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 Table of Contents
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 Abstract and acknowledgements
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 Appendices
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FGS FEOL



Florida petroleum production and exploration
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Title: Florida petroleum production and exploration
Physical Description: Archival
Language: English
Creator: Lloyd, Jacqueline M.
Florida Geological Survey
Publisher: Florida Geological Survey
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Fla.
Publication Date: 1994
 Notes
General Note: Florida Geological Survey information circular 110
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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Letter of transmittal
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Table of Contents
        Page v
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
    Abstract and acknowledgements
        Page vi
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Appendices
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Back Cover
        Page 31
        Page 32
Full Text




P.K. YONGE LIBRARY OF
FLORIDA HISTORY



STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Virginia B. Wetherell, Secretary



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL SERVICES
Nevin Smith, Director



FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and Chief




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 110


1992 AND 1993 FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION

By
Jacqueline M. Lloyd


INCLUDING FLORIDA PETROLEUM RESERVE ESTIMATES

By
Charles H. Tootle






Published for the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Tallahassee
1994



































P.K. YONGE '
LIBRARY OF
FLORIDA HISTORY

UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA LIBRARIES












LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


Florida Geological Survey
Tallahassee



Governor Lawton Chiles
Florida Department of Environmental Protection
Tallahassee, Florida 32301

Dear Governor Chiles:

The Florida Geological Survey, Division of Administrative and Technical Services,
Department of Environmental Protection, is publishing "1992 and 1993 Florida Petroleum
Production and Exploration" as its Information Circular 110. This information is useful
to the state and to the oil and gas industry in planning wise development and
conservation of Flcrida's oil and gas resources.

Respectfully yours,


Walter Schmidt, Ph.D., P.G.
State Geologist and Chief
Florida Geological Survey


























Printed for the
Florida Geological Survey

Tallahassee
1994

ISSN 0085-0616


iv








TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page

Abstract .............. ............................... vi
Acknowledgem ents .......................................... vi
Introduction .............................................. 1
1992 and 1993 Production .................................... 1
1992 and 1993 Onshore Drilling Activity ........................... 7
Proposed Everglades Exploration ................................ 11
Offshore Drilling Activity ....................................... 13
Exploratory Drilling in State Waters .......................... 13
Exploratory Drilling in Federal Waters, Offshore Florida ........... 16
1992 and 1993 Geophysical Exploration Activity ..................... 17
Summary ................................ ....... .......... 17
References .............................................. 20

ILLUSTRATIONS

1. South Florida oil field location map ........................... 2
2. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous,
south Florida ........................................... 3
3. Northwest Florida oil field location map ........................ 4
4. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous,
north est Florida ........................................ 5
5. Oil and gas production, 1943 through 1993 .................... 6
6. Jay field and statewide oil production comparison, 1970 through 1993 8
7. 1991, 1992, and 1993 oil production comparison for active Florida oil
fields, excluding Jay field .................................. 9
8. 1992 and 1993 exploration wells ............................ 10
9. Mesozoic structural features in Florida and offshore ............... 12
10. Exploration wells, Florida state waters, including Coastal Petroleum's
proposed exploratory well locations .......................... 14
11. 1992 and 1993 geophysical exploration activity .................. 15
12. Exploration wells and historic leases, federal waters, offshore Florida 18

APPENDICES

1. Florida oil field discovery well data ........................... 22
2. 1992, 1993 and cumulative production data .................... 23
3. 1992 and 1993 field well statistics ........................... 24
4. 1992 and 1993 wildcat wells drilled .......................... 25
5. Oil exploration wells drilled in Florida state waters ................ 26
6. 1992 and 1993 geophysical exploration activity .................. 29
7. Florida oil and gas reserve estimates ......................... 30









STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Virginia B. Wetherell, Secretary



DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL SERVICES
Nevin Smith, Director



FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Walter Schmidt, State Geologist and Chief




INFORMATION CIRCULAR NO. 110


1992 AND 1993 FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION

By
Jacqueline M. Lloyd


INCLUDING FLORIDA PETROLEUM RESERVE ESTIMATES

By
Charles H. Tootle






Published for the

FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
Tallahassee
1994








ABSTRACT


Florida oil production began to decline in 1979 and generally has continued to do
so. However, statewide production increased during 1992 and 1993 due to increased
production at the Jay field, the largest producing field in Florida. Exploration activity
during 1992 and 1993 was very limited. Only five onshore exploratory wells were drilled
during 1992 and 1993. Three of these were in the Florida panhandle in Escambia and
Santa Rosa Counties; two were in south Florida in Hendry and Collier Counties. All five
exploratory wells were plugged and abandoned as dry holes.

Geophysical exploration conducted during 1992 and 1993 was limited to the Florida
panhandle and only covered 41.4 miles of seismic lines. In addition to this completed
geophysical exploration, a permit expired for an extensive offshore seismic, gravity, and
magnetic survey. This exploration would potentially have explored a dense grid off of
Florida's Gulf coast extending from offshore of Apalachicola, Franklin County to offshore
of Naples, Collier County.

One exploratory well permit was pending in federal waters off Florida at the close of
1993. This well would be the third to be drilled in the Destin Dome area by Chevron.
The two previously drilled wells were classified by the federal government as producible
Norphlet gas discoveries.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Several Florida Geological Survey staff members contributed to this report. Charles
Tootle compiled oil field data and production statistics. The Oil and Gas Section
maintains files on permitted exploratory and development drilling. Don Hargrove, Ed
Garrett, and Catherine Florko provided comments and assistance in using these files.
Don Hargrove and Ed Garrett also tabulated and assisted with the interpretation of the
geophysical exploration permit data. Jim Jones and Ted Kiper drafted some of the
figures. Jon Arthur, Joel Duncan, Catherine Florko, Ed Garrett, Ed Lane, Tom Scott, and
Walt Schmidt edited the manuscript and suggested improvements. Claire Severn
(Florida Department of Revenue) provided oil and gas severance tax data.







Information Circular 110


1992 AND 1993 FLORIDA PETROLEUM
PRODUCTION AND EXPLORATION
By
Jacqueline M. Lloyd, P.G. #74


INTRODUCTION

There are two major oil producing
areas in Florida. One is the Sunniland
trend in south Florida, the other is the
Jay trend in the western panhandle area.
The Sunniland trend includes 14 oil
fields; the western panhandle includes
eight. Appendix 1 lists the discovery
well data for these fields. Uoyd (1991)
includes descriptions of each of these 22
oil fields. South Florida production
began with Florida's first oil discovery at
Sunniland field in September, 1943. Of
the 14 south Florida oil fields, seven are
active, four are temporarily shut-in, and
three are plugged and abandoned.
These fields are oriented along a
northwest-southeast trend through Lee,
Hendry, Collier, and Dade Counties
(Figure 1). This trend has become
known as the Sunniland trend.
Production is principally from rudistid
reefs found in the upper one hundred
feet of the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland
Formation (Figure 2). Depth to
Sunniland production averages about
11,500 feet below mean sea level (MSL).

Production in the western panhandle
began with the discovery of Jay field in
June, 1970. The eight panhandle oil
fields are located in Escambia and Santa
Rosa Counties, Florida (Figure 3). Five
fields are active and three are plugged
and abandoned. Production is from
Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation
carbonates and Norphlet Sandstone


sands (Figure 4). Depth to Jurassic
production averages about 15,100 feet
below MSL.

1992 AND 1993 PRODUCTION

Appendix 2 lists 1992, 1993, and
cumulative production statistics for each
of Florida's oil fields including oil, gas,
and water production data. Appendix 3
lists 1992 and 1993 field well statistics
including the number of production,
injection, shut-in, and temporarily
abandoned wells for each field.
Florida oil production peaked at 47.5
million barrels in 1978. Production
began to decline in 1979 and generally
has continued to do so since then
(Figure 5). Total oil production for 1992,
however, was 5,424,516 barrels, up 15
percent from 1991. Oil production
increased another three percent during
1993 for a 1993 total of 5,604,126
barrels. Total gas production increased
29 percent in 1992 and six percent in
1993. Gas production totals were
7,623,553 thousand cubic feet (MCF) in
1992 and 8,055,745 MCF in 1993.
This increased production is
primarily due to an increase in
production at Jay field, which dominates
Florida production. The increase in
production at Jay field over this two-year
period is probably not due to any
change in recovery methods, but is more
likely due to field or well-specific
management (Charles Tootle,
Professional Engineer, and Joel Duncan,


















EXPLANATION

O ACTIVE OIL FIELD
0 INACTIVE OIL FIELD


LOCATION


0 10 20 MILES

0 10 20 30 KILDMETERS


Figure 1. South Florida oil field location map.








Information Circular 110


BROWN
DOLOMITE
ZONE
















BASAL
CLASTICS


LIMESTONE



W CLASTICS


P DOLOMITE


R SHALE


o vv


ANHYDRITE


Figure 2. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, south
Florida (modified from Applegate, et al., 1981).


FGS060491








Florida Geological Survey


R33W R32W R31W R30W R29W R28W R27W R26W


EXPLANATION


0 ACTIVE OIL FIELD
0 INACTIVE OIL FIELD


LOCATION




-N-


SCALE


10 20 MILES

10 20 30 KILOMETERS










Figure 3. Northwest Florida oil field location map.


z
I-


GI 1



I )


z
i .--



I I-

-c









FGSOI0491











Information Circular 110


m
d



- 135 -



- 140


- 145-


GROUPS AND FORMATIONS LITHOLOGY


STAGE



BERRIASIAN


UPPER
JURASSIC


- 155 -


OXFORDIAN




CALLOVIAN


COTTON VALLEY GROUP
UNDIFFERENTIATED





HAYNESVILLE
FORMATION



BUCKNER
MEMBER
(LOWER
HAYNESVILLE
FORMATION) V

SUMACKOVER
FORMATION



NORPHLET SANDSTONE


LOUANN SALT


SILTSTONE




K DOLOMITE




ANHYDRITE


CONGLOMERATE




SALT


FGS070491


TITHONIAN



UPPER
KIMMERIDGIAN





LOWER
KIMMERIDGIAN


Figure 4. Stratigraphic nomenclature, Middle Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous, northwest
Florida (modified from Ottman, et al., 1973).


LOWER
CRETACEOUS


- 160


MIDDLE
JURASSIC


SANDSTONE



LIMESTONE




CLASTICS


. .


""~~~""'


SYSTEM









Florida Geological Survey


Explanation
Field: Sunniland
Discovery Date: 9-26-43














Sunniland Forty Mile Bend Sunoco Felda
9-26-43 2-1-54 7-22-64


Mid Felda
10-13-77
Baxter Island


Raccoon Point
6-28-78


8-11-77
Pepper Hammock
wetwate 9-28-78
4-22-77

Lehigh Park
7-30-74

Seminole
11-14-73
Townsend Canal
Bear Island 6-27-82
12-5-72 Bluff Springs
3-25-84
Blackjack Creek Corkscrew
2-14-72 11-10-85
Mt Carmel McLelan
12-19-71 2-19-8
Coldwater
Jay Creek
6-15-70 6-4-
McDavi
Lake Trafford I-14.-8
3-30-69
West Felda
8-2-66


-I


43 47 51 55 59 63 67 71 75

YEAR


--- Oil -+- Gas


Figure 5. Oil and gas production, 1943 through 1993.


50-


20-




10-


79 83 87 91







Florida Geological Survey


Professional Geologist, Florida
Geological Survey (FGS), personal
communication, 1994).
The Jay field was discovered in 1970
and reached peak production in 1978.
It accounts for about 70 percent of the
1992 oil production total, about 71
percent of the 1993 total, and about 79
percent of the total statewide production
since 1943. Figure 6 compares
statewide annual oil production with Jay
field annual oil production for 1970
through 1993, clearly showing Jay field's
dominance in Florida oil production
trends. The Jay field production curve is
typical of oil fields produced with tertiary
recovery methods (David Curry, Oil and
Gas Section Administrator, FGS,
personal communication, 1992).
Production has generally leveled off
since 1987 (Figure 6). This agrees with
the projections made by Christian et al.
(1981) in their discussion of tertiary
recovery estimates for Jay field. They
estimated that tertiary recovery would be
terminated in 1996, followed by rapid
decline to depletion in about 2004.
Figure 7 is a histogram comparing
1991, 1992, and 1993 oil production for
all Florida oil fields except the Jay field.
Jay field data would obscure the
information for all other fields since its
production for 1991 was more than five
times greater than that of Raccoon Point
field, the next most productive field in
Florida during 1991. Northwest Florida
production increased by 24 percent from
1991 to 1992 and by three percent from
1992 to 1993. South Florida production
decreased by 11 percent from 1991 to
1992 and increased by five percent from
1992 to 1993. Oil and gas severance
taxes collected for 1992 and 1993


totaled 8.2 million dollars and 7.8 million
dollars, respectively (Claire Severn,
Florida Department of Revenue, written
communication, 1994). Florida currently
ranks twenty-first in crude oil production
and twenty-third in natural gas
production for the nation.

1992 AND 1993 ONSHORE
DRILLING ACTIVITY

Five exploratory wells and no
development wells were drilled during
1992 and 1993 (Appendix 4, Figure 8).
All five exploratory wells were plugged
and abandoned as dry holes. Two,
Permits 1242 and 1275, were drilled in
south Florida in Collier and Hendry
Counties and targeted the Sunniland
Formation at about 11,350 and 11,650
feet below MSL, respectively.
Permit 1275, located in Collier
County about 2.5 miles southwest of
Lake Trafford field, was the first attempt
to drill a horizontal exploration well in
Florida. This drilling method potentially
enhances well productivity by increasing
the volume of producing formation
exposed to the well bore. The well was
drilled vertically to a depth of 11,402 feet
below MSL, at which point the drill
began to deviate from the vertical. The
Sunniland Formation was penetrated at
a vertical depth of 11,635 feet below
MSL. True horizontal drilling began
within the Sunniland at the total vertical
depth of 11,885 feet below MSL. Total
lateral displacement was 3,503 feet, of
which 3,451 feet were drilled through the
Sunniland. A drill stem test from 11,690
to 11,817 feet below MSL produced only
a trace of oil.
Three exploratory wells were drilled in






Florida Geological Survey


YEAR


-*- Jay Field -+- Statewide


Figure 6. Jay field and statewide oil production comparison, 1970 through 1993.






Information Circular 110


K 1991
71992
1993


2 4 6
ACTIVE FLORIDA


8 10 12 14 16
OIL FIELDS EXCLUDING JAY


Figure 7. 1991, 1992, and 1993 oil production comparison for active Florida oil fields
excluding Jay field.








Florida Geological Survey


2.5 TIMES ENLARGEMENT





LEGEND
-N APPROXIMATE WELL LOCATION
P-280 FLORIDA PERMIT NUMBER



SCALE

0 50 100 150 MILES
SI II I I I I
0 80 160 240 KILOMETERS





Figure 8. 1992 and 1993 exploration wells.


. L .. FGS120492







Florida Geological Survey


northwest Florida in Escambia and Santa
Rosa Counties. Two of these, Permits
1273 and 1283, tested the Smackover
Formation at about 16,200 and 16,100
feet below MSL, respectively. These two
wells represent attempts to extend the
Jay trend to the southeast toward the
Pensacola Arch area (Figure 9). This
area has also been the focus of
geophysical exploration during 1992 and
1993 (discussed later in Geophysical
Exploration Section).
The other northwest Florida
exploration well, Permit 1284, targeted
the Tuscahoma Sand unit of the Eocene
Wilcox Group at the relatively shallow
depth of about 3,100 feet below MSL.
Oil is produced from Wilcox Group
sands in southwestern-most Mississippi
and east-central Louisiana (Evans, 1987).
A review of Evans' discussion of the
Wilcox trend in Mississippi yielded no
apparent reason to expect this trend to
extend beyond southwestern Mississippi.
Culbertson and Miller (1990) analyzed
the cost of exploration in Mississippi and
Alabama and found Wilcox exploration to
be the least successful with a 6.5
percent new field discovery rate for the
six-year period of 1981 through 1986.
Despite these od s, Advent Oil and
Operating of Pensacola, Florida, decided
to pursue this location (Myers, 1992).
A 73-year old Cottage Hill, Florida
resident (Clyde Creighton) said he and a
friend discovered an oil field at the site in
1958 using a "doodle bug." The doodle
bug consisted of a vial of oil attached to
a metal rod that bobbed downward in
the direction of oil. Creighton claimed
that a well drilled near the site in 1958
gushed black crude oil but the drilling
company plugged the well and left the


state because they had not obtained
proper state permits. He was confident
that the new well, 300 feet north of the
former, would succeed: "I used the
doodle bug and checked it out" (Myers,
1992).

PROPOSED EVERGLADES
EXPLORATION

Shell Western has proposed drilling
a wildcat well on the Miccosukee Indian
Reservation located within the
Everglades in south Florida. The drill
site would be on Indian land north of
Interstate 75 and just west of the L-28
canal in Broward County. The well
would be directionally drilled with the
bottom hole located about 4,600 feet
east of the surface hole location and
beneath one of South Florida's protected
water conservation areas. The proposed
location is about 12 miles northeast of
Raccoon Point oil field which produces
from the Cretaceous Sunniland
Formation (Figure 2) at about 11,375 feet
below MSL. Raccoon Point field is the
southeastern-most field in the Sunniland
trend (Figure 1). The well's proposed
true vertical depth of 17,700 feet below
MSL would be close to Florida's land
depth record of 18,642 feet below MSL
set at the Bass Enterprises-Collier
Company No. 12-2 well (Permit 778), a
dry hole drilled in Collier County in 1975
(Oil and Gas Journal, 1991).
Shell submitted its application for a
permit to drill this well to the United
States Bureau of Land Management in
January 1991. Both Shell and the
Miccosukee tribe believe the state has
no jurisdiction in this area, thus no
application has been filed with the state.








Information Circular 110


SCALE
0 50 100 150
0 80 160 240


FGS120692


Figure 9. Mesozoic structural features in Florida and offshore (modified from Applegate,
1987; Miller, 1986; Klitgord, et al., 1984; and Mancini and Benson, 1980).







Florida Geological Survey


At the end of 1993, the Bureau of Land
Management was in the process of
finalizing the Environmental Impact
Statement for the proposed exploration.
Announcement of the federal "record of
decision" is expected in mid-summer
1994 (Mary Dokianos, Shell Western,
personal communication, 1994).

OFFSHORE DRILLING ACTIVITY

State ownership of the continental
shelf off Florida extends three miles into
the Atlantic Ocean and about 10.4 miles
(three marine leagues) into the Gulf of
Mexico. The federal government
controls resources beyond these state
boundaries out to 200 miles; this area is
designated the "Outer Continental Shelf"
(OCS). "OCS" or "federal waters," in this
context, does not refer to ownership, but
rather to responsibility (Johnson and
Tucker, 1987).

Exploratory Drilling in State Waters

A total of 19 wells were drilled in
Florida state waters between 1947 and
1983 (Appendix 5 and Figure 10).
Effective July 1992, all drilling activity
was prohibited in Florida state waters
(Lloyd and Ragland, 1991), except for
within pre-existing lease areas. Only one
company, Coastal Petroleum, has pre-
existing mineral-rights leases in Florida
state waters. Coastal has held these
leases since 1944 in a three-mile wide
band, 7.4 to 10.4 miles offshore,
extending from Apalachicola Bay to
Naples. The leased area is shown as
the offshore shaded area on Figure 11
(this coincides with the company's
permitted geophysical exploration area).


Subsequent to the offshore-drilling
ban, Coastal filed a lawsuit against the
state, claiming that the ban was
effectively a seizure of the company's
offshore lease assets, for which the state
had accepted annual lease payments
since 1944. The suit was suspended
when a federal judge declared that the
company had no case because the state
had not denied any applications for
drilling within the lease areas.
Subsequently, in March 1992, Coastal
applied for five offshore drilling permits,
two off Franklin County, and three off
Sarasota, Charlotte, and Collier Counties
(Figure 10).
The Department of Natural
Resources required detailed reports on
zero-discharge drilling operations,
hydrogen-sulfide safety, hurricane safety
and spill response plans. Coastal
submitted the required documents for
only one of the sites, Permit 1281
(Figure 10). A bond of 550 million
dollars was required for this site to cover
potential spill damage. The company
offered its leases as collateral to cover
the bond requirement and completed its
application for Permit 1281. This
application was submitted to the
Governor and Cabinet for consideration
in January 1993 and was denied.
Coastal never completed the remaining
four applications and, on that basis, they
were denied in June 1993.
The information obtained from the 19
wells that were drilled in state waters
prior to the ban may be useful in future
decisions concerning offshore
exploration and development in federal
waters. The 19 offshore wells tested
three different potential oil horizons. Ten
of the wells were within the South Florida








Florida Geological Survey


-N-



1


LEGEND

APPROXIMATE WELL LOCATION

P-280 FLORIDA PERMIT NUMBER

TOTAL DEPTH OF WELL,
FEET BELOW MSL

1959 WELL COMPLETION DATE

A COASTAL PETROLEUM'S PROPOSED
EXPLORATORY WELL LOCATIONS



SCALE

0 50 100 150 MILES

0 80 160 240 KILOMETERS
0 80 160 240 KILOMETERS


Figure 10. Exploration wells, Florida state waters, including Coastal Petroleum's
proposed exploratory well locations.


P-304
10,563
1963


P-297
12.560
1961


P-275
15,422
1959
*
P-292
7,686 P-298
1961 12,793
1962


P-22
15,432
1947


FGS120592







Information Circular 110


-N-t




LEGEND

PERMITTED AND SURVEYED

W PERMITTEDj NOT SURVEYED

APPLICATION PENDING


SCALE
0 50 100 150 MILES
I I 80 1 0 iI IKI I OME
0 80 160 240 KILOMETERS


FGS120892


Figure 11. 1992 and 1993 geophysical exploration activity.







Florida Geological Survey


Basin (off Charlotte and Lee Counties
and off the Florida Keys, Monroe
County, Figures 9 and 10) and targeted
the Lower Cretaceous. The six wells
drilled off the Florida panhandle sought
to extend the onshore (and offshore
Alabama) Jurassic production (Figures 3
and 4). The remaining three wells drilled
off the northern portion of the Gulf coast
(Permits 304, 382 and 383) were
Cretaceous or possibly Paleozoic tests
(Applegate and Uoyd, 1985).
As shown in Appendix 5, only one of
the wells drilled in state waters had a
significant oil show. A drill stem test of
the Gulf Oil-Florida State Lease 826-Y
(Permit 275), located near the
Marquesas Keys off Monroe County,
recovered 15 barrels of 220 A.P.I. gravity
oil and 14.1 barrels of saltwater from the
Lake Trafford (?) Formation. Another
well, which was drilled in federal waters
near the Marquesas, tested black
saltwater in the Lake Trafford and
Sunniland Formations and in the Brown
Dolomite Zone of the Lehigh Acres
Formation (Applegate and Uoyd, 1985).

Exploratory Drilling in
Federal Waters, Offshore Florida

The first federal oil and gas lease
sale off Florida was conducted in May,
1959 off the Florida Keys in what is now
the Straits of Florida Planning Area. Ten
additional OCS lease sales have
occurred since then; seven in the
Eastern Gulf of Mexico Planning Area
and three in the South Atlantic Planning
Area. There have been no sales in the
Straits of Florida Planning Area off
Florida since the 1959 sale. The last
lease sale in the South Atlantic Planning


Area off Florida was Sale 78 in July,
1983. The two most recent lease sales
off Florida were in the Eastern Planning
Area. They were Sales 79 and 94, held
in January, 1984 and January, 1985,
respectively. These sales are discussed
in Applegate and Lloyd (1985) and Uoyd
and Applegate (1987); the leases are
shown on Figure 12.
The State of Florida has responded
to the public's environmental concerns
by objecting to future lease sales and
exploration in federal waters off the
Florida coast. In response to these
concerns, the federal government
excluded all areas originally proposed off
the Florida coast in Eastern Planning
Area Sale 116, held in November 1988.
The federal government also proposed a
joint federal-state repurchase of all
leases off the Florida coast south of
260north latitude (Pulley Ridge and
Howell Hook areas, Figure 12 (Lloyd and
Ragland, 1991). The State of Florida has
objected to a joint repurchase, leaving
the final outcome for these leases
unknown.
Despite objections by the State, it
appears that Chevron is planning what
could become Florida's first offshore
production field (Spear, 1993). There
were no wells drilled during 1992 or
1993 in federal waters offshore Florida;
however, Chevron has had an
application pending for permission to
drill in the Destin Dome area (Block 97,
Figure 12, map location code 38). The
request is based on their recent
successful drilling of two gas-producible
Norphlet wells in this area (Block 56,
Figure 12, map location code 32) (Lloyd,
1992).
In addition to the two Chevron wells,







Information Circular 110


the Amoco-8338 well, which was
completed in Destin Dome block 111 in
1987, was also a Norphlet gas discovery
described by Gould (1989) as producible
(map location code 31, Figure 12). This
was the first commercial discovery in the
Eastern Planning Area (Gould, 1989).
These discoveries extend the offshore
Norphlet gas trend (which is highly
productive off Mobile Bay, Alabama)
seaward and eastward from the Mobile
map area of the Central Planning Area,
offshore Alabama, into the Florida
offshore.

1992 AND 1993 GEOPHYSICAL
EXPLORATION ACTIVITY

Four geophysical permit applications
were received by the FGS during 1992;
two were received during 1993. Five of
these six applications have been
permitted; the remaining one is still
pending permit approval. An additional
permit, which was submitted in 1991,
was approved in 1992. Appendix 6
summarizes the data for these
applications.
The only geophysical exploration
actually completed during this two-year
period was in the Florida panhandle
(Figure 11). This exploration was well
southeast of known Smackover
production and near the depositional
limits of the Upper Jurassic sediments
on the Pensacola Arch (Figure 9). The
mileage permitted for these areas was
only partially surveyed for a total of 41.4
miles of seismic lines.
Seismic survey activity was
permitted, but not yet conducted, in
South Florida. One of the two South
Florida permitted areas is located within


the known Sunniland producing trend in
Lee County. The other is northeast of
the producing area in Highlands County.
Additional geophysical exploration of
an extensive offshore area was permitted
in July 1992. This seismic, gravity, and
magnetic survey would have explored a
dense grid off of Florida's Gulf coast
extending from offshore of Apalachicola,
Franklin County to offshore of Naples,
Collier County (Figure 11). The seismic
portion of the survey would have
covered a total of 1,450 miles; the
gravity/magnetic survey was to include
4,665 stations. The permit for this area
expired in July 1993 with none of the
required activity reports submitted by the
permitted to the Department of
Environmental Protection.

SUMMARY

In contrast to a generally declining
production trend, Florida oil production
increased during 1992 and 1993. Jay
field, as the leading producing field for
Florida, was responsible for the increase.
Exploration activity was very limited
during 1992 and 1993. Only five
exploratory wells were drilled; all five
were plugged and abandoned as dry
holes. Geophysical exploration activity
was limited to the Florida panhandle and
covered only 41.4 miles of seismic lines.
One exploratory well permit
application was pending in federal
waters off Florida at the close of 1993.
This well will be the third to be drilled by
Chevron in the Destin Dome area. Two
wells previously drilled by Chevron in
this area are classified by the federal
government as producible Norphlet
discoveries.







Florida Geological Survey


SCALE


Exploration wells and historic leases, federal waters, offshore Florida (well
location data from Gould, 1989 and Andy Petty, MMS, personal
communication, 1992).


Figure 12.











Information Circular 110


MAP LOCATION CODES AND WELL DATA FOR FIGURE 12
LEASE NO.
MAP OR FLORIDA PLUGGED & TOTAL
PLANNING LOCATION MAP BLOCK PERMIT WELL ABANDONED DEPTH
AREA CODE AREA NUMBER NO. (P-) OPERATOR NO. (1) DATE (FT.)


ASTERN
ULF OF
IEXICO
PLANNING
REA (2)


Deatin Dome
Destin Dome
Florida Middle Ground
Deetin Dome
St. Petersburg
Detin Dome
Deatin Dome
St. Petersburg
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
The Elbow
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Charlotte Harbor
Charlotte Harbor
Charlotte Harbor
The Elbow
Vemon Basin
Charlotte Harbor
Pensacola
Charlote Harbor
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Pensacola
Destin Dome
Gainesvllle
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
DeSoto Canyon
Charlotte Harbor
Florida Middle Ground
Pensacola
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Pensacola
Pensacola
Destin Dome
Destin Dome
Pensacola
Destin Dome
Deatin Dome


Exxon
Exxon
Texaco
Fina
Shell
Exxon
Exxon
Texaco
Exxon
Exxon
Exxon
Gulf
Mobil
Chevron
Amoco
Shell
Gulf
Tenneco
Shell
Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Mobil
Odeco
Sohio
Shell
Sohlo
Shell
Sohio
Exxon
Chevron
Shell
Shell
Tenneco
Tenneco
Amoco
Chevron
Tenneco
Texaco
Gulfstar
Gulfstar
Gulfstar
Chevron
Chevron


38 Destin Dome 97 Chevron Application Pending

OUTH 1 NH 17-5 208 3686 Tenneco 1 1979 7.754
TLANTIC 2 NH 17-5 427 3605 Tenneco 1 1979 7,472
LANNING 3 NH 17-2 913 3664 Getty 1 1979 7,000
REA (3) 4 NH 17-2 1005 3671 Transco 1 1979 11,635
5 NH 17-5 472 3699 Exxon 1 1979 7,578
6 NH 17-5 564 3705 Exxon 1 1980 12,863
7 NH 17-5 387 N.A. Ocean Prod. GE-1 1977 13,254

TRAITS OF 1 NG 17-10 44 P-296 Gulf 1 1961 4,886
LORIDA 2 NO 17-10 46 P-200 Gulf 1 1961 7,871
LANNING 3 NG 17-10 28 P-264 Gulf 1 1960 15.204
REA (3)

TA = Temporarily Abandoned; ST = Sidetrack Well.
Data from Gould, 1989 and from Andy Petty, MMS, personal communication, 1992.
Data from Karpas and Gould, 1990.





19


10,930
7.075
15,663
17,608
18,443
10,418
7.507
17,388
6,634
4,800
17,938
20,988
15,865
10,513
18,338
20,450
11,362
11,302
12,362
18,128
10,768
1,270
23,264
11.360
21,068
7,764
18,958
16,953
15,941
17,500
22,222
12.300
10,550
12,401
19,200
19,240
22,572
19,200
17,910
2,000
1,800
2,700
17,128
22,840







Florida Geological Survey


REFERENCES

Applegate, A. V., 1987, The Brown Dolomite Zone of the Lehigh Acres Formation (Aptian)
in the South Florida Basin a potentially prolific producing horizon offshore: Florida
Geological Survey Information Circular no. 104, Part II, p. 43-66.

and Uoyd, J. M., 1985, Summary of Florida petroleum production and
exploration, onshore and offshore, through 1984: Florida Geological Survey
Information Circular no. 101, 69 p.

Winston, G. O., and Palacas, J. G., 1981, Subdivision and regional
stratigraphy of the Pre-Punta Gorda Rocks lowermostt Cretaceous-Jurassic?) in
South Florida: Supplement to Transactions of the Gulf Coast Gulf Coast Association
of Geological Societies, v. 31, p. 447-453.

Christian, L. D., Shirer, J. A., Kimbel, E. L., and Blackwell, R. J., 1981, Planning a tertiary
oil-recovery project for Jay/LEC fields unit: Journal of Petroleum Technology, v. 33,
p. 1535-1544.

Culbertson, V. L. and Miller, D. W., 1990, What are we paying to find oil, gas in
Mississippi, Alabama?: Oil and Gas Journal, v. 88, no. 19, p. 148-156.

Evans, R., 1987, Pathways of migration of oil and gas in the Southern Mississippi Salt
Basin: Transactions of the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies, v. 37, p.
75-86.

Gould, G. J., 1989, Gulf of Mexico Update: May 1988 July 1989, U. S. Department of
the Interior Minerals Management Service: OCS Information Report, MMS 89-0079,
51 p.

Johnson, P. G. and Tucker, D. L., 1987, The federal Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas
leasing program; a Florida perspective, February, 1987: Office of the Governor,
Office of Planning and Budgeting, Intergovernmental Unit, 16 p.

Karpas, R. M., and Gould, G. J., 1990, Atlantic update: July 1986 June 1990, Outer
Continental Shelf oil and gas activities, U. S. Department of the Interior Minerals
Management Service: OCS Information Report, MMS 90-0060, 57 p.

Klitgord, K. D., and Popenoe, P., and Schouten, H., 1984, Florida: A Jurassic transform
plate boundary: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 89, no. B9, p. 7753-7772.







Information Circular 110


Uoyd, J. M., 1992, 1990 and 1991 Florida petroleum production and exploration: Florida
Geological Survey Information Circular no. 108, 31 p.

1991, 1988 and 1989 Florida petroleum production and exploration:
Florida Geological Survey Information Circular no. 107, Part I, p. 1-62.

and Ragland, J. M., 1991, Petroleum exploration and development policies
in Florida: Response to public concern for sensitive environments: Florida
Geological Survey Information Circular no. 107, Part II, p. 63-82.

and Applegate, A. V., 1987, 1985 Florida petroleum production and
exploration: Florida Geological Survey Information Circular no. 104, Part I, p. 1-42.

Mancini, E. A., and Benson, D. J., 1980, Regional stratigraphy of Upper Jurassic
Smackover carbonates of southwest Alabama: Transactions of the Gulf Coast
Association of Geological Societies, v. 30, p. 151-165.

Miller, J. A., 1986, Hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and
parts of Georgia, Alabama, and South Carolina: U. S. Geological Survey Professional
Paper 1403-B, 91 p.

Myers, C., 1992, Wildcatters hunt black gold in Cottage Hill: Pensacola News Journal,
December 6, 1992, p. A-1.

Oil and Gas Journal, 1991, Shell planning 17,700 ft wildcat in Everglades: Oil and Gas
Journal, February 4, 1991, p. 60.

Ottman, R. D., Keys, P. L., and Ziegler, M. A., 1973, Jay field a Jurassic stratigraphic
trap: Transactions of the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies, v. 23, p.
146-157.

Spear, K., 1993, Drilling off Florida: Natural-gas boom, natural-beauty bust?: The
Orlando Sentinel, December 5, 1993, p. G-1 and G-7.










Florida Geological Survey


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Florida Geological Survey


APPENDIX 3. 1992 AND 1993 FIELD WELL STATISTICS (1)
1992 1993
Number of Wells Number of Wells
FIELD (2) PRO INJ SI TA TOTAL PRO INJ SI TA TOTAL


NORTHWEST FLORIDA


Jay 50 26 38 0 114 43 23 46 0 112
Coldwater Creek 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Blackjack Creek 10 8 4 0 22 10 10 2 0 22
Mt. Carmel 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
McLellan 2 0 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 2


Subtotal 63 34 44 0 141 57 33 48 0 138
SOUTH FLORIDA


Lehigh Park 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1
Townsend Canal 2 0 2 0 4 1 0 3 0 4
West Felda 10 0 13 0 23 9 0 14 0 23
Mid-Felda 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 2
Sunoco Felda 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 4 0 4
Corkscrew 3 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 3
Lake Trafford 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
Sunniland 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 4 0 4
Bear Island 6 0 9 0 15 6 0 9 0 15
Pepper Hammock 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1
Raccoon Point 9 0 3 0 12 8 0 4 0 12


Subtotal


33 0 37


0 70


29 0 41 0 70


STTWD TOA 96 34 81 0. 21 86 3 9:0


1. Statistics compiled by Charles Tootle, Florida Geological Survey, Oil and Gas Section.
2. Fields are listed In approximate order from north to south and west to east.


PRO Producing Wells
INJ Injection Wells
SI Shut In Wells
TA Temporarily Abandoned Wells


Abbreviations:










Information Circular 110


APPENDIX 4. 1992 AND 1993 WILDCAT WELLS DRILLED
Drill Floor Total
Well (1) and Operator-Well Completion Elev., Ft. Depth
county Permit No. Name & No. Location (2) Date Above MSL Ft. (3) Status
NORTHWEST FLORIDA

scambia No W# (4) Advent-Bell 782.7' FNL & 2/1/93 125 3,500 Target: Tuscahoma
P-1284 No. 2-2 833.1' FWL Sand Unit of the
Sec. 2, Eocene Wilcox Group.
T1N, R31W Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 2/24/93.

anta Rosa W-16886 Odyssey- SHL: 1325' FNL& 5/11/92 163 MD: 16,905 Target: Smackover Fm.
P-1273 Champion 2358' FEL TVD: 16,699 Top of Smackover:
International Sec. 9, 16,354'.
Corp. No. 9-2 T3N, R28W Plugged & abandoned
BHL: 1222' FNL as a dry hole, 5/18/92.
1327' FWL
Sec. 9,
T3N, R28W

anta Rosa W-16885 Fina Oil & 1290' FNL & 12/1/92 65 16,606 Target: Smackover Fm.
P-1283 Chemical Corp.- 1190' FEL Top of Smackover
Gerald Johnson Sec. 18, 16,146'.
No. 18-1 T2N, R27W Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 12/1/92.
OUTH FLORIDA

oilier W-16883 Maersk Energy Inc. SHL: 1511' FNL & 11/5/92 43 MD: 15,234 Target Sunniland Fm.
P-1275 No. 1-Collier 1605' FEL TVD: 11,933 First horizontally drilled
Resources Co. Sec. 21, exploration well in
T47S, R28E Florida. Top of
BHL: 4376' FNL Sunniland: 11,678'.
3740' FEL Plugged & abandoned
Sec. 21, as a dry hole, 12/20/92.
T47S, R28E

endry No W# (4) Hilliard-State 1694' FSL 12/19/92 50 11,710 Target: Sunniland Fm.
P-1242 of Florida 1453' FWL Top of Sunniland:
No. 11-3 Sec. 11, 11,392'.
T46S, R31E Plugged & abandoned
as a dry hole, 12/19/92.

Florida Geological Survey well number for smples (cuttings or core chips).
For directionally drilled wells, SHL Is surface hole location, BHL is bottom hole location.
For directionally drilled wells. MD Is measured depth; TVD s true vertical depth.
Well samples have not been submitted yet.









Florida Geological Survey


APPENDIX 5. OIL EXPLORATION WELLS DRILLED IN STATE WATERS (1)
Rotary
Permit and Lease No. Table Elev. Total Geological
Year Well(2) No. Operator and Area County Ft. above MSL Depth, Ft. Significance


1947 P-16 Gulf Oil State of Florida
W-1413 Corp. Lease 374 No. 1
Sugarloaf Key Area

1947 P-22 Gulf Oil State of Florida
W-972 Corp. Lease 373 No. 1
Big Pine Key Area


1947 P-43 Magnolia
W-1502 Petroleum
Co.


State of Florida
Block 5-B No. 1-A
St Vincent Sound


1955 P-232 Gulf Oil State of Florida
W-3510C Corp. Lease 826-G No. 1
Florida Bay


1956 P-251
W-4122


HORC State of Florida
Lease 833 No. 1
Pensacola Bay


1959 P-275 Gulf Oil State of Florida
W-5094 Corp. Lease 826-Y No. 1
Marquesas














1959 P-280 California State of Florida
W-5152 Coastal Lease 1011 No. 1
Big Pine Key Area

1959 P-281 California State of FLorida
W-5103 Coastal Lease 224-A No. 1
St George Island
Area


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Franklin


offshore
Monroe


offshore
Santa Rosa


offshore
Monroe















offshore
Monroe


offshore
Franklin


23 6,100 Bottomed in Upper Cretaceous(?).




23 15,455 No porosity in Sunniland Fm.
Well bottomed in Pumpkin Bay
Fm. Very difficult to correlate
this well because of anhydrite
development. Structurally very
low.

10 7,019 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.




32 12,631 Well cored from 11,661-12,544'
in Sunniland Fm. and Punta Gorda
Anhydrite. Encountered some salt
stringers in Punta Gorda. Only 60'
of dark dense calcilutite in Sunni-
land Fm.

26 7,505 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.




56 15,478 Four drill stem tests:
12,474-12,533'(Lake Trafford? Fm.)
12,534-12,544'(Sunniland Fm.)
12,582-12,822'(Sunniland Fm.)
14,642-14,702'(Brown Dolomite Zn.)
The 12,474-12,533' test recovered
15 barrels of 22 degree API
gravity oil and 14.1 barrels of
saltwater. Brown Dolomite from
14,650-15,036' was somewhat
vuggy. This may be the principal
target in this area. Net dolomite
estimated at 400'.

21 6,030 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.




26 7,030 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.


1. Modified from Applegate and Uoyd, 1985.
2. Florida Geological Survey well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).










Information Circular 110


APPENDIX 5 (cont.). OIL EXPLORATION WELLS DRILLED IN STATE WATERS (1)
Rotary
Permit and Lease No. Table Elev. Total Geological
Year Well(2) No. Operator and Area County Ft above MSL Depth, Ft Significance


960 P-289 California State of Rorida
W-5574 Coastal Lease 224-B No. 1
Boca Grande Area

961 P-292 California State of Florida
W-5713 Coastal Lease 1011 No. 2
Marquesas

961 P-293 California State of Florida
W-5654 Coastal Lease 224-A No. 2
South of Alligator
Point

961 P-297 California State of Florida
W-5785 Coastal Lease 224-B No. 2
Boca Grande Area









962 P-298 California State of Florida
W-5970 Coastal Lease 1011 No. 3
Marquesas


offshore
Lee



offshore
Monroe



offshore
Franklin




offshore
Lee










offshore
Monroe


963 P-304 California State of Florida offshore
W-6278 Coastal Lease 224-B No. 3 Pinellas
Honeymoon Island


967 P-375 Mobil Oil State of Florida
W-8139 Corp. Lease 224-B No. 1
Boca Grande Area


offshore
Charlotte


967 P-382 Mobil Oil State of Florida offshore
W-8304 Corp. Lease 224-A No. 1-A Citrus
W-SW of Crystal
River


39 14,000 Brown Dolomite: 12,485-12,589'.
Estimated net dolomite: 103'.



36 7,722 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.




34 10,560 Did not encounter Smackover Fm.
Bottomed in Eagle Mills Fm. of
Triassic age. Diabase found in
Eagle Mills.

40 12,600 There is an estimated 40' of dolo-
mite in the 12,445-12,560' Brown
Dolomite interval. No evidence of
oil staining. Dolomite microcrys-
talline to finely crystalline.
Core analysis from 11,255-11,625'
Sunniland interval showed no
permeability, extremely low por-
osity, and no oil.

57 12,850 Bottomed in Punta Gorda
Anhydrite. No shows of oil and
no porosity reported. Drill stem
test of the 12,521-12,600' interval
tested saltwater. Revecca Shoals
Reef (Paleocene and Upper
Cretaceous) present

37 10,600 Bottomed in Lower Cretaceous.
Very poor samples. No oil shows.
Carbonates-clastics below 7,000'.



21 12,931 This well drilled into Pumpldn
Bay Fm. at 12,230'. Drilled
into basement (rhylite porphyry)
at 12,830'. No shows in Sunniland
Fm. Brown Dolomite Zone:
11,920-12,000'. Estimated net
dolomite: 70'. Poor samples.

22 6,041 Mixed fades carbonatess, sand-
stones, and shales) at 4,325';
Triassic, Eagle Mills at 5,625';
Paleozoic at 5,920'. Very indur-
ated shale and siltstone. Some
quartzite. Bedding planes verti-
cal in this core. No shows and no
porosity.


. Modified from Applegate and Uoyd, 1985.
SFlorida Geological Survey well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).









Florida Geological Survey




APPENDIX 5 (cont.). OIL EXPLORATION WELLS DRILLED IN STATE WATERS (1)
Rotary
Permit and Lease No. Table Elev. Total Geological
Year Well(2) No. Operator and Area County Ft. above MSL Depth, Ft Significance

1967 P-383 Mobil Oil State of Florida offshore 25 4,735 Mixed faces carbonatess, sand-
W-8305 Corp. Lease 224-A No. 1-B Levy stones, and shales) at 2,882' in
Cedar Key Area Cretaceous. Predominantly vari-
colored unconsolidated sandstone
below 4,180'. Highly indurated
quartzites and interbedded shales
in core (Paleozoic) from 4,720-
4,735'.

1968 P-387 Mobil Oil State of Florida offshore 37 14,369 This well encountered Jurassic
W-8487 Corp. Lease 224-A No. 1 -C Franklin limestone. First indication of
Little St George possible Smackover Fm. in Apa-
Island Area lachicola area.

1983 P-1097 Getty Oil State of Florida offshore 30 18,011 Smackover tests at 17,405-17,411'
W-15391 Company Lease 2338 No. 1 Santa Rosa and 17,328-17,411' produced only
East Bay saltwater. Norphlet Ss. and Louann/
Werner evaporites were very thin.

1. Modified from Applegate and Uoyd, 1985.
2. Florida Geological Survey well number for samples (cuttings or core chips).










Information Circular 110


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FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
903 WEST TENNESSEE ST.
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA 32304-7700

Walter Schmidt, Chief and State Geologist
Sandie Ray, Administrative Assistant Alice Jordan, Librarian
Jessie Hawkins, Custodian Cindy Collier, Administrative Secretary
Deborah Mekeel, Library Assistant



GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS SECTION

Thomas M. Scott, Assistant State Geologist
Jon Arthur, Petrologist Jim Jones, Cartographer
Joe Aylor, Research Assistant Ted Kiper, Cartographer
Jim Balsilli, Coastal Geologist Darlene Lasalde, Secretary Specialist
Paulette Bond, Geochemist Li Li, Research Assistant
Ken Campbell, Sedimentologist John Morrill, Driller
Steve Campbell, Research Assistant Jim Trindell, Assistant Driller
Joel Duncan, Sedimentary Petrologist Tippi Polo, Research Assistant
Will Evans, Research Assistant Jennifer Rooks, Research Assistant
Rick Green, Research Assistant Frank Rupert, Paleontologist
Mark Groszos, Research Assistant Lorene Whitecross, Research Assistant
Chen Xi-quiang, Research Assistant


MINERAL RESOURCE INVESTIGATIONS
AND
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY SECTION

Jacqueline M. Lloyd, Assistant State Geologist
Connie Garrett, Environmental Geologist Ed Lane, Environmental Geologist
Brad Highley, Research Assistant Li Li, Research Assistant
Ron Hoenstine, Environmental Geologist Steve Spencer, Economic Geologist
Candice Trimbell, Research Assistant



OIL AND GAS SECTION

L. David Curry, Administrator
Robert Caughey, District Coordinator Ed Garrett, Geologist
Cindy Cook, Geologist Joan Gruber, Secretary
Catherine Florko, Biologist Don Hargrove, Engineer
Ed Gambrell, District Coordinator Evelyn Jordan, Secretary
Charles Tootle, Petroleum Engineer