till the cream to butter turn
Dasher must not stay.

3 Press, press, press;
All the milk must be
From the golden butter now
Pressed out carefully.

4 Pat, pat, pat,
Make it smooth and round.
See I the roll of butter's done -
Won't you buy a pound?

5 Taste, oh! taste,
This is very nice.
Spread it on the children's bread,
Give them each a slice-
I























XVIII.

SANTA CLAUS.







78 NURSE


RY FINGER-PLAYS.


XVIII.-- SANTA CLAUS.


"'~
~`" ---- '-II
." ~'' *
'~''*' ~L~i~ rI1~1-

..

I
.;.
:.::r :-
r' "~
:
'~ X
-


c




NURSERY FINGER-PLAYS. 7


Our stockings we'll hang,
And while we're asleep
Then down through the chimney
Will Santa Claus creep


He'll empty his pack,
Then up he will come
And, calling his reindeer,
Will haste away home.


Sg CCLAi


Then clap, clap the hands!
And sing out with glee,
For Christmas is coming
And merry are we!


4 -= S ~ ~ ~C






EMILIE POULSSON.


SANTA CLAUS.


CORNELIA C. ROESKE.


Sc t h si u wi g
1. O,clap, clap the hands,And sing out with glee For
2. O,clap, clap the hands,And sing out with glee! For
3. O,clap, clap the hands,And sing out with glee! For


I i4i~


Ij I* rd I ,_ I I I:
- -- A -- -
-- -- -- *'1 7_ ^ 1 -- | --- I ------- L --- ---- | -- ---- L _


I I


I -


I I







THROUGH THE FARMYARD GATE.


1Rhbmes anb. stories for little Cbilbren at 1bome anb in 1kinbergarten.
By EMILIE POULSSON.

4to, Cloth. Illustrated by L. J. Bridgman. $1.50.

ISS POULSSON'S name is known in every kindergarten
THROUGH THE Vi in the land. As a practical kindergartener, as the
AR M YA R D author of "Nursery Finger Plays and In the Child's
Af I A World," and as a charming writer for the little ones, she has
Established a
o reputation
7 that assures a z
readywelcome rnd
l" to any new
work from her
n pen. The sales
i POU550ON of her delight-
EMILE ful "Nursery
F inger Plays"
have been
enormous, and
an equal suc-
cess should attend this new volume, Through
the Farmyard Gate." Primarily it teaches
love for animals; indeed, the characters il ..
the verses and stories are the dear friends -
about the farmyard gate. But, more than









f


this, it furnishes reading matter and subject
for talk, both in the nursery and the kinder-
garten; while the pictures of Mr. Bridgman,
whose drawings gave so much effect to Miss Poulsson's "Finger Plays," add life' and attrac-
tiveness to the "Farmyard Gate."


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON.






HE FIVE LITTLE FINGER STORIES.
Se A BOOK FOR CHILDREN
BY LCGY HRITILTON W7nRNER.
4to, cloth, with unique original illustrations, P1.25.

There can never be too many stories for children, if only they are
interesting and helpful; but a variation of the old style is especially wel-
come for its novelty, and will stand a chance of longer engaging the child's
attention. "The Five Little Finger Stories" are
designed to meet this want of something fresh
and original, and will readily commend them-
selves to children on that account.
The fingers and the thumb each tells its own
stories, these stories being quaint little fancies :-. .
about fairies and elves, and entertaining stories '. .:.".


j~ 'I/


about pet animals, with an occasional autobiogra-
phy from one of them, as in Woggie's Wonders,"
which is the story of a frog from the beginning of
its career. "The Clothes-line Imps," "The Broom
Fairies," May's Musical Bars," Who lives in
Mamma's Work Bag ? "Mr. and Mrs. Flyaway
'At Home,"' are some of the other stories of this
fascinating volume, which is full of droll conceits,
and yet conveys many hints to make children more
kind to animals, more ready to help others, as well
nature.


as more observant of the wonders of


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON.






WHAT THE DRAGON FLY TOLD THE CHILDREN.


By FRANCES BELL COURSE.


One vol., 4to, illustrated, $1.50.


" O interest children in
poetry, especially the
poetry of nature, is not al-
ways readily accomplished;
and yet nearly all children
are poetic, and have a natural
love of rhyme and the melody
of verse. Miss Coursen is of
the opinion that children early d
in life can be brought to love
the great poets and their
works. As a step toward this
end she has made a slender
little story of summer days in the country the medium by which to introduce into the
narrative, and bring to the attention of young children, the work of some of our greatest
poets. A buzzing, gossipy' dragon fly darting in and out among the summer flowers,
itself the very poetry of motion, is the introducer. And he does his work so deftly that
before the summer is over the boys and girls are delighted
students of the famous English poets. The idea is novel
and the plan unique. The book is beautifully illustrated
with many pictures and decorations, among them small
portraits of the leading English and American poets from
Chaucer to Tennyson and Longfellow. A daintier and
more delightful book would be hard to find for a child's
hand; while its influence in the way of education, taste,
culture, and poetical discrimination must be instant and last-
ing upon the young minds and the investigating eyes be-
fore which it is brought.


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON.





FIGURE DRAWING FOR CHILDREN.

BY CFROLINE HUNT RI2II7WMER.

Quarto, cloth, P1.25; decorated with an appropriate and beautiful design in inks and
gold, illustrated with charming frontispiece of Baby Neptune" from bas-relief by the
author, and with numerous other appropriate cuts. . .


0 one, surely, could be found better qualified to interest and
guide children in art than Caroline Hunt Rimmer, herself a
deft and delightful illustrator of child life and child ways. In
this new book, which she terms "Figure Drawing for Children,"
Miss Rimmer essays to teach pleasantly, and in a series of brief
lessons, the art of figure drawing so that the child who has any
aptitude for handling a Faber HH can, in the fewest lines and
most correct proportions, draw the pictures of other children.
SAll this may sound like a text book, but it is not. The book
is direct, simple, suggestive and practical, but it is never dry;
while the wealth of technical and decorative illustrations that fills its pages .gives proof of
Miss Rimmer's ability to draw as well as to instruct, and is certain to catch the wandering
eye and chain the restless fancies of the young artist whose hand is ever
ready to attempt what the untrained eye cannot, uninstructed, perform.
As a home help the book is invaluable. The papers of which it is com-
posed are of especial value to all interested in.the .development of art
among the children, and are steps toward excellence in drawing which any.
child who loves to draw can, with home oversight, certainly take. The
twelve chapters of the book deal with : Proportions of the child-figure;
action by means of single lines; age and action in the single-line figure; the
solid form; the solid form, side and back; action in the solid figure; the
head front view; the head side view; the head--back.view and expres-
sion; the arm, fore-arm and hand; the thigh, leg and foot; foreshortening
and composition. These lessons in drawing are emphasized and explained
by simple diagrams and illustrations, and the unique and attractive volume
is at once a picture-book and a drawing-book,
S' a volume on art and a storehouse of sugges-
Stions that will prove a boon whenever the
active brain and busy hand of children with
the taste for drawing seek for subject or
occupation.
The book has been carefully compiled
and dressed, and is beautifully printed, at-
tractively bound and delightfully illustrated. The frontispiece and other decorative cuts are
excellent specimens of Miss Rimmer's most effective work.


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON.







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