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 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Aladdin
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Group Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp : a gift for all seasons
Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082162/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aladdin, or, The wonderful lamp a gift for all seasons
Physical Description: 48 p. : ;
Language: English
Creator: Zieber, George B ( Publisher )
Darley, Felix Octavius Carr, 1822-1888 ( Illustrator )
Grossman and Worley ( Printer )
Publisher: George B. Zieber
Place of Publication: Philadelphia
Manufacturer: Grossman and Worley
Publication Date: 1847
 Subjects
Subject: Bldn -- 1847
Genre: fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with fifteen exquisite illustrations on wood engraved by Brightly, Gilbert, Gihon, Waitt, and Downes ; from original design by Darley ; edited by Lawrence Lovechild.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082162
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001724466
oclc - 25812035
notis - AJD6984

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Frontispiece
        Frontispiece
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Preface
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Aladdin
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 36a
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 42a
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Back Cover
        Back Cover
Full Text



























































































The Baldwin Library
f UnivTsmity
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V.>








ALADDIN;


OR



THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


A GIFT FOR ALL SEASONS.




WITH FIFTEEN EXQUISITE ILLUSTRATIONS ON WOOD, ENGRAVED BY
BRIGHTLY, GILBERT, GIHON, WAITT, AND DOWNES,
FROM ORIGINAL DESIGNS BY
DARLEY.



EDITED BY LAWRENCE LOVECHILD.




PHILADELPHIA:
GEORGE B. ZIEBER.
1847.



































Entered according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1846, by

SGEORGE B. ZIEBER,

in the office of the Clerk of the District Court of the United States, in and for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania.


E, B. MEARS. STERE.OTYPER.


CROSSMAN AND WOR.LEY, PRINTERS.
















PREFACE.


THE Arabian Nights' Entertainments are perhaps the only series of
stories that give a correct view of ancient Oriental manners and customs.
Some of the tales, however, have become more popular than others.
Among the most noted, that of ALADDIN stands deservedly pre-eminent.
Translated into almost every language, it has obtained a high rank in all.
It has been dramatized, we know not how frequently, and, at the same
time, has served as a theme for innumerable poets. The thousand
ways in which it has become known, have rendered it as familiar as a
household word; while, with the rest of the series, it has grown classic,
and obtained with them a place in almost every well-selected library.
Many of the romances, however, though innocent to maturer age, are cal-
culated to awaken ideas and create impressions in early youth which
parents might consider objectionable. ALADDIN, however, had very few
lfults of the kind, and revised, modified, and corrected, as it has been in
the present edition, has become a highly-wrought moral story, calculated
to produce a pleasing and permanent effect. Children are always poets,
and whatever assimilates itself to their tone of mind must necessarily







iv PREFACE.

create a strong sympathetic impression. Truth, therefore, may be clothed
in the garb of romance, without losing any of its characteristics, while-
the dress it wears never fails to invest it with additional charms. Over-
careful parents might suggest that the machinery of Oriental stories is
fabulous-that such beings as Genii never existed, and that magic and
necromancy are exploded propositions; but children are almost as well
aware of the fact as themselves. Where they are not, a word will set
them right; and the opportunity of explanation is one every parent
should grasp at; for early instruction on such a subject can never be
eradicated.













ALADDIN;

OR

THE WONDERFUL LAMP.




IN the capital of one of the richest and most extensive kingdoms of
Cathay, the name of which does not at this moment occur, there lived a
tailor, whose name was Mustafa, who had no other distinction than that
of his trade. This tailor was very poor, as the profits of his trade barely
produced enough for himself, his wife, and a son, with whom God had
blessed him, to subsist upon.
Mustafa's son, whose name was Aladdin, had been brought up in a
very negligent manner, and had been left so much to himself, that le had
contracted the most vicious habits of idleness and mischief, and had no
reverence for the commands of his father or mother. Before lie had
passed the years of childhood, his parents could no longer keep him in the
house. He generally went out early in the morning, and spent the whole
day in playing in the public streets with other boys about the same age,
who were as idle as himself.
Arrived at an age when he was old enough to learn a trade, his father,
who was unable to have him taught any other than that lie himself fol-
lowed, took him to his shop, and began to show him how le should use
his needle. But neither kindness nor the fear of punishment was able to







ALADDIN; OR


restrain his volatile and restless disposition; nor could his father, by
any method, make him satisfied with what he was about. No sooner
was Mustafa's back turned, than Aladdin was off, and returned no more
during the whole day. His father continually chastised him, yet still
Aladdin remained incorrigible; and Mustafa, to his great sorrow, was
obliged to abandon him to his idle, vagabond kind of life. This conduct
of his son gave him great pain, and the vexation of not being able to in-
duce him to pursue a proper and reputable course of life, brought on so
obstinate and fatal a disease, that at the end of a few months it put an
end to his existence.
As-Aladdin's mother saw that her son never would follow the trade
of his father, she shut up his shop, and converted all his stock and imple-
ments of trade into money, upon which, added to what she could earn by
spinning cotton, she and her son subsisted.
Aladdin, now no longer restrained by dread of his father, and regard-
ing whatever his mother might say, so little, that he even threatened her
with violence, whenever she attempted to remonstrate with him, gave
himself completely up to a life of indolence and licentiousness. IHe con-
tinued to associate with persons of his own age, and was fonder than ever
of entering into all their tricks and fun. He pursued this course of life till
he was fifteen years old, without showing the least spark-of understanding
of any sort, and without making the least reflection upon what was to be
his future lot. He was in this state, when, as he was one day playing
with his companions in one of the public places, as was his usual custom,
a stranger, who was going by, stopped and looked at him.
This stranger was in fact, a noted and learned magician, called, for
distinction, the African Magician. And indeed he was so styled with the
greater propriety, as he was a native of Africa, and had arrived from that
part of the world only two days before.
Whether this magician, who was well skilled in physiognomy, had re-
marked in the countenance of Aladdin the signs of such a disposition as
was best adapted to the purpose for which he had undertaken so long a







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


journey, or not, is uncertain; but he very adroitly made himself acquainted
with his family, discovered who he was, and the sort of character and dis-
position he possessed. He'was no sooner informed of what he wished,
than he went up to the yoong man, and taking him to a little distance
from his companions, he asked him if his father were not called Mustafa,
and a tailor by trade. Yes, sir," replied Aladdin, but he has been dead
this long time."
At this speech the African magician threw his arms around Aladdin's
neck, embraced and kissed him for some time, while the tears seemed to
run from his eyes, and his bosom to heave with sighs. Aladdin, who
observed him, asked him what reason he had to weep. "Alas! my
child," replied the magician, how can I do otherwise? I am your uncle;
for your father was my most excellent brother. I have been several years
upon my journey, and at the very instant of my arrival in this place, and
when I was congratulating myself in the hopes of seeing him, and giving
him joy on my return, you inform me of his death. Can I then be so un-
feeling as not to be sensible to the most violent grief, when I thus find
myself deprived of all my expected consolation? What, however, in a
small degree alleviates my affliction is, that as far as my recollection
carries me, I discover many traces of your father in your countenance,
and I have not in fact been deceived in having addressed myself to you."
He then asked Aladdin, putting at the same time his hand into his purse,
where his mother lived; and as soon as he was answered, the African
magician gave him a handful of small money, and said to him, My
son, go to your mother, make my respects to her, and tell her that I will
come and see her to-morrow, if I have an opportunity; in order to afford
myself the consolation of seeing the spot where my good brother lived so
many years, and where he at last finished his career."
The African magician had no sooner quitted his new-created nephew,
than Aladdin ran to his mother, highly delighted with the money his sup-
posed uncle had given him. "Pray tell me, mother," he cried, the instant
of his arrival, "whether I have not an uncle ?"-" No, my child," replied







ALADDIN; OR


she, you have no uncle, either on your poor father's side or mine."-" I
have, however, just left a man," answered the boy, who told me he was
my father's brother, and my uncle. Oie even cried and embraced me,
when I told him of my father's death. And to prove to you that he spoke
the truth," added he, showing her the money which he had received, see
what he has given me. He bid me also be sure and give his kindest re-
membrances to you, and to say that he would, if he had time, come and
see you himself to-morrow, as he was desirous of beholding the house
where my father lived and died."-" It is true, indeed, my son," replied
Aladdin's mother, "that your father had a brother, but he has been dead
a long time, and I never heard him even mention any other." After this
conversation, they said no more on the subject.
The next day the African magician again accosted Aladdin, while he
was playing in some other part of the city, with three other boys. iHe
embraced him as before, and putting two pieces of gold into his hand,
"Take this, my boy," said he, "and carry it to your mother. Tell her,
that I intend to come and sup with her this evening, and that this is for
her to purchase what is necessary for us to regale ourselves with; but
first inform me in what quarter of the city I shall find your house."
Aladdin gave him the necessary information, and the magician took his
departure.
Aladdin, carried the two pieces of gold to his mother, and when he had
told her of his supposed uncle's intentions, she went out and procured a
large supply of good provisions. And as she was unprovided with a suf-
ficient quantity of china or earthenware, she went and borrowed what
she might want of her neighbours. She was busily employed, during the
whole day, in preparing for night; and in the evening, when everything
was ready, she desired Aladdin, as his uncle might not know where to
find the house, to go out into the street, and if he should see him, to show
him the way.
Although Aladdin had pointed out to the magician the exact situation
of his mother's house, he was nevertheless very ready to go, and at the








THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


very moment that he was at the door, he heard some person knock.
Aladdin instantly opened it, and saw the African bringing several bottles
of wine in his hand, and several sorts of fruit for them all to regale with.
He had no sooner given to Aladdin all the things that he had brought,
than he paid his respects to his mother, and requested her to show him
the place where his brother Mustafa was accustomed to sit upon the sofa.
She had no sooner pointed it out, than he immediately prostrated himself
before it; kissed the place several times, while the tears seemed to run ii
abundance from his eyes. My poor brother," he exclaimed, how min
fortunate am I not to have arrived time enough to have received your
embraces once more before you died!" The mother of Aladdin begged
this pretended brother to sit in the place her husband used to occupy, but
he would by no means hear of it. No !" he cried, I will take care how
I do that: give me leave, however, to seat myself opposite, that if I am
deprived of the pleasure of seeing him here in person, sitting like the father
of a family that is so dear to me, I may at least look at the spot, as if he
were present." Aladdin's mother pressed him no farther, but permitted
him to take whatever seat he chose.
When the African magician had placed himself where he liked, he
began to enter into a conversation with Aladdin's mother. Do not be
surprised, my good sister," he said, at never having seen me during the
whole of the time you have been married to my late brother, Mustafa, of
happy memory. It is full forty years since I left this country, of which I
am a native, as well as himself. In the course of this long period, I first
travelled through India, Persia, Arabia, Syria, and Egypt; and after
passing some considerable time in all the finest and most remarkable cities
in those countries, I went into Africa, where I resided for a great length
of time. At last, as it is the natural disposition of man, how distant soever
he may be from the place of his birth, never to forget his native country,
nor lose the recollection of his family, his friends, and the companions of
his youth, the desire of seeing mine, and of once more embracing my dear
2







ALADDIN; OR


brother, took so powerful a hold of my mind, that I felt myself sufficiently
bold and strong again to undergo the fatigue of so long a journey. I in-
stantly, therefore, set about all the necessary preparations, and began my
travels. It is useless to mention the length of time I was thus employed,
the various obstacles I had to encounter, and all the fatigue I suffered,
before I arrived at the end of my labours. Nothing, however, so much
mortified me, or gave me so much pain, in all my travels, as the intelli-
gence of the death of my poor brother, whom I so tenderly loved, and
whose memory I must ever regard with a respect truly fraternal. I have
traced almost every feature of his countenance in the face of my nephew
and it was this that enabled me to distinguish him from the other young
persons with whom he was. He can inform you in what manner I received
the melancholy news that my brother no longer lived. We must, how-
ever, praise God for all things; and I console myself in finding him again
alive in his son, who thus preserves his most remarkable features."
The African magician, who perceived that Aladdin's mother was very
much affected at this conversation about her husband, and that the recol-
lection of him renewed her grief, changed the subject; and turning towards
Aladdin, he asked him his name. "I am called Aladdin," he answered.
" Well then, Aladdin," said the magician, what do you employ yourself
about? Are you acquainted with any trade ?"
At this speech Aladdin hung down his head, and was much discon-
certed.: butt his mother, seeing this, answered for him. "Aladdin," she
said, "is a very idle boy. His father did all he could, while he was alive,
to make im learn his business, but he could not accomplish it; and since
his death,'in spite of everything I can say, he will learn nothing, but lead
the idle life of a vagabond, though I talk to him on the subject every day
of my life. He spends all his time at play with other boys, as you saw
him, without considering that he is no longer a child; and if you cannot
make him ashamed of himself, and profit by your advice, I shall utterly
despair that he will ever be good for anything. He knows very well, that







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


quaintance since his arrival, and whom he had now invited to partake of
a repast, in order to introduce his pretended nephew to them.
The entertainment was not over till the evening. Aladdin then
wished to take leave of his uncle, and go home; the African magician,
however, would not suffer him to go alone, but went himself, and con-
ducted him back to his mother's. When she saw her son so handsomely
dressed, she was transported with joy. She continued to bestow a thou-
sand blessings on the magician, who had been at so great an expense on
her dear child's account. Generous relation," she exclaimed, "I know
not how to thank you enough for your great liberality. My son, I am
aware, is not worthy of so much generosity; and he will be wicked indeed
if he ever prove ungrateful to you, or does not conduct himself so as to
deserve and be an ornament to the excellent situation you are about to
place him in. For my part," added she, I thank you with my whole
soul; may you live many happy years, and witness my son's gratitude,
who cannot prove his good intentions better than by following your
advice."
Aladdin," replied the magician, is a good boy. He seems to pay
attention to what I say. I have no doubt but we shall make him what
we wish. I am sorry for one thing, and that is, that I am not able to
perform all my promises to-morrow. It is Friday, and on that day all
the shops are shut; and it is impossible either to hire one, or furnish it
with goods, because all the merchants are absent, and engaged in their
several amusements. We will, however, settle all this business on Satur-
day; and I will come here to-morrow to take Aladdin, and show him the
public gardens, in which people of reputation constantly walk and amuse
themselves. He has, probably, hitherto been ignorant of the way in
which they pass their time there. He has associated only with boys, but
he must now learn to live with men." The magician then took his leave,
and departed. In the meantime, Aladdin, who was delighted at seeing
himself so well dressed, was still more pleased at the idea of going to the
gardens in the environs of the city. He had never been withoutsidc of
B







, ALADDIN; OR


the gates, nor seen the neighboring country, which was in fact very
beautiful and attractive.
The next morning Aladdin got up and dressed himself very early, in
order to be ready to set out the moment his uncle called for him. After
waiting some time, and which he thought an age, he became so impatient,
that he opened the door and stood on the outside to watch for his arrival.
The moment he saw him coming, he went and informed his mother of it,
took leave of her, shut the door, and ran to meet him.
The magician behaved in the most affectionate manner to Aladdin.
"Come, my good boy," said he, with a smile, "I will to-day show you
some very fine things." He conducted him out at a gate that led to some
large and handsome houses, or, rather, magnificent palaces, to each of
which there was a beautiful garden, in which they had the liberty of
walking. At each palace they came to, he asked Aladdin if it were not
very beautiful; while the latter often prevented this question by exclaiming,
when a new one presented itself: 0, uncle, here is one much more beau-
tiftil than those we have before seen." In the meantime they kept going
on into the country; and the cunning magician, who wanted to go still
further, for the purpose of putting a design, which he had in his head, into
execution, went into one of these gardens, and sat down by the side of
a large basin of pure water, which received its supplies through the jaws
of a bronze lion. He then pretended to be very tired, in order to give
Aladdin an opportunity of resting. "My dear nephew," he said, you
must be fatigued, as well as myself. Let us rest ourselves here a little
while, and get fresh strength to pursue our walk."
When they were seated, the magician took out from a piece of linen
cloth, which was attached to his girdle, various sorts of fruits, and some
cakes, with which he had provided himself: he then spread them all on
the bank before them. He divided a cake between himself and Aladdin,
and gave him leave to cat whatever fruit he liked best. While they were
(:illi., lie gave his pretended nephew much good advice, desiring him to
leave off playing with boys, and to associate with intelligent and prudent







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


men; to pay every attention to them, and to profit from their conversation.
" You will very soon," said he, be a man yourself; and you cannot too
soon accustom yourself to their manners and behaviour." When they
had finished their slight repast, they got up and pursued their way by the
side of gardens, which were separated from each other by a small fosse,
that served chiefly to mark the limits of each, and not to prevent the
communication between them; the honesty and good understanding of
the inhabitants of this city made it unnecessary for them to take any other
means of preventing any injury from being done to each other. The
African magician insensibly led Aladdin on much further than the gardens
extended; and they walked on through the country, till they came into
the neighbourhood of the mountains.
Aladdin, who had never in his whole life before taken so long a walk,
felt himself very much tired. Where are we going, my dear uncle?"
said he; "we have got much further than the gardens, and I can see
nothing but hills and mountains before us. And if we go on any further,
I know not whether I shall have strength enough to walk back to the
city."-" Take courage, nephew," replied his pretended uncle, "I wish to
show you another garden, that far surpasses all you have hitherto seen.
It is not far from hence; and, after your arrival, you will readily own
how sorry you would have been to have come thus near it, and not gone
on to see it." Aladdin was persuaded to proceed, and the magician led
him on considerably further, amusing him all the time with entertaining
stories, to beguile their way, and make it less fatiguing and unpleasant.
They at length came to a narrow valley, situated between two mode-
rately sized mountains, of nearly the same height. This was the particu-
lar spot to which the magician wished to bring Aladdin, in order to put in
execution the grand project that was the sole cause of his coming from
the extremity of Africa to Cathay. We shall now," said he to Aladdin,
"go no further; and I shall here unfold to your view some extraordinary
things, hitherto unknown to mortals; and which, when you shall have
,soen, you will thank me a thousand times for having made you an eye-







ALADDIN; OR


witness of. There are indeed such wonders as no one besides yourself
will ever have seen. I am now going to strike a light; and do you, in the
meantime, collect all the dry sticks and leaves that you can find, in order
to make a fire."
There were so many pieces of dry sticks scattered about this place,
that Aladdin had collected more than was sufficient for his purpose by the
time the magician had lighted his match. He then set them on fire;
and as soon as they were in a blaze, the African threw a certain perfume,
which he had ready in his hand, upon them. A thick and dense smoke
immediately arose, which seemed to unfold itself in consequence of some
mysterious words pronounced by the magician, and which Aladdin did
not in the least comprehend. At the same instant the ground slightly
shook, and opening in the spot where they stood, discovered a square stone
about a foot and a half across, placed horizontally, with a brass ring fixed
in the centre, for the purpose of lifting it up.
Aladdin was dreadfully alarmed at all these things, and was about to
run away, when the magician, to whom his presence in this mysterious
affair. was absolutely necessary, stopped him in an angry manner, and
gave him at the same moment a blow, which not only beat him down,
but nearly knocked some of his teeth out. Poor Aladdin, with tears in
his eyes, and the blood streaming from his mouth, and trembling in every
limb, got up. My dear uncle," he cried, what have I done to deserve
such severity ?"-" I have my reasons for it," replied the magician, I am
your uncle, and consider myself as your father, and you ought not to make
me any answer. Do not, however, my boy," added he, in a milder tone
of voice, be at all afraid; I desire nothing of you, but that you obey me
most implicitly: and this you must do, if you wish to render yourself
worthy of, and to profit by, the great advantages I mean to afford you."
These fine speeches of the magician in some measure lessened the fright
of Aladdin; and when the former saw him less alarmed, "You have ob-
served," he said, what I have done by virtue of my perfumes, and the
words that I have pronounced. You are now to be informed, that under






THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


the stone, which you see here, there is a concealed treasure, destined for
you; and which will one day render you richer than any of the most
powerful potentates of the earth. It is moreover the fact, that no one in
the world but you can be permitted to touch, or lift up this stone, and go
beneath it. Even I myself am not able to approach it, and to take pos-
session of the treasure which is under it. And, in order to ensure your
success, you must observe and execute in every respect, even to the mi-
nutest point, what I am now going to instruct you in. This is a matter
of the greatest consequence both to you and to myself."
Wrapped in astonishment at everything he had seen and heard, and
fill of the idea of this treasure which the magician said was to make him
for ever happy, Aladdin forgot everything else that had passed. Well,
my dear uncle," he exclaimed, as he got up, what must I do? Tell me,
I am ready to obey you in everything."-" I heartily rejoice, my boy,"
replied the magician, embracing Aladdin, "that you have made so good
a resolution. Come to me; take hold of this ring, and lift up the stone."
-" I am not strong enough, uncle," said Aladdin, you must help me."-
"No, no," answered the African magician, you have no occasion for my
assistance; we shall neither of us do any good, if I attempt to help you;
you must lift it up entirely by yourself. Pronounce only the name of your
father and your grandfather, take hold of the ring, and lift it: it will come
without any difficulty." Aladdin did exactly as the magician told him;
lie raised the stone without any trouble, and laid it by the side of him.
When the stone was taken away, a small cavern was visible, between
three and four feet deep, at the bottom of which there appeared a door,
with steps to go down still lower. You must now, my good boy," said
the African magician to Aladdin, "observe very exactly everything I am
going to tell you. Go down into this cavern, and when you have come
to the bottom of the steps which you see, you will perceive an open door,
which leads into a large vaulted space, divided into three successive halls.
In each of these you will perceive, on both sides of you, four bronze vases,
as large as tubs, full of gold and silver. You must take particular care
3 B2







ALADDIN; OR


not to touch any of it. When you get into the first hall, take up your
robe and bind it round you. Then observe, and go on to the second
without stopping, and from thence in the same manner to the third. Above
all, however, be very particular not to go near the walls, nor even to touch
them with your robe; for if any part of your dress comes in contact with
them, your instant death will be the inevitable consequence. This is the
reason of my having desired you to fasten your robe firmly round you.
At the extremity of the third hall there is a door which leads to a garden,
planted with beautiful trees, all of which are full of fruit. Go on straight
forward, and pursue a path which you will perceive, and which will bring
you to the bottom of a flight of fifty steps, at the top of which is a terrace.
When you shall have ascended the terrace, you will observe a niche before
you, in which there is a lighted lamp. Take the lamp, and extinguish it.
Then throw out the wick, and the liquid that is within, and put it in your
bosom. When you have done this, bring it to me. Do not be afraid of
staining your dress, as what is within the lamp is not oil; and, when you
have thrown it out, the lamp will dry directly. If you should feel your-
self very desirous of gathering any of the fruit in the garden, you may do
so; and there is nothing to prevent your taking as much as you please."
When the magician had given these directions to Aladdin, he took off
a ring, which he had on one of his fingers, and gave it to his pretended
nephew; telling him, at the same time, that it was a preservative against
every evil that might otherwise happen to him, and again bid him be
mindful of everything he had said to him. Go, my child," added he, de-
scend boldly; we shall now both of us become immensely rich for the rest
of our lives."
Aladdin gave a spring, jumped into the opening with a willing mind,
and went down to the bottom of the steps. He found the three halls, ex-
actly answering the description the magician had given of them. He
passed through them with the greatest precaution possible; as he was
fearful he might be killed, if he did not most strictly observe all the di-
rections he had received. He went on to the garden, and ascended to the







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


terrace without stopping. He took the 'lamp, as it stood lighted in the
niche, threw out its contents; and, observing that it was, as the magician
had said, quite dry, he put it into his bosom. He then came down the
terrace, and stopped in the garden to examine the fruit, which he had
only seen for an instant as he passed along. The trees of this garden
were all full of the most extraordinary fruit. Each tree bore a sort of a
different colour. Some were white, others sparkling and transparent, like
crystal; some were red, and of different shades, others green, blue,
violet; some of a yellowish hue; in short, of almost every colour. The
white were pearls; the sparkling and transparent were diamonds; the
deep red were rubies, the paler a particular sort of ruby, called balass;
the green, emeralds; the blue, turquoises; the violet, amethysts; those
tinged with yellow, sapphires; in the same way, all the other coloured
fruits were varieties of precious stones; and the whole of them were of
the largest size, and more perfect than were ever seen in the world.
Aladdin, who knew neither their beauty, nor their value, was not at all
struck with the appearance of them, which did not the least suit his taste,
like the figs, grapes, and other excellent fruits common in Cathay. As
he was not yet of an age to be acquainted with their value, he thought
they were all only pieces of coloured glass, and did not therefore attach
any other value to them. The variety, however, and contrast of so many
beautiful colours, as well as the brilliancy and extraordinary size of each
sort, nevertheless tempted him to gather some of each. And he took so
many of every colour, that he filled both his pockets, as well as his two
new purses, that the magician had bought for him, at the time he made
him a present of his new dress, that everything he wore might be equally
new; and as his pockets, which were already full, could not hold his two
purses, he fastened them on each side of his girdle, or sash, and also
wrapped some in its folds, as it was of silk, and made very full. In this
manner, he carried them so as they could not fall out. He did not even
neglect to fill his bosom quite full, between his robe and shirt.
Laden in this manner, with the most immense treasure, though igno-







20 ALADDIN; OR
rant of its value, Aladdin made haste through the three halls in order that
he might not make the African magician wait too long. Having pro-
ceeded through them with the same caution as before, he began to ascend
the steps he had come down, and presented himself at the entrance of the
cave, where the magician was impatiently waiting for him. As soon as
Aladdin had perceived him, he called out, "Give me your hand, uncle, to
help me up."-" You had better, my dear boy," replied the magician, first
give me the lamp, as that will only embarrass you."-" It is not at all in
my way," said Aladdin, "and I will give it to you when I am out." The
magician still persevered in wishing to get the lamp before he helped
Aladdin out of the cave: but the latter had in fact so covered it with the
fruit of the trees, that he absolutely refused to give it till he had got out
of the cave. The African magician was then in the greatest despair at
the obstinate resistance the boy made; he put himself into the most violent
rage; he threw a little perfume upon the fire, which he had taken care to
keep up, and he had hardly pronounced two magic words, before the stone
which served to shut up the entrance to the cavern returned of its own
accord to the place, with all the earth over it, exactly in the same state it
was when the magician and Aladdin first arrived there.
There is no doubt but that this African magician was not the brother
of Mustafa, the tailor, as he had formerly boasted, and consequently not
the uncle of Aladdin. IHe was most probably originally of Africa, being
born there; as that is a country where magic is more studied than in any
other; he had given himself up to it from his earliest youth: and, after
nearly forty years spent in enchantments, experiments in geomancy, fumi-
gations, and reading books of magic, he had at length discovered, that
there was in the universe a certain wonderful lamp, the possession of
which would make him the most powerful monarch of the universe, if he
were so fortunate as to obtain it. By a late experiment in geomancy he
had discovered, that this lamp was in a subterraneous place in the middle
of Cathay, in the very spot, and under the very circumstances, that have
just been detailed. Thoroughly persuaded of the truth of this discovery,







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


he had come from the furthest part of Africa; and after a long and painful
journey, had arrived in the city that was nearest this treasure. But though
the lamp was certainly in the place which he had found out, yet he was
nevertheless not permitted to take it away himself, nor to go in person to
the very spot where it was. It was absolutely necessary that another
person should go down to take it, and then put it into his hands. It was
therefore for this reason, that he had addressed himself to Aladdin, who
seemed to him to be an artless youth, and well adapted to perform the
service he expected from him; and he had resolved, as soon as he had
got the lamp from' him, to raise the last fumigation, pronounce the two
magic words, which produced the effect already seen, and sacrifice poor
Aladdin to his avarice and wickedness, that he might not have existing
witnesses of his being in possession of the lamp. The blow he had given
Aladdin, as well as the authority he exercised over him, were only for the
purpose of accustoming him to fear him, and obey all his orders without
hesitation; that when Aladdin had got possession of the wonderful lamp,
he might instantly deliver it to him. The reverse, however, of what he
both wished and expected, came to pass; for he was so much in a hurry
to put an end to poor Aladdin, only because he was afraid that while he
was contesting the matter with him, some person might come, and make
that public which he wished to be quite secret, that he completely failed
in his object.
When the magician found all his hopes and expectations for ever
blasted, he had only one method to pursue, and that was to return to
Africa, which he in fact did the very same day. He pursued his journey
along the most private roads, in order to avoid the city where he had met
with Aladdin. He was also afraid to meet any person who might have
seen him walk out with him, and come back without him.
To judge from all these circumstances, it might naturally be supposed
that Aladdin was gone for ever; and, indeed, the magician himself, who
thought he had thus destroyed him, had not paid any attention to the ring
which he had placed on his finger, and which was now about to render







ALADDIN; OR


Aladdin the most essential service, and to save him. Aladdin knew not
the wonderful qualities either of that or the lamp; and it is indeed aston-
ishing that the loss of both of them did not drive the magician to absolute
despair: but persons of his profession are so accustomed to defeat, and
have so many events happen quite contrary to their wishes, that they never
cease from endeavouring to conquer every misfortune, by charms, visions,
and enchantments.
Aladdin, who did not expect this wicked action from his pretended
uncle, after all the kindness and generosity with which the latter had be-
haved to him, experienced a degree of surprise and astonishment which is
much easier to conceive than explain. When he found himself, as it were,
buried alive, he called aloud a thousand times to his uncle, telling him he
was ready to give him the lamp. But all his cries were useless ; and hav-
ing no other means to make himself heard, he remained in perfect dark-
ness. Giving, at length, a little cessation to his tears, he went down to the
bottom of the flight of stars, intending to look for the light in the garden
where he had before been. But the walls, which had been opened by en-
chantment, were now shut by the same means. He felt all around him,
to the right and left, several times, but could not discover the least open-
ing. He then redoubled his cries and tears, sat down upon the step of his
dungeon, without the least ray of hope ever again to see the light of day,
and with the melancholy conviction, that he should only pass from the
darkness which now encompassed him, to the shades of an inevitable and
speedy.death.
Aladdin remained two days in this state, without either eating or
drinking. On the third day, regarding his death as certain, he lifted up
his hands, and, joining them as in the act of prayer, he wholly resigned
himself to the will of God, and uttered in a loud tone of voice; There
is no strength or power but in the high and great God." In this action
of joining his hands, he happened, without at all thinking of it, to rub the
ring which the African magician had put upon his finger, and of the vir-
tue. of which he was as yet ignorant. Upon its being thus rubbed, a







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


Genie of a most enormous figure and most horrid countenance, instantly
rose, as it were, out of the earth before him; he was so tall, that his head
touched the vaulted roof, and he addressed these words to Aladdin:
" What do you wish? I am ready to obey you as your slave; as the
slave of him who has the ring on his finger; I and the other slaves of
the ring."
At any other moment, and on any other occasion, Aladdin, who was
totally unaccustomed to such appearances, would have been so frightened
at the sight of such a wonderful figure, he would have been unable to
speak; but he was so entirely pre-occupied with the danger and peril of
his situation, that he answered without the least hesitation, Whoever
you are, take me, if you are able, out of this place." IHe had scarcely
pronounced these words, when the earth opened, and he found himself on
the outside of the cave, and at the very spot to which the magician had
brought him. It is easy to be conceived, that after having remained in
complete darkness for so long a time, Aladdin had at first some difficulty
in supporting the brightness of open day. By degrees, however, his eyes
were accustomed to the light, and, in looking round him, he was surprised
to find not the least opening in the earth. Hie could not comprehend in
what manner he had so suddenly come out of it. There was only the
place where the fire had been made, which he recollected was close to the
entrance into the cave. Looking round towards the city, he perceived it
surrounded by the gardens, and thus knew the road he had come with the
magician. lie returned the same way, thanking God for having again
suflcred him to behold and revisit the face of the earth, which he had quite
despaired of doing.
lHe arrived at the city, but it was with great difficulty that he got
home. When he was within the door, the joy he experienced at again
seeing his mother, added to the weak state he was in, from not having
eaten anything for the space of three days, made him faint, and it was
some time before lie came to himself. His mother, who had already wept
for him as lost or dead, seeing him in this state, did not omit any thing







ALADDIN; OR


that could tend to restore him to life. At length he recovered, and the
first thing he said to his mother was, "Bring me something, my dear mo-
ther, to cat, before you do anything else. I have tasted nothing these
three days." His mother instantly set what she had before him. My
dear child," said she, at the same moment, "do not hurry yourself, it is
dangerous; cat also but little, and at your leisure: you must take great
care how you manage, in the pressing appetite you have. Do not even
speak to me; you will have plenty of time to relate to me everything that
has happened to you, when you shall have regained your strength. I am
sufficiently satisfied at seeing you once more, after all the affliction I have
suffered since Friday, and all the trouble I have also taken to learn what
was become of you, when I found the night approach and you did not
return home."
Aladdin followed his mother's advice; he ate slowly and not a great
deal, and drank sparingly. "I have great reason, my dear mother," said
he, when he had done, to complain of you for putting me in the power
of a man whose object was to destroy me, and who at this very moment
supposes my death so sure, he cannot doubt either that I am no longer
alive, or at least that I shall not remain so another day. But you took
him to be my uncle, and I was also equally deceived. Indeed, how could
we suppose him to be anything else, as he almost overwhelmed me with his
kindness and generosity, and made me so many promises of future advan-
tage ? But I must tell you, mother, that he was a traitor, a wicked man, a
cheat. He was good and kind to me only that he might, after answering
his own purpose, destroy me, as I have already told you, without either of
us being able to know the reason. For my part, I can assure you I have
not given him the least cause for the bad treatment I have received; and
you will yourself be convinced of it by the faithful and true account I am
going to give you of everything that has passed, from the first moment
that I left you, till he put his wicked design in execution."
Aladdin then related to his mother everything that had happened to
him and the magician, an the day when the latter came and took him







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


away to see the palaces and gardens round the city; what had befallen
him on the road and at the place between the two mountains, where the
magician worked such prodigies: how, upon throwing the perfume into
the fire and uttering some magical words, the earth instantly opened, and
discovered the entrance to a cave, that led to most inestimable treasures.
Neither did he forget the blow that the magician had given him, and the
manner, after having first coaxed him, he had persuaded him, by the means
of the greatest promises, and by putting a ring on his finger, to descend
into the cave. IHe omitted no circumstance of what passed, or what he
had seen in going backwards or forwards through the three halls, in the
garden, or on the terrace, whence he had taken the wonderful lamp, which
lie took out of his bosom and showed to his mother, as well as the trans-
parent and different coloured fruits that he had gathered as he returned
through the garden, and the two purses quite full, all of which he gave his
mother; who, however, did not set much value upon them. The fruits,
however, were in fact precious stones; and the lustre which they threw
round by means of a lamp that hung in the chamber, and which almost
equalled the sun in brightness, ought to have informed her they were of
the greatest value; but the mother of Aladdin had no greater knowledge
of their value than her son. She had been brought up in a middle station
in life, and her husband had never been rich enough to bestow any jew-
cls upon her. Besides, she had never even seen any among her relations
or neighbours, it was not therefore at all surprising, that she considered
them as things of no value, and only fit to please the eye by the variety
of their colours. Aladdin, therefore, put them all behind one of the cush-
ions of the sofa on which they were sitting.
Hie finished the recital of his adventure by telling her that, when he
came back and presented himself at the mouth of the cave to get out,
upon refusing to give the lamp to the magician, the entrance to the cave
was instantly closed, by means of the perfume thrown by the magician on
the fire, which he had kept alight, and of some words that he pronounced.
lie could not then proceed any further without shedding tears, and- repre-







6 ALADDIN; OR
renting the miserable state he found himself in, buried, as it were, alive in
/this fatal cave, till the moment he got out and was again brought forth
into the world, by means of the ring of which he did not even now know
the virtues. When he had finished his account, he said to his mother,
"I need not tell you more: the rest is known to you. This is the whole
of my adventures, and of the danger I have been in since I left you."
Wonderful and surprising as this relation was, distressing too as it
must have been'for a mother, who in spite of his defects tenderly loved
her son; she had the patience to hear it to the end without giving him the
least interruption. In the most affecting parts, however, particularly
those that unfolded the wicked intentions of the African magician, she could
not help showing by her actions how much she detested him, and how
much he excited her indignation. But Aladdin had no sooner concluded,
than she began to abuse this impostor in the strongest terms. She caled
him a traitor, a barbarian, a cheat, an assassin, a magician, the enemy
and destroyer of the human race. "Yes, my child," she exclaimed, he
is a magician, and magicians are public evils. They hold communication
with demons by means of their sorceries and enchantments. Blessed be
God that he has not suffered the wickedness of this wretch to have its full
effect upon you. You too ought to return Him many thanks for his kind-
ness to you. Your death would have been inevitable if God had not come
to your assistance, and you had not implored his aid." She added many
more things of the same sort; showing at the same time her complete
detestation of the treachery with which the magician had treated her son;
but as she was proceeding in this manner, she perceived that Aladdin, who
had not slept for three days, wanted rest. She made him therefore retire
to bed, and soon afterwards went thither herself.
As Aladdin had not been able to take any repose in the subterranean
vault in which he had been, as it were, buried with the idea of his certain
destruction, it is no wonder that he passed the whole of that night in the
most profound sleep, and that it was even late the next morning before he
a woke. He at last got up, and the first thing he said to his mother was,







THE WOND-tRFIrL LAMP. 27

that he was very hungry, and that she could not oblige him more than
by giving him something for breakfast. "Alas! my child," replied his
mother, "I have not a morsel of bread to give you. You ate last night -
all the trifling remains of food there was in the house. Have, however,
a little patience, and it shall not be long before I .will bring you some. I
have a little cotton of my own spinning, which I will go and sell, and
purchase something for our dinner."-" Keep your cotton, mother," said
Aladdin, '*fo.r.another time, and give me the lamp which I brought with
me ye--tirda3y. I will go and sell that, and the money it will fetch will
serve us for breakfast and dinner too, nay, perhaps also for supper."
Aladdin's mother took the lamp from the place she had put it in. Here
it is," she said to her son, "but it is I think very dirty. If I were to
clean it a little, perhaps it might sell for something mdie." She then took
some water and a little fine sand to clean it with. But she had scarcely
begun to rub this lamp, when instantly, and while her sdn was present, a
hideous and gigantic Genie rose out of the ground before her, and cried
with a voice as loud as thunder: "What do you wish? I am ready to
obey you as your slave, and the slave of those who have the lamp in their
hands; I and the other slaves of the lamp." The mother of Aladdin was
not in a condition to answer this address. She was unable to endure the
sight of a figure so hideous and alarming as that of the Genie; and her
fears were so great, that he had no sooner begun to speak, than she fell
down in a fainting-fit.
As Aladdin had oncc -before seen a similar appearance in the cavern,
and did not either lose his presence of mind or his judgment, he instantly
seized the lamp, and supplied his mother's place by answering for her in a
"firm tone of voice, "I am hungry, bring me something to eat." The
Genie disappeared, and returned the moment after, with a large silver ba-
sin,'which he carried on his head, and twelve covered dishes of the same
material, filled with the nicest meat, properly arranged, and six loa\ e, as
white as snow, upon as many plates; two bottles of the no.dt'excellent

.., : ., '? .







ALADDIN; OR


wine, and two silver cups in his hand. He placed them all upon the sofa,
and instantly vanished.
All this passed in so short a time, that Aladdin's mother had not re-
covered from fainting, before the Genie had disappeared the second time.
Aladdin, who had before thrown some water over her without any effect,
again endeavoured to bring her to herself; but at the very instant he was
going to set about it, whether her scattered spirits returned of themselves,
or that the smell of the dishes which the Genie had brought iprodiuii: d the
effect, she quite recovered. ." My dear mother," cried Aladdin, there is
nothing the matter. Get up, and come and eat; here is what will put you
in good spirits again, and at the same time satisfy my violent appetite.
Come, do not let us suffer these good things to get cold before we begin."
His mother was extremely astonished when she beheld the large basin,
the twelve dishes, the six loaves, the two bottles of wine and two cups, and
perceived the delicious odour that exhaled from them. My child," she
said, How came all this abundance here, and to whom are we obliged
for such liberality ? The sultan surely cannot have got acquainted with
our poverty and have had compassion upon us ?"-' My good mother,"
replied Aladdin, "come and sit down, and begin to eat; you are as much
in want of something as I am. I will tell you of everything when we
have broken our fast." They then sat down, and both of them ate with
the greater appetite, as neither mother nor son had before ever seen a
table so well covered.
During the repast, the mother of Aladdin could not help stopping fre-
quently to look at and admire the basin and dishes; although she was not
quite sure whether they were silver or any other material, so little was she
accustomed to things of this sort; and in fact without regarding their
value, of which she was ignorant, it was only the novelty of their appear-
ance that attracted her admiration. Nor indeed was her son better in-
formed than herself. Although they both merely intended .to make a
simple breakfast, yet they sat so long, that the hour of dining came before
Iiey had risen; the dishes were so excellent, they almost increased their






THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


appetites; and as they were still hot, they thought it no bad plan to join
the two meals together, and therefore they dined before they got up from
breakfast. When they had made an end of their double repast, they
found enough remaining, not only for supper, but even for two as good ,
meals next day, as they had just made.
When Aladdin's mother had taken away the things, and put aside
what they had not consumed, she came and seated herself on the sofa
near her son. I now am waiting, my boy," she said, for you to satisfy
my impatient curiosity, and hear the account you have promised me."
Aladdin then related to her everything that had passed between him and
the Genie, from the time her alarm had made her faint, till she again came
to herself. At this discourse of her son, and the account of the appearance
of the Genie, his mother was in the greatest astonishment. But what
do you tell me, child, about your Genie? Never since I was born, have
I heard of any person of my acquaintance that has seen one. How comes
it, then, that this villanous Genie should have presented himself to me?
Why did he not rather address himself to you, to whom he had before ap-
peared in the subterraneous cavern?"
"Mother," replied Aladdin, the Genie who appeared just now to you,
is not the same that appeared to me. In some things, indeed, they resem-
ble each other, being both as large as giants, but they are very different
both in their countenance and dress, and they belong to different masters.
If you recollect, he whom I saw called himself the slave of the ring, which
I had on my finger; and the one who appeared to you, was the slave of
the lamp you had in your hand: but I believe you did not hear him, as
you seemed to faint the instant he began to speak."-" What," cried his
mother, "is it then your lamp that was the reason why this cursed Genie
addressed himself to me, rather than to you? Ah! child, take the lamp
out of my sight, and put it where you please, so that I never touch it
again. Indeed I would rather that you should throw it away or sell it,
than run the risk of almost dying with fright by again touching it. And
if you would also follow my advice, you would put away the ring as well.
c 2
*14 .







30 ALADDIN; OR
We ought to have no commerce with Genii; they are demons, and our
Prophet has told us so."
S "With your permission, however, my dear mother," replied Aladdin,
"I shall take care how I sell this lamp in a hurry, which has already been
so useful to us both. I have indeed been once very near it. Do you not
Ssee what it has procured us, and that it will also continue to furnish us
-with enough for our entire support? You may easily judge as well as
: myself, that it was not for nothing that my pretended wicked -uncle gave
himself so much trouble, and undertook so long and fatiguing a journey,
since it was merely to get possession of this wonderful lamp, which he
preferred to all the gold and silver which he knew was in the three halls,
S.t, advhich I myself saw, as he had before said I should. He was too
w ell acquainted with the worth and qualities of this lamp to wish for any
oth hef part of that immense treasure. Since chance then has discovered
."'- .itfsvirtues to us, let us profit by them; but in such a manner that we shall
not make anmy bustle, and by such means draw down the envy and jealousy
*of our neighbour" I-will take it indeed out of your sight, and put it
S\where I shall be able to.find it whenever I shall have occasion for it, since
-: yo are so much'alarmed: at'4e appearance of Genii. Neither can I re-
sIlve to throw'the ring away. Without this ring you would have never
seeyn me again; and even if I should fow have been alive, it would have
beeI~- anl-t the last inoment'ofTiby existence. You nuist permit me then
to keep and to wear it always very carefully on my finger. Who can
Iell if some danger may not one day; oikother again happen to me, which
ntei her.you nor I can n"ow foresee, and fromi which it may deliver me?"
As A the' arguments .of( Aladdin appeared very just and reasonable, his
other had nothing to sayi m eply. ":Do asyu like, my son," she cried,
S- "as for me, I \ ishlto have nothing at all-to do with-Genii ;"and I declare
" .to you; that I entirely wash my hands: of them, and will never mention
Them to you again."
Alter upper dhe next evening, nothing renijned of the goodprovi-
S.i z .aiJ shich the Genie had brought.. The following morning, Aladdin, who



.- '- .- -
\ .: -. -






THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 31
did not like to wait till hunger compelled him, took o obf the silver plates
under his robe, and went out early in order to sc it. He addressed him-
self to a Jew, whom he happened to meet. Aladdin took him aside, and
showing him the plate, asked him if he would buy it.
The Jew, who was both clever and cunning, took the plate and ex-
amined it. He had no sooner ascertained that it was good silver, than he
desired to know how much he expected for it. Aladdin, who knew not
its value, nor had ever had any dealings of the sort before, was satisfied
with saying, that he supposed the Jew knew what the plate was worth,
and that he would depend upon his honour. Being uncertain whether
Aladdin was acquainted with its real value or not, he took out of his
purse a piece of gold, which was exactly worth one seventy-second part
as much as the plate, and offered it to Aladdin. The latter eagerly took
the money, and as soon as he had got it, went away so quickly that the
Jew, not satisfied with the exorbitant profit he had made by this bargain,
was very sorry he had not foreseen Aladdin's ignorance of the value of
the plate which he had brought to sell, and in consequence, offered him
much less for it. He was upon the point of running after the young man,
to get something back out of the piece of gold he had given him. But
Aladdin himself ran very fast, and was already got so far, that he would
have found it impossible to overtake him.
In his way home, Aladdin stopped at a baker's shop, where he bought
enough bread for his mother and himself, which he paid for out of his
piece of gold, and received the change. When he got back, he gave
what remained to his mother, who went to the market and purchased as
much provision as would last them for several days.
They thus continued to live in an economical manner; that is, till Al-
addin had sold all the twelve dishes one after the other, to the same Jew,
exactly as he had done the first, when they found they wanted more
money. The Jew, who had given him a piece of gold for the first, durst
not offer him less for the other dishes, for fear of losing so good a ba-
gain. He bought them all therefore at the same rate. When the nmofney






ALADDIN; OR


for the last plate was expended, Aladdin had recourse to the basin, which
was at least ten times as heavy as any of the others. He wished to carry
this to his usual merchant, but its great weight prevented him; he was
obliged, therefore, to go and look for the Jew, and bring him to his
mother's. After having examined the weight of the basin, the Jew count-
ed out ten pieces of gold, with which Aladdin was satisfied.
While these ten pieces lasted, they were employed in the daily expense
of the house. In the mean time Aladdin, thus accustomed to lead a sort
of idle life, abstained from going to play with other boys of his own age,
from the time of his adventure with the African magician. He now
passed his days in walking about, or conversing with such men as he got
acquainted with. Sometimes he stopped in the shops, belonging to large
and extensive merchants, where he listened to the conversation of such peo-
ple of distinction and education as came there, and who made these shops
a sort of meeting-place. The information he thus acquired, gave him a
slight knowledge of the world.
When nothing remained of his ten pieces of gold, Aladdin had re-
course to the lamp. He took it up, and looked for the particular spot
that his mother had rubbed. As he easily perceived the place where the
sand had touched it, he applied his hand to the same place, and the same
Genie whom he had before seen, instantly appeared. But, as Aladdin
had rubbed the lamp in a more gentle manner than his mother had done,
the Genie spoke to him also in a more softened tone. "What do you
wish?" said he to him, in the same words as before; "I am ready to obey
you, as your slave, and the slave of those who have the lamp in their
hands; I, and the other slaves of the lamp."-" I am hungry," cried Alad-
din, "bring me something to eat." The Genie disappeared, and in a
short time returned, loaded with a similar service to that he had brought
before, which he placed upon the sofa, and vanished in an instant.
As Aladdin's mother was well aware of the intention of her son, she
had gone out on some business, that she might not even be in the house
when the Genie again made his appearance. She soon after came in and







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


saw the table and sideboard well set out; nor was she less surprised at
the effect of the lamp this time, than she had been the first. Aladdin and
his mother immediately placed themselves at the table; and after they had
finished their repast, there still remained sufficient food to last them two
whole days.
When Aladdin again found that all his provisions were gone, and that
he had no money to purchase any, he took one of the silver dishes, and
went to look for the Jew, whom he was before acquainted with, in order
to sell it to him. As he walked along, he happened to pass a goldsmith's
shop, belonging to a respectable old man, whose probity and general hon-
esty were unimpeachable. The goldsmith, who perceived him, called to
him to come into the shop. My son," said he, I have often seen you
pass, loaded as you are at present, and join such a Jew; and then in a
short time, come back again empty-handed. I have thought that you went
and sold him what you carried. But perhaps you are ignorant, that this Jew
is a very great cheat; nay, that he will even deceive his own brethren,
and that no one who knows him will have any dealings with him. Now
what I have more to say to you, is only this: and I wish you to act ex-
actly as you like in the matter; if you will show me what you are now
carrying, and are going to sell it, I will faithfully give you what it is worth,
if it be anything in my way of business, if not, I will introduce you to
other merchants, who will not deceive you."
The hope of making a little more of his silver dish, induced Aladdin
to take it out from under his robe, and show it to the goldsmith. The old
man, who knew at first sight that the dish was of the finest silver, asked
him if he had sold any like this to the Jew, and how much he had re-
ceived for them. Aladdin ingenuously told him that he had sold twelve,
and that the Jew had given him a piece of gold for each. Ah! the
thief," cried the merchant; but, my son, what is done cannot be undone,
and let us therefore think of it no more; but in letting you see what your
dish, which is made of the finest silver we ever use in our shops, is really
worth, we shall know to what extent the Jew has cheated you."
5







ALADDIN; OR


The goldsmith took his scales, weighed the dish, and after explaining
t.c '.iaddin how much a mark of silver was, what it was worth, and the
diffc rent divisions of it, he made him observe, that according to the weight
" 'ie dish, it was worth seventy-two pieces of gold, which he immediately
-ounted out to him. "This," said he, "is the exact value of your dish;
if you doubt it, you may go to any one of our goldsmiths you please;
and if you find that he will give you any more for it, I promise to forfeit
.o you double the sum. All we get is by the fashion or workmanship of
the goods we buy in this manner; and this is what even the most equi-
table Jews do not." Aladdin thanked the goldsmith for the good advice
he had given him, from which too he derived so much advantage. And
for the future, he carried his dishes to no one else. He took the basin,
also, to his shop, and always received the value, according to its weight.
Although Aladdin and his mother had an inexhaustible source for
money in their lamp, by which they could procure what they wished, and
whenever they wanted anything; they nevertheless continued always to
live with the same frugality as before, except that Aladdin put a little
apart f6r some innocent amusements, and to procure some things that
were necessary in the house. His mother took the care of her dress upon
herself, and supplied it from the cotton she spun. From such a quiet
mode of living, it is easy to conjecture how long the money, arising from
the sale of the twelve dishes and the basin, at the rate Aladdin had sold
them at, must have lasted them. They lived in this manner for some
years, with the profitable assistance which Aladdin occasionally procured
from the lamp.
During this interval, Aladdin did not fhil to resort frequently to those
places where persons of distinction were to be met with; such as the
shops of the most considerable merchants in gold and silver stuffs, in silks,
fine linens, and jewellery; and by sometimes taking a part in their con-
versations, he insensibly acquired the style and manners of the best com-
pany. It was at the jewellers' more particularly, that he became undeceived
in the idea he had formed, that the transparent fruits he had gathered in






THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 35

the garden which contained the lamp, were only coloured glass, and that
he learnt their value to be that of jewels of inestimable price. By means
of observing all kinds of precious stones that were bought and sold in t
these shops, he acquired a knowledge of their value: and as he did not
see any that could be compared with those he possessed, either is bril-
liancy or in size, he concluded, that instead of bits of common glass, which
he had considered as trifles of no worth, he was in fact possessed of a
most invaluable treasure. He had, however, the prudence not to mention
it to any one, not even to his mother; and there is no doubt, that it was
in consequence of his silence, that he afterwards rose to the great good
fortune, to which we shall in the end see him elevated.
One day, as he was walking in the city, Aladdin heard a proclamation
of the sultan, ordering all persons to shut up their shops, and retire into
their houses, until the princess Badroul Boudour, the daughter of the sul-
tan, had passed by in her way to the bath, and again returned.
This public order created in Aladdin a curiosity to see the princess un-
veiled; which however he could not accomplish, but by going to some
house where he was acquainted, and by looking through the lattices. Yet
this by no means satisfied him, because the princess usually wore a veil
as she went to the bath. He thought at last of a plan, which by its suc-
cess completely gratified his curiosity. He went and placed himself-be-
hind the door of the bath, which was so constructed, that he could not
fail to see her face.
Aladdin did not wait long in his place of concealment, before ihe prinv
cess made her appearance; and he saw her through a- crevice p. Aictly
well without being at all seen. She was accompanied 1v ;l great cro nwd
of females and eunuchs, who walked on each side of her, and others who
followed her. When she had come within three or four paces of the door
of the bath, she lifted up the veil, which not only concealed her face but
Encumbered her, and thus gave Aladdin an opportunity of seeing her quite
at his case, as she approached the door.
Till this moment, Aladdin had never seen any other female without


"A







ALADDIN; OR


her veil, except his mother, who was rather old; and he was therefore
incapable of forming any comparison on the beauty of women. Hie had
indeed heard that there were some females who were possessed of surpri-
sing beauty; but the expressions people use in commenting upon beauty
never make the same impression which the examples themselves aflbrd.
Aladdin had no sooner beheld the princess Badroul Boudour, than he
fobrgot that he had ever supposed all women similar to his mother. His
opinions were now very different, and his heart could not help surrender-
ing itself to the object whose appearance had so charmed him.. The
princess was, in fact, the most beautiful brunette that ever was seen. Hler
eyes were large, well placed, and full of fire; yet the expression of her
countenance was sweet and modest; her nose was properly proportioi,:d
and pretty; her mouth small, her lips like vermilion, and beautifully formed;
in short, every feature of her face was perfectly lovely and regular. It is
therefore by no means wonderful, that Aladdin was dazzled, and almost
out of his senses, at beholding such a combination of charms, to which
he had been hitherto a stranger. Besides all these perfections, the figure
of the princess was elegant, aid her air majestic; and merely the sight
of her could attract the respect that was due to her rank.
Even after she had entered the bath, Aladdin stood for some time like
a man distracted; retracing and impressing more strongly on his own
mind the image of a person by whom he had been so charmed; and
whose beauty had penetrated the inmost recesses of his heart. He at last
came to himself, and recollecting that the princess had gone by, and that
it would be perfectly useless for him to keep his station, in order to see
her come out, as her back would then be towards him, and she would also
be veiled, he determined to quit his post and retire.
After he had got home, Aladdin was unable to conceal his disquietude
and distress from his mother. She was much surprised to see him appear
so melancholy, and with such an unusually confused manner; and asked
him if anything had happened to him, or if he were not well. He gave
her, however, no answer whatever, and continued sitting on the sofa in a







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


negligent manner for a great length of time, entirely taken up with retra-
cing in his imagination the lovely image of the princess Badroul Bou-
dour. His mother, who was employed in preparing supper, did not
continue to trouble him. As soon as it was ready, she served it up close
to him on the sofa, and set down to table. But as she perceived that
Aladdin was too much absorbed to attend to it, she invited him to partake
of the cheer; but it was with great difficulty she could get him even to
change his situation. He at length ate, but in a much more sparing man-
ner than usual; casting down his eyes all the time, and keeping such a
profound silence, that his mother could not obtain a single word in answer
to all the questions she put to him, in order to learn the cause of so extra-
ordinary a change.
After supper, she again wished to renew the subject, and inquire the
cause of his great melancholy; but she could get no intelligible informa-
tion from him; and he determined to go to bed rather than afford his
mother the least satisfaction.
It is not necessary to inquire how Aladdin passed the night, struck as
he was with the beauty and charms of the princess Badroul Boudour; but
the next morning, as he was sitting upon the sofa opposite his mother,
who was spinning her cotton as usual, he addressed her as follows. I
am going, mother, to break the long silence I have lipt, since my return
from the city yesterday morning. I am very certain, nay, indeed I have
perceived, that it has pained you. I was not ill, as you seemed to think,
nor is anything the matter with me now; yet I can assure you, that what
I at this moment feel, and what I shall ever continue to feel, is much
worse than any disease. I am myself ignorant of the nature of my feel-
ings; but doubtless, when I have explained myself, you will understand
them.
It was not known in this quarter of the city," continued Aladdin,
"and therefore you of course are ignorant of it, that the princess Badroul
Boudour, the daughter of our sultan, went after dinner yesterday, to the
bath: I learnt this intelligence during my walk in the city. An order was







38 ALADDIN; OR
consequently published, that all the shops should be shut up, and every
one keep at home, that the honour and respect which is due to her might
be paid to the princess; and that the streets through which she had to
pass might be quite clear. As I was not far from the bath at the time,
the desire I felt to see the princess unveiled made me take it into my
head to place myself behind the door of the bath, supposing, as indeed it
happened, that she might take off her veil just before she went into it.
You recollect the situation of this door, and can therefore very well judge
with what ease I could obtain a full sight of her, if what I conjectured
should actually take place. She did in fact take off her veil in going in;
and I had the happiness and supreme satisfaction of seeing this beautiful
princess. This, my dear mother, is the true cause of the state you saw
me in yesterday, and the reason of the silence I have hitherto kept. I
feel such a violent passion for this princess, that I know not terms strong
enough to express it; and as my ardent desire increases every instant, I
am convinced it can only be satisfied by the possession of the amiable
princess Badroul Boudour, whom I have resolved to' ask in marriage of
the sultan."
Aladdin's mother listened with the greatest attention to the whole ac-
count of her son, till he come to the last sentence; but when she heard
that it was his intention to demand the princess Badroul Boudour in
marriage, she could lt help interrupting him with a most violent fit of
laughter. Aladdin wished to resume his speech, but she prevented him.
" Alas! my son," she cried, "what are you thinking of? You must surely
have lost your senses, to talk thus." "Mother," replied Aladdin, "I assure
you I have not lost my senses; I am perfectly in my right mind. I fore-
saw that you would reproach me with folly and extravagance, even more
than you have already done; but whatever you may say, nothing will pre-
vent me from again declaring to you, that my resolution to demand the
princess Badroul Boudour of the sultan, her father, in marriage, is abso-
lutely fixed."
"Truly, my son," replied his mother very seriously, "I cannot help







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


telling you, that you seem entirely to have forgotten who you are; and
even if you are determined to put this resolution in practice, I do not
know who will have the audacity to make this request to the sultan."--
"You yourself must," answered he instantly, without the least hesitation.
"I!" cried his mother, in a tone of the greatest surprise: "I go to the
sultan! Not I, indeed; I will take care how I engage in such an enterprise.
And pray, son, who do you suppose you are," she continued, "to have the
impudence to aspire to the daughter of the sultan? Have you forgotten
that you are the son of one of the poorest tailors in his capital, and that
your mother's family cannot boast of anything better ? Are you ignorant
that sultans do not deign to bestow their daughters even upon the sons
of other sultans, unless they have some chance of coming to the throne?"
My dear mother," replied Aladdin, "I have already told you, that I
perfectly foresaw everything you have said, and am aware of all that you
can add more; but neither your reasons nor your remonstrances will in
the least change my sentiments. I have told you that I would demand
the princess Badroul Boudour in marriage, and that you must make the
request. It is a favour which I require of you, and ask with all the re-
spect I owe to you; and I entreat you not to refuse me, unless you would
rather see me die than, by granting it, give me life as it were a second
time."
Aladdin's mother was very much embarrasseEwhen she saw with
what obstinacy her son persisted in his mad design. My dear son," she
said, "I am your mother, and like a good mother, who has brought you
into the world, I am ready to do anything that is reasonable and proper
for your situation in life and my own, and to undertake anything for your
sake. If this business were merely to ask the daughter of one of our
neighbours, in a condition of life similar to yours, I would omit nothing,
but willingly employ all my abilities in the cause. And to hope for suc-
cess, even in such a case, you ought to possess some little fortune, or at
least be master of some business. When poor people like us wish to
marry, the first thing we ought to think about is how to live. While you,






ALADDIN; OR


not to mention the lowness of your birth, and the little merit or fortune
you have, at once aspire to the highest degree of fortune, and pretend to
nothing less than to ask in marriage the daughter of your sovereign, who
need only open his lips, to blast all your designs and destroy you at once."
"I will omit," continued Aladdin's mother, "what will be the conse-
quence of this business, to you, who ought to reflect upon that, if you
have any reason left; and I will only consider what regards me. How
such an extraordinary design as that of wishing me to go and propose to
the sultan that he would bestow the princess his daughter upon you, came
into your head, I cannot think. Now suppose that I have, I will not say
the courage, but the impudence to go and present myself before his
majesty, and to make such a mad request of him, to whom should I, in
the first place, address myself for an introduction ? Do you not'suppose
that the very first person I spoke to, would treat me as a mad woman,
and drive me back with all the indignity and abuse I should so justly
merit? But, even if I should overcome this difficulty, and procure an au-
dience of the sultan; as indeed I know he readily grants it to all his sub-
jects, when they demand it of him for the purpose of obtaining justice;
and that he even grants it with pleasure, when you have to ask a favour
of him if he thinks you are worthy of it, what should I do then ? Are
you in either of these situations? Do you think that you deserve the
favour which you wia me to ask for you ? Are you worthy of it? What
have you done for your prince, or for your country ? How have you ever
distinguished yourself? If then you have done nothing to deserve so
great a favour, and if moreover you are not worthy of it, with what face
can I truly make the demand? How can I even open my lips to propose
such a thing to the sultan ? His illustrious presence and the magnificence
of his whole court will instantly stop my mouth. How shall I, who trem-
bled before your poor late father, my husband, whenever I wished to ask
him anything, even attempt such a thing ? But there is also another rea-
son, my son, which you have not yet thought of, and that is, that no one
,ver appears before the sultan, without offering him some present, when







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


any favour is required to be granted. Presents have at least this advan-
tage, that if, for any reason of their own, the persons solicited refuse your
request, they listen to the demand that is made without any repugnance.
But what present have you to offer? And when should you ever have
anything that might be at all worthy the attention of so mighty a monarch;
what proportion can your present possibly have, with the demand you
wish to make ? Recollect yourself, and think that you aspire to a thing
which it is impossible to obtain."
Aladdin listened with the greatest patience to everything his mother
said, in order to dissuade him from his purpose; and having reflected for
some time upon every part of her remonstrance, he addressed her as fol-
lows: "I really acknowledge to you, my dear mother, that it is a great
piece of rashness in me to dare to carry my pretensions so high as I do;
and that it must also appear very inconsiderate to request you with so
much earnestness and warmth to go and propose this marriage to the sul-
tan, without first having taken the proper means of procuring an audience
and a favourable reception. I freely ask your pardon for doing so; but
you must not wonder if the violence of the passion that possesses me, has
prevented me from thinking about everything that was necessary to pro-
cure me the gratification I seek. I love the princess Badroul Boudour far
beyond what you can possibly conceive; or rather I adore her, and shall
for ever persevere in my wish and intention of marrying her. This is a
matter on which my mind is irrevocably fixed. I am much obliged to you
for the hints which you have thrown out in what you have said; aid I
look upon this beginning as an earnest of the complete success, which I
flatter myself will attend my proposals.
"You say that it is customary for him who seekl an audience of the
sultan to bear a present in his hand, and that I have nothing worthy to
offer him. I agree with you about the present, and also that I never once
thought of it. But with regard to what you say about my having nothing
worthy of his acceptance, that is a different matter. Do you not suppose,
mother, that what I brought home with me on the day that I was saved
6 ,. D2






ALADDIN; OR


in so wonderful a manner, as I have before told you, from an almost in-
evitable death, would be an acceptable present to the sultan ? I mean what
I brought home in the two purses, in my sash, and in my vest, and which
we have both hitherto taken for coloured glass; but I am now undeceived,
and can inform you that they are precious stones of almost inestimable
value, and exactly suitable to the state and dignity of a great sovereign.
I became acquainted with their value by frequenting the shops of jewel-
lers; and you may, I assure you, depend upon the truth of what I say.
None of those which I have seen at our jewellers are to be compared
with those we have, either for size or beauty; andyet the dealers set a
very high price upon them. In fact, we are both of us ignorant of the
value of ours; although that is the case, however, as far as I can judge
from the little experience I have, I am well persuaded the present cannot
but be very agreeable to the sultan. You have a porcelain dish sufficiently
large, and of a very good shape for holding them. Bring it here, and
let us see the effect it will produce, when we have arranged them accord-
ing to their different colours."
Aladdin's mother brought the dish, and he took the precious stones
out of the two purses, and arranged them. The effect they produced in
broad daylight by the variety of their colours, by their lustre and bril-
liancy, was so great, that both mother and son were absolutely dazzled,
and were in the greatest astonishment, because they had both only seen
:them by the light of ai lamp. It is true, that Aladdin had seen them on
the trees, hanging like fruit, where they afforded a most brilliant sight;
but as he was then as it were afihild, he looked upon the jewels only as
things proper to play with, and had regarded them in no other point of
view.
After having for some time admired the beauty of the present; "You
cannot now," said Aladdin resuming the conversation, "excuse yourself
any longer from going andFpresenting yourself to the sultan, under the
pretence that you have nothing to offer him. Here is a present, which,
in my opinion, will procure for you the most favourable reception."






THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


Although the mother of Aladdin, notwithstanding its great beauty and
brilliancy, did not think this present near so valuable as her son did; yet
she nevertheless supposed it would be very acceptable; she was therefore
aware that she had nothing to answer respecting that point. She then
again recurred to the nature of the request which Aladdin wished her to
make to the sultan: this was a constant source of disquietude to her; "I
cannot, my son," she said, "possibly conceive that this present will pro-
duce the effect you wish, or that the sultan will look upon you with a fa-
vourable eye. And it becomes necessary for me to acquit myself with
propriety in the business you wish me to undertake. I feel convinced I
shall not have courage enough to carry me through, but be struck quite
dumb; and thus not only lose all my labour, but the present also, which,
according to what you say, is most uncommonly rich and valuable. If I
should fail in this manner, how painful will it be for me to come back and
inform you of the destruction of all your hopes and expectations. I have
thus told you what I know will happen, and you ought to believe it.
But," added she, "if I should act so contrary to my opinion, as to sub-
mit to your wishes, and shall have sufficient courage to make the request
you desire, be assured that the sultan will either ridicule me and send me
back as a mad woman, or that he will be in such a passion, and with rea-
son too, that both you and I shall most infallibly become the victims of it."
Aladdin's mother continued to give her son many other reasons, in
order to prevail upon him to change his mind; but the charms of the prin-
cess Badroul Boudour had made too strong an impression upon the heart
of Aladdin, to suffer his intentions to be altered. He persisted in requi-
ring his mother to perform her part of what he had resolved upon; and
the regard she had for him, as well as the dread lest he should give him-
self up to some horrid excess, at length conquered her repugnance, and
she acceded to his wishes.
As it was now very late, and the time of going to the palace to be
presented to the sultan was past for that day, they let the matter rest till
the next. Aladdin and his mother talked of nothing else during the rest







ALADDIN; OR


of the day, and the former took every opportunity of saying to her all he
could think of, to confirm her resolution of going to present herself to the
sultan. But notwithstanding all that he could say, his mother could not
be persuaded that she should ever succeed in this affair; and indeed there
appeared every reason for her to be doubtful of it. My dear child,"
said she, even if the sultan should receive me as favourably as my re-
gard for you would lead me to wish, and should listen with the greatest
patience to the proposal you request me to make, will he not, even after
so gracious a reception, inquire of me what property you possess, and
where your estates are ? for he will of course in the first instance rather
ask about this matter than about your personal appearance; if, I say, he
should ask me this question, what answer do you wish me to make ?"
"Do not, mother, let us distress ourselves," replied Aladdin, about a
thing that may never happen. Let us first see how the sultan will receive
you, and what answer he will give to your request. If he should wish to
be informed of what you mention, I will find out some answer to make
him. I put the greatest confidence in my lamp, by means of which we
have been able for some years past to live in the manner we have done.
It will not desert me when I have most need of it."
His mother had not a word to say to this speech of Aladdin. She
might naturally suppose that the lamp which he mentioned would be able
to perform much more astonishing things than simply to procure them the
means of subsistence. This satisfied her, and at the same time smoothed
all the difficulties which seemed to oppose themselves to the business she
had promised to undertake for her son respecting the sultan. Aladdin,
who easily penetrated into his mother's thoughts, said to her: Above all
things, observe to keep this matter secret; for upon that depends all the
success we may either of us expect in this affair." They then separated
for the night, and retired to bed: but love, joined to the great schemes of
aggrandizement which the son had in view, prevented him from passing
the night so tranquilly as he wished. He got up at daybreak, and went
immediately to call his mother. He was anxious that she should dress






THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


herself as soon as possible, in order that she might repair to the gate of
the sultan's palace, and enter at the same time that the grand viziers and
the other officers of state went into the divan or hall of audience, where
the sultan always held his council in person.
Aladdin's mother did everything as her son wished. She took the
porcelain dish, in which the present of jewels was, and folded it up in a
very fine and white linen cloth. She then took another cloth, which was
not so fine, and tied the four corners of it together, that she might carry
it with less trouble. She afterwards set out, to the great joy of Aladdin,
on the road towards the palace of the sultan. The grand vizier, accom-
panied by the other viziers and the proper officers of the court, had
already gone in before she arrived at the gate. The crowd of persons
who had business at the divan was very great. The doors were opened,
and the mother of Aladdin went into the divan with the rest. It was a
beautiful saloon, very spacious, and with a magnificent entrance. She
stopped, and placed herself opposite to the throne of the sultan, near the
grand vizier and other officers who formed the council on both sides.
The different parties who had suits to press were called up one after the
other, according to the order in which their petitions had been presented;
and their different affairs were heard, pleaded, and determined, till the
usual hour of breaking up the council. The sultan then rose, took leave
of the members, and went back to his apartment, into which he was fol-
lowed by the grand vizier. The other viziers and officers who formed
the council then went away: as also did all those whose private business
had brought them there, some being delighted at having gained their cause,
while others were but ill satisfied with the decisions pronounced against
them; in addition to whom was a third party, still anxious to have their
business come on at as early a future meeting as possible.
Aladdin's mother, who saw the sultan arise and retire, rightly imagined
that he would not appear any more that day, as she observed that every
one was going away; she therefore determined to return home. When
Aladdin saw her come back with the present in her hand, he knew not at







ALADDIN; OR


first what to think of the success of her journey. He could hardly open
his mouth to inquire what intelligence she brought him, from the fear that
she had something unfortunate to announce. This good woman, who had
never before set her foot within the walls of a palace, and of course knew
not in the least the customs of the place, very soon relieved her son from
the embarrassment in which he was, by saying to him with an air of
gaiety: "I have seen the sultan, my son, and I am persuaded he has seen
me also. I placed myself directly opposite him; and there was no per-
son in the way to prevent his seeing me: but he was so much engaged in
speaking with those on each side of him, that I really felt compassion to
see the patience and trouble he had to listen to them. This lasted so long,
that I believe at length he was quite worn out; for he got up before any
one expected it, and retired very suddenly, without staying to hear a great
many others, who were all ranged in readiness to address him in their
turn; and indeed this gave me great pleasure; for I began to lose all pa-
tience, and was extremely tired with remaining on my feet so long.
There was, however, no other restraint; and I will not fail to return to-
morrow; the sultan will not then, perhaps, be so much engaged."
However desperate Aladdin's passion was, he was obliged to be satis-
fied with this excuse, and to summon up all his patience. He had at least
the satisfaction of knowing that his mother had got over the most difficult
part of the business, which was that of obtaining an interview with the
sultan; and therefore hoped that, like those who had spoken to him in her
presence, she would not hesitate to acquit herself of the commission with
which she was entrusted, when the favourable moment of addressing him
should arrive.
The next morning, quite as early as the preceding day, Aladdin's
mother set out for the sultan's palace with the present of jewels; but her
journey was useless. She found the gate of the divan shut, and learned
that the council never sat two days together, but alternately, and that she
must come again on the following morning. She went back with this in-
telligence to her son, who was again obliged to exert his patience. She







THE WONDERFUL LAMP.


returned again to the palace six different times on the appointed days,
always placing herself opposite to the sultan; but she was every time as
unsuccessful as at first; and would probably have gone a hundred times
as uselessly, if the sultan, who constantly saw her standing opposite to him
every day the divan sat, had not taken notice of her. This is the more
probable, as it was only those who had petitions to present or causes to
be heard, that approached the sultan, each in his turn pleading his cause
according to his rank; and Aladdin's mother was not in this situation.
One day, however, when the council was broken up, and the sultan
had retired to his apartment, he said to the grand vizier: For some time
past, I have observed a certain woman, who has come regularly every day
I hold my council, and who carries something in her hand wrapped up in
a linen cloth. She remains standing, from the beginning of the audience
till it is concluded; and always takes care to place herself opposite to
me. Do you know what she wants?"
The grand vizier, who did not wish to appear ignorant of the matter,
though in fact he knew no more about it than the sultan himself, replied:
"Your majesty, sir, is not ignorant that women often make complaints
upon the most rival subjects; she appears to have come to your majesty
with some complaint that they have sold her some bad meat, or some-
thing else of equal insignificance." This answer, however, did not satisfy
the sultan. "The very next day the council sits," said he to the grand
vizier, "if this woman returns, do not fail to call her, that I may hear what
she has to say." The grand vizier only answered by kissing Kis hand,
and placing it on his head, to show that he would rather lose it than fail
in his duty.
The mother of Aladdin had already been so much in the habit of
going to the palace on the days the council met, that she now thought it
no trouble, provided she by these means proved to her son that she ne-
glected nothing that depended upon her, and that he had therefore no rea-
son to complain of her. She consequently returned to the palace the







ALADDIN; OR


next day the council met, and placed herself near the entrance of the
divan, opposite to the sultan, as had been her usual practice.
The grand vizier had not made his report of any business before the
sultan perceived Aladdin's mother. Touched with compassion at the ex-
cessive patience she had shown, In the first place," said he to the grand
vizier, "and for fear you should forget it, do you not observe the woman
whom I mentioned to you the last time? order her to come here, and we
will begin by hearing what she has to say, and expedite her business."
The grand vizier immediately pointed out this woman to the chief of the
ushers, who was standing near him, ready to receive his orders, and de-
sired him to go and bring her before the sultan. The officer went directly
to the mother of Aladdin, and having made a sign to her, she followed
him to the foot of the throne, where he left her, and went back to his place
near the grand vizier.
Aladdin's mother, following the example that so many others whom
she had seen approach the sultan had set her, prostrated herself, with her
face towards the carpet which covered the steps of the throne; and she
remained in that situation till the sultan commanded her to rise. She did
so; and the sultan then addressed her in these words: "For a long time
past, my good woman, I have seen you regularly attend my divan, and re-
main near the entrance from the time it began to assemble till it broke up.
What is the business that brings you here ?" On hearing this, she pros-
trated herself a second time, and on rising, thus answered: "High mon-
arch, mightier than all the monarchs of the world, before I inform your
majesty of the extraordinary and almost incredible cause that compels me
to appear before ybur sublime throne, I entreat you to pardon the bold-
ness, nay I might say the impudence of the request I am going to make
to you. It is of so uncommon a nature, that I tremble, and feel almost
overcome with shame to propose it to my sultan." In order, however,
that she might have full liberty to explain herself, the sultan commanded
every one to leave the divan, and remained with only his grand vizier in




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