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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00048
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Series Title: Florida dairy news.
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 3d quarter 1960
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00048
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
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        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Back Cover
        Page 45
        Page 46
Full Text



































































One of the Popular Ladies' Auxiliary Meetings at the 1960 Joint Florida Dairy Industry Conventions at Clearwater










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EDITORIAL


Governor's Arbitrary Control Over
Actions of Florida Milk Commission
As we understand Florida's government, it is the duty of the Legislature
to pass the laws, the duty of the Courts to interpret the laws and the duty of
the Governor to direct the enforcement of the laws of the State.
The Governor, when inaugurated, takes an oath of office to uphold and
carry out the laws of the State.
The Florida Milk Commission Law is one of the laws of the State which
Governor Collins took an oath to uphold. It has been a law of the State since
1933. Yet, Governor Collins was quoted by the Associated Press in the Talla-
hassee Democrat on August 6 as saying in effect that he was "shocked" to hear
that the Milk Commission was trying to carry out the provisions of this law.
The Governor was "shocked" to learn that the members of a State Board
- all of whom he had appointed were using their best judgment to carry
out the provisions of the Milk Commission Law with respect to giving assistance
to the Florida dairy industry for protection of the industry and the public
against destructive milk price wars.
The Commission had learned first-hand through a three days public hear-
ing, participated in by all milk distributors under the supervision of the Milk
Commission.
The Chairman of the Commission estimated that the record of information
taken at this hearing would cover 600 pages.
Yet the Governor tried to impose his prejudiced will on the members of the
Milk Commission by asking them to rescind their vote to provide temporary
protection to the dairy industry and retail stores against the damaging milk
price war which had spread to a large part of the State.
It was indeed "shocking" to members of the dairy industry to read recent
press reports that Governor Collins called before him the Chairman of the Milk
Commission, the Administrator of the Milk Commission, and one of the mem-
bers of the Commission and informed them, as the press stated it, "in no un-
certain terms" that he thought they and other members of the Commission
should act according to his views and his wishes.
Such dictation by the Governor to an agency of the State is nothing less
than a threat to democratic, constitutional government.
The Florida Milk Commission Law Chapter 501, Florida Statutes -
places the authority for the administration and enforcement of this law in the
hands of the members of this seven-member Commission and not in the hands
of the Governor.
The only authority this law gives the Governor is that of appointing the
members of the Milk Commission.
All authority for carrying out the law in its administration and enforce-
ment is vested in the Commission.
In view of the Governor's personal objections to and insistence on prevent-
ing the Milk Commission from setting wholesale or retail milk prices, it is most
interesting to note what the law provides should be done with regard to milk
prices.
In the first place, the "legislative finding," Section 1 of the law, (Chap.
501) states that "it is found necessary to resort to the legislation remedy of
regulating prices to save both (milk) producers and consumers from abuses
arising from destructive and unfair manipulation of (milk) prices." (Words in
parenthesis added.)
Section 13 of the law states that "The Commission shall ascertain by such
investigations and proofs as the emergency permits and requires WHAT
PRICES FOR MILK ... will best protect the milk industry ...
"The Commission SHALL take into consideration all conditions affecting
the milk industry including the amount necessary to yield a reasonable return
to the producer and to the milk dealer ...
"The Commission after making such investigation SHALL FIX BY OFFICI-
AL ORDER the minimum WHOLESALE and RETAIL PRICES . to be
charged for milk handled in the state for fluid consumption."
In the Florida Supreme Court's ruling of July 6, 1956, in which it held the Florida
Milk Commission Law to be constitutional, the court had the following to say about the
"statement of policy" which the Legislature enacted into this law:
"We have never found a stronger finding of fact and statement of policy as the basis
for regulating and administering a great industry than that embodied in this law for
control of the milk industry."


111111


VOL. 10 NO. 3
THIRD QUARTER, 1960


3/pidda


DAIRY


NEWS
Established 1950

ROBERT FREELAND
Associate Editor
For State Dairymen's Association

E. T. (ANDY) LAY
Associate Editor
For Dairy Products Association

Official Publication of

Florida State Dairymen's
Association
JOHN B. SERGEANT, President
Lakeland

Florida Dairy Products
Association
JAMES H. LAHER, President
Miami

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
GEORGE H. BOUTWELL,
President
Lake Worth

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
FRANK L. DE BORD, JR.,
President
Quincy

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Miami

Florida Association of Milk
and Food Sanitarians
W. HARVEY JORDAN,
President
Miami
THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida
State Dairymen's Association, Inc.,
and the Florida Dairy Products As-
sociation, 1024-26 Oak St. Jackson-
ville 4, Florida. Subscription price is
$1.00 a year. Second-class postage
paid at Jacksonville, Fla.
Business and Editorial office, 1024-
26 Oak St., Jacksonville 4, Fla.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

THIRD QUARTER, 1960 1
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 1












Following two days of separate and joint discussions and conferences at
their Annual Conventions held June 22-24 in Clearwater, a joint directors'
meeting of the Florida Dairymen's Association and the Florida Dairy Products
Association adopted the following joint objectives for the coming year:
(1) That the program and objectives adopted in 1958 for cooperation be-
tween the milk producers and milk distributors of the State through their re-
spective local and state organizations be continued through the medium of joint
meetings and conferences at both state and local levels, the joint annual meet-
ing and convention of The Florida State Dairymen's Association and The Flor-
ida Dairy Products Association and through meetings and conferences of offi-
cials, directors and committees of these Associations.
(2) That each Association encour-
age and endeavor to bring about closer research, training, extension and dis-
cooperation, understanding and mutu- ease control, to the end that the great-
al trust between our producers' and est possible efficiency and economy
distributors' organizations and between will be practiced in Florida milk pro-
individual distributors and the pro- duction, processing and distribution.
ducers of their products. (9) Continue the firm belief in and
(3) The continuing of efforts to support of an effective system of milk
develop and bring into operation a price stabilization in Florida by State
practical and timely program of fluid Law and control, if possible, as essen-
milk production, advertising and pub- tial to the continued assurance of the
lic relations to be jointly sponsored by production and furnishing to the con-
producers and distributors . on an suming public of a wholesome and
area basis but with a uniform plan adequate fresh home milk supply.
and objective and coordination of the (10) Continue efforts to bring
programs of the various areas to be de- about improvement by various govern-
veloped through a central committee mental agencies in compiling and
of representatives from all areas. maintaining accurate and up-to-date
(4) The development of state-wide records and statistics on the Florida
standards for milk and milk products dairy industry.
to be submitted to the 1961 State (11) Urge the Milk Commission
Legislature as amendments to the Flor- and State Department of Agriculture
ida Milk and Milk Products Law and to strictly enforce laws and regulations
the Florida Frozen Desserts Law. pertaining to using substitutes for fresh
(5) The development of closer con- fluid milk.
trols and supervision over milk and
milk products imported into the State (12) Oppose enactment by the U.
of Florida to the end that such prod- S. Congress of national standards for
ucts are properly reported and in- milk superseding State milk laws and
spected and meet the standards of regulations of milk quality.
Florida Laws. (13) Consider advisability of spon-
(6) The recommendation of char- scoring amendments to Florida Milk
ges in present "milk base-earning regu- and Milk Products Law (a) to increase
lations" of the Florida Milk Commis- the minimum butterfat content of milk
sion to the end that such base plans from 3.25% to 3.5%, (b) to clear up
may be made more equitable to all pro- present confusion as to the standards
ducers and more practical in their of chocolate milk and chocolate milk
treatment of surplus milk including drink, (c) to provide an adequate staff
more realistic pricing methods so that and adequate finances to the Dairy Di-
uneconomical surpluses will be kept to vision for the efficient and effective
a minimum. supervision of the dairy industry and
(7) That the Milk Quality Con- the establishing of uniform quality
trol Committees which are now active standards throughout the state.
in both Associations be continued with (14) Commend the Livestock
the objective of maintaining and im- Board and its mastitis control division
proving wherever possible the present for their efforts and success in con-
high quality and standards of the Flor- trolling mastitis conditions and urging
ida milk supply, continuing special that the Board continue and strength-
studies and efforts to be made by these en and improve the present program
Committees to assure the proper use, in any way possible and practical.
where needed in the industry, of pes- (15) Commend Mr. Alex Shaw,
ticides and antibiotics. Chief Dairy Supervisor of the State
(8) Continue'to actively support, Department of Agriculture, for his
assist and participate in the various leadership and efforts to secure a
State and Federal programs of dairy much needed specially equipped mo-
2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


bile laboratory for the special testing
of milk supplies for pesticides and an-
tibiotics. Also commend and thank
the Commissioner of Agriculture, Mr.
Lee Thompson, and others of the De-
partment of Agriculture for their as-
sistance in making possible the pur-
chase of such a mobile laboratory . .
and pledging the cooperation of the
dairy industry in securing necessary
action by the 1961 State Legislature
for the continued financing of the op-
eration of such mobile laboratory.
(16) Commend the excellent and
effective educational work in dairy
foods which is being done by Florida's
three local Dairy Council "Units" and
work for the further support of and ex-
tension of this program.
(17) Promote and cooperate with
the University of Florida in its dairy
programs, including Milk Sanitarians
Short Course, Dairy Herdsmen's Short
Course, Dairy Manufacturing Short
Course and Annual Dairy Field Day.
(18) Continue support and encour-
agement of State 4-H Dairy Judging
Team, 4-H and F.F.A. Dairy Shows,
State Fair Dairy Show, and Area Dairy
Shows.
(19) Continue support of June
Dairy Month Program and Special
School Milk Program.
(20) Continue efforts to work out
some suitable plan by which Florida
milk might be sold to Florida Military
establishments on a practical and prof-
itable basis to Florida producers and
distributors.
(21) Undertake to develop a suita-
ble plan for annual recognition by the
F.S.D.A., the F.D.P.A. and the Uni-
versity of Florida, of producers attain-
ing high standards of "Herd Health
Control." Efficient Milk Production,
Pasture, Forage and Feed Production,
Good Farm Appearance, and partici-
pation in dairy and civic activities and
display of a suitable Dairy name by all
producers and dairies.
(22) Continue the joint sponsor-
ship of the "Florida Dairy News" as
a means of informing the industry and
the public of news and facts of the
Florida dairy industry.
(23) Begin the sponsorship jointly
of an "Annual Florida Dairy Facts
Booklet."
(24) Consider sponsorship of a
competent survey of public-consumer
opinion concerning their ideas and
views of the dairy industry, milk
prices, milk value in the diet, and milk
consumption habits for use as a guide
to planning information to be dissemi-
nated to consumers in various ways
during the year and for possible im-
provements of dairy products, methods
and practices.










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4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
4 .FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Marion Carr of Carr Brothers Dairy, Jacksonville, receives top State Winner plaque in the
1959 Efficient Dairy Production Contest from E. P. Yocum of Marianna representing the
National Dairy Products Corp., who provided the awards. George Baumeister of Jersey
Jug Dairy, Orlando, (2nd from left) was the East Florida District Winner. Absent were
Fletcher Gardner, Lake Wales, the West Florida District Winner, and A. J. Rusterholz, Jr.
of Apopka, the second place State Winner. C. W. Reaves, extension dairyman, (left) super.
vised the contest
Gilbert Ross of Orlando (right) was the top State Winner in the DHIA Supervisor
Division. I. F. Harder, Marianna, 2nd place winner was absent.


Chipola Association Meets
The Chipola Dairy Association had
a special meeting Monday, August 15,
for consideration of the provisions of
the renewal of the annual contract be-
tween the producers of the Mariana-
Tallahassee area and their distributors.
The contract, which has been in ef-
fect in this area since Milk Commis-
sion prices were withdrawn more than
a year ago, is subject to renewal Sep-
tember 1st. Arthur Aukema of Chip-
ley is president of the Chipola Associ-
ation. Don Fuqua of Altha and mem-
ber of the State Legislature from Cal-
houn County is Secretary.

Curlett Joins Miller Machinery
As Sales Representative
Miller Machinery and Supply Com-
pany of Miami and Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, has announced the addition of
George C. Curlett to their organiza-
tion as Sales Representative. He will
cover north Florida, the east coast
of Florida and also the Miami area.
Mr. Curlett has spent a great many
years in the midwest and New Orleans
area in the dairy, beverage and food
fields. He will specialize in the food
and industrial fields for the Miller
Machinery and Supply Company.
The Edward B. McClain Company,
management and accounting consul-
tants for milk and ice cream plant dis-
tribution operations, Memphis, Ten-
nessee, has released national averages
on total product and cost per gallon
of ice cream as $1,3518.


MILK COMMISSION CASES
STILL PENDING IN COURT
Various cases involving Florida Milk
Commission Orders challenged by cer-
tain milk distributors are still awaiting
action by the Courts except for the
"just cause" provision which was held
invalid and a ruling that the Commis-
sion is not required by the law to set
resale milk prices if it sets the produ-
cer prices.
The Skaff Dairy case is yet to be
heard by the Court. The Commission
ordered Skaff Dairy to pay $30,000.-
00 to his producers. Skaff took the
matter to court.
The Foremost case in which the
Commission ordered Foremost to pay
producers Class I for milk sold outside
of a control area for military use and
which was contested by Foremost has
not yet been heard by the Court.
In another case, distributors chal-
lenged authority of the Commission to
require distributors to purchase all the
milk produced by a "base producer"
over the amount required for Class I
usage and pay prices set by the Com-
mission for such Class II and III milk.
This case is still on appeal before
the Supreme Court for decision.
Producers of Foremost, Sealtest and
Perret dairies are involved in this case
and will receive a large amount of
back pay on their Class II milk for
the period since this case was started,
if the Commission wins the case.








NEW DAIRY INSPECTORS
JOIN STATE DEPARTMENT
Two new dairy inspectors were
added to the staff of the Dairy Di-
vision of the State Department of Agri-
culture in June, 1960.
Carl Kroppman has his headquar-
ters in Jacksonville, taking over the
position and area formerly held by
Lewis T. Smith, who has retired. Mr.
Kroppman has worked for several dair-
ies and processing plants, and most
recently has been employed by a dairy
supply firm in Miami, as an expert in
installation and operation of the most
modern equipment used on both dairy
farms and in dairy plants.
Marvin L. Kidd is located in West
Palm Beach and serves the area north-
ward to and including Indian River
County and westward taking in Mana-
tee, Sarasota and Charlotte Counties
on the Gulf. Mr. Kidd, prior to June
1, has been connected with the Palm
Beach County Health Department.
His technical training was obtained at
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and he
has worked with bulk plants in the
state.
Additional Inspector
For Jacksonville Area
Commissioner of Agriculture Lee
Thompson announced recently that a
second inspector would soon be added
to the Jacksonville area due to the
need for additional inspection of mili-
tary contract milk in the area.

PRICE OF MILK
vs.
PRICE OF HAIR CUTS
Some complain that the price of
milk is high. Among other prices
which can be pointed out by compari-
son is the cost of a haircut.
Under a Chicago date line of April
8 an announcement was made that
Chicago barbershop owners had voted
to increase the regular $2.00 price of
haircuts for adults to $2.25 on Satur-
days and days before holidays.
Fifty years ago the writer delivered
milk in a small town in Illinois for
5 cents a quart and paid 15 cents for
a haircut.
Milk in that town today is 25 cents
a quart and in Chicago, 26 cents a
quart, or about a 500 per cent
increase.
If Chicago had a 25 cent haircut
50 years ago, instead of the small
town price of 15 cents, the increase
to $2.25 is 900 per cent.
An alert and open-minded milk
consumer will find that the increase
in milk prices is favorable by com-
parison with most any other article
purchased today.


4








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THIRD QUARTER, 1960 5












Register Calves Now
Advises Holstein Official
Benjamin Franklin probably didn't
have cows in mind when he arrived at
the fact that a penny saved is a penny
earned.
But Holstein breeders are applying
his advice on a wholesale basis in reg-
istering their purebred calves in The
Holstein-Friesian Association of Amer-
ica Herd Book.
Under a fee schedule adopted by
the organization in 1958, a Holstein
breeder with 10 calves to register can
save as much as $45 by getting the
job done before the animals reach six
months of age.
Net result, according to Robert M.
Stebbins, Superintendent of the As-
sociation's Registry Department, is that
more than 75 percent of all purebred
Holsteins are now being registered be-
fore they hit the six months mark.
At the same time, he pointed out
that the six month deadline is fast ap-
proaching for calves born in late win-
ter and early spring. He urged Hol-
stein breeders to bring their registra-
tions up to date during August.
As a bonus advantage, he said, the
Association was geared up to handle
incoming business much more rapidly
than it could during its traditionally
busy fall and winter months.

NEW BROCHURE AVAILABLE
An attractive new brochure on farm
sanitation is available from Klenzade
Products, Inc., Beloit, Wisconsin.
This booklet emphasizes a systematized
sanitation routine as a part of a "Farm
Quality Program" aimed at a healthier
and a safer farm as well as an im-
proved milk quality because of better
practices and dependable protection.
Write Klenzade Products, Inc., Beloit,
Wisconsin for your copy.

CONTROL OF PARASITES
CIRCULAR IS AVAILABLE
Circular 206, entitled Control of
External Parasites of Livestock in Flor-
ida, is available from the Agricultural
Extension Service of the University of
Florida, or from the office of the Dairy
News. Authored by James E. Brogden
and Leonard E. Swanson, this circular
identifies the parasites and develops
clearly a complete program of control.
Since insecticides are under attack be-
cause of harmful residues, herdsmen
should find this circular valuable for
its timely and reliable information.
6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


secretary of Agriculture 1zra 1aft Benson
(left)-a former breeder of Holstein cattle
-was the recipient of the first diamond-
chip lapel pin symbolizing The Holstein-
Fresian Association of America's Diamond
Jubilee year.
The presentation was made in Washing-
ton, D. C. by Robert H. Rumler, Executive
Secretary of the national Holstein organiza-
tion. The association was formed in 1885
with 284 charter members. It now has a
total membership of nearly 50,000 and ranks
as the world's largest dairy cattle registry
organization.


Holsteins Shatter
Three Florida Records
The Holstein Friesian Association
of America reports that three register-
ed Holstein cows owned by Galbraith
Bros. Dairy of West Palm Beach have
shattered all-time Florida butterfat pro-
duction records on Herd Improvement
Registry Test.
The official 365-day production of
Peggy Hartog Hope 4772009 totaled
14,238 lbs. of milk and 568 lbs. of
butterfat. It establishes a new state
record for Junior 3-year-olds milked
three times daily in the H. I. R. Pro-
gram.
A paralleling record for Junior 2-
year-olds milked three times daily was
shattered by Frances Erickdale 4797-
313. Her 365-day record officially
totalled 11,372 Ibs. of milk and 524
lbs. of butterfat.
A third cow in the same herd, Gar-
thome Pietje Juanita 4821645, estab-
lished a new high for Senior 3-year
olds milked three times daily.
Her official 365-day production to-
talled 14,455 lbs. of milk and 549
lbs. of butterfat. Weighing and test-
ing were supervised by the University
of Florida working in close cooperation
with the national Holstein organiza-
tion.
University of Florida supervised the
weighing and testing of all these new
records under the rules of Herd Im-
provement Registry-one of two herd-
testing programs conducted by the
Holstein Association. The second pro-
gram is known as Dairy Herd Im-
provement Registry.


HOLSTEIN CATTLE CLUB NEWS


OHIO HOLSTEIN EATS
350 LBS. GRASS DAILY
The top limits of a good cow's ap-
petite, like the valleys on the moon,
have never been reached.
As evidence, Holstein breeders the
country over are currently pointing
with pride to a cow named Ohio EX
Warden Marcella 3567144. She
stowed away a phenomenal 350 lbs. of
freshly-chopped alfalfa-brome grass in
recent feeding trials at the Wooster,
Ohio, Agricultural Experiment Station.
Professor Avery D. Pratt, one of the
scientists in charge of the project, re-
ports that the seven year old registered
Holstein was fed no grain and no sup-
plement roughage during the experi-
ment.
Despite its lush bulk, the 350 lb.
daily diet contained only 39 lbs. of
dry matter. Yet "Marcella" averaged
53 lbs. of milk a day. She did it, in
the finest dairy cow tradition, by lit-
erally milking the beef off her back.
All told, the Ohio Holstein has pro-
duced 10,807 lbs. of milk and 427
lbs. of butterfat with more than 100
days to go in her current lactation. In
four previous lactations, she averaged
15,507 lbs. of milk and 544 lbs. of
butterfat.
The "green-chop" ration was a part
of research work comparing the feed-
ing value of silage and soilage.

Extension Service Sponsors
County Dairy Schools
Well attended dairy production
schools with weekly meetings were
held during the spring in Orange,
Okeechobee and Manatee counties.
Escambia County held two one-day
schools in December and February.
Subjects in the schools were varied,
but dealt mostly with management
phases. Orange County's school used
the general theme of Dairy Farm Busi-
ness Analysis.
Dairy Processing Schools
Dairy processing schools were held
in Orlando and Tallahassee. H. B.
Young, Assistant Extension Dairyman
(in Dairy Manufacturing) arranged
the schools in cooperation with the
county agents and local committees.
Plant workers showed unusual interest
in these schools and the average at-
tendance at these weekly night meet-
ings was approximately 100.
Both the milk production and milk
processing schools were sponsored by
the Dairy Extension Service of the
University of Florida and the County
Farm Agent in the respective coun-
ties.
Extension Dairymen C. W. Reaves
and Wilson Sparks and Howard Young
in Dairy Processing Extension planned
and conducted the schools.






























A gold decorated milk bottle was presented recently to J. N. McArthur, president of Mc-
Arthur Jersey Farm Dairy, Miami, Florida., commemorating the company's 30 years of
service to the dairy industry and to Dade County community. The presentation of Mr. Mc-
Arthur (right) was made by Robert E. Davis, Dairy Container Division Manager of Owens-
Illinois Glass Company, Toledo, (left) and R. D. Waller, 0-I Miami representative, (center).
The McArthur dairy owns one of the largest herds of dairy cows in the world.


SCHOOL MILK AID PROGRAM
RENEWED FOR YEAR 1960-61
Florida will receive a grant of Fed-
eral funds of approximately $1,250,-
000.00 for a Special School Milk Pro-
gram for the coming school year 1960-
61.
This is Florida's portion of a con-
gressional appropriation of $85,000,-
000.00 made for this purpose.
During the school year 1959-60
Florida received $1,214,145.00 from
this fund. 1,363 Florida schools will
be eligible for receipt of allotments
from this fund during the 1960-61
school year.
Under the so-called "Special School
Milk Program," milk that is purchased
in addition to that received as a part of
a regular school lunch is sold at cost
or less usually about 5c per half-
pint.
The two-fold purpose of the pro-
gram is to provide children better nu-
trition while at school and provide a
way for aiding the nation's dairy farm-
ers by providing a market for a portion
of their surplus milk.
A survey made by the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture among 8,000
school children in 100 schools, dis-
closed that per capital consumption of
milk by students in schools having the
"Special Milk Program" was 7 % high-
er than consumption in schools not
using the program.
The report showed that children in
special milk program schools drank
nearly one-third more at school.


ALEC WHITE RETIRES
AS HILLSBORO AGENT
Alec White, a veteran of 25 years'
service as Hillsborough Count Agri-
cultural Agent, retired from the Flor-
ida Agricultural Extension Service
March 31, 1960.
Dr. M. O. Watkins, director, says
White has been replaced by Jean
Beem, assistant Hillsborough agent
since 1949.
White, who was appointed to the
Hillsborough position in November,
1935, is a graduate of the University
of Florida. He held several offices in
the Florida County Agents' Associa-
tion, including the presidency in
1951.
Beem graduated from the Univer-
sity of Florida in 1947 and worked
as assistant soils surveyor with the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion until his Hillsborough appoint-
ment in 1949.

Read the Label Folders
Distributed by F.S.D.A.
The Florida State Dairymen's As-
sociation recently mailed to Florida
dairymen four thousand copies of an
informative and attractively printed
folder entitled, "Read the Label." The
folder was published by the Florida
State Department of Agriculture and
provides warnings and instructions
about the use of poisonous materials
in agriculture and livestock produc-
tion.


THIRD QUARTER, 1960 7


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see why.

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S* FLORIPA DAIRY NEWS


Compliments of

STOCKMEN'S SUPPLY COMPANY

2535 St. Clair Street, Jacksonville, Florida


County Agents of Nation
To Meet in Miami Beach
Harry J. Brinkley, president of the
Florida County Agents' Association,
is proud to announce that County
Agents from all 50 states will be com-
ing to Florida for
their 45th annual
meeting of the Na-
tional Association
of County Agricul-
tural Agents. Ap-
proximately 3000
persons are expect-
ed to attend the
meeting October
BRINKLEY 30 through No-
vember 3 with headquarters at the
Deauville Hotel in Miami Beach. M.
U. Mounts, Palm Beach County
Agent, is the general chairman of the
annual meeting committee.
The objective of the national or-
ganization is stated as follows: to
encourage a high standard of profes-
sional performance . to promote
a high degree of cooperation and loyal-
ty . to improve the effectiveness
of Cooperative Extension Work . .
to carry out the policies and programs
of the Land Grant Colleges in the
United States.

Mastitis Study Committee
Favors Continued Program
At their monthly meeting in May,
the Florida Livestock Board voted to
set up a special study committee on
mastitis conditions in Florida and make
an evaluation of the Board's program
established some ten years ago for the
prevention and control of mastitis in
Florida.
The Committee met in June at
Tampa when it named Dick Dressel,
Chairman of the Livestock Board, to
also act as Committee Chairman.
After hearing a report from Dr. Mc-
Murray, head of the Board's Mastitis
Control Program, and a number of
dairymen who praised the program
and recommended it be continued and
improved, if possible, the Committee
voted -
(1) That it favors continuing the
Board's Mastitis Program;
(2) That the Committee devote its
efforts to (a) a study of mastitis con-
ditions in Florida, (b) the methods
and effectiveness of the present mas-
titis program, and (c) the develop-
ment of recommendations for possible
improvement of the program.
In connection with its studies the
Committee is securing information re-
garding Mastitis Control Programs of
various other states.








A.D.A's FALL PROGRAM
The American Dairy Association's
September promotion of fluid milk
will be an all-media effort. Fluid milk
commercials will appear on the Dave
Garroway show; a complete national
magazine campaign will appear in
such organs as Reader's Digest, Coro-
net, Seventeen and
Ladies' Home Jour-
fi t nal; the newspaper
,( schedule will be in
the Sunday supple-
S If ment sections of
the major newspa-
pers, and in select-
ed newspapers of
Nature's Lift general advertising,
across the state. Approximately 170
signboards will carry out the theme
that is appearing in national maga-
zines and newspapers.
As a special effort in the Mliami
market a heavy ra-
dio schedule is
planned with be-
tween 70 and 75
spots per week, re- 1-4 '
minding the Flor-
ida housewife to
purchase that extra
quart of milk for
the week-end! Nature's Nightcap
This campaign in September will
be followed the latter part of October
by the "Nature's Lift" campaign that
is another of the American Dairy As-
ciation's occasion buying efforts, tie-
ing in with the two
preceding campaigns
this year . "Na-
# ture's Nightcap" and
; "Nature's Snack."
In the very near
future all distribu-
tors and other fluid
milk retailers will
Nature's Snack have the opportunity
to see the 1961 plans and will be en-
couraged to gear their promotional
efforts in 1961 to those of the Ameri-
can Dairy Association.

Guarantee Against Pesticides
According to the California Dairy-
man, issue of June 18, 1960, "many
banks and credit firms are requiring
dairymen borrowers who are buying
hay to obtain it from a producer who
signs a guarantee stating that the hay
is free from residues. If it is not and
the dairyman loses his market, the
lender will have some claim against
the grower."

Life is a grindstone, and whether
it grinds a man down or polishes him
up depends on the stuff he's made of.
-Josh Billings


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THIRD QUARTER, 1960 9


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WARNING

ANTIBIOTICS
PESTICIDES, &
INSECTICIDES

CAN GIVE YOU
TROUBLE

PROTECT YOUR MILK SUPPLY
BY PRACTICING CAUTION IN
THEIR USE!

An information booklet on this sub-
ject, entitled "Read the Label" has
been issued by the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture . and is avail-
able free upon request to:
Lee Thompson,
Commissioner of Agriculture,
Mayo Bldg., Tallahassee

The front cover of this booklet is
reproduced below:









^ Aw













on FOODS
on DRUGS

on FERTILIZERS

on FEEDS


on PESTICIDES


Heroism Awards Made
To Milkmen By M.I.F.
Vice President Richard M. Nixon
recently awarded the Milk Industry
Foundation Gold Pasteur Medal for
outstanding heroism to James R. Bur-
ris, 21, an Indianapolis route sales-
man for the Banquet Ice Cream and
Milk Company. The award was pre-
sented during ceremonies in Mr.
Nixon's office. Named after the great
French scientist, Louis Pasteur, the
award has been made annually since
1937 by the Milk Industry Founda-
tion for outstanding acts of heroism.
At the risk of personal injury, Mr.
Burris rescued two small children
from their rapidly burning home. He
then re-entered to call the fire depart-
ment; at which time the youngsters re-
turned to the house, thus necessitat-
ing rescuing them again. Mr. Burris
took the children to a next door neigh-
bor's home and learned that their un-
cle was also in the burning house. The
uncle severed a blood vessel in his
arm during his rescue, which Mr. Bur-
ris treated.
As Mr. Nixon placed the ribbon
of the Pasteur medal around the neck
of Mr. Burris, he said: "Because of
your disregard for your own safety
and because of your heroic efforts on
April 8, 1960, in saving the lives of
little Terry, age 3, and Debra, age 2,
the small children of Mr. and Mrs.
Thompson, and Harold Carter, from
their burning home, I am proud to
present to you, James Burris, the Louis
Pasteur Gold Medal of the Milk In-
dustry Foundation in gratitude and
recognition for outstanding heroism."
Silver Medals Awarded
Eight other milkmen received Pas-
teur Heroism Medals in local cere-
monies during June Dairy Month. The
second highest award, the silver med-
al, was presented to the following:
Louis P. Dalitto of Bowman Dairy
Company, Chicago, who saved the life
of one youngster from his burning
home and unsuccessfully attempted to
save the lives of two other youngsters;
Robert Foley of Somerset Hills Dairy,
Bernardsville, New Jersey, who en-
tered a flaming apartment, aroused a
sleeping family and led them to safety;
and Floris S. Wisserkerke, an inde-
pendent dealer for Eugster's Farm
Dairy, Rochelle Park, New Jersey,
who aroused a family in a burning
home, brought them out on a ladder
and assisted the fire department in
fighting the fire.
Bronze Medals Awarded
Bronze Pasteur Medals were awarded
to the following: Calvin Albec of
White Brothers, North Quincy, Mas-
sachusetts, who found an elderly cus-
tomer on the floor of her home with


HOLT HEADS DIVISION OF
EXPERT DAIRY SERVICE
Frank J. Holt has been appointed
manager of the Milk Transport Divi-
sion of Expert Dairy Service, Inc.,
Miami, Florida, according to the re-
cent announcement of George Tworog-
ger, president.
Before joining Expert Dairy Service
on July 1, Frank Holt was manager
of Florida-Foremost Dairies. His many
dairy industry and civic affiliations in-
Council; past-presi-
Sdent of the Florida
State Elks Associa-
tion; past Exhalted
Ruler of Miami Elks
Lodge 948; Rotar-
ian, with eleven
years perfect attend-
ance; member of the
clude service as past-
HOLT president of the
South Florida Dairy
board of the Harry-Anna Crippled
Children's Hospital at Umatilla, Flori-
da; and member of the Hospital Ad-
visory Board of Dade County.
Besides the Milk Transport Divi-
sion, Expert Dairy Service is also
operating a laboratory and consulting
service for dairy plants in the United
States and Latin America. Holt's ap-
pointment will greatly facilitate the
current expansion program of Expert
Dairy Service in its various fields of
operation.


a broken hip. She had been on the
floor, helpless for 24 hours; Angelo
Cassaro of Foremost Dairies, Beau-
mont, Texas, who helped save the life
of an elderly customer whose house
was filled with gas fumes; Raoul My-
rand of The Borden Company, Ltd.,
Quebec, Canada, who made several
efforts in vain to save a small child
from his burning home; Perry L.
Smith of The Borden Company, Terre
Haute, Indiana, who saved an elderly
lady from being crushed to death un-
der the wheels of a train; and Frank
Verna of Wawa Dairy Farms, Wawa,
Pennsylvania, who carried three small
children from their flaming house.
Judges of the 1960 Awards were:
Chairman, Paul Wooton, known as the
DEAN of Washington Correspond-
ents, who covers the nation's capital
for the New Orleans Times-Picayune
and is the Washington member of the
Chilton Publications' Editorial Board;
Miss Helen Thomas of the United
Press International and president of
the Women's National Press Club; and
Philip Love, Editor of the Sunday
Magazine, The Evening Star, Wash-
ington, D. C,


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






group up to date on some cases that have recent-
ly been tried in the courts.
This was followed by a panel discussion on
what changes are needed in the Milk Commission
law to make possible effective stabilization of the
industry on a state-wide basis. Wilmer Bassett


was the moderator and panel members were Dr.
Jim Acree, Jacksonville; John DuPuis, Miami;
Jack Dodd, Orlando; John Adkinson, Pensacola;
Bob Freeland, Tallahassee; Dewey Wilbanks,
Tampa; W. J. Barritt, Tampa; Jerry Dressel,
Miami; T. G. Lee, Orlando; John Hood, Braden-


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SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL


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prevent the occurrence of adverse publicity for
the Florida milk industry. He indicated that pro-
ducers need to do more than just follow the direc-
tions. He illustrated his point by stating that, for
example, winds have carried chemicals unbeliev-
able distances when disbursed by airplanes. A
conscientious and rule-abiding dairyman does not
have control over what his neighbors may inad-
vertently do to him. Mr. Shaw stressed the need
for 100% cooperation from the dairy industry.
He feels that if they attempt to solve their own
problems first, the federal government will be
more cooperative and less harsh with the Florida
dairy industry.
The afternoon program created so much in-
terest among the conventioneers that it fell be-
hind schedule and sufficient time was not avail-
able for all the scheduled speakers. They were
heard the next morning. The seriousness of Wed-
as to who won the honors but George Boutwell,
Boutwell Dairies, Lake Worth; Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Flack (Standard Cap and Seal), Atlanta,
Georgia; and Mrs. Bob Brunner (Dairypak But-
ler, Inc.), Orlando, were the top contenders in the
hula division.
Thursday morning started out as a joint ses-
sion with Jimmy Laher introducing the speakers.
The National Dairy Council's motion picture "The
Time Is Now" was shown. Howard Young, Ex-
tension Specialist from the University of Florida,
spoke on dairy extension services. Mr. Young told
about the short course night schools for key men
in dairy plants that were held in Orlando and
Tallahassee. These two sessions had excellent at-
tendance. In addition to plant operators, whole-
sale and retail milk salesmen attended the meet-
ings to learn more about plant problems. Mr.
Young indicated that short course night school
sessions were planned for Tampa, St. Petersburg
and Jacksonville this fall.
Mr. Young was followed on the podium by
Dr. Ouida Abbott, University of Florida, who
spoke on Research Answers to Irresponsible At-
tacks on Milk. Dr. Abbott stressed that the in-
dustry must always be on guard to protect its
nesday's business was completely reversed by the
Hawaiian Beach Party and the Luau Hawaiian
Buffet dinner. The costumes were indescribably
good. The readers will have to scan the photo-
graphs for a more complete report.
Entertainment was provided by a group of
seven girls-the HULA BABIES from Tarpon
Springs, Florida. Master of Ceremonies was Hula
Jack Dewla, widely known as Jack Dew of Seal-
test. The contest was so close that memory fails
products from these irresponsible attacks. She


TOP ROW: 1. John Wilkes (Hackney Brothers Body
Company), Lake Alford, and Sam Hodges, Super Sue
Ice Cream, Leesburg. 2. Howard Young, Extension
Specialist of the University of Florida. BOTTOM ROW:
1. Sam Noles, State Board of Health, and Jim Jen-
nings (Land O' Lakes Creameries, Inc., and Eze Orange
Company), Jacksonville. 3. Mrs. Bob Brunner and Mr.
Brunner (Dairypak Butler), Orlando.

quoted a Consumer Reports claim that milk was
overrated and another source which claimed that
milk was an incomplete food because it did not
contain iron or copper. She also quoted a source
which indicated that the Japanese and Chinese
had no milk and no coronary disease.
The speaker said that we have known for
years that milk does not contain iron or copper
and experiments on animals fed milk with iron
and copper added prove that milk is a complete
food. Doctors and research scientists don't know
what causes coronary disease, she contended. An-
other claim which she brought out was that high-
ly bred cows produce milk with too many hor-
mones which causes too rapid growth in our chil-
dren-upsetting the pituitary gland. Dr. Abbott
countered this claim by pointing out to the group
that children who grow rapidly have long legs
and long chests. This is not the type of growth,
she emphasized, that goes with glandular trouble.
She concluded her talk by reminding the group
that they must work hard to counteract the things
that are being said against milk.
Next on the agenda was Howard Walton, Ad-
ministrator of the Florida Milk Commission, who
gave a general, as well as financial, report on the
Florida Milk Commission. He also brought the


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL








sion will work "just as well as you want it to
work". The dairy industry, he concluded, must
recommend the best men available for the job to
serve on the Commission.
The afternoon program was continued by
Alex Shaw, Chief Dairy Supervisor of the Dairy
Division, State Department of Agriculture. Mr.
Shaw told the group about the mobile laboratory
for product testing which the state is using to
detect pesticides and antibiotics in milk. He also
said that the laboratory is complete and can do
other work whenever time and personnel are
available.
Pesticides and antibiotics are here to stay,
he declared. The federal government is going to
keep a close watch on these dangerous substances
in milk and milk products. Mr. Shaw feels the
laboratory could be used for early detection and


TOP ROW: 1. Wilmer Basset, Bassett's Dairy, Monti-
cello, may have been asleep, but the photographer
wasn't. 2. Howard O. Robinson (Wyandotte Chemi-
cals Corporation), Miami; Mark Moore, T. G. Lee
Dairy, fieldman; and W. R. Waldeck (Miller-Lenfestey
Company), Tampa. 3. Delores Moody, Atlanta, Geor-
gia, and Marilyn Mott (Maryland Baking Company),
Jacksonville, watching the fashion show. MIDDLE
ROW: 1. Still at the fashion show. Ginny Bobo (Gen-
eral Dynamics Corporation, Liquid Carbonic Division).
Atlanta, Georgia, and Judy Fulton (Diversey Corpora
tion), Jacksonville. 2. John Warrington (International
Paper Company), Miami; Jack McMullen, Vice Presi
dent of A.D.A., Clearwater, and William R. Boardman.
Manager of the Florida A.D.A. 3. Mr. and Mrs. Bill
Pickens, Borden's Dairy, St. Petersburg. BOTTOM
ROW: 1. Elizabeth Gardner (International Paper Com-
pany), Atlanta, Georgia; and Mrs. William Boardman
of Florida A.D.A. 2. Mrs. Edgar Pennell and Mr. Pen-
nell (Murphy Body Works, Inc.), Wilson, North Caro-
lina. 3. Young Bill Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy, Lake
Worth, proudly displays the trophy he won in the
golf tournament. Bill shot a 75 on a par 72 course.


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL



































































explained, will bring agriculture closer to the
people and remove it further from politics. He
indicated that previously the State Department of
Agriculture had inherited many functions not re-
lated to agriculture. He explained that the Com-


mission of Dairy Industries was made up of two
citizens (one college and one extension), two pro-
ducers, two distributors, and one member of the
Board of Health. He explained that the commis-


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL



























Jimmy Laher congratulating Doyle Conner, and
Tom Adams being congratulated by John Sar-
geant. Mr. Conner and Mr. Adams were made
honorary members of the Florida Association.

economy will come in about 1975 and there will
be a reversal of the present trend in the entire
farm economy. He foresees a shortage of farm-
ers at the three-quarters of a century mark. In
15 or 20 years, the speaker suggested, we will see
a ceiling on market prices paid to farmers rather
than the floor we now have.
After a delightful noon luncheon, Ernest
Kellogg, Milk Industry Foundation, Washington,
D. C., commented on pending bills in Congress
which affect the milk industry. He also told the
group that hearings were being held on federal
orders. Mr. Kellogg contended that although
there is resistance to federal orders, producers
tend to support them after they have been in ef-
fect for several years. He also said the Depart-
ment of Agriculture has asked Congress for a
half-million dollars for pesticide research. This
research program should have the support of the
dairy industry.
The speaker reminded the group that a con-
sent decree prevented the packing companies
from retailing meats and from processing milk.
The question has been argued again in Chicago
courts in regard to packers manufacturing ice
cream and butter. While the case was decided in
the negative, it will be carried to a higher court.
Mr. Kellogg concluded his informal presentation
by emphasizing that cottage cheese and sour
cream offer the industry the fastest growing op-
portunity to recapture the fat markets which
were lost to vegetable oils.
The convention then heard a tribute to the
Florida Livestock Board's screwworm eradication
program by Dr. C. L. Campbell, State Veterinar-
ian. In 1957, he said, there was no control for
screwworm except inspection and treatment. The


HAWAIIAN BEACH PARTY
SHOWN ON OPPOSITE PAGE ---
TOP ROW: 1. A fun loving pair, Lee and Frank Flack
(Standard Cap and Seal Company), Atlanta, Georgia.
2. Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Laher, Sealtest Foods, Miami.
3. These two aren't married-George Boutwell, Bout-
well's Dairy, Lake Worth, and Charles Hickerson
(Creamery Package Mfg. Company), Atlanta, Georgia.
SECOND ROW: 1. Leigh Sellers, granddaughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Leon Sellers, Sellers Farm, St. Petersburg. 2.
Jim Morgan and Bob Shackelford, Jacksonville; Bob
Waller, Miami, all with Owens-Illinois Glass Com-
pany. 3. Ernest Kellogg, Milk Industry Foundation,
and Alf R. Nielsen, Alfar Creamery Company, West
Palm Beach, Former President of F.D.P.A. and former
director of Milk Industry Foundation. THIRD ROW: 1.
Jack Binder (American Maize-Products), Clearwater;
Murray Gay, Winn-Dixie, Tampa; Pat Griffin, Bor-
den's Dairy, Tampa; and Earl Haynes (American
Maize-Products), Atlanta, Georgia. 2. A rose between
two thorns, "Chuck" Ringland (Mohawk Cabinet Com-
pany), Jacksonville; Ann Terwilliger, Sealtest Foods,
West Palm Springs, and Sam Hodges, Super-Sue Ice
Cream, Inc., Leesburg. 3. That is rich fluid in the buc-
ket. Can't identify the man with the ladle; Charles
Hickerson (Creamery Package Mfg. Company), At-
lanta, Georgia; Bill Boardman, Manager of Florida
A.D.A., holding the bucket, and George Boutwell of
Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth. BOTTOM ROW: 1. Bash-
ful Jim Brunt (Hackney Brothers Body Company), and
one of the attractive members of the entertainment
group, Elizabeth Mills of Miami. 2. Natives? Frank
Flack (Standard Cap and Seal Company), Atlanta,
Georgia, and Mrs. Bob Brunner (Dairypak Butler),
Orlando. 3. Mary Binder (American Maize-Products),
Clearwater; Pat Gay, Winn-Dixie, Tampa; Connie
Haynes (American Maize-Products), Atlanta, Georgia,
and Betty Griffin, Borden's Dairy, Tampa.

fly that causes screwworms has an unusual breed-
ing habit in that the female mates only once and
then dies after laying her eggs. In 1950 radiation
was used to create a mutation which produced
sterile males. Experiments on gulf coast islands
indicated the screwworm could be completely
eradicated in five months; although in areas
where there is nearby infestation, the eradication
is only temporary and the area is soon reinfested.
The eradication program has been highly success-
ful, but it will have to cover the entire South and
adjoining areas if it is to be permanent.
Later in the afternoon the Honorable Tom
Adams, Democratic nominee for Secretary of
State in Florida and Chairman of the Agricultural
Services Reorganization Committee of the State
Legislature, which recently drafted a reorganiza-
tion law, gave a technical and informative sum-
mary of that law. He pointed out that Florida
was the first state to pass such a reorganization
law in three-quarters of a century and predicted
that other states would soon follow. The law, he


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL








South. He emphasized that one farmer now feeds
24 people and that crop production per acre has
doubled in recent years. Agriculture has increased
its efficiency in production five or six per cent,
which is twice as fast as industry has been able
to increase its production efficiency; the indus-
trial figure is two and one-half to three per cent.
Ironically, the more efficient the farmer becomes,
and the more people for which one farmer is able
to provide food and fiber, the more abuse he has to
contend with from self-appointed non-farm ex-
perts across the country.
Dr. Nunn expects a population explosion by
1975 that will produce 220 to 240 million people
for American farmers to feed and clothe. He fore-
casts new developments at a rapidly increasing
pace in plant breeding, livestock breeding, and in
techniques concerning better use of chemicals and
irrigation as well as better management prac-
tices. He predicts that the real break in our farm

TOP ROW: 1. Early Birds Emmett Hood, daughter
Mary Lee and Mrs. Hood, Hood's Dairy, St. Peters-
burg, register early Tuesday afternoon. 2. Mermaids
Lynn Williams and Lesly Williams, Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, helped their grandmother, Mrs. E. T. Lay, at the
registration desk between trips to the swimming pool.
3. Beauty reigned supreme at the style show with
Bonnie Hood, daughter of the John Hoods, Hood's
Dairy, Bradenton, and Sherry Chapman, graddaugh-
ter of the E. M. Hoods, Sr., Hood's Dairy, St. Peters-
burg, modeling the latest in play clothes. Sorry, boys


Tom Powers (Robert A. Johnston Company),
Jacksonville, and Frank Thompson (General Dy-
namics Corporation, Liquid Carbonic Division),
Jacksonville, newly elected President and Vice
President of the F.D.P.A.'s Allied Trades.

-the rest of my notes on these two are confidential.
BOTTOM ROW: 1. Furnishing a beautiful background
for an orchid is Mrs. Jim Mott (Maryland Baking Com-
pany), new Chairman of the Allied Trades Women's
Auxiliary. 2. Billed as the biggest man and the small-
est lady at the convention is John Tripson, Tripson
Dairies, New Beach, and Mrs. Helen Radke (Ex-Cell-O
Corporation), Atlanta, Georgia. 3. A candidate for
the youngest conventioneer is held by her grand-
father, Aaron Block (Reddi-Whip Company of Florida),
Jacksonville.


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL


i1~





































TOP ROW: 1. A trio of poker faces. Robert Walker
(Walker Stainless Equipment Company), New Lisbon,
Wisconsin; John Manning, of the same firm, North
Miami, and Donald Perret, Perret's Jersey Farm, Jack-
sonville. 2. Joseph Costa, Jr. (National Pectin Products
Company), Athens, Georgia, and Hank Tull (Lily-
Tulip Cup Corporation), Atlanta, Georgia. 3. Ray Art-
ley (Miller Machinery and Supply Company), Miami,
and Bob Shortlidge of Borden's Southern Division.
BOTTOM ROW: 1. Harvey Barritt, Borden's Dairy,
Tampa, and R. H. Pair (Vanilla Laboratories, Inc.),
Atlanta, Georgia. 2. Bob Walters (Marathon Division
of American Can Company), Jacksonville, chatting
with Carl E. Peterson (Mulholland-Harper Company),
Winter Park, Florida. 3. Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Beatty,
Foremost Dairies, Jacksonville, and Hugh McCauley
(Dairypak Butler), Athens, Georgia.

had officially registered. Alf R. Nielsen, Alfar
Creamery, West Palm Beach, one of the old tim-
ers of this association, thought the association
was founded in 1917 with about eight members.
This proved quite a contrast when compared to
the turn-out for the 1960 Early Birds dinner
which nearly filled the Hibiscus Room.
Wednesday morning presented a dilemma
that was to rear its ugly head several times in
the next 48 hours. Two meetings were scheduled
at one time. The state Dairymen's Association
met in the Blue Room with President John Sar-
geant presiding. The 22 attending members
passed a resolution paying tribute to the Florida
Livestock Board's screwworm eradication pro-
gram. A spirited discussion developed concerning


milk imported into the state and several recom-
mendations were formulated for presentation to
the Florida Milk Commission.
Meanwhile, back in the Hibiscus Room, the
Dairy Products Association was holding a con-
ference with the Florida Egg Commission. Presi-
dent Jimmy Laher introduced Chairman Sam
Bush, Newport Richey, and Albert H. Moore, Ft.
Myers, of the Florida Egg Commission and Frank
W. Richer, Assistant Commissioner of Marketing
from Jacksonville.
The egg commissioners showed a portfolio of
colorful point-of-sale material that is available to
dairies from their egg dealers. In addition to the
excellent posters, they displayed a place mat, pro-
moting fresh Florida eggs, for use in restaurants.
This item has been particularly successful and
the Commission has received requests for them
from states as far north as Pennsylvania. The
Commissioners shared their enthusiasm for
Florida eggs with the dairymen by furnishing a
fat, plump, delicious hard boiled egg for everyone
at the noon luncheon.
The two Associations then held a late morn-
ing joint session at which Dr. Alexander Nunn,
Birmingham, Alabama, Editor of Progressive
Farmer, spoke on SOUTHERN AGRICULTURE
IN THIS DECADE. Dr. Nunn explained that
tractors had replaced mules and that the use of
chemicals along with new tillage techniques, ir-
rigation and fertilization had been primarily re-
sponsible for recent record farm production in the


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL























































It takes excellent speakers to create an attention-hold-
ing program and Florida had them. TOP ROW: 1.
Julian Lane, dairyman and mayor of Tampa. 2. Alex
Shaw, Chief Dairy Supervisor of the Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture. 3. Dr. Jim Brogden, University of

guilty. One of the favorite pastimes was pulling
family pictures out of purses and billfolds and
discussing their children's brilliant prospective
futures with the person nearest at hand.
Tuesday's official functions, in addition to
registration, were the Early Birds Reception on
the Garden Terrace and the Early Birds dinner in
the Hibiscus Room. Both of these events were ex-
tremely well attended and justified predictions
that this would be one of the largest joint meet-
ings ever held by Florida dairy folks. By the end
of the week it was estimated that some 600 people


Florida, Entomologist. 4. Dr. Ouida Abbott, Univer-
sity of Florida. SECOND ROW: 1. Ernest Kellogg, Act-
ing Executive Director of Milk Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C. 2. Tom Adams, Democratic nomi-
nee for Secretary of State and Chairman of the Agri-
culture Service Reorganization Committee. 3. Mark
Moore, T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando. 4. Dr. C. L. Camp-
bell, Florida State Veterinarian. THIRD ROW: 1. E. T.
"Andy" Lay, Executive Secretary of F.D.P.A. 2. Sam
Noles, State Board of Health. 3. Howard Walton, Ad-
ministrator for the Florida Milk Commission. 4. A
Young man who will go a long way, Doyle E. Con-
ner, Commissioner Elect of Agriculture. BOTTOM ROW:
1. Lovely Mrs. John Hood, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton,
was elected chairman of the F.D.P.A. Women's Aux-
iliary. 2. Dr. E. L. Fouts, Technical Editor of SOUTHERN
DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL. 3. Dr. A. A. McMurray,
Director of the Florida Mastitis Control Program. 4.
Another hard worker, Mrs. John Fuqua, Fuqua's
Dairy, Altha, immediate past Chairman of the F.S.D.A.
Ladies Auxiliary.


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL










SUNSHINE



WITH


FLORIDANS


By MAX E. HOLLINGER


President John Hood, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton, and
Vice President Claude Kelly, Foremost Dairies, Jack-
sonville, two newly elected officers of The Florida
Dairy Products Association.


T. f





John Adkinson, Adkinson and Mayne Dairy, Pensa-
cola, and Dewey Wilbanks, W&A Dairy, Tampa, new-
ly elected President and Vice President of Florida
State Dairymen's Association.


Everybody, everything, including the after-
noon rain drops, is warm and friendly in Florida.
Rain and sunshine exchanged places in the sky as
often as did the atmosphere, from gaiety to ser-
iousness, in the spacious meeting rooms of the Ft.
Harrison Hotel, Clearwater, Florida, during the
Florida Dairy Products Association Convention on
June 21-23. The conventioneers had unity of pur-
pose-to improve demand for Florida milk prod-
ucts and to create a more stable price situation.
Traditionally, dairymen work hard and play hard.
They did both at this convention and at the same
time performed much of the necessary ground
work to create a better and more profitable fu-
ture for the industry.
Activity centered around the registration
desk, swimming pool and bar-milk and ice cream
bar, that is-Tuesday afternoon. The early hours
of disorganized confusion were short in number.
This was the first convention for many, but the
newcomers received a helping hand from the old-
timers and soon became veterans. Getting ac-
quainted and becoming acclimated to the fast
moving pace of a well planned program was much
easier than getting up in the morning for those
9 o'clock sessions. Some brave soul was always
talking about a swim before breakfast but, in-
deed, most had difficulty keeping up with the
planned activities without adding any extra-cur-
ricular ones.
The registration desk on the mezzanine was
a Mecca for those seeking all types of informa-
tion. It even attracted an artificial inseminator
from Oklahoma. This gentleman had created a
number of unemployed bulls in his native state,
but he desired to transfer his activities to the
Southeast.
Busily handling registrations, Mrs. Andy Lay
was assisted by her two pre-teenage granddaugh-
ters as well as Elsie Remsen of the Florida Dairy
Products Association office. Frank Thompson,
Secretary of the Alligators, was busy greeting
members of his organization. Andy Lay, Execu-
tive Secretary of the F.D.P.A., together with
President Jimmy Laher, and John Sargeant, Presi-
dent of Florida State Dairymen's Association, were
equally busy checking all details behind the
scenes which helped to make this convention run
so smoothly.
Advance billing on the convention indicated
this was to be a family affair. That it was, and
children of all ages made excellent use of the hotel
swimming pool and other recreational facilities
available to them. As a matter of fact, the folks
that left the "younguns" behind must have felt


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL







A 12-PAGE SUPPLEMENT


Reprinted


from


The SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL


August 1960


Issue


-An CEdlorial and Pictorlal eeview...

OF THE

1960 FLORIDA CONVENTION


Held Jointly By


The Florida


Dairy Products


Association


AND


The Florida


State


Dairymen's


Association


JUNE


21-23


Fort Harrison Hotel Clearwater,


Florida


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL S-1







Honorary Membership Voted
Honorary Membership Voted Holland and Meadows Honored
Doyle Conner and By Progressive Farmer
Tom Adams By Florida For Services To Agriculture
Dairy Industry


THREE NEW MEMBERS
Florida Dairy Industry
"ORDER OF BELL COWS"

Three new members of the Dairy
Industry's Honorary Leadership Fra-
ternity, "The Order of Bell Cows,"
were recognized and installed at the
joint 1960 annual convention in Clear-
water, July 22-24, of the Florida State
Dairymen's Association and the Flori-
da Dairy Products Association.
In the absence of the chairman of
the "Bell Cow" group, Alf Nielsen, Dr.
Everett L. Fouts, head of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, University of
Florida and vice chairman of the
group, installed the new members.
New members of the Order are se-
lected by the existing members and
not by the dairy associations. Those
selected are recognized as having ren-
dered distinguished service to the Flor-
ida Dairy Institute.
With three additional members, the
Bell Cow group now has twenty mem-
bers. The new members, installed at
a luncheon session of the convention,
are:
JOHN B. SERGEANT, now serv-
ing his second term as president of the
Florida State Dairvmen's Association
and as chairman of the Florida Dairy
Industry Conference. Mr. Sargeant
also served as Vice President of the
Florida Dairy Association and as chair-
man of the "Producers' Division" of
that former industry-wide organization.
JACK DEW of Sealtest Dairies,
Jacksonville, a former co-worker with
the Evangelist Billy Sunday, who
throughout his long years of service in
public relations for Sealtest has been
recognized as an Ambassador of Good
Will for the entire dairy industry in
the use of his unusual talents in the
conducting of meetings, song leading
and as a master of ceremonies. Jack
has served as official song leader and
master of ceremonies for Florida dairy
industry conventions for as long as
most present dairymen can remember
and is still going strong.
ALEX SHAW, Chief Dairy Super-
16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Two of Florida's future State Cabi-
net Members-Doyle Conner, Demo-
cratic nominee for Commissioner of
Agriculture, and Tom Adams, Demo-
cratic nominee for Secretary of State
- were guests of honor and guest
speakers at a luncheon session of the
1960 Joint Annual Convention of the
Florida State Dairymen's Association
and the Florida Dairy Products Assoc-
iation at Clearwater, Florida.
Both Conner and Adams have had
close association with the agricultural
interests of Florida. Conner is an ac-
tive and successful farmer and has
served as National President of the
Future Farmers of America. Adams
spent many years as a Florida dairy
farmer and at the time of his retire-
ment from the farm had climbed near
the top of the ladder in the dairy in-
dustry as 1st Vice President and
Treasurer of the Florida Dairy Indus-
try Association.
Both received a rising ovation when
a surprise resolution was offered at
the 1960 Dairy Convention at Clear-
water naming them as "Honorary
Members" of both the Florida State
Dairymen's Association and the Flor-
ida Dairy Products Association.

visor of the Florida State Department
of Agriculture, has served the Florida
dairy industry first as an area dairy
supervisor and as Chief Supervisor
since the retirement of John Scott a
number of years ago. Although in his
official duties Alex Shaw has had the
responsibility of inspecting, regulating
and policing all phases of the dairy
industry, his gentle personality and
kindly manner of dealing with the
problems of the industry have won for
him the respect and friendship of the
members of the industry.
Other Bell Cows
The members of the "Order of Bell
Cows," other than the three named
above are: Alf Nielsen, Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Ernest Graham, John DuPuis,
Jr., J. O. Bowen, Theo Datson, T. G.
Lee, Richard J. Werner, Robert H.
North, E. T. Lay, Cotton Paul, Ver-
non Graves, C. W. Reaves, Col. B. F.
Castle, John M. Scott, Bill Graham
and Herman Boyd. Former members,
now deceased, are: Dr. J. Hillis Mil-
ler and Sam Solomon.
Parties who want milk should not
seat themselves on a stool in the mid-
tle of a field in hope that the cow
will back up to them.
-Elbert Hubbard


Certificates Awarded At
Florida Dairy Convention
Frank L. Holland, Winter Haven,
Florida, and Dr. M. E. Meadows
(D.V.M.) of Tallahassee, were pre-
sented "distinguished service to agri-
culture" awards by the Progressive
Farmer magazine of Birmingham, Ala-
bama, at special Agricultural Services
luncheon of the Florida Dairy Indus-
try Convention, July 22 in Clear-
water, Florida.
Named Man of the Year
Frank Holland was presented the
Progressive Farmer's award as "Man
of the Year 1959 in Florida Agricul-
ture." Mr. Holland, a brother of
Florida U. S. Senator Spessard Hol-
land, has served
Florida agriculture
since 1933 as Exec-
utive Secretary of
the Florida Agricul-
tural Research In-
stitute. He was also
one of the organi-
zers and first chair-
A 'A man of the Florida
HOLLAND Agricultural Council
which serves as a medium of coopera-
tion between all Florida agricultural
organizations.
Dr. Meadows received the Pro-
gressive Farmer award as "Man of the
Year 1959 in Southern Agriculture."
The recognition to Dr. Meadows came
because of his outstanding service to
Southern Agriculture as Executive Di-
rector of the Screwworm Eradication
Program in Florida. Dr. Meadows
represented both the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture and the Florida
Livestock Board with headquarters at
Sebring, Florida. Now that the screw-
worm program has been completed,
Dr. Meadows has moved to Talla-
hassee as a full time member of the
staff of the Livestock Board.
Dr. Meadows' picture can be seen
among those in the Dairy Conven-
tion story elsewhere in this issue.
Dr. Alexander Nunn, Editor of the
Progressive Farmer "Southern Edi-
tion," presented the awards to Holland
and Dr. Meadows at the Florida Dairy
Convention. He also addressed the
Convention on "Southern Agriculture
in this Decade."
A salesman, held up in a small
town by a bad snow storm, wired the
firm: "Stranded here due to storm.
\\ire instructions."
Back came the reply: "Start vaca-
tion immediately."


















,ORIDA DAIRY CONVENTION

oups Provides Ideal Combination of Business and Vacation


Highlights of Program
The nature of this busy meeting
as a joint convention and annual
meeting of the State Dairymen's As-
sociation and the Florida Dairy Prod-
ucts Association might appear to an
observer as being somewhat of "a 4-
ring circus."
Such as impression would be gain-
ed because of the busy three-day
schedule of events which were in
progress three or four at the same
time during portions of the day.


Events for Different Groups
The Dairymen's Association and
the Dairy Products Association had
both separate and joint general busi-
ness sessions and directors' meetings.
The Ladies' Auxiliary and the Allied
Trades Association, both having joint
membership between the two Dairy
Associations, held their own separate
business and recreational program.
These included the ladies "get-ac-
quainted party" on the opening day,
a ladies' fashion show and a special
ladies' luncheon program. The Al-
lied Trades sponsored a general "fel-
lowship and entertainment program"
for the entire convention group as
well as a "golf tournament." They
also held a separate annual business
meeting.
Hawaiian Party Pleases
One of the most delightful and en-
tertaining fellowship and entertain-
ment programs of any of the many
Florida dairy conventions was the
Hawaiian Night party. The party
started off with a Hawaiian costume
parade and water show which was
one of the most colorful ever seen
at the Florida conventions.
Winners of the costume prizes
were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Flack of
Atlanta as best couple: Mrs. Bob
Brunner of Orlando, ladies' prize, and
Bill Boardman, Winter Haven, man's
prize.
The Hawaiian dance prize was
won by Art Boutwell (6 ft. 3 in.) of
Lake Worth, in a flaming grass skirt
and his tiny 4-year old partner Leigh
Sellers, granddaughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Sellers, Sr. of St. Peters-
burg. This performance was really
a scream.

PICTURES IDENTIFICATION
LEFT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(1) Mr and Mrs. George Heine, Sealtest,
Tampa. (2) Mr. and Mrs. Bill Gooding,
Alfar Creamery, West Palm Beach. (3)
Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Thomas, Sealtest,
West Palm Beach.
RIGHT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(1) Water show girls' precision swimming
team. (2) The Hula Babies again. (3)
Art (Snooky) Boutwell and dance partner,
little Leigh Sellers, perform in Hawaiian
dance contest. (4) Group at Hawaiian cos-
tume party. (5) One of the many family
groups, Mrs. Herman Boyd of Miami and
her three attractive youngsters.
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 15


D P I r




I


1 PICTURES TELL THE STORY C

Shrow How Increasing Attendance of Ladies and Fam

,Ak an\ of the record group of 324 who attended Florida's 1960 July
22-24 Annual oint Convention of the State producer and distributor associa-
tion--F.S.D.A. and F.D.P.A.-at the Clearwater Fort Harrison Hotel
we are confident you would hear praise for both the constructive business
session. and conferences on the industry's current problems and for the good
times enjoyed through fellowship and recreation opportunities which the
cLon\cntion program provided.
Pictures Tell the Story
Belie ing that both those who attended the convention and those who
could not would enjoy a report of its proceedings in pictures, the Dairy
News is pleased to be able to review the convention this year with some fifteen
pages of copy including approximately one hundred pictures.
As a Visitor Saw It
The Florida Dairy News is in-
debted to the Southern Dairy Prod-
ucts Journal of Atlanta, Georgia, for
granting permission to reprint its en-
tire eleven-page story including eighty-
two pictures of this convention, as
reported by the Journal's Associate
Editor, Max Hollinger, who came as
a complete stranger to the convention.
This story is titled "Funshine with
Floridans" and follows this story. Be
sure to read it!


PICTURES IDENTIFICATION
TOP (Both Pages) L to R-(1) John
Sargeant, President of the Dairymen's As-
sociation presides at business session. (2)
J. H. Laher, President of the Dairy Products
Association, introduces the next speaker.
(3) One of convention luncheon meetings.
(4) and (5) Speakers table at luncheon
meeting . Honor guest Thomas B. Adams,
4th from left; Honor guest Doyle E. Conner,
6th from right; Dr. and Mrs. M. E. Mead-
ows, Honor guests, at right end. (6) Jack
Dew (Sealtest, lax.), permanent convention
master of ceremonies, did a marvellous job
as usual leading group singing, leading in
praver, olliciating in attendance priht draw-
ingp and managing entertainment. For his
part in tIh Hauaitan i Night program. he
acquired tlh name "Hula jack Dcula." For
hIis long Icar of leadership he was honored
with membership in tle "Order of Bell
Cou '."
LEFT PANEL (This Paget From Top:
(II Dr. .Allexander .\'uni. Editor. Progres-
sit, Farmer magazine. present, "Distin-
guished Strrice to .Agriculture" au aid. (2)
Do}lt Conntr, nominee for Commissioner
of Agriculture, retlit*f friendlil greeting
front hIs bot. i.soiiation Presidinti John
Sai giant. lItf. and limmni Labcr. (3) lack
Dtu. mater of all ceremonits. u'ilt Ha-
uavian dance, team. "Fhe Hula Babies." (4)
Ladies parts committee. L to R. .Mrs. Bill
Pickns. .fr,,. (lair Hill and M1rs. lobn
.lannitng. prepare to distribute orchids to
ladies for Huawaian night program.
RIGHT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(f ) .lr. anid AMrs. John Sargeant. Pres..
F.S.D.A. (2) ,lr. and ,Mrs. Julian Lane.
I Prei., F.S.D..A. (I) Ar. and .lrs. John
Hood. I'. Prt s.. F.D.P.A.
14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


-W


- V


Ir"


I





ii


-_M


4~.


(.01,0































Florida's "Dairy Princess" for 1960, Miss Gail Gustafson of Green Cove Springs, has
announced her entry in the 1960 "American Dairy Princess" Contest which will be held
in Chicago during National Dairy Industry Conventions, October 31-November 5.


National Dairy Conventions
And Dairy Exposition In
Chicago, Oct. 31-Nov. 5,1960
The 22nd Dairy Industries Exposi-
tion and Annual Conventions of eight
national associations within the dairy
industry are scheduled for the period
of October 27 to November 5 in Chi-
cago.
The exposition of dairy supplies
and equipment will be held in the
International Amphitheatre, one of the
world's largest exposition buildings.
The International Association of
Milk and Food Sanitarians Convention
will be held at the "Morrison Hotel,"
October 27-29.
The International Association of
Ice Cream Manufacturers Convention
will be held at the "Conrad Hilton Ho-
tel," October 31-November 2.
The Milk Industry Foundation Con-
vention will be held at the "Palmer
House" November 2-4.
Dairy Showcase 60
Termed "the first Big Show of dairy
industry supplies and equipment of
the Soaring 60's," attendance at the
Exposition is said to be potentially the
most valuable business experience for
any dairy industry executive who
wants to become or stay or grow in-
creasingly successful.
This exposition, held every two
years, is one of the largest of its kind
in the world. Dairy supplies and
equipment will be exhibited by about
400 firms and will be seen by an esti-
mated 20,000 persons.


Where To Stay
Hotels are assigned by the National
Conventions and Exposition Commit-
tee to each Association.
Members of National Associations
such as Milk Industry Foundation, In-
ternational Ice Cream and Dairy Sup-
plies & Equipment, should request ho-
tel reservation forms from your Associ-
ation.
Persons not members of one of the
convening national associations may
request hotel reservations or informa-
tion on hotels and rates from The Chi-
cago Convention Bureau, 134 N. La-
Salle St., Chicago 2, Illinois.
Admission By Badge Only
The Dairy Industries Exposition
does not admit the general public.
Only persons who are actively engaged
in dairy processing enterprises, or who
serve the dairy industries in public or
private capacities, are admitted.
Badges are issued free to all dairy
processors and their families who
identify themselves at the registration
desks. Free admission badges are also
issued to educators, sanitarians, public
health officers, armed forces personnel
with interests in food preparation or
service, and certain other government
personnel.
The convention badges of regular
members of MIF, IAICM, and NAR-
ICM are honored for instant admis-
sion, so members of these groups do
not have to re-register when they arrive
at the Show.


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113 S. Ashley Street, Valdosta, Georgia
Dealers In:
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Other Ingredients and Grains
Phone: CHerry 2-6075 Valdosta, Georgia


LIVESTOCK
WISCONSIN'S finest HOLSTEIN and
Guernsey dairy heifers shipped to you
on approval. Write for free price list.
Otto Vanderburg, North Prairie, Wis.





JOIN


the many Florida

dairymen who

have depended

on the quality

and reliability of

Kuder Citrus Pulp

for more than

twenty years.







KUDER PULP

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Lake Alfred, Florida


THIRD QUARTER, 1960 13








The Dairy Division
Department of Agriculture
After 1961 Reorganization
The director of the division of dairy
industry shall be appointed by the
Commissioner and shall serve at his
pleasure.
No person shall be appointed di-
rector of the division of dairy industry
who does not possess the following
minimum qualifications:
(a) A graduate of a recognized and
reputable college of agriculture;
(b) A person with at least four
years experience in dairy farm and
milk plant control supervision.
The director shall supervise, direct
and coordinate the activities of his
division and to that end he shall under
the direction of the commissioner en-
force the provisions of Chapters 502
(Fla. Milk & Milk Products Law)
and 503 (Fla. Frozen Desserts Law).
The division of dairy industry shall
be divided into not less than three
sections including:
(1) Dairy farm inspection. It
shall be the duty of this section to
inspect dairy farms of the state and to
enforce those provisions of Chapter
502, Florida Statutes, as authorized
by the Commissioner.
(2) Milk and milk products plant
inspection.-It shall be the duty of
this section to inspect milk plants,
milk products plants, and plants en-
gaged in the manufacture and distri-
bution of frozen desserts and frozen
desserts mix and to enforce those pro-
visions of Chapters 502 and 503, Flor-
ida Statutes, as authorized by the Com-
missioner.
(3) Mobile dairy laboratory.-It
shall be the duty of this section to
analyze and test samples of milk
products, frozen desserts and frozen
desserts mix collected by it and to
enforce those provisions of Chapters
502 and 503, Florida Statutes, as
authorized by the Commissioner.
The dairy industry technical ad-
visory committee is hereby created
and shall be composed of seven mem-
bers as follows:
(a) Two citizens of the State, one
of whom shall be associated with the
agricultural extension service of the
University of Florida and the other
such citizen shall be associated with
the college of agriculture of the Uni-
versity of Florida.
(b) The state health officer or
some employee of the State Board of
Health.
(c) Two dairy farmers who are
actively engaged in the production of
milk in this State and who earn a
major portion of their income from
the said production of milk.
12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DAIRY PRODUCTS IMPORTED INTO FLORIDA DURING 1959
(As reported by Dairy Division, State Department of Agriculture)
State of Fluid 40% Condensed Cottage Sour Yogurt
Production Milk Cream Milk Cheese Cream
In Gallons In Pounds
Alabama 1,906,439 3,057
Arkansas 381,914
Georgia 668,734 6,203 9,463 125
Illinois 66,513 5,057,600
Iowa 54,366 163,980
Kentucky 500,859
Louisiana 12,725
Mississippi 318,873 39,542 61,586
Missouri 338,663 57,392 1,704,596 13,829
Minnesota 76,363
North Carolina 59,440
New York 2,145,324 205,771 62,417
Pennsylvania 72,362
Tennessee 310,623 402,264 950,041 7,224,638 21,686
Virginia 154,071 162,288 231,425
Wisconsin 1,379,863 235,440 90,922 778,914
Totals 5,389,924 1,187,457 1,391,436 17,647,736 241,411 62,417


(d) Two distributors of milk. "Dis-
tributor" means any milk dealer who
operates a milk gathering station or
processing plant where milk is collect-
ed and bottled or otherwise processed
and prepared for sale.
The Commissioner shall appoint the
members of this technical committee
except that his choice of appointment
of the four members provided for in
paragraphs (c) and (d) shall be limit-
ed to nominations received from the
governing bodies of recognized state-
wide organizations representing (1)
the producer group and (2) the dis-
tributor group of the dairy industry.
These respective organizations shall
each recommend no less than four nor
more than six candidates to fill their
respective two seats on the technical
committee. Such nominations shall be
made pursuant to proper provisions
adopted and made a part of the by-
laws of the respective organizations.
In the absence of nominations from
the producer or distributor groups of
the dairy industry, the Commissioner
shall appoint such persons as are quali-
fied under the provisions of this sec-
tion.
Two members of the first technical
committee shall hold office until Jan-
uary 15, 1962, or until their success-
ors are duly appointed and qualified
and thereafter shall serve for a term
of two years. The three remaining
members shall serve for a term of two
years. The terms of office of members
of the first technical committee shall
date from January 15, 1961.


20-Member Advisory Council
In addition to its representation
on the technical advisory committee
to the Dairy Division, the dairy in-
dustry will have one member of a
20-member advisory council to the
Department of Agriculture as a whole.
This same member will serve as the
dairy member of the Livestock Tech-
nical Advisory Committee which will
correspond to the present Florida Live-
stock Board.


Dr. Scribner Advanced
To Orange County Position
Dr. L. A. Scribner, who has served
in the City of Orlando Health De-
partment for the past eighteen and
one-half years as supervisor and in-
spector of dairies, milk, milk products
and meat, recently resigned to accept
a similar position with the Orange
County Health Department.
This will extend Dr. Scribner's ju-
risdiction throughout the County as
well as the City of Orlando.


REASONS YOUR MILK
IS GRADED "GOOD"
COWS: Clean healthy prop-
erly fed
SURROUNDINGS: Clean dry
well-ventilated
UTENSILS: Clean Sterile -
smooth
MILK: Quickly cooled protected











TWENTIETH ANNIVERSARY
Jersey Cattle Sale, Sept. 8
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club will
sponsor its annual Jersey cattle sale on
September 8 at the Orange County
Agricultural Center, E. Michigan Ave-
nue, Orlando. Marking the twentieth
anniversary of its first annual sale,
this year's committee is very proud of
the 50 or more animals to be sold from
the best Florida herds and also from
Alabama, Indiana, Ohio, New Jersey
and Tennessee. Chester Folck & Sons,
Springfield, Ohio, are managers for
the sale.
The annual meeting and banquet of
the club will be held on the afternoon
and evening of September 7. Advance
banquet and motel reservations, as well
as sales catalogs, should be obtained
from Al Cribbett, Assistant County
Agent, Orange County Agricultural
Center, E. Michigan Avenue, Orlan-
do, Florida.


"Cow Power" and
"Ton of Gold" Records
A registered Jersey cow, Alvarez
Beau Sandy Sport, owned by A. T. Al-
varez, Jacksonville, has recently com-
pleted an official production record
giving her a "Cow Power" Index of
13.4. This indicates that Sandy pro-
duced 13.4 times her body weight in
milk during this lactation. Her total
production was 9,370 pounds of milk
and 459 pounds of fat in 305 days at
the age of one year, ten months.
Jester Lela Cynthia, a registered
Jersey cow owned by J. K. Stuart, Bar-
tow, has been awarded a "Ton of
Gold" certificate for producing 2,113
pounds of butterfat-more than a ton
-from 40,702 pounds of milk in
four years. This record far exceeds
that of the "average" cow in the
United States and the American Jersey
Cattle Club makes the awards as a
means of encouraging the selection of
cows with consistently high production
over a long period.
Herd Classification
The herd of registered Jerseys
owned by B. W. Judge, Orlando, was
recently classified for breed type by an
official classifier of the American Jer-
sey Cattle Club.
The Judge herd now has 9 Excel-
lent animals, 83 Very Good, 44 Good
Plus, and 2 Good, making a total of
138 animals with an average rating of
86.09%. The ideal Jersey animal is
rated 100%.


Schedule of Events
For Jersey Breeder
The 1960 All American Jersey
Show and Sale at the Ohio State Fair
Grounds, Columbus, Ohio, October
15-19, promises to be bigger and bet-
ter than ever. Featured events in-
cluded are: National Jersey Show, Na-
tional Junior Jersey Show, All Ameri-
can Sale, National Jersey Jug Futurity
Show, National Milking Derby, Calf
Scramble, and Pot O' Gold Heifer Sale.
The Jersey breed is the dairy breed
that sponsors its own national show
and to date they have held eight All
American Sales.
Jersey breeders will be exhibiting
at the following shows also: the region-
al show at the Eastern States Exposi-
tion, West Springfield, Massachusetts,
on September 20 and 21; the Mid-
South Regional at the Mid-South Fair,
Memphis, Tennessee, September 28;
the National Dairy Congress, Water-
loo, Iowa, October 4 and 5; Grand
National Livestock Exposition at the
Cow Palace, San Francisco, California,
October 27; and the International Live
Stock Exposition in Chicago, Illinois,
November 25 to December 3.


JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


20th Annual

FLORIDA STATE

JERSEY SALE

September 8, 1960
ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Orange County Agricultural Center-12:00 Noon


SELLING

50 HEADS--Fresh and Springing

JERSEYS
Nothing but the very top in quality and production has been selected by
the sale manager and committee for this sale.
FINANCING AVAILABLE-Arrangements should be made with the clerk
prior to start of sale.
For further information, contact:
B. W. Judge, Sales Chairman, Rt. 1, Box 284, Orlando; Phone-GArden 5-3655
Woodrow Glenn, Secy. Fla. Jersey Cattle Club, County Agent, Marianna, Florida
Sponsored by
FLORIDA JERSEY CATTLE CLUB

THIRD QUARTER, 1960 11


JERSEY DOLLAR PROGRAM
One of the highlights of the 92nd
annual meeting of the Jersey breeders
held at Fresno, California, June 1,
was the launching of the dollar pro-
gram, which will offer state Jersey
organizations additional revenue to
promote Jerseys within the state. The
program plan gives each state a quota
based on the average number of ani-
mals registered in that state during the
last five years. For each Jersey recorded
over the five-year average, that state
will receive one dollar.


WANTED

AND

FOR SALE

DEPARTMENT

One Insertion Free
A one-inch ad will be run free
in this section for any Florida
dairy in the next issue of The
Florida Dairy News, Nov. 15.
Send copy to 1024 Oak St.,
Jacksonville 4.








ton; Claude Kelly, Jacksonville, and Jimmy Lah-
er, Miami. Most of the panel members expressed
the opinion that Florida has a good law but that
it needs better administration.
After lunch Thursday, William R. Boardman,
Florida A.D.A. Manager, showed the group slides
on Florida A.D.A. activities and outlined several
future promotions. He was followed on the pro-
gram by Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of Florida
and Technical Editor for SOUTHERN DAIRY
PRODUCTS JOURNAL, who moderated a panel
discussion on WHAT ABOUT ANTIBIOTICS,
PESTICIDES AND INSECTICIDES CONDI-
TIONS, REGULATIONS AND CONTROL PRO-
GRAMS? During the discussion Ernest Kellogg,
Acting Director, Milk Industry Foundation, spoke
briefly on recent activities of the Federal Food
and Drug Administration in this field. He said
that California provided an ideal testing area be-
cause so much milk production and agriculture is
concentrated in a small geographical area. He
pointed out that forty per cent of the total
amount of insecticide used was used in California.
Howard Young, Extension Division of the
University of Florida, Dr. Jim Brogden, Ento-
mologist, University of Florida, and Sam Noles,

Picture Identification
For Opposite Page
TOP ROW: 1. A. H. Decker (Germantown Manufactur-
ing Company), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Fred
L. Schoenberger of the same firm, Atlanta, Georgia.
2. Joseph Costa, Jr. (National Pectin Products Cpm-
pany), Athens, Georgia; Jack Key (Ambrosia Choco-
late Company), Atlanta, Georgia, giving a pointer to
Joe Anderson (The Kelco Company), Atlanta, Georgia.
3. Bet they were discussing cheese-Alex Steinberg,
Yogurt Master, Lakeland, and Alex Shaw, director of
Milk and Cream for the Florida Department of Agri-
culture. SECOND ROW: 1. Mrs. George Heine, Seal-
test Foods, Tampa; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rooney (Joe
Lowe Corporation), Clearwater. 2. Ralph Kirkland
(Miller-Lenfesty Supply Company), Thmpa, is listening
to Charles Spradlin (Schaefer, Inc.), Newport News,
Virginia. 3. A serious moment between D. "Jack"
Headford (Krim-Ko Corporation), Daytona Beach, and
P. V. Heeler, Hood's Dairy, St. Petersburg. THIRD ROW:
1. Peggy and Wallace Mobley (Land O' Lakes Cream-
eries, Inc.), Atlanta, Georgia, study the program. 2.
Three ex-presidents of Allied Trades are O. L. Bobo
(General Dynamics Corporation, Liquid Carbonic Divi-
sion); Jim Mott (Maryland Baking Company), Jack-
sonville, and Gene Fulton (Diversey Corporation),
Jacksonville. BOTTOM ROW: 1. Ernest Burris, Bow-
man Dairy Company, St. Petersburg; L. E. Ford, Florida
Department of Agriculture; and M. R. DeBaets (Bow-
man Dairy Company), Chicago, Illinois. 2. John Hood,
Hood's Dairy, Bradenton; Jim Jennings (Land O' Lakes
Creameries, Inc., and Eze Orange Company), Jack-
sonville, and John "Robin" Hood, Jr. 3. The waitresses
in the Sugar n' Spice got in the spirit of June Dairy
Month and donned A.D.A. hats.


State Board of Health, also appeared on the panel.
Mark Moore of T. G. Lee Dairy and Chairman of
the F.D.P.A. Committee on Milk Quality Control,
completed the panel by speaking on actions taken
by the Florida dairy industries. The afternoon
session ended with a discussion on the Florida
mastitis control program.
Festivities on the final evening started at
6:30 with an Alligator Club fellowship party on
the Garden Terrace at poolside. This was followed
by the annual banquet in the Roof Garden Ball-
room. Jim Mott (Maryland Baking Company),
and Tom Powers (Robert A. Johnston Company),
of the Allied Trades, arranged for a top-notch
group of professional entertainers. Not all of the
entertainment was professional; however, every-
one was professionally entertained. Following sev-
eral excellent dance routines, an audience partici-
pation situation developed. Although there was a
good bit of reluctance on his part, Dr. Fouts, Uni-
versity of Florida, with the help of one of the
more feminine professional dancers, demonstrat-
ed several old time dance steps. The Professor,
good sport that he is, did alright until someone
slipped the musicians a fast sheet of music.
New officers for the coming year were an-
nounced as follows: (F.D.P.A.) President, John
Hood, Hood's dairy, Bradenton; Vice President,
Claude Kelly, Foremost Dairies, Jacksonville;
Treasurer, J. N. McArthur, McArthur Jersey
Farm Dairy, Miami; Assistant Treasurer, Clair
Hill, Jacksonville, and Executive Secretary, E. T.
(Andy) Lay, Jacksonville. (F.S.D.A.) President,
John T. Adkinson, Adkinson and Mayne Dairy,
Pensacola; First Vice President, Dewey Wilbanks,
W&A Dairy, Tampa; Second Vice President, Jul
ian Lane, Tampa; Treasurer and Executive Secre-
tary to be elected before January 1, 1961. (Al-
lied Trades) President, Tom Powers (Robert A.
Johnston Company); Vice President, Frank
Thompson (General Dynamics Corporation, Liq-
uid Carbonic Division), and Secretary-Treasurer,
Bob Shackelford (Owens-Illinois Glass Company).
In the ladies auxiliaries, Mrs. Jim Mott (Mary-
land Baking Company) was selected as Chairman
of the Allied Trades Auxiliary and Mrs. John
Hood, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton, was elected Chair-
man of the Ladies Auxiliary for the F.D.P.A.
The Second Vice President of the Florida
State Dairymen's Association, Julian Lane, is one
dairyman who takes his politics seriously. He is
the Mayor of Tampa. Although he referred to
himself as the cowboy mayor of Tampa, there
was nothing cowboyish about his informal re-
marks at the annual banquet except a country-
style-wit which he used effectively. Mayor Lane
had many fine things to say about Tampa, Flor-


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL


S-11























































TOP ROW: 1. Taste testing products from the ice cream
bar are Howard Hullender, Velda Farms, Tallahassee,
and Warren Clark (Crown Cork and Seal Company),
Baltimore, Maryland. 2. Dick Slye (Morris Paper Com-
pany), Hank Tull (Lily-Tulip Cup Corporation), Atlanta,
Georgia; W. M. Scott (International Paper Company),
and Curry Bassett, Borden's Dairy, Miami. 3. Charles
Hickerson (Creamery Package Mfg. Company), At-
lanta, Georgia; Emmett Hood, Hood's Dairy, St. Peters-
burg, and Howard O. Robinson (Wyandotte Chemi-
cals), Miami. CENTER ROW: 1. Mrs. Elsie Remsen, Of-
fice Secretary for F.D.P.A.; Dewey Wilbanks, W & A
Dairy, Tampa; Leslie Williams, Jacksonville, and
grandfather, Andy Lay. 2. W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Bout-
well's Dairy, Lake Worth, and Mrs. Frank Flack (Stand-
ard Cork and Seal), Atlanta, Georgia. Bob Freeland,
Freeland Brothers Dairy, Tallahassee, talking to John
Sargeant, Lakeland. BOTTOM ROW: 1. Curry Bassett,
Borden's Dairy, Miami; Mrs. Jimmy Laher, Sealtest,
Miami, and Jack Waldrop (International Paper Com-
pany), Miami. 2. Jack Dew, Sealtest, Jacksonville, and
E. S. Gustafson, Cove Springs, holding picture of


daughter, Gail Gustafson, a popular Florida Dairy
Queen. 3. Resting between meetings are Hank Tull
(Lily-Tulip Cup Corporation), Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs.
Whitey Crawbuck (Universal Cabinet Corporation),
Jacksonville, and Mrs. Tommy Thomas, Sealtest,
Miami.


ida, and the Dairy Associations. However, he re-
ceived loud, spontaneous applause when he
touched on the national scene and said, "With all
the embarrassment the President has taken in
Europe and Asia, it certainly is time for us to
stand up and be counted." With that serious note
and the evening's festivities that followed, the
1960 convention was over except for a final Direc-
tors meeting on Friday morning.


SOUTHERN DAIRY PRODUCTS JOURNAL


S-12
















BOYD CASEY

Dairymen's Association
Officers and Directors
Named For The Year 1961

The Florida State Dairymen's As-
sociation, looking to a growing and
expanding membership, elected seven
additional directors for a total of nine-
teen who will serve for the year 1961.
The new directors will represent
areas not previously represented on
the board as well as provide additional
representation in areas of increased
membership.
John Adkinson of Pensacola was
elected President to succeed John Sar-
geant who was replaced only after his
insistence that he be relieved of the
duties of the presidency after having
served for several years.
Adkinson has been active on the
F.S.D.A. Board of Directors for many
years and is well qualified to continue
the splendid leadership which Sar-
geant has given Florida milk produ-
cers. Adkinson has served as President
of the Producers' Association of the
Pensacola area for the past ten ears
and as 2nd Vice President of F.S.D.A.
the past two years.
Dewey Wilbanks of Tampa, an ac-
tive officer and leader of the Tampa
Bay Producers Association, was elected
1st Vice President.
Julian Lane, President of the
Tampa Bay Association and 1st Vice
President of F.S.D.A. the past two
years, was made 2nd Vice President
after requesting relief from active duty
with F.S.D.A. while he is serving as
Mayor of Tampa.
C. C. Sellers of Tallahassee was re-
elected Treasurer.
Bob Freeland of Monticello con-
tinues as Secretary and Joe Harper of
Jacksonville as Field Representative.
Directors Re-Elected
The following directors were re-
elected: John T. Adkinson, Pensa-
cola; John DuPuis, Miami; E. C. Far-
less, Orlando; J. D. Fuqua, Altha; A.
L. Hammond, Kissimmee; Julian Lane,
Tampa; R. L. Lunsford, Milton; Val
Massev, Palmetto; Foye O'Stcen, Mayo;
John Sargeant, Lakeland; C. C. Sel-
lers, Tallahassee; and Dewey Wil-
banks, Tampa.


L"D
DODD


.
AAM-fU& -ft






WRIGHT


New Directors Elected
The following new directors were
elected: Herman Boyd, Miami; Wil-
bur Casey, Largo: Jack Dodd, Mait-
land; Bob Freeland, Monticello; Ger-
ald Reagan, Zephyrhills; A. B. Siga-
foose, Pensacola; W. P. Wright, Jack-
sonville.

Milk Quality Control
Committees Are Active
Several months back, when federal
health authorities warned that a seri-
ous threat to milk quality existed be-
cause of the improper or careless use
of antibiotics and pesticides on dairy
farms, the Florida Dairy Products As-
sociation and the Florida State Dairy-
men's Association promptly set up com-
mittees to deal with this problem.
The Dairymen's Committee headed
by Dewey Wilbanks of Tampa and
the Dairy Products Committee headed
by Marl Moore of Lee's Dairy, Or-
lando, decided to work on this prob-
lem together and have held several
joint meetings where information and
recommendations have been received
from the best known experts in this
field from the University of Florida
Agricultural Experiment Station and
Extension Service.
Chairman Mark Moore and Jim
Brogden, Entomologist of the Univer-
sity of Florida, reported the latest in-
formation and developments on this
question at the dairy industry's recent
joint convention in Clearwater.
The two Association Committees
have had two meetings in Orlando,
another during the dairy convention
in June, and plan their next meeting in
Gainesville September 15 at the Uni-
versity Dairy Science Department.

MILK OR WHISKEY?
So you think Irish whiskey is the
leading drink in Ireland? No, it's
milk! According to the latest figures
from the USDA, the three countries
having the highest per capital con-
sumption of milk and other dairy
products are in this order Ire-
land, New Zealand, and Finland. The
United States ranks 15th in the per
capital consumption of dairy products.


Dairy Products Association
Elects 1961 Officers
And Directors
At its annual business meeting in
Clearwater July 23, the Florida Dairy
Products Association elected the fol-
lowing officers and directors for the
calendar year 1961:
John Hood of Bradenton to succeed
J. H. Laher as President.
Claude Kelly, Foremost Dairies'
Florida manager of Jacksonville, to
succeed Hood as Vice President.
J. N. McArthur, McArthur's Jersey
Farm Dairy, Miami, to succeed Kelly
as Treasurer.
Clair Hill, Jacksonville Borden man-
ager, was elected Assistant Treasurer.
Seventeen Directors Elected
Directors elected for the year 1961
are: John Hood, Bradenton; J. H.
Laher, Miami; Claude Kelly, Jackson-
ville; J. N. McArthur, Miami; A. R.
Allison, Orlando; Harvey Barritt,
Tampa; Wilmer Bassett, Monticello;
George Boutwell, Lake Worth; Walter
Burton, Jacksonville; John Cone, Plant
City; Corwith Davis, Jacksonville:
Jerry Dressel, Miami; T. G. Lee, Or-
lando; Gordon Nielsen, West Palm
Beach: Donald E. Perret, Jacksonville;
John Tripson, Vero Beach; and J. F.
W. Zirkelbach, Pensacola.

Dairymen's Association
Lists Local Producer Units
The Florida State Dairymen's As-
sociation reported at its recent Annual
Meeting in Clearwater a membership
of over 400 including its affiliated lo-
cal units.
Local units of the Association listed
were: Tampa Bay Producers Associ-
ation; Pensacola Milk Producers Asso-
ciation; Chipola (Marianna area) Dai-
ry Association; North and West Flor-
ida Dairy Farmers Association (Talla-
hassee area); Jacksonville Chapter,
State Dairyman's Association; Central
Florida Chapter, State Dairymen's As-
sociation; and South Florida Chapter,
State Dairymen's Association.
Each local unit is represented on
the 19-member Board of Directors of
the State Association by one or more
directors according to the number of
members in the local unit.









THIRD QUARTER, 1960 17



















LARGEST STORY EVER PUBLISHED

Includes 15 Pages and 124 Pictui


The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida
Dairy Industry elected three co-chair-
men of the organization for the year
1961 during their Annual Meeting at
the Florida Dairy Convention June 24
in Clearwater.
The joint group, which in recent
years has become one of the largest
ladies' units of a State dairy conven-
tion, includes the ladies of the State
Dairymen's Association, the Dairy
Products Association and the ladies of
the Allied Trades Alligator Club.
Mrs. Herman Burnett, B & H Dairy
of Bradenton, was elected chairman
for the Dairymen's Association; Mrs.
John Hood, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton,

PICTURES IDENTIFICATION
TOP (Both Pages) L to R: (1) Dairy-
men's Ass'n Directors' Meeting in session.
(2) Dairy Products Ass'n. Directors' Meet-
ing in session. (3) Tom Adams (center),
nominee for Secretary of State, is welcomed
by convention hosts, John DuPuis (left)
Ass'n. Past President, and Dick Dressel,
Avon Park, dairyman and Chairman, Fla.
Livestock Board. (4) Richard Lee, son of
T. G. Lee, Orlando, and Bill Seeburger,
sales-manager of Lee's Dairy. (5) Mr. and
Mrs. Clair Hill (center), Borden's Manager,
Jacksonville, enjoying the pool area. (6)
Ladies "get acquainted" party.

LEFT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(1) Mrs. John Manning, Miami, Allied
Trades Ladies Chairman, serves coffee in
ladies headquarters lounge. (2) Bonnie
Hood, Hood's Dairy, Bradenton, models a
bathing ensemble in the ladies' fashion
show. (3) Miss Sherry Chapman, St. Peters-
burg, modeling hat and dress in the fashion
show. (4) Hawaiian dancer entertains at
ladies' luncheon.

RIGHT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(1) Jimmy Laher (R), Pres., F.D.P.A., and
Convention Guest Speaker Ernest Kellogg,
Acting Director of Milk Industry Founda-
tion, Washington, D. C. (2) John Wilkes
(left), Hackney Bros. Bodies, Lake Alfred,
Fla., and Sam Hodges, Manager, Super Sue
Ice Cream, Leesburg, Fla. (3) Raleigh
Thompson (left), Milk Sanitarian, Jackson-
ville Health Department, and Joe Harper,
Field Representative, Fla. Dairymen's Ass'n.


for the Dairy Products Association,
and Mrs. Jim Mott, The Maryland
Companies, Jacksonville, for the Allied
Trades.
1960 chairmen are Mrs. John
Fuqua, Altha (for Dairymen's Associa-
tion), Mrs. Clair Hill (Borden's, Jack-
sonville) for the Dairy Products
Association and Mrs. John Manning
(Walker Stainless Equipment Co.),
Miami, for the Allied Trades.


'?











I


F A FLORIDA DAIRY MEETING

'he Florida Dairyv Coneention


ALLIED TRADES OFFICERS
ELECTED FOR NEXT YEAR
1he "lli~uator Club" ofl the \llicll
Trlade l Ii binlhci-ip uft thi Flor'id.
Dair\in ni', AI -i.Xtiati. n and thL Florida
Dair\ PridulLt; \-'.s.ij. n Ill el ctid ilii
li.illiu m -. UhtiU s li-or lth \cl a 1961
Thlii liction \\aj hcld ait hL .\Ininua
\l.ctlinI ,-I thl e 'r, LIp lllun 23 .t thil
Fl,,rid1. l) lr\ (C ii(tll-ntl ii n II (I l.11i -
i\ldthi'


Prel,'nlt. Tuni Pun .rs. P,,bt. .\.
Jlhnslin C... .11n .pa. \ I Pi'r.-.Ni nI .
Fri.jnk Tlhnimpsn 1i Liquid Ca.iibniic
DI C GlnI3r'al F)nalnis LCorp.. jclk-
,fin' ille: SIcLiLtar FrI.asLIrec I 81b
'ihaLkL1fllord. OC)"ln:-Illinuis Glas.'. C(
Jjcksom dlle.
lim nMott t thL \Mar\land Cnim-
panics,. Ji ck" ,n' ill.. is 19t11 .\lligatu. r
C lb I' I.idtillt i n i. \ILL. PLL -.Ti-
dcnt: aniid I hinips.n is 'i itrt.lir\-
1I' .'"I I' ri.


Golf Award Winners
At Dairy Convention
The top convention golf tournament
award the handsome McClanahan
Revolving Trophy-was won by Bill
Boutwell of the Boutwells' Dairy, Lake
Worth.
Art Boutwell, also of the Boutwells'
Dairy, won second high honors and a
fine golf bag.
Kirk Price won first low net score
and a prize of two dozen golf balls.
George Boutwell had second low
net; Bob Waller, third low net and
Tom Powers, fourth low net. All oth-
er contestants who failed to win a
prize had a wonderful time.
WE HAVE THE FILM
If you are in this picture story and
would like to have the film, write Mrs.
E. T. Lay, Florida Dairy News, 1024
Oak St., Jacksonville.

PICTURES IDENTIFICATION
LEFT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
(1) Max Hollinger, Associate Editor South-
ern Dairy Products Journal, Atlanta, (right),
with kodak, who took over 100 pictures and
published an 11-page story of the Florida
Convention. (2) Stephen Fonts, son of Dr.
and Mrs. E. L. Fonts, University of Fla.,
entertains audience of 324 at Hawaiian
Luau Dinner Meeting (3) Mrs. Donald Per-
ret, Jacksonville, one of the attractive mod-
els for the ladies' fashion show.
RIGHT PANEL (This Page) From Top:
Ladies table groups seen as they enjoyed
their special fashion show.

THIRD QUARTER, 1960 19


Af/
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31r


C~3i1IJIJI~J~P
1'







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service
Dairy Farm Research Unit


Dairy Products Laboratory
Agricultural Experiment Station


THURSDAY AFTERNOON, September 15
1:15 OPENING OF SESSION
1:30 WELCOME-Dr. E. L. Fouts,
Head, Department of Dairy Science
1:45 Announcements
1:50 USAGE OF PESTICIDE AND
HERBICIDES WHERE LACTATING
COWS ARE INVOLVED-Mr. J. E. Brog-
don, Assoc. Extension Entomologist
2:05 QUESTIONS
2:10 STATUS OF USAGE OF ANTI-
BIOTICS WITH LACTATING COWS -
Dr. C. B. Plummer, Extension Veterinarian
2:25 QUESTIONS
2:30 AUTOMATION IN DAIRY
FARM RECORD KEEPING-Mr. R. E.
Burleson, Extension Dairyman, Federal Ex-
tension Service, Washington, D. C.
3:00 VALUE OF PANGOLA AND OF
ALFALFA PASTURES-Dr. S. P. Mar-
shall, Dairy Husbandman
3:15 MILK BREAK
3:30 SYMPOSIUM: COMFORT OF
CATTLE DURING HOT WEATHER-
Moderator-Dr. R. B. Becker
3:30 FLORIDA'S SUMMER CLI-
MATE TEMPERATURE, HUMIDITY,
WIND AND RADIATION Mr. K. D.
Butson, State Climatologist
3:40 QUESTIONS
3:45 FACTORS THAT CAUST DIS-
COMFORT TO COWS-Dr. J. M. Wing,
Asst. Dairy Husbandman
4:00 QUESTIONS
4:05 CONSIDERATIONS ON SHADE,
AIR CONDITIONING, FORCED VENTI-
LATION AND SPRINKLERS FOR IM-
PROVING COMFORT Dr. I. J. Ross,
Asst. Agricultural Engineer
4:30 QUESTIONS
4:35 PRODUCTION PERSISTENCY
OF HOLSTEINS AT U. OF F. DURING
SUMMER Dr. C. J. Wilcox, Asst. Dairy
Husbandman
20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


4:45 MANAGEMENT FACTORS RE-
LATED TO COMFORT OF CATTLE -
Mr. C. W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman
5:00 ADJOURN
THURSDAY NIGHT, September 15 -
Student Service Center-7:00 O'clock
DAIRY FIELD DAY DINNER AND
PROGRAM-Presiding: Dr. S. P. Marshall,
Dairy Husbandman. Presentation: Florida
Dairy Princess, Miss Gail Gustafson
ADDRESS: Is the United States Losing
Out in its International Affairs? Dr.
Fayette Parvin, Assistant to the President,
University of Florida
PRESENTATION OF AWARDS -
Herd Honor Roll Diplomas; Efficient Dairy
Production Awards; Dairy Science Club
Outstanding Dairyman Award
FRfDAY MORNING, September 16
9:00 EFFECT OF LEVELS AND
METHODS OF SUPPLEMENTAL CON-
CENTRATE FEEDING UPON MILK
PRODUCTION Dr. C. J. Wilcox, Asst.
Dairy Husbandman
9:15 SOME FACTORS IN GETTING
AND KEEPING QUALITY LABOR-Mr.
A. F. Cribbet, Asst. Orange County Agent
9:35 SYMPOSIUM: SHOULD FLOR-
IDA DAIRYMEN FEED SILAGE?-Mod-
erator-Mr. T. W. Sparks, Asst. Extension
Dairyman
9:35 FEEDING VALUE OF DIFFER-
ENT SILAGES-Dr. R. B. Becker, Dairy
Husbandman
9:45 STRUCTURES, EQUIPMENT &
LABOR REQUIRED TO MAKE & FEED
SIIAGE-Mr. E. S. Holmes, Asst. Agricul-
tural Engineer
10:05 PROS AND CONS OF USING
SILAGE-Discussants: Mr. D. D. Robinson,
Dairyman; Mr. Cecil Regan, Dairyman;
Mr. Oliver Burgess, Dairyman


1111


U. OF F. ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY
IS ANNOUNCED FOR SEPTEMBER 15-16
The 25th Annual Dairy Field Day Program sponsored by the University
of Florida Department of Dairy Science and the Dairy Extension Service will
be held Thursday and Friday, September 15 and 16.
Old timers will recall having attended dairy meetings at the University
much more than 25 years ago which were a part of "Farmers' Week" program.
However, it seems that back about 1951 it was decided that the "Annual
Dairy Field Day" was started in 1935. Anyone knowing differently about this
is requested to inform the Dairy News.
The Thursday afternoon (September 15) portion of the program and up
to 10:30 Friday morning will be held in the McCarty Hall Auditorium on the
University of Florida campus. The remainder of the program will be at the U. F.
Dairy Experiment Farm at Hague. The program will conclude with a barbecue
lunch served by the Student Dairy Science Club.
Two parts of the program that should be of special interest to dairymen
this year are the symposiums entitled "Comfort of Cattle During Hot Weather"
and "Should Florida Dairymen Feed Silage?" We are looking forward to a good
attendance again this year.


PROGRAM SCHEDULE


ANNUAL FIELD DAY


Meeting the Challenge
Of Florida Agriculture
By: DR. GEORGE THORNTON
Assistant Dean, College of Agriculture
University of Florida
Editor's Note: Dr. Thornton addressed the
dinner meeting of the Herdsmen's Short
Course on "Agriculture-Present and Fu-
ture". The following omits much of the im-
pressive material on the growth of agricul-
ture in Florida and its present dimensions
in order to give his comments on how the
University is meeting the demand for
trained personnel.
Southern Agribusiness is a $34,-
000,000,000 industry including
farming and all related businesses and
industries. Fifty per
cent of its total em-
ployment is engaged
in agribusiness.
This is a tremen-
dous challenge to us
here at the College
of Agriculture to see
that we train and
supply our share of
THORNTON the leaders of today
and tomorrow for such a huge
industry.
I am not implying that all of these
jobs should be filled with college
trained men. However, it is obvious
that the leaders and key personnel
must be adequately and properly
trained.
To meet this challenge, we are de-
veloping our program in Agriculture
so that the students may receive edu-
cation in three broad areas of special-
ization.
They may elect: 1. Agricultural Sci-
ence
We have proposed a curriculum in
Science at the undergraduate level to
give the fundamental essentials for
later pursuing graduate study, here or
at other Land Grant Colleges and
Universities.
We need more men trained for re-
search if we expect to maintain our
national and state Agricultural Experi-
ment Station research programs. We
must also supply highly trained re-
searchers for industry and commercial
laboratories.
(Continued on Page 27)

10:30 ASSISTANCE EXTENSION
SERVICE OFFERS IN PLANNING SI-
LAGE PROGRAMS--Mr. J. R. Henderson,
Extension Agronomist; Mr. T. C. Skinner,
Assoc. Extension Agricultural Engineer;
Mr. T. W. Sparks, Asst. Extension Dairy-
man
10:40 SUMMARY
10:45 MILK BREAK
10:50 DEPART FOR DAIRY RE-
SEARCH UNIT-See Dairy Herds and Fa-
cilities
12:30 P.M.
13BARBECUE LUNCH Dairy Research
Unit, Served by Student Dairy Science
Club


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE




























Dairy group and members of the University of Florida staff who took part in the 1960 Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course, assembled in front
of the Dairy Science Building.


Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course
Well Attended

R. B. Becker and C. W. Reaves

The most successful Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course of the series was held
at the University of Florida and the Dairy Research Unit on July 26-28th
with a record attendance and participation in the program. Subject matter was
built from suggestions by those attending the short course the previous year, and
so dealt directly with problems of current interest.
A panel of Francis Galbraith, J. Mck. Jeter, Donald Platt, Darrow Robin-
son and W. J. Simmons discussed the feeding practices that have made four of
their herds leaders in production in their respective Dairy Herd Improvement
Associations. They were agreed that individual feeding according to production
was the most profitable with their herds. Some of them depended heavily upon
fertilized pastures as an important part of the feed supply. Additional green
chopped forage contributed to a greater forage consumption during the parts
of the day when cows prefer to be in the shade. Silage was used throughout
the year by one successful dairyman to supplement green chop and pasture.
T. W. Sparks moderated the panel directing questions from the audience.
Dr. C. J. Wilcox, a new man on the
Dairy Science staff last year, reviewed yielding cow's producing ability. Others
the latest research on silage preserva- agreed that feeding all cows based on
tion. Mention was made of wilting the average of the herd reduced the
crops high in moisture content before profit because of limiting the milk
ensiling, but that this involved an ex- production.
tra handling and so might not be prac- Dr. Ben Plummer, Extension Vet-
tical under some situations. He re- erinarian, outlined the contributory
ported that cows have consumed as causes and some recommendations for
much as 60 to nearly 100 pounds of correction of acetonemia in dairy cows
good quality silages daily, and that si- a problem sometimes encountered
lage production is increasing in Flor- in part of the herds represented.
ida as insurance of an adequate forage Raising good calves was outlined by
intake regardless of season. a sound movie taken at the Dairy Re-
A major handicap of the better search Unit under direction of Dr. J.
cows in most dairy herds was observed M. Wing. This subject was expanded
by Roderick Peeples dairy special- in the afternoon session at the farm by
ist with Jackson Grain Company to Herman Somers and Johnny Boggs,
be underfeeding. He cited cases where based on experience. Recent heavy
some unprofitable cows have become rains locally prevented a tour of the
quite profitable by good management facilities used in raising the dairy re-
during the previous dry period, and placements by which the herd is main-
providing feed according to the high tained.


Placement Service is Announced
By University of Florida
A new service for Florida employers
has been established at the University
of Florida according to a recent an-
nouncement from the Placement Serv-
ice office. The general purpose of this
office is to place recent graduates and
alumni in touch with prospective em-
ployers. A listing of current job op-
portunities is being compiled and will
be maintained by the placement office.
Employers who wish to employ college
graduates or persons with some college
training may contact: Director, Uni-
versity Placement Service, Building H,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.


The program on the second day
dealt with breeding, inheritance, the
cow's udder and maintaining milking
machines in top operating condition.
The reproductive organs of a normal
cow were used as a basis around which
R. B. Becker discussed factors in-
volved in normal reproduction by nat-
ural service or artificial insemination.
Improvement in producing ability
of dairy cattle is conditioned by feed-
ing, management and heredity. All
three factors combine to bring about
increased production by dairy cows,
inheritance accounting for a fraction
of improvement according to Dr.
Wilcox.
C. W. Reaves presented data and
steps in determining a standard for
culling on individual farms. Using av-
erage Florida costs other than feed of
$220 per cow and varying feed costs,
(Continued on Page 22)
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 21
























The 1960 officers of the Florida Association Milk and Food Sanitarians are shown in the picture at left: Seated, left to right, W. B.
Richards, St. Lucie County Health Dept., and Lewis W. Willis, Milk Consultant, Florida State Board of Health, directors; W. A. Krienke,
Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida, secretary; W. Harvey Jordan, Cheif Dairy Supervisor, Dade County Health Dept., presi-
dent; Leon W. Sheumaker, Supervisor Division of Sanitation, Leon County Health Dept., vice president; Anthony F. Damanda, Bacteri-
logist, Florida State Board of Health, Chairman Laboratory Affiliate and director; Standing, Howard B. Young, Assistant Extension
Dairyman, Agricultural Extension Service, University of Florida and Stamie D. Williams, Jacksonville Health Dept., directors. Not in
the picture: B. C. Afford, Director of Sanitation, Alachua County Health Dept., treasurer; and P. J. Griffin, Borden Company, Tampa,
director.
The picture at right shows Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head, Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida, at left, making the presentation of
10-year Awards, a feature of the annual meeting and conference held on the campus of the University of Florida in April. Recipients of
the awards are, left to right: H. B. Ahlefeldt, Hendry and Glades Counties Milk Sanitarian; Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, Assistant Director,
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station; and W. Harvey Jordan, Chief Dairy Supervisor, Dade County Health Department. Dr. Wilkow-
ske originated the plan for 10-year Awards ten years ago when he was a member of the dairy science staff at the University and secretary-
treasurer of the Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians; he has now joined the ranks of the recipients of this award.


HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
PROGRAM SUMMARY
(Continued from Page 21)
he showed that 5,000 pounds milk
cows lacked $63 of paying their share
of dairy farm expense. The "break-
even point" for a cow was just above
6000 pounds of milk production. It
was pointed out that cows well below
the herd average can be culled advan-
tageously and those just below can be
culled of better replacements are avail-
able. Culling and replacement with
similar cows is expensive and of no
benefit. Average breed tests were given
for Florida for those not having indi-
vidual cow tests.
A major subject in the program this
year was the experience of Walter
Welkener of Holly Hill Dairy in Du-
val County. He began to improve the
pastures and build the herd of regis-
tered Jerseys in 1931. It is one of the
successful medium sized dairy herds in
the country, and among the leaders
in average production of the cows. De-
tailed study and planning went into
selection of foundation cows and suc-
cessive herd sires. The present herd
is the result of some 17 bulls used and
proved in natural service, and com-
plete fertilizer and two summer ap-
plications of nitrogen and potash. All
the hay as well as grazing for the herd
comes from the farm. Three of the
proved sires have gone on into artifici-
al service when their local use was too
limited (to avoid inbreeding) to justi-
fy retaining them. Sales of breeding
animals have been extensive as far
22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


as California and Costa Rica and South
America. Mr. Welkener emphasized
that records, long life, and careful cull-
ing were necessary in building a good
herd.
Structure of the udder and know-
ledge of its care is fundamental to
good milking management, according
to Dr. S. P. Marshall, who demon-
strated udder anatomy from animals
removed from the herd. This discus-
sion of mastitis and its control by Dr.
Ellic of the Diagnostic Laboratory.
These were followed by two milking
machine experts N. S. Carlson of
DeLaval and Edgar Sunderhaus of
Surge. They discussed importance of
proper adjustment and care of milking
machines for efficient operation, and
pointed out some of the parts that re-
quire attention. Proper pump capacity,
sufficient vacuum and absence of leaks
were stressed. A number of questions
helped to amplify the need for con-
tinuing attention to upkeep of milking
machines for best use. Both experts
mentioned that it was most important
in mastitis prevention to remove the
milking units from the teats as soon
as the milking is complete in each
quarter. Proper storage of milking
machine inflation and tubes was
explained.
At the Dutch Supper meeting Wed-
nesday night, Dr. George Thornton,
Assistant Dean of the College of Agri-
culture talked on Agriculture, Present
and Future. With the introductory
statement that the implements which
will be used by the next generation


may not have been invented yet, he
proceeded to give an enlightening
picture of Southern agriculture today
and the potential for agriculture and
related industries in the future.
Dr. Becker followed with an illus-
trated talk entitled Cow Paths, Past
and Present. Using a select group of
slides of ancient archaeology, he
showed pictures of early forms of
cattle as shown by skeletons and cave
drawings now preserved in museums
over the world. He traced the origin of
our present dairy breeds from these
early forms of wild ox and other pre-
historic cattle.
The third day's topics related to
Management. Clifford Alston, Exten-
sion Economist in Farm Development
told of the information that can be
secured by carefully kept dairy farm
business records and the use of the
analysis of the records in making busi-
ness decisions.
C. W. Reaves presented his newly
divised Lifetime Cow Record sheet de-
signed for herds not in DHIA. It is
a combination sheet with individual
cow breeding, calving and health en-
tries on one side and a milk record
on the other. It gives more usable
information than the standard Weight
-A-Day-A-Month forms. Dairymen can
weigh the milk one day a month using
the record service at a nominal cost or
a group in the county may collectively
pay a special person to weigh the milk
and tabulate the milk current and re-
cord-to-date.
(Continued on Page 26)


r









GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Florida Guernsey Sale
Held In Orange County
The twenty-second annual Florida
Guernsey Sale was held September 1
in the Orange County Agricultural
Center at Orlando, according to plans
announced in a special bulletin mailed
to all Florida dairy farmers as a sup-
plement to this issue of the Dairy
News.
Forty-five cows were to be sold by
twenty-two of the foremost Guernsey
breeders in Florida, Georgia and South
Carolina. The sales committee in-
cluded the following: L. H. Sellers,
chairman, C. W. Reaves, T. W.
Sparks, C. J. Jacobs, C. L. Ward, C.
C. Sellers, "Bud" Ward, and Mason
Smith.

HELP FOR DAIRYMEN
ON MASTITIS CONTROL
Mastitis is causing a greater loss to
our Florida dairymen than all other
major diseases combined, according to
Dr. A. A. McMurray, head of the Flor-
ida Livestock Board's Mastitis Pro-
gram.
Those who wish to place their herds
under the State Livestock Board's Mas-
titis Control Program may contact Dr.
C. L. Campbell, State Veterinarian,
Florida Livestock Board, P. O. Box
1509, Tallahassee, Florida, or Dr. A.
A. McMurray, Director, Mastitis Con-
trol Division, Florida Livestock Board
P. O. Box 3008, NSA, Lakeland,
Florida.


The Florida Dairy
Industry Is Sick
It needs a program! A united, joint,
producer-and-distributor supported-
and-conducted program of consumer
education on milk and the dairy in-
dustry, milk promotion programs and
milk advertising.


Florida Guernsey Records
Cone's "Summarized Sire"
Sonesta H. Count, registered Guern-
sey bull owned by John H. Cone,
Plant City, has become a Summarized
Sire, according to the American Guern-
sey Cattle Club. To attain this distinc-
tion, a bull must have at least ten
daughters with official production rec-
ords.
"Count" has ten tested daughters
that have made eleven official produc-
tion records, their average production
being 9,209 pounds of milk and 416
pounds of fat, when converted to a
twice-daily milking, 305-day, mature
equivalent basis.
This fine Guernsey bull was bred
by A. M. Sonnabend, Millis, Massa-
chusetss. This bull's sire was Fairlawn
Actress' Hornet and its dam was Coro-
nation Majestic Hopeful, that posted
official production record of 13,569
pounds of milk and 694 pounds of fat.
"Count's" most illustrious daughter
is Pasturelands C. Beaut that had a
production record of 8,684 pounds
of milk and 423 pounds of fat in the
305 2X division.
HIR Production Records
Bayou Vista Noble Felice, a regis-
tered Guernsey cow owned by W. J.
and K. W. Casey, Largo, has com-
pleted a 365 day test, milked two
times daily. This record was for 12,-
816 pounds of milk and 563 pounds
of fat. "Felice" was a six-year-old.
Matoaka Lucius Sadie Lee, owned
by Walter Schmid & Son, Sarasota,
has completed a 305 day test, milked
two times daily, to make an official
HIR production record of 10,142
pounds of milk and 431 pounds of
fat, as a senior two-year-old.

Series of Meetings Planned
To Study Mastitis Control
Daniel O. Moorlander, former
member of the California Mastitis
Research Team and author of the
book, "Milking Machines and Masti-
tis," will be in Florida, August 26
through September. He will meet with
the Florida Mastitis Control Board on
August 31 in Lakeland.
Meetings are also being arranged
so that Mr. Moorlander can consult
with county agents, sanitarians and
herdsmen of dairy animals, in all
the major milk marketing areas of the
state. A schedule of these meetings
may be obtained from F. L. Gore,
P. O. Box 605, Zephyrhills, Florida,
after August 25.


MILK SAMPLES POPULAR
AT MEDICAL MEETING
Over 12,000 samples of Golden
Guernsey 4.5% Milk and Gurnzgold,
a Golden Guernsey low-fat milk, were
distributed by Golden Guernsey, Inc.
to persons attending the recent meet-
ing of the American Medical Associa-
tion in Miami. This was the sixth year
that Golden Guernsey has had a booth
at the AMA meeting.
This year's booth was under the
direction of M. R. Stuhlsatz, national
Golden Guernsey field man, assisted
by Ida Schmid, national representa-
tive; J. McK. Jeter, Florida represent-
ative; C. J. Jacobs, southeastern
Guernsey fieldman; and Arthur L.
Mulford, Pennsylvania Golden Guern-
sey representative.
Golden Guernsey, Inc. is a subsidi-
ary corporation of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club, national non-
profit agricultural registry association
for breeders of registered Guernsey
dairy cattle. Golden Guernsey super-
vises the sales of pure Guernsey milk
under the organization's three nation-
al registered trademarks-GOLDEN
GUERNSEY, GUERNSEY ROYAL,
and GURNZGOLD.
Milks for this year's convention
booth were provided by Dressel's Dairy,
a Golden Guernsey milk products dis-
tributor in Miami.

WHO HAS OLDEST
DAIRY FARM IN FLORIDA?
If a dairy farm has been in your
family continuously for a long time,
please write the Florida Dairy News.
Give location and approximate date
acquired by ancestor. Oldest dairy
farms will be listed in this column
in the next issue.
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 23


1 I









Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg
South Florida & Jacksonville

This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely informa-
tion of the activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material
will be supplied by the three Council directors in turn.

Material in this issue Sponsored by
Dairy Council of South Florida-Including
Dade, Broward, Monroe and Palm Beach Counties

Lighted Dairy Council Display

Arouses Interest In Milk

Your Dairy Council works through many channels to educate Florida'-
potential consumers. The display shown in the accompanying picture is only
one of many ways in which emphasis is placed on the fact that to reach opti-
mum good mental and physical health, the needs of one's body can well be at-
tained by an increased consumption of fluid milk and other dairy foods. This
general statement pertains to all age groups.
This display points up the fact that also for use by the dairies in their
it is the teenager rather than the small consumer contacts.
child who needs the greatest quantity The dairy industry has been deeply
of milk each day. A sturdy tooth and concerned over the widespread attacks
bone structure and proper body func- on milk and milk products and the un-
tioning are determined primarily by favorable publicity making headlines
the kinds and amounts of food used in our newspapers and magazines. Un-
during this period of rapid growth. We founded claims of food faddists and
in the dairy industry are well aware of publicity seekers have done much
these facts and more. But this is not harm to the industry. The National
enough! Dairy Council and its network of af-
Proper education of the individual filiated units has been the industry's
consumer can do much to promote watchdog to keep reports of research
sales. It can in the course of his life- and true information before the pub-
time do more than a catchy newspaper lic, also. The Dairy Council exists to
ad or a reduction of the price of milk educate the public.
for a short time. These things may
boost sales for the time being, but look-
ing into the future of the industry as Production of milk in Florida is the
a whole it is more important to present third largest cash agricultural product
authentic nutritional information to in the state-totaling $85,000,000
our customers. Your Dairy Council has annually. Citrus and truck vegetables
materials by which this can be ac- rank first and second. Florida's dairy
complished, not only as we do make cattle by head count increased 60 per
it available for use in the schools, but cent in the past 10 years.


Dairy Council display for June Dairy Month in Hialeah window
24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
102 E. Ashley St. Jacksonville 2
Mrs. Margaret Long, Secretary
DAIRY COUNCIL OF
POLK COUNTIES
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa 9
Van Skiver Bldg.,
20 Third S. W. Winter Haven
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Corinne Cox, Asst. Dir.
Mrs. Nell Hughes, Asst. Dir.
Mrs. Katherine Minton, Office Mgr.
DAIRY COUNCIL OF SOUTH
HILLSBOROUGH, PINELLAS AND
FLORIDA-Including DADE,
BROWARD, MONROE AND
PALM BEACH COUNTIES
2175 S. W. 1st St. Miami 35
Mrs. Joanne Jack, Exec. Director
Mrs. Levina S. Phillips, Asst. Dir.
Mrs. Marian Petterson, Asst. Dir.


NEW DIRECTOR IN SOUTH
FLORIDA DAIRY COUNCIL
Mrs. Joanne Jack has recently been
appointed Executive Director of the
Dairy Council of South Florida, fol-
lowing the resignation of Nancy
Hinckley to become Mrs. Richard
Maloy.
Mrs. Jack lived on
a large Pennsylvania
dairy farm until she
was ready for col-
lege, and her back-
ground includes
membership in a 4-
H Calf Club and
practical experience
MRS. JACK with both the ani-
mals on a farm and the operation of
a processing plant.
She was graduated from Indiana
State Teachers' College, Indiana, Penn-
sylvania, with a Bachelor of Science

degree in Home Economics Education.
She was active in dramatic and musi-
cal productions, religious and civic
organizations, sports and home eco-
nomics clubs. She also attended Na-
tional Aquatic School and received her
instructorship in Red Cross Water
Safety and First Aid. Upon gradu-
ation, Mrs. Jack worked with the Fed-
eral Extension Service as Assistant Ex-
tension Home Economist in Western
Pennsylvania.
Mrs. Jack and her husband Robert
L. Jack, have lived in Miami since
June of 1958. He is with the Con-
necticut General Life Insurance Com-
pany and she has been teaching
Homemaking and General Science at
Shenandoah Junior and Miami Senior
High Schools.

















HILL WATSON


Display of Jacksonville Dairy Council materials in the corridor of the Duval County
Schools' Administration Building on exhibit from August 23 through September 15.
The display was arranged by Mrs. Margaret Long, (left) supervisor of Home Eco-
nomics, and Mrs. Lorena Johnson, supervisor of Elementary Instructional Materials, who
are seen with the display.
Mrs. Johnson's office, Room 205, Old Duval County School Administration Building,
has accepted a new responsibility of cooperation with the Dairy Council by acting as a
"display and distribution office" for Dairy Council materials during the 1960-61 school
year.
Mrs. Johnson says that although the Dairy Council office is across the street, the
placing of a display and supply of material in the Administration Building has already
proven its importance in attracting the attention and interest of more teachers.


NDC TO PARTICIPATE IN
WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE
National Dairy Council has accepted
an invitation to send an official dele-
gate to the White House Conference
on Aging, January 9-12, 1961, in
Washington, D. C. NDC and its affili-
ated units for many years have in-
cluded senior citizen nutrition educa-
tion programs as an important part of
their total health education work.
Grace R. O'Keefe, program consult-
ant for NDC and an authority on
adult nutrition, will serve as the dairy
industry organization representative.
As a delegate, she will participate in
Conference workshop sessions where
she will relate Dairy Council experi-
ences in developing nutrition educa-
tion programs to serve the needs of
of the aged and aging population.
Miss O'Keefe will report to NDC
on the recommendations of the White
House Conference, especially where
these relate to the nutrition needs of
older people.
The White House Conference on
Aging will have been preceded by
numerous governors' conferences on
aging, as well as by a national and
regional meeting sponsored by the
American Medical Association. The re-
sults of these conferences have helped
to develop the program for the White
House Conference in 1961. NDC and
its affiliated units have participated in
several of these earlier conferences.


National Dairy Council
Announces Staff Changes
Milton Hult, N.D.C. president, has
announced three changes in the staff
of the National Dairy Council, all
effective by September 1, 1960.
Neal D. Kelley, who has been serv-
ing as Director of Industry Relations,
moves to the newly created position
of Director of Promotion where he
will produce materials related to mem-
bership promotion and membership
services. Mr. Kelley has been with
N.D.C. since 1940 and has attended
a number of meetings of the Florida
dairy industry.
William B. McKinney has been
manager of the Eastern Region since
1953. He will move to chicago to fill
the position left vacant by Mr. Kelley.
Dr. Merrill Stafford Read will be-
come Director of Nutrition Service at
N.D.C., replacing Dr. Zoe E. Ander-
son, who resigned to become Head of
the Department of Home Economics
at Wayne State University. Dr. Read
comes to N.D.C. from the Virginia
Polytechnic Institute where he has
been Visiting Professor, Department
of Biochemistry and Nutrition. He is
a nutrition consultant of the Atomic
Energy Commission.

Quite a lot of the world's trouble is
produced by those who don't produce
anything else.


Jacksonville Council
Installs New Officers
The Jacksonville Dairy Council in
its annual business meeting held re-
cently elected Clair Hill, Borden man-
ager, as President to succeed Jim
Watson, Duval County Farm Agent
who had served as President for sev-
eral years.
Producer A. B. Thien was elected
Vice President to succeed Paul Sim-
mons, and Nowell Smith, Treasurer.
Directors elected for a one-year
term were: Producers-A. B. Thien,
Paul Simmons, Hugh Adams and Jim
Watson. Producer-Distributors-Wal-
lace Nolan, C. A. Perret, Cody Skin-
ner and Nowell Smith. Distributors-
Clair Hill; Duncan Sturm, Foremost;
and Thomas H. Bloodworth, Sealtest.
Also re-elected a director and Sec-
retary of the Council "Board of Di-
rectors" is Mrs. Margaret Long, who
has served as a Dairy Council di-
rector representing Duval County
schools since the organization of the
Council, except for the first year. Mrs.
Long, who is Duval County School
Supervisor in Home Economics, vol-
unteered to devote extra time in co-
ordinating the Dairy Council pro-
gram in the schools while the vacancy
in the position of Council Executive
Director is vacant. Mrs. Long will be
assisted by Mrs. Lorena Johnson, co-
ordinator of instructional materials
for Duval County Schools.
Mrs. Audrey Hadley, former Execu-
tive Director, found it necessary to
retire because of poor health.
Dutch Cavender, National Dairy
Council Field Representative for
Southern States, participated in two
recent meetings with the directors of
the Jacksonville Council in planning
the unit's educational program and
activities for the coming year.

To those who talk and talk
This adage doth appeal;
The steam that blows the whistle
Will never turn a wheel.

A man can fail many times, but he
isn't a failure until he begins to blame
somebody else.
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 25








West Florida Dairy Show
Held at Chipley, August 11
The annual West Florida Dairy
Show and Judging contest is growing
in both size and quality as was evi-
denced by the many entries and good
attendance on August 11 in Chipley.
No one county or area dominated the
list of entries or winners. There was a
Junior Division for 4-H and F.F.A.
members and an Open Show in both
exhibition and judging. Purebred and
grade cattle were shown separately by
breed in six different classes.
Rivalry was keen among the judg-
ing teams. In the F.F.A. Division, the
Quincy Chapter won the trophy fur-
nished by the Florida State Dairymen's
Association for top judging honors;
Havana was second and Marianna,
third. In the 4-H Judging Contest,
Jackson County took both first and
second places with their two teams;
Leon County was third.
Carter Wins Judging Award
Top judging honors in the Open
Show were won by Representative-
elect Ralph Carter of Washington
County. The plaque for this winner
is furnished by the Florida Dairy
Products Association.
Entering both Holsteins and Guern-
seys in the Open Show, Clifton Lyons
of Holmes County came up with grand
champion and reserve champions in
both breeds. Nita Ford of Gadsden
County showed the grand champion
Jersey, while George Ford, also of
Gadsden, showed the reserve cham-
pion.
Archie Cook of Jay showed the
grand champion Ayrshire in the
F.F.A. Division. In the same division,
John Sellers of Leon County showed
both the grand champion registered
Guernsey and the reserve champion
Guernsey calf. Also as a F.F.A., Jack
Ford showed the grand champion
registered Jersey cow and the reserve
champion.
Robert Willis of Jackson County
won the showmanship contest. Es-
cambia took first place in the herds-
men contest; Gadsden County was sec-
ond and Leon County was third.
Individuals showing the best group
of three animals in the Open Show
were: George Ford of Gadsden, first;
Robert Willis of Jackson, second; Nita
Ford of Gadsden, third; Clifton Lyons
of Holmes, fourth; and Jim Harley of
Jackson, fifth.
Grady Taylor of Jackson County
showed the best fitted animal to win
a trophy in that contest.
In the F.F.A. Division, the best
chapter group of three animals was
shown by the Quincy chapter, with
Leon second and Graceville third.
26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Hood's Milk Buys Burress Dairy
The Burress Dairy, St. Petersburg,
Florida, has announced that its milk
processing and distribution business
has been sold to Hood's Milk, Inc.,
St. Petersburg.
The Burress Dairy, which for many
years was operated as a producer-dis-
tributor of milk in the St. Petersburg
area, had restricted its operation in
recent years to milk processing and
distribution.
Ernest Burress is establishing a
new company for the wholesale sale
of dairy products manufactured by
the Bowman Dairy of Chicago.


HERDMEN'S SHORT COURSE
SUMMARY
(Continued from Page 22)
Al Cribbett, Orange County As-
sistant Agent, gave the results of a
survey he made of Labor Turnover
and Working Conditions on dairy
farms in his county. He used the data
to point up some strategic principles
needed in the development of a
trained, capable, satisfied labor force
on each farm.
Professor Joe B. Richardson dis-
cussed Muddy Lots, bringing up for
consideration some of the problems
and methods to avoid muddy lots by
paving lots and lanes. A discussion of
handling cows in concrete corrals indi-
cated the need for further research in
this method.
Dr. J. M. Wing gave a review of
the basic principles involved in the
"Management of Milk Cows in Hot
Weather." The talk and discussion
from the floor covered various ways
of making cows more comfortable in
hot weather. A symposium on the sub-
ject is to be on the Dairy Field Day
program.
Attendance was large especially
from the central and south Florida
dairies. The county agent service in
four major dairy counties, the feed
industry, artificial breeding, and dairy
herd improvement associations were
represented. The dairymen attend-
ing entered into the discussions
throughout the three days and termed
it a worthwhile event.

The West Florida Dairy Show and
Contests are sponsored by the State
Department of Agriculture, the Voca-
tional Agriculture Department, the
Agricultural Extension Service, the
City of Chipley, several local busi-
nesses and organizations, including the
Florida State Dairymen's Association
and the Florida Dairy Products Associ-
ation.


AYRSHIRE NEWS

FLORIDA AYRSHIRE COW
AMONG NATION'S TOPS
The registered Ayrshire cow, Red
Raider's Starling, owned by Melvin
Vernon, Jr. of Dixie Farms, Tampa,
Florida, is reported in the 1959 an-
nual report of the Ayrshire Breeders'
Association as having produced one of
the ten highest milk production rec-
ords in her age division.
Milked just twice daily, Red Raid-
er's Starling's actual record was 10,-
735 lbs. of milk and 432 lbs. of fat
in 305 days. In terms of m. e. 4%
milk or 4% fat-corrected milk by
which the Ayrshire Breeder's Associa-
tion ranks its outstanding producers,
the record of Vernon's Yearling cow
is equivalent to 14,415 lbs.

Florida Ayrshires
Make Good Records
The Dixie Farms herd of Ayrshires
owned by Melvin Vernon, Jr. at Tam-
pa was recently classified for type by
an official Type Inspector for the Ayr-
shire Breeders' Association. One cow
in the herd, Trans-Vale Trixie-Bell,
rated the score of "Excellent." The
107-cow herd had an average score
of .841 and included 7 cows rating
"Good," 49 "Good Plus," and 49
"Very Good".
Two registered Ayrshire cows be-
longing to Melvin Vernon, Sr., Dover,
have recently completed official HIR
testing records. Ardrossau H. R. Gre-
tal, a three year old produced 11,814
pounds of milk and 399 pounds of
butterfat on 305 days on twice daily
milking. This is equal to 18 quarts of
milk per day. Duntrokn Saint Soncie,
a seven year old cow, had a record of
14,671 pounds of milk and 542
pounds of butterfat in 305 days on
twice daily milking. Her record is
equal to 22 quarts of milk per day for
the 10 month test period.
AYRSHIRES PURCHASED
Jose Suarez, owner of Star Dairy
at Limona, Florida, recently purchased
a registered Ayrshire herd sire named
Shuford-Ayr's Preference from R. H.
Shuford, Statesville, North Carolina.
Bred by the Agricultural Experiment
Station at Morgantown, West Virginia,
this young bull has a rating of "Se-
lected Pedigree".
Another registered Ayrshire sire
with the same rating was recently pur-
chased by Hubert H. Jacobs, Deland,
from Partridge Hill Farm, Barneveld,
New York. Partridge Hill Orbit was
bred on the farm from which he was
purchased.








WHAT GOES INTO
A WORLD'S RECORD

By: C. W. REAVES
Florida State Extension Dairyman
Within our life-time, records of
production from individual cows have
reached higher and higher marks. In
my boyhood, a 1,000 pounds butter-
fat record in a year was something to
be read about and awe surrounded the
1,402 pounds record of my college
days. That record was made on four
times a day milking in 365 days.
Records have fallen rapidly during
the last three years. The tremendous
Holsetin records were taken over in
succession by three Brown Swiss, the
latest being the 1,733 pounds butter-
fat by the Brown Swiss cow, Letha
Irene Pride, finished in 1959 in 365
days on three-times a day milking.
Now that record is superceded in a
tremendous jump to 1,866 pounds
butterfat completed January 15, 1960
by the registered Holstein cow, Prin-
cess Breezewood R A Patsy, on a 365
day test made on twice a day milking.
It is a World's Record for butterfat
over all breeds, regardless of number
of times milked daily, (and second
highest 2X milk record). The cow is
owned in a farmer-breeder herd of
Gelbke Brothers, Breezewood Farm,
Vienna, Ohio, who fed and milked
her.
HAD 38 SEPARATE TESTS.
Patsy's record was 36,821 pounds
milk, 5.1 per cent test, and 1,866
pounds butterfat. Since her high pro-
duction and test repeatedly met the
automatic retest requirements, she had
38 separate tests made by 12 different
test supervisors (part 24-hour and
part 48-hour tests). She averaged over
100 pounds milk and five pounds
butterfat a day throughout her 365
day testing period.
FEED. The special care she receiv-
ed seemed to be plenty of feed and
she was able to handle it. Her basic
ration was a mixture of 1,200 pounds
corn and cob meal, 800 pounds oats,
and 400 pounds soy bean oil meal.
Though milked only twice a day she
was fed grain three times a day
(amount not given). She was fed hay
on an average of nine times a day and
she ate over 100 pounds choice hay
daily. Also, she was fed liberally on
wet brewers' grain or wet beet pulp
(interchangeably, according to when
the wet brewers' grain was available).
The ability and desire of this 1,690
pounds cow to consume such tremend-
ous quantities of feeds appear the only
unusual thing about her or her pedi-
gree in the making of this remarkable
record. Records of near relatives gives
no indication of such and butterfat


MEETING THE CHALLENGE
OF FLORIDA AGRICULTURE

(Continued from Page 20)
As already pointed out, this pro-
gram is based on fundamental train-
ing in chemistry, mathematics, physi-
cal and biological sciences with ap-
plications in the applied areas such as
plant science, animal science, patholo-
gy, soils, entomology, food processing
and dairy manufactures.
A slight modification in the base
program will prepare students for
graduate study in Agricultural Eco-
nomics and Agricultural Education.
Students may choose: 2. Agricultural
Technology or Applied Agriculture.
This is very much the same pro-
gram as we have always followed in
Agriculture. The student gets a broad
background in Agriculture with some
degree of specialization in his particu-
lar field of interest.
They may elect: 3. Agricultural
Business.
This is, somewhat, a new concept
in Agricultural training and we are
offering this curriculum to those who
will go into jobs requiring a certain
amount of knowledge of business
management, business law and sales-
manship. We are proposing for this
curriculum certain courses in the Col-
lege of Business Administration as
well as additional courses in our own
department of Agricultural Economics.
In addition, the student will get some
accounting plus courses in public
speaking and sales.
This curriculum should be of par-
ticular interest to young men wanting
to go into dairy management, food
processing, packing house manage-
ment, fertilizer and machinery sales
and a host of other agricultural busi-
ness careers.
Other developments in our teaching
program which should and will im-
prove our future services to the young
people of our state are:
1. Development of a strong train-
ing program for Nematologist.
2. A cooperative plan for alternate
semesters of work and attendance at
the College of Agriculture between the
Fruit Crops Department and several
Citrus Co-ops and Agricultural Indus-
tries in the state. It is hoped this may
be extended to other departments since

production capacity. She is the ex-
ceptional one. If she can transmit to
her descendants something of her
unique ability, she can make a marked
impression on the breed. In the mean-
time, all cow men can study what it
takes for a cow to make a World's
Record.


Ware Replaces Floyd Luckey
Independent Dairy Farmer's Asso-
ciation has announced, with regret,
the resignation of R. F. Luckey, Jr.,
manager for the past four and one-
half years. George R. Ware assumed
Luckey's position, August 15.
Ware comes to Florida from Wash-
ington, D. C., where for the past
several years he has been connected
with USDA as a milk marketing
specialist, with duties relating to oper-
ation of Federal milk marketing orders
in various markets throughout the
country.
A native of Vermont, Ware gradu-
ated from the University of Vermont
with a degree in agriculture. He work-
ed as a county agricultural agent prior
to joining the USDA staff in Wash-
ington.
Floyd Luckey leaves IDFA to work
for the development division of Gra-
ham's Dairy, Inc. He will be connected
with the company's housing project-
a planned community and shopping
center in Dade County.


an ever increasing number of our stu-
dents come from urban areas and do
not have first hand agricultural experi-
ence. Also, arrangements have been
completed and course proposals sub-
mitted for a summer teaching pro-
gram in Citrus culture at the Citrus
Experiment Station. This especially
planned for those not having actual
grove or other practical experience.
3. The Department of Botany and
Entomology have been approved for
the offering of the Doctor of Philoso-
phy degree. Also, Botany is offering
formal courses in Radiation Biology,
one of the peaceful uses of atomic
energy or nuclear science.
4. Separate curricula in Agricul-
tural Engineering have been approved,
making it possible for students to
either major in Mechanized Agri-
culture in the College of Agriculture
or earn the Bachelor of Agricultural
Engineering degree given jointly by
the Colleges of Agriculture and
Engineering.
These and other improvements in
our teaching program will help to keep
us abreast of a changing world and
make for a brighter future in agri-
culture in our great State of Florida,
as well as in the South and the
Nation.
Author's Note: The data on Southern Agri-
business presented here were gathered and
published by the Association of Southern
Agricultural Workers. Copies of the bro-
chure, Southern Agriculture is Big Business,
mav be obtained by writing to the Dean,
College of Agriculture, University of Flor-
ida, Gainesvillc.
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 27


k













ODHAM REAPPOINTED
TO RESIGN IN JANUARY
J. Brailey Odham was reappointed
August 1 by Governor Collins to a
four-year-term on the Florida Milk
Commission but was reported to have
announced that he intends to resign
after Farris Bryant takes office as Gov-
ernor in January.
A Tallahassee press story of August
5 quotes Governor Collins as saying
that he concurs in Odham's decision
to resign when a new governor takes
office.

Odham Changes Views On
Milk Price Controls
Many who have followed closely
the actions of the Florida Milk Com-
mission and particularly the discus-
sions and actions of its chairman
Brailey Odham have recently become
aware that Odham's views with regard
to milk price controls and the Florida
Milk Commission have changed con-
siderably since he campaigned twice
for the position as governor on a plat-
form of abolishing the Milk Commis-
sion and its milk price controls.
Mr. Odham has displayed unusual
ability and energy in studying and
analyzing the problems of the dairy
industry during his two and one-half
years service as chairman of the com-
mission. In explaining his change from
a position of opposition to this law
to one of trying to make it serve a
useful purpose in setting up realistic
regulations and ground rules for com-
petition, Mr. Odham said that he was
still opposed to milk price fixing as it
existed in the past, with minimum
prices set at producer, distributor and
retail levels. But he said it was un-
realistic to expect distributors to oper-
ate at a loss. He said the commission
had a responsibility to protect the
markets of Florida dairy farmers.
Mr. Odham went on to say that the
answer lies in getting dairymen to
stand up to the chain stores and refuse
to sell to them at a loss. The present
system whereby complete control of
65 per cent of the milk buying is in
the hands of ten men who buy for
the big chain stores "is a great evil."
"It is an evil just as bad as retail price
controls," said Odham.
Odham said that the commission
had testimony that chain stores had
taken over control of the milk industry
in Tampa, Orlando and Jacksonville
through "fear". A dairyman is afraid
not to cut his prices to meet those of a
28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


MILK PRICE FLOORS
SET BY COMMISSION
The milk price order adopted by
the Milk Commission August 12 was
as follows:
(1) Effective date, August 24.
(2) Expiration date, November
15, 1960.
(3) No dairy may sell half-gallons
of milk at wholesale to stores at less
than 43, 140% of the producer
price set by the Commission.
(4) No milk may be sold at retail
at less than 46t, 150% of the pro-
ducer price set by the Commission.
(5) No limit on quantity and no
tie-in sales.
(6) Milk sold in a vending ma-
chine, granted a one-cent differential
below the 150% minimum applying
to stores.
(7) Cash and carry milk sales at
farm where produced is exempted.
(8) The filing of price schedules
with the Commission by dairies will
not be put into effect, although this
provision was adopted.
(9) A Study Committee was ap-
pointed by the Commission to con-
tinue the study of the industry's prob-
lems and consideration of recommen-
dations to the Commission for a pro-
gram to be adopted for the period
after the expiration of this order
November 15.
Members of this Committee are:
Administrator Howard Walton, Bob
Carter, Wilmer Bassett, Dr. Jim Acree,
Commission Auditor Hays Odom, Ed
Gustafson, J. H. Laher, John Sar-
geant, Chris Jensen, Robert Venn,
Glenn Woodard (Winn-Dixie Stores),
Joe Greco, owner of the Big Barn
Grocery Stores, Tampa, and Bill Dur-
den of the Governor's office.


Governor Collins Vows
Effort To Stop Price Order
A United Press, Tallahassee date-
line, story, appeared in the press Sat-
urday, August 20, as follows: "Gov-
ernor Collins said yesterday he will
do his best to see that enforcement
of minimum milk prices stops No-
vember 1."

competitor lest he lose the big chains
as customers.
Odham said that he had "never
seen anything like" the present situa-
tion "where the competitive spirit of
the milk distribution industry is so
completely controlled by fear.


13 Producers Lose Bases
In Jacksonville Area
As Result of Price Wars
Milk price wars, chaotic market
conditions and the threat of bank-
ruptcy caused two Jacksonville in-
dependent producer-distributors to cut
off all milk producers effective Sep-
tember 1. They have been purchas-
ing milk from these producers under
the usual Florida Milk Commission
producer base plan.
Skinner's Dairy gave the legal 90-
day notice to their five producers
while Perret's Dairy said they were
entitled to discontinue their eight pro-
ducers for "just cause," the "just
cause" being that the dairy does not
need the milk and cannot dispose of
it at a profit.
Representatives of the State Dairy-
men's Association and the Dairy Prod-
ucts Association suggested that the
two distributors continue to receive
and use or dispose of the milk of
these producers on a temporary non-
contract basis. This arrangement was
agreed to.
The Gustafson Dairy of Green Cove
Springs agreed to purchase their extra
supply needs from the Skinner and
Perret Dairies (until January 1,
1961) as a means of helping the
thirteen producers who faced the pos-
sibility of being without a market for
their milk.

Asks 70c A Gallon
Price To Producers
Dairymen who packed the large
House of Representatives chamber
during the August 3, 4 & 5 public
hearing of the Florida Milk Commis-
sion were so absorbed in the discus-
sions of what would be done to curb
Florida's ruinous milk price wars that
one important and significant request
made to the commission by a Deland
producer went by practically unno-
ticed.
This was a request that considera-
tion be given to the adoption of a 70c
per gallon milk price to producers
To all appearances the producer who
made the request, although a stranger,
was not lost. He appeared to have
the counsel and guidance of leaders
of an organization of producers.
University of Florida milk produc-
tion cost surveys were completed in
the Jacksonville and Orlando market
areas within recent months and a
similar survey in the Tampa market
is soon to be released. These studies
will no doubt have a considerable
bearing on future milk prices to the
producers. If actual costs support the
need for an increase in the price to
the producer, either costs must go
down or prices must go up.









Milk Commission
Adopts Temporary Order
To End Milk Price Wars

Governor Tries and Fails
To Have Order Cancelled
On August 5th at the end of a
three-day public hearing and the tak-
ing of an estimated 600 pages of
testimony from milk dealers and re-
tail store representatives, the Florida
Milk Commission adopted a tempo-
rary order for a milk price floor at
both the wholesale and retail level.
The action was an effort to stop rag-
ing milk price wars and chaotic con-
ditions in the Jacksonville, Orlando
and Tampa areas.
Collins Fails To Block Order
Upon learning of the Commission's
action, Governor Collins denounced
the wholesale and retail milk price
floors included in the order and asked
the Commission to delay making the
order effective until he could call be-
fore him his Commission lieutenants
-Chairman Odham, Carter and Ad-
ministrator Walton.
The United Press (Tallahassee)
quoted Collins as saying, "The con-
sumer members of this board and I
have struggled successfully too long
and hard against special-interest pres-
sures to relax our opposition to any
retail or wholesale price fixing."
Collins was quoted further as say-
ing: "If price wars should be regarded
as a guage for controls, then we could
quickly see the Government move into
countless commodity markets" . .
"with milk and No. 1, liquor would
follow as No. 2, and then also would
come demands for fixing of prices of
services with haircuts leading the
way."
A Tallahassee (AP) story quoted
Governor Collins and saying "he was
shocked to learn that the Milk Com-
mission had imposed minimum
prices."
Collins Pressures Commission
As if the Governor and the State
of Florida had no more serious busi-
ness for attention, Governor Collins
spent a considerable part of his day
August 10 in trying to persuade Com-
mission members Odham and Carter
to change their minds and reverse
their votes for a milk price floor which
the Commission adopted in the hope
of ending chaotic milk price wars in
the Jacksonville, Orlando and Tampa
areas.
Both Open and Closed Sessions
According to news reports of the
conference, Governor Collins let re-
porters attend his conference after
first saying he would not. They said
he later took Odham, Carter and Ad-


ministrator Walton to lunch with him
at the mansion.
Governor Expresses Strong Views
The Tampa Tribune of August 11
gave a lengthy report of the confer-
ence, a portion of which is quoted as
follows:
"Collins said he was governor, that
he was against price controls and he
expected his boards to have the same
goals."
"Collins said he always had been
against rigging the price of milk
through price controls."
"He said he promised in his cam-
paigns for governor that he would
oppose milk price controls.
"Collins told Carter he knew Carter
was voting his convictions last Friday
when he voted for the price controls.
'I have asked you here today be-
cause I was disappointed,' Collins
said.
'If you give serious consideration
to the historic background, you will
understand the disappointment.'
"Collins said the governor is some-
thing like the captain of a ship, and
his ideas should prevail.
"Members of boards are account-
able to the governor to carry on his
basic desires, Collins said.
Dislikes Meddling
"'I have demonstrated over and
over again that I don't want to med-
dle into details of boards even though
the members are appointed by me,
Collins said.
"He said he had never told any
board who to hire or who to fire.
"'But I have felt strongly that
boards should think in the same basic
grooves and philosophies and atti-
tudes of government that the gover-
nor does,' he said.
"Collins said he had informed the
State Legisature in every message that
he is against price controls.
"He urged Carter to change his
mind, to agree for a delay to give
the milk commission a chance to try
to work out something which would
stabilize the market without putting
on price controls.
'You must know this is a serious
matter to this administration,' Collins
said. 'I think it is a serious matter
to you.'
"Odham said he did not consider
Carter's votes as an reflection on Col-
lins.
"He said he was convinced that
Carter felt something had to be done
before independent milk distributors
were driven out of business by under-
priced milk.
Odham Defends Setting Price Floor
"The current price floor, said Od-
ham, is not so bad. It sets milk at a
realistic floor-460 a half gallon-


Commission First Withdraws
Then Re-Adopts Price Order
After an all-day discussion and re-
hearing on their August 5 milk price
floor order, the Milk Commission
complied with the Governor's request,
reconsidered and withdrew the order.
They then confirmed the need for
such an order and the duty of the
Commission to take action for con-
trol of a chaotic milk price war situ-
ation and re-adopted the same price
floor provisions as were in the pre-
vious order.
The only change was in the expir-
ation date, which was made November
15, 1960 instead of June 1, 1961.

and Odham said he doubted if it will
sell for that.
"Odham said with 'five or six peo-
ple' controlling the purchase of more
than half the state's milk at the whole-
sale level, 'I cannot in all honesty say
that independent dairy distributors
will survive or the people do better
with no controls.'
"The situation has changed dras-
tically in three years, Odham said.
"Where once the dairy distributors
had the industry 'locked up,' chain-
stores now do.
Denies Order Is Price Control
"Carter, who kept silent during the
first hour of the meeting, said he did
not consider the 46f floor on milk
to be price controls.
"He said the press ought not to call
it that.
'We have not reinstated retail
price controls, we have set a floor,'
Carter said.
"Carter said he was convinced the
use of milk as a loss leader in stores
was the root of the trouble in Tampa,
Orlando and Jacksonville.
"By restricting the minium price to
46o a half gallon, the milk commis-
sion had effectively cut out loss lead-
ers, Carter said.
Consents To Delay
"A price of 460 a half gallon is not
'dramatic' enough to be a good loss
leader, Carter said.
"Carter said milk is a perishable,
and when the milk market is upset
drastically, the steady flow is inter-
rupted and soon everything gets out
of kilter.
"Milk can't be stored like whiskey,
Carter said.
"Carter told the Governor he would
go along with a short delay to see if
some other answer could be found.
"The price control order was sup-
posed to be filed today, but Odham
said he would take the responsibility
of delaying it until after Friday's
meeting in Jacksonville."
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 29


M













Convention Committee
Scouting 1961 Location
A 1961 joint Convention Planning
Committee of the Florida Dairymen's
and Dairy Products Associations are
scouting hotel locations for their July
1961 Convention.
Members of the Committees report
that for the first time consideration is
being given to an off-shore convention
site. In addition to a number of Flor-
ida locations, word is out that the
Committee plans to look over the
"Grand Bahama Club Hotel" in the
Bahamas, 50 miles off-shore from
Palm Beach, before deciding on next
year's convention location.
The presidents-elect of the two As-
sociations, John Hood of F.D.P.A., and
John Adkinson of F.S.D.A., head the
planning committee.



A Good Question ...
Why Should The U. S.
Subsidize Congo Savagery?
This question was put (August 18)
by David Lawrence, prominent Wash-
ington, D. C. newspaper columnist.
Mr. Lawrence said, "An amazing item
came over the news ticker this week.
It said in part as follows:
'The State Department asked Con-
gress today for an extra $100,000,000
in foreign-aid funds to help the vio-
lence-torn Congo and possibly other
new African nations.' "
About this, Mr. Lawrence com-
ments, "Not many days ago the troops
of the Congo government which is to
be given American taxpayer's money
committed one of the worst atrocities
in human history-brutal attacks on
white residents, with wholesale beat-
ings of the men, mistreatment of the
children and rape of the women, in-
cluding at least two American mis-
sionaries. Yet the prime minister of
the Congo government has called it
a 'lie', and not a word of regret or
apology has come from the very
government whose troops were guilty
of the atrocities-and whose same
troops now would be supported with
money furnished by the taxpayers of
America."


Three fourths of the earth's surface
is water and one fourth land. It's clear
the Good Lord intended man should
spend three times as much time fish-
ing as he does mowing the lawn.
30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Directors' Meeting Announced
By Dairymen's Association
John Sargeant, president of the Flor-
ida State Dairymen's Association, has
announced a meeting for directors and
members of the Association to be held
at the Thomas Hotel, Gainesville, the
evening of September 14 and the
morning of September 15.
Sargeant said this particular time
and place was selected because of the
Annual Dairy Field Day meeting at
the University of Florida, which is
scheduled for the afternoon of the
15th through noon of the 16th.


Bryant and Conner
Open Tallahassee Offices
Farris Bryant and Doyle Conner
have already established active offices
in Tallahassee from which they are
busily making plans for their new jobs
in Tallahassee next January.
The future Governor's office is at
the Duval Hotel and the future Com-
missioner of Agriculture has his office
at the Cherokee Hotel.
Chester Blakemore, one of the lead-
ers in Conner's successful campaign,
is in charge of the temporary office in
the Cherokee.

Court Rules "Just Cause"
Commission Order Out
The Florida Supreme Court has
ruled against that portion of a Milk
Commission order which provided that
a milk distributor could not discon-
tinue the purchase of milk from a
producer who had earned a milk base
with him except for a "just cause" as
interpreted and determined by the
Commission.
The "producer base plan" provides
that a producer and distributor base
relationship can be discontinued by
the giving of notice by either one not
less than 90 days before the end of
the current base period year.
The court ruling holds that the 90
days notice within the time period
specified is all that is required for
either a producer or a distributor to
quit the other.

Farmers realized a cash return of
4.2 billion dollars from whole milk
sold to milk dealers in 1959, says
USDA. The price per hundredweight
averaged $4.15 in 1959, 3 cents per
hundred pounds higher than the 1958
average price.


RECENT DAIRY EVENTS

July 26-28-Annual Dairy Herdsmen's
Short Course at University
of Florida, Gainesville
Aug. 11 -West Florida Dairy Show,
Chipley
Aug. 12 -Pensacola Area Dairy School,
Molino
Aug. 22-26-Annual Agricultural Exten-
sion Conference

COMING DAIRY EVENTS

Sept. 1 -State Guernsey Sale Or-
lando
Sept. 7 -Florida Cattle Club Meeting
Orlando
Sept. 8 -State Jersey Sale Orlando
Sept. 15-16-Annual Dairy Field Day,
University of Florida,
Gainesville
Sept. 27-29-Annual Meeting of Int'l.
Assn. of Milk Control Agen-
cies, Hotel Riviera, Las
Vegas, Nevada
Oct. 30 -14th Annual Meeting, Dairy
Society International, La-
Salle Hotel, Chicago
Oct. 31 -Dairy Industries Exposition -
Nov. 5 International Amphitheatre,
Chicago
Oct. 31 -56th Annual Meeting, Inter-
Nov. 2 national Assn. of Ice Cream
Mfrs. Conrad Hilton Hotel,
Chicago
Nov. 2 4-53rd Annual Meeting, Milk
Industry Foundation, Palmer
House, Chicago
Nov. 20-23-Southern Assn. of Ice Cream
Mfrs., Americana Hotel,
Miami Beach, Fla.

Milk Control Agencies
Will Meet in September
The International Association of
Milk Control Agencies will hold its
1960 meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada,
September 27-29. Everyone interested
in the milk industry is invited. High
points on the program are the follow-
ing:
Federal Marketing Orders vs. State
Milk Control.
Importance of Maintaining State
Order in Connection with Federal
Order.
Panel discussions will include:
Public Relations for Milk Control
Agencies (R. J. Werner, moderator).
Enforcement of Fair Trade or Other
Regulations.
What Should the Industry-Pro-
ducer and Distributor-Expect of Milk
Regulations and Milk Regulatory
Agencies.

All Within Reason
Did you ever see one of those "come
on" orange juice signs which read, "All
you can drink for 10"?
Well . a recent visitor to Florida
said he was disappointed to find that
the "All you can drink" signs are be-
ing changed to "All you can drink-
within reason" for 10.








Governor Has Short Memory
Of His Former Stand
On Milk Commission Law
Letter to the Editor ..
"Governor Collins was quoted by
the press as stating in his recent con-
ference with Milk Commission mem-
bers over the question of setting a
milk price floor to help prevent milk
price wars, that he had always been
against rigging the price of milk
through price controls . that he
promised in his campaign for gov-
ernor that he would oppose milk price
controls."
Others See It Differently
"Dairy industry persons who re-
call the actions of Leroy Collins as a
member of the House of Representa-
tives and Senate have the very strong
impression that Collins always sup-
ported the Milk Commission Law up
to the time he was elected governor.
If he ever as a member of the House
or Senate sponsored or advocated any
repeal or changes in the Milk Com-
mission Law to remove price control
authority, those who followed these
legislative matters closely do not re-
call such efforts, other than his sup-
port of a bill in the 1953 legislature
which exempted school milk from the
price authority of the law."
"As to his campaign promises as a
candidate for governor, there are
prominent dairy industry persons who
say they distinctly recall that the then
candidate Collins in his first campaign
told them that he had always believed
in and supported the dairy industry;
that he knew of no need for nor was
advocating any changes in the dairy
laws of the state."
"There are also those who distinctly
recall hearing candidate Collins and
candidate Odham speaking from the
same platform as opposing candidates,
when Odham attacked the Milk Com-
mission Law and Collins defended
the Law and his own support of it."


IN 1890 IT TOOK
26 MINUTES
Today only 7 minutes . of an
average U. S. worker's time ... to earn
the price of a quart of milk! . ac-
cording to the U. S. Bureau of Labor
Statistics.
WHAT IS THE REAL PRICE OF
MILK? The real price of anything is
represented by the amount of work
that is required to earn enough money
to purchase it. In these terms, the
price of a quart of milk today repre-
sents just a little more than 14 the
amount of labor it did in Grandpa's
day.


LIVESTOCK BOARD ADOPTS
FEVER TICK REGULATIONS
At their August meeting in Orlando,
the Florida Livestock Board adopted
new regulations for the control of the
"fever tick." The regulations are effec-
tive September 1, 1960 and supercede
the Boards' previous regulations gov-
erning the eradication of the cattle
fever tick which had been in effect
since May 1949.
Provisions of the Order
The new order provides for the
quarantine of all cattle, horses, mules
and asses found to be infected with or
exposed to the cattle fever tick in the
State of Florida. It also requires the
regular dipping of all such animals
within any area in which systematic
tick eradication is being conducted or
shall otherwise be treated in an ap-
proved solution. All dipped animals
will be officially marked.
All hay, straw, shrubbery, pulp-
wood, etc., originating in the tick-
eradication area shall not be moved
unless treated in an approved manner.
Animals may move out of an in-
fected area only after approved treat-
ment and under supervision.
Copy of Regulations
Copies of the cattle Fever Tick
Regulations may be secured from:
THE FLORIDA DAIRYMEN'S AS-
SOCIATION, 1026 Oak Street, Jack-
sonville 4, Florida.
NEW PACKAGE DESIGNS
FOR FOREMOST DAIRIES
Foremost Dairies has blossomed out
in a brand new wardrobe of packages
for its products, and for the first time
the company is presenting a single
basic package design to its customers
across the country.
With the new packaging Foremost
will be able to use the same basic
advertising and sales promotion in all
of its operating areas and will, in
addition, have an opportunity to build
a single strong package image in its
national advertising.
Previously, Foremost had to a great
extent stayed with the package designs
used by the dairy companies with
which it has joined in past years. Most
of its seven regional fresh products
divisions had packages which were
used in their own areas only.
In areas where Foremost is still
known more prominently by the prede-
cessor dairy's name (Golden State,
Tastemark, Hage's, Medosweet and
Sunnybrook), that name will be in-
cluded on the carton. But all of the
cartons throughout the country will
otherwise be identical, with the famil-
iar trademark "f" the main design
feature.
National introduction of the Fore-


9 YEARS AGO
IN
"THE DAIRY NEWS"
Headlines Taken From
The Florida Dairy News
Vol. 1, No. 4-5-6, 1951

Legislature Rejects Proposals To
Abolish or Amend Milk Commission
Law
Committee of Fifty Directs Pro-
gram of "Dairy Month Activities"

Mrs. H. B. Thomas named "Dairy
Lady of the Month"

Dairy Industry Makes Great Ad-
vances on all Fronts

Milk is Recommended as Best
Bread Enrichment

Dried Citrus Pulp Revolutionizes
Dairying the Last Ten Years

What Government Price Freeze
Really Means
New McArthur Dairy in Miami Is
One of Nation's Finest
Dairymen Can Meet the Challenge
of Fresh Concentrated Milk says Dr.
E. L. Fouts
Jersey Breeders Hold First Florida
Field Day
A Tribute to Albert Lawton's 22
Years as Duval County Farm Agent
Dairymen Will Entertain Florida
Public Health Group
Junior Dairy Association Recom-
mended by Committee
Annual Dairy Field Day at Univer-
sity Hailed Biggest and Best in 16-
Year History
16% Price Increase for Florida
Newspapers
Borden Co. Acquires Datson Dairy
in Orlando

most packages took place during the
first two weeks of January, and for the
time, a picture of a Foremost package
appeared in a national magazine. Pub-
lications used to introduce the new
designs were Saturday Evening Post,
Life, Reader's Digest, McCall's, Good
Housekeeping and Parents. In addi-
tion, newspapers and billboards as
well as radio and television were used
on a local basis.
THIRD QUARTER, 1960 31











Special Card Ad Directory


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

Florida State Dairymen's Association Florida Dairy Products Association


ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC
CITRUS PULP, CITRUS MEAL,
CITRUS MOLASSES
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division
Auburndale, Fla. WOodlawn 7-1104





INC. 2hri-RIch
Chocolate Products Egg Nog, Orange
Ice Cream Fruits & Flavors
ED SALVATORE
P. O. Box 86, Tampa Ph. 24-5271


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
ICE CREAM COATING, FRUITS & FLAVORS
IRA STONE
Phone 22-3742
Brightwater Beach Apts., Apt. 12
175 55th Ave. St. Petersburg Beach, Fla.


GENERAL DYNAMICS
CORPORATION
LIQUID CARBONIC DIVISION
O. L. BOBO W. R. WIGGINS
M. O. DELGADO, JR. B. F. THOMPSON
743 McDaniel St. Atlanta 3, Georgia


GULF CARTON DIVISION
ST. REGIS PAPER CO.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVOY
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Pure Pak Milk Containers
C. J. WALDROP, Resident Manager
345 State Rd. No. 9, North Miami Beach
WALTER M. SCOTT E. H. BROWN
1731 Indian Rocks Rd. 2820 Eastern Parkway
Clearwater Orlando


LAND O' LAKES NON-FAT MILK SOLIDS
EZE ORANGE CO.
ORANGE AND GRAPE BASES FOR
DAIRY FRUIT DRINKS
JIM JENNINGS
3456 Ribault Scenic Dr.
Jacksonville 8, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
COCOA DIVISION

Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
TOM POWERS
830 E. River Dr. Tampa 10, Fla.
Temple Terrace

32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer

JOE E. ANDERSON

1345 Springdale Rd., N. E. Atlanta 6, Ga.
Phone DRake 8-0204



KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation

WM. C. MAYFIELD
742 Ponce de Leon Place, N. E., Atlanta 6, Ga.



KRIM*KO
CHOCOLATE ORANGE EGGNOG
MARBLETONE SYRUPS
Ice Cream Flavoring and Specialties
DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
616 Jessamine Blvd., Daytona Beach, Fla.
Phone CLinton 2-0148



LIBERTY GLASS COMPANY

F T P MILK BOTTLES

A. MAURICE DAVIS


P. O. Box 520


Sapulpa, Okla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Van-Sal Vanilla Products

D. C. MULLIGAN, Florida Representative


2840 West 47th Place


Chicago 32, Ill.


MURPHY BODY WORKS, INC.
REFRIGERATED TRUCK BODIES

E. D. "Ed" PENNELL


310 Herring Ave.
Phone 23-72191


Wilson, N. C.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, 'Sherbets & Fruits
JOE COSTA, JR.
Phone LIberty 6-6481, 6-6484 or 0324
P. O. Box 311 Athens, Ga.



Patronize


Our


ADVERTISERS


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. PARMALEE R. G. SHACKELFORD
J. M. MORGAN
1601 Prudential Bldg., Jacksonville 7, Fla.
R. D. WALLER
7630 Biscayne Blvd. Miami 38, Fla.


PENNSALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies

ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
Moultrie, Georgia

Riverside Masterbilt Uniforms
JAMES M. STEWART DAVE FREEMAN



STANDARD PACKAGING CORP'N.
MILK BOTTLE CLOSURES

LARRY HODGE


1121 duPont Bldg.


Miami, Fla.


THE MARYLAND COMPANIES

P. O. Box 2698 [*i.
S h er Jacksonville, Florida


JIM MOTT


LOUIS PECK


UNIVERSAL CABINET CORP.
(Formerly Anheuser-Busch, Inc.)
ICE CREAM CABINETS
Warehouses:
MIAMI TAMPA JACKSONVILLE
Walter S. Crawbuck, Dist. Mgr.
4650 Arapahoe Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.


MANUFACTURERS OF
DAIRY EQUIPMENT



JOHN W. MANNING
Phone: WIlson 7-0503
17750 N. E. 19th Ave. N. Miami Beach, Fla.


WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY
Pure-Pak Milk Bottles
R. J. EVANS, Resident Manager
L. K. Nicholas, Jr. & W. Hugh Tindall
Sales Representatives
Phone ELgin 6-1334
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.










































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