• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Alphabet
 Three little kittens
 Back Cover






Title: Our friends
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082140/00001
 Material Information
Title: Our friends
Alternate Title: Three little kittens
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 29 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Wolf & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Wolf & Co.
Place of Publication: London
Philadelphia
Publication Date: 1895
 Subjects
Subject: Alphabet rhymes   ( lcsh )
Alphabet books -- 1895   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre: Alphabet books   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
United States -- New York -- New York
United States -- Illinois -- Chicago
 Notes
Summary: A rhyming alphabet followed by a poetic version of Three little kittens.
General Note: Date from inscription.
General Note: "Untearable" -cover.
General Note: Imprint also notes Wolf & Co., location in New York and Chicago.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082140
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002043925
oclc - 33343953
notis - AKN1823

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Front Matter
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Alphabet
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
    Three little kittens
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Back Cover
        Back Cover 1
        Back Cover 2
Full Text







































































The Baldwin Library
Univerity
(RmB















1 Ii
- ~. 1


V -


'2 I


Z




1 craur/
j Nb 6/1a_7S

~~~a~ MRsKr'r


Our
Q V,-Sic ,


Friends.


Londan :
DEAN & SON, LIMITED,
16Oa, Fleet Street, E.C.


WOLF & CO.,
Philadelphia,
Jril, !lorh & Ghicago.


U1111~
CI~L~)


~tpt~i
.r


I-
~
'5=--, ---~










.,as'tI ld
'* 2~


& ~ 'p.
.1'

N,:
4-

#_


Bobbie

and Ben,
Are two bold
fishermen,
They're going to
catch lots,
But they don't
know when.


Bob I & Ben
JiL
- i-. .,- `


"IO
A \
N


Apples round
and apples red,
Give me one,

please,"Algy said;

But all that Annie
had to say
Was Go and have
a game of play."


*71
21










1.


Carlotta


c62)




Carlotta fair
With the golden hair,
How happy you look
In your garden there.














Douglas has eyes of sunny blue,


His heart is loving,
is true;


his laugh


Douglas



Dd

Merry and manly, frank and free,
Douglas is just the boy for me!


~--~"~;"~~~=3FTT~-fr:
`i '.~YJ~~olweoa


rA Q
JA








<' /- ,


"-;' ,- I "t
Irr


<1* Edwin
'. ..

.-,.--
'


1
.lr


,p. ., .


I


Edwin saw an Earwig crawl,
Up his father's


garden wall;


'q14f~ii)


Screamed, the foolish little man,
Off the frightened Earwig ran.








Fanny &. Fred

Fannyand
Fred and

roggee ', '
Met on the cli ffs
by the sea:
"How do you do?"
said they to him, I III^^:
But never a wordd L-
croaked he!


.', ~ z.


.i


r W


f


C


"1.


















Gertie-Pertie met young
Bertie,
Coming down the stair;
Bertie kissed her for her
sister,
Gertie pulled his hair!..



_. ,.
Harriet







,`-. ls little Harriet,
Sweetest maid I ever met;
Mother's treasure, Father's pet.







(j9$


Ivy Ivan


-1


Ivy and Ivan
Went out on


the ice;
Said Ivan


to.


Ivy
"Oh, skating's
so nice "


j .


. '


'ni Jennie
and her
Jackdaw,
Chatter all the
day;
I really couldn't
tell you
Which has the
more to say !


J


'"-


!~9;
I
'
!:
~--~

L:
5
5


:-~r"c~l






( 'r
s. f4, ?




Kafe Kari.


't7


La ece.

La wren ce.


k


K, IKe and Karl
S: morning,


tri


i.~i,


V Ji
v-&Y


Lr I


/i
*/'


Sweet little ucy
Is learning to skate,


one


Made a sno\\ma n fine;
But alas, away he ran
In the bright sunshine.


6'



* I..j

'I,-


'4j

:~


nd Lawrence is
teaching her
Early and late.


I -
w-' -'


2" Z--- .4,


-
:c~
::

? :~:~
; .:~



















Maudie .
M :..,
Maudie, Maudie,. ... -
Going to school,
Pouts and frowns
As a general rule;
But Maudie, Maudie, --
When school is done,
Sings like the birdies %
And smiles like the sun, ,









-*-- -- *
t _.. .-.[ .- ,..







p,',
.- o.
^*- '


)\
/ p

4r I









-r -


I' Na
Nancy


Nancvys garden's
full of flowers,


Nancy
there
hours;


spends
all her


Yellow gown and
locks so curly,
She's a flower
herself, sweet
girlie!


* ~4..1


i~ J


14 :



























Br
A
P1
In


S and his organ,
Through busy
England roam;
And while he
plays,

sof Italy -his
home.





other Percy V CI
id sistr P Iuine, ,
Pau ne Percy

*the meadows
green.
't .,' .


c











,I i "p _-









Queenie's a maid just eight
years old,
,- She, for her crown, has Ruby Rober
ii1 R uby Robert
curls of gold .

r-- t
1I. t'. k II I








Through the 4 1 f I.;'
green lanesW
in the summer *
weather ,
Ruby and Robert ,, A
wander to et"her. '-
.. a ', '-.* '



























When Susie sings,the
birds are dumb,
And far and near to listen come.


* -V- "-


.,; ),.


Tom my
caught a "- .
thrush one .-
day, n
But, it would not
sing ; .... l .. .y A.
Then he let it fly A.d it-a ... .


Little feathered thing!


' .. "-,


.1v.


away,


~lyr.












iJU

Ur.\in, Urwin,
come when I
call,
And pick the
grapes that
grow on
'- the
^ wall.


r;!-
~.~cr
3
J_..
rI,


1,


, Violet ggeM


Violet, sweet

Violet,
Aren't you glad
that we two met ?"
"Very glad indeed,"
said she,
" Two's the best of
company !"


/ v
womb., SI


"1


;. 4 I:~-


'


r
r.;l-l~ L

r















*~~3 pK~j :-

k~~~si~


/V





V Walter went
a fishing,
Thought he'd
catch a Whale,
Very soon, by
putting
Salt upon its tail.
Cried the Water-


SWagtail,
"Really that's absurd-
Everybody surely knows
That's how you catch a bird!"


-ill~


/


Young Xerxes
out a sliding
\\'ent t,
The ice, alas, was
thin;
Now if he'd staved
upon dry land
He wouldn't have
tumbled in.


~~--* Li'




e~


L -i 1


Xerxes


: ~3P"/
~he


*>












Y-
Yac htsman


- .. I", ,- "-. -


.
pip

IP~e~~,"zb";"t""41


I'll be a
Yachtsman
when I'm a man,
Away to sea I'll go;
I'm learning Onow as
fast as I can
The way to sing
SYeo-ho."


. ... .,-


Zoe ;
*f .v-41 / *


z'


Zoe's the last, the sweet
little pet,
And that is the end of the Alphabet.


T/





















" I J


Ul"


F hr" -


i


Li


-a m INNIP
.mI _
-y~~a..~ *uIt~~' mq'P~'~p


~sa*-
~;
rr
D ~n~-
~LY


The Three LiLtle KiI[-en, have loSL their Millen'.


'-'P~r
IiR
I~~
~S'c~
.4'
ir;


L..--


:


!


., !


.: .
.. -


quo *
na~~n~C II IDB


.7li4- .
*Wd
^". *j


B








uee littlee %ittens.
JHREE little Kittens in sunshiny weather,
SWere keeping their birthday all together,
And their mother had given each one of these kittens,
That very morning, a smart pair of mittens.
To tell the tale truly, as every one should,
Sometimes they were naughty, sometimes they were good;
But one thing is certain-these three little Kittens
Looked charmingly pretty, when dressed in their mittens.
"I think," said their mother, "to-day, I will try
To make, for your dinner, a big birthday pie,
With a thick crust well flavoured with sugar and spice,
And the inside well filled with small birds and fat mice."
The pie was fast baking, and smelling so nice,
With the mice and the bird, the sugar and spice,
When quickly down stairs came the three little Kittens,
Dressed ready for dinner in ribbons and mittens.
All smiling and happy they sat in a row,
Their tails hanging down, ribbons tied in a bow,
And whispering softly, "Which do you like best?
A mouse or a bird?-I like milk with the rest."
Mrs. Pussy was shocked, "My dears, you are thinking
A great deal too much of your eating and drinking:--
Run out in the garden, till dinner is ready,
Don't tear your new mittens,-be quiet and steady,"
They went to the spot where the trees in a ring,
Stood all round the grass, and here was a swing,
Into it scrambled the three little Kittens,
Completely forgetting their bows and their mittens.













'N.


)'
Is4


a t.~


4,
-tt.


lt


S.:


p


I~


i-
c~
;;s"'
,
-*-
.;
?
c

c
I Ih!l c~c.-': ~


The Three Li tHe Kilten/Sin eachh oF their M\iL-en#.
l- cun


'


S,*
-.*1


i'
r



* ^
'*


r :
1.;~


i~ '~
X


A.
* "



jjkL


C






Yhree Little Kittens.


The Kittens swung low, the Kittens swung high,
They swung till their toes nearly touched the blue sky,
A.nd when they were tired they jumped down to look
At the yellow old duck, that swam in the brook.

They thought it was such a curious whim,
That a bird should not fly, but prefer to swim;
As they stood watching, one of the Kittens
Exclaimed in a fright, What's become of my mittens? "

"And mine? cried the second, "And mine ?" cried the third.
Then they looked at their paws, without saying a word,
They certainly were the most careless of Kittens,
Not one of the three had got on its mittens.

At length, when their speech they began to recover,
They said to each. other, "Let's go and tell mother!
She'll know what to do." So the three little Kittens
Ran back to the house without any mittens.

Now the Kittens, though careless, did wisely in this,
For it's best to tell mother, whatever's amiss;
She will certainly know how to smooth out the tangle,
Which is better than stopping to cry or to wrangle,

Mrs. Puss was astonished, as well she might be,
"I really don't know what to say to you three,
To lose your new mittens!-a terrible thing!
Perhaps they fell off while you sat in the swing?

Better go there and look! It is no use to cry,
But till you have found them, you shall have no pie.
I cannot give pie to three naughty Kittens,
Who have lost in ten minutes, three pairs of mittens!"
































fly

It
Lp

"; 2-



kt .wk __


*i .:


4-


*

r


m .. A,.


j.


I 'i.-' 'ql^-B~~?'\. -'
-'. -,
* *.*-A' > ^ 1-.
I lr,". '{ '" *


The Three Lif le Ki en4 have Found their Nlrlens


A r *t

ii. v1


- ,


- '


it



I A ''


'1


~R"-i'; ~
)i~l ;
I''
i
~ t
.il
::


1; l"t,.


.. ; i.


'. ( I


. j .,


,j


;.-r

" :'
'"
:;I


_l l


-Ar



er-l






Three Little Kittens.


Sobbing and crying went these careless Kittens,
Back to the garden to search for their mittens,-
In the coach-house, the stable, and heedless of danger,
They even turned over the oats in the manger.

They looked in the kennel-the dog was away,-
They climbed to the loft and searched in the hay,-
In the cucumber-frame, the orchard, the vinery,--
Nowhere could they find a trace of their finery.

They hunted about in neat flower-beds,
They sat down and puzzled their dear little heads,
"They are not by the swing. Where can they be?
Why, there they are up in the top of that tree!"

Up the tree joyfully clambered the Kittens,
And brought down triumphantly three pairs of mittens,
"The wind must have blown them up ever so high,
Oh, mother, we've found them! Where is the pie?"

"Ah, I thought you would find them if only you tried,
You see you were silly, you need not have cried.
If you can't do a thing at once, it is plain,
The very best plan is to try it again.

Now come in to dinner, tie up your bows,
Put on your mittens, turn out your toes."
Down they sat gaily, the pie was a treat,
The birds were so fat, and the sugar so sweet.

At last it was eaten, and then the three Kittens,
Were rather dismayed at the state of their mittens,
All sticky with sugar and smeared with the spice;
Mrs. Pussy frowned severely, "That's not at all nice.














pI


4 'I


a, /


-i..
*jflu


-~1


,1'

V .


TheThree Little KiLtenA eating Iheir Pie.


I .1'.


( 'I


::,.: ?
i

I:I '.s;
1,:--e B


1
~L








Three Little Kittens.


To put pie on your mittens. Pray what do you meau ?
You are the naughtiest Kittens that ever were seen!
I thought you were eating too quickly, dear! dear .
Your mittens are ruined completely, I fear."

The nursery was at the top of the house,
Up stole each Kitten as soft as a mouse,
They poured out warm water, they got lots of soap,
They hung near the fire a short piece of rope.

They washed and they washed !--Oh, how those three Kittens
Rubbed, pounded, and scrubbed those three pairs of mittens,
Then wrung them out well and hung up to dry,
And sat down to watch them with hope raising high.

The mittens dried quickly, the mittens dried clean,
There wasn't a, smear nor a speck to be seen,
They put them on carefully, dancing with glee,
Rushed into the drawing-room-" Dear mother, see!

" We've washed all our mittens as spotless as ever,
Don't you think, mother, for once we've been clever?"
" What my darling children, washed all your mittens?
Let me look! Yes, I see. You are very good Kittens!

I hope you have not made your clothes at all damp,
Get ready for tea, and ring for the lamp.
You shall each have some cream and a large slice of cake.
Then go early to bed and don't lie awake.

Here ends the tale of the three little Kittens,
And the story of losing and finding their mittens.
Though they were careless, they tried to be good,
And to mend their mistake, as everyone should.
4


















%p


Pt',,
$ K
/`
/


r




4''


- T.ji


* *~e*---~-'


X


~;~"r1~


/-


I ae
-4t~' gta
41 A'i
.ua ~ aI
%'1% 4%


Si *


A,,


TheThree Lit-He Kit-en, washing their Mit-eng.


I~ ?82:il
c
^.
i~.;F :
" 9


~8. j




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs