• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00041
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 3d quarter 1958
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00041
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Back Cover
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text





































TA





Florida's 1958 State Cha ion 4-H Dair
Florida's 1958 State Chamoion 4-H Dairy Jud














pfg


II


with Sales
2 bogs


Larro SURERAISE
basic tool in building better herd replacements


WIN
A Better Homes and Gardens
IDEA HOME ,N~atz6Cock to
"NAME THE KITCHENS CONTEST"'
GET ENTRY BLANK AT YOUR GROCERS I


All the health and growth boosting
benefits of Larro SureRaise pre-
starter for calves . plus a real
money-saving price on a top qual-
ity hammer.
Valued at $5.00, this one-piece
forged hammer is yours for only
$2.50 when you mail a sales slip
showing purchase of 2 bags of Larro
SureRaise to General Mills, Dept.
330, 623 Marquette Ave., Minne-
apolis 2, Minnesota.
This real bargain bonus is your
Larro dealer's way of introducing
you to Larro SureRaise. This
FIRST-AID FEED FOR CALVES
is the best of 141 calf feed formulas
tested at General Mills' FACT
FARM, U.S.A. It knocks out scours,
starts calves 30% faster than ac-
cepted standards, cuts calf raising
costs.
Calves benefit from an exclusive
balance of highly digestible, appe-


tizing nutrients in SureRaise. Anti-
biotics and chemobiotics give an
extra nutritional punch, combat
scours and secondary infections,
too.
Make Larro SureRaise the basic
tool in building profitable herd re-
placements. See your Larro dealer
for details while this special ham-
mer offer lasts. Or write: General
Mills, Feed Division, 2515 Galiano
Street, Coral Gables, Florida.


products


Coral Gables, Florida


01_
0MWhW1b._








EDITORIALS


Guest Editorial
OUR GREATEST PROBLEMS ARE HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS
By: NORMAN MYRICK, Editor
American Milk Review, New York
NOTE: Following Mr. Myrick's visit to Florida in June as a guest
speaker at the Annual Meeting of the Florida Dairy Association at
St. Petersburg Beach, the Dairy News asked him for a guest editorial.
We are sure our Dairy News readers will be pleased that Mr. Myrick
responded with the following appraisal of the problems of the dairy
Industry today.
The rapid growth of population that is taking place in the United States is
the single most important factor affecting the dairy business today. The popu-
lation of the United States is growing at the rate of 3 million people a year, a
development which poses the same ancient problem of human relationships
that always occurs with increases in population.
The most casual glance at the dairy industry shows that the major issues
that concern us today are problems of people. There is no outstanding physical
problem that we have not mastered. The principal question in Florida is the
same question that is found in other markets from one end of the nation to
the other. That question is the problem of "fair competition" which is, in
essence, a problem of people.
The dairy industry in Florida is a classic example of the way in which
physical problems are replaced by human problems as population increases.
The fact that Florida's milk production and milk plants are "among the
most advanced in the nation" is proof to me that your problems are not
physical. Your problems are problems of people, problems of competitive
relationships as the stormy history of the Florida Milk Commission, in its
efforts to help solve your problems, demonstrates.
This poses a fundamental challenge. Historically, societies have failed
when they were unable to find a solution to the problems of human relation-
ships that arose as their populations increased. The pattern has always been a
trend from smaller to larger units with an attendant loss of individual freedom
and creativeness. The same pattern has been apparent in the dairy industry
during the post war years. The number of independent distributors has declined
by as much as 30 per cent. However, within recent months there have been
some developments which suggest that the dairy industry is in the process of
Winding a solution to this problem. Twin Oaks Dairy of Chicago and the Dairy
Center of the Berkshires in Massachusetts are examples of how a number of
small firms, by banding together into a kind of federation, have found a way
to place themselves on an equal plane with their larger competitors without
losing their individual identities as independent businessmen. These have been
creative responses to the great challenge of human relationships involved in
the competitive problem.
There are other obvious manifestations of the profound evolutionary nature
of the period through which the dairy industry is passing. The trend toward
regional plants, the development of automatic techniques in the plant, the
growing influence of organized labor in plant operation, are the surface shop
of basic currents. These currents, difficult to comprehend because of their
size and their intangible character, are the efforts of an enormous number of
people to adjust themselves to a new environment created by a rapidly grow-
ing population and a continuing agricultural and industrial revolution. People
are the fundamental problem. They are both the drivers and the driven. Until
we recognize and understand these first causes, our approach to the practical
problems of the milk business will be inadequate at best and aggravating at
the worst. The basic problem, in my opinion, is not one of economics, not one of
engineering it is a problem of sociology the relationships between people.
These problems as such are not new. What sets the present period apart
from others is the fact that a wide range of trends, a massive array of funda-
mental forces, are bringing to maturity with an unprecedented rapidity prob-
lems that have been developing during the last decade.


VOL. 8 NO. 3
THIRD QUARTER, 1958

THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
JOHN B. SERGEANT, President
Lakeland

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
LEON H. SELLERS, President
St. Petersburg

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
F. DUPONT MAGILL, President
Dinsmore

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
A. J. RUSTERHOLZ, JR., President
Apopka

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
JOHN MASSEY, President
Pensacola

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Comm:ttee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
JOHN B. SERGEANT, President
Sargeant Dairy Farms, Lakeland
T. G. LEE
1st V. Pres. & Chairman
Distributors' Division, Orlando
JOHN L. McMULLEN
2nd V. Pres. & Chairman
Producers' Division, Clearwater

Additional Producers
JOHN B. SERGEANT, Lakeland
R. L. LUNSFORD, Milton
C. C. SELLERS, Tallahassee
E. F. FROEHLICH, West Palm Beach
Additional Distributors
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida
Dairy Association, 615 Park St., Jack-
sonville, Florida. Subscription price is
$1.00 a year. Entered as second class
mail at the Post Office at Jacksonville,
Fla., under Act of March 3, 1879, as
amended.
Business and Editorial office, 615
Park Street, Jacksonville.

NATIONAL EDITORIAL




THIRD QUARTER, 1958 I







ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:

Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami &
Jacksonville

This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.
Material in this issue Sponsored by
Dairy Council of Hillsborough & Pinellas Counties
MRS. AMERICA ESCUDER, Director

Trimnastic Program For Y-Teens

Is Vacation-Time Project In Tampa

In cooperation with the Tampa YWCA the Dairy Council of Hillsborough
and Pinellas Counties have presented a course in Trimnastics for a group of
thirty Y-Teen girls during the vacation period just past.
The first hour of each two-hour
Tuesday morning period was spent in Dairy C nc Nutritionist
exercises which emphasized posture iry Council Nutritionist
and figure control. During the second Attends 9th International
hour, Mrs. Corinne Cox, assistant di- Home Economics Congress
rector of the Dairy Council, conducted
discussions and illustrated a variety of Mrs. America Escuder, director and
topics including the following: "Im- nutritionist of the Hillsborough
portance and Relationship of Good and Pinellas Dairy Council, was the
Nutrition to Health and Appearance," v only home econo-
"Weight Control," "Good Grooming," mist from Florida
"Check Your Meals" and "Making to attend the 9th
Snacks Count." Mrs. Cox also gave International Con-
Dairy Council materials to the girls gress at the Uni-
for use outside the study period. versity of Mary-
Refreshments were served at the lan d, July 2 8
first and last meeting; when ice cream through August 2.
was served the girls were shown how The International
the size of the serving could be adap- ESCUDER Federation of
ted to all weight-watchers those Home Economics was established in
wishing to gain and those already too 1908 and has its headquarters in Paris,
heavy; when a delicious strawberry France. This is the first Congress to
ice cream milk punch was served, be held in the United States.
leaflets were distributed with recipes In addition to the lectures of nation-
and party menus using different ally known speakers there were small
flavors of milk punch. group workshops. Mrs. Escuder was
to participate in one which dealt with
News Notes From The teaching nutrition to the public as
well as to school pupils.
Jacksonville Dairy Council ____________waso.
One important project of the Dairy products and will be shown the film,
Council of Jacksonville is the distri- "The New Story of Milk." These
bution of our pre-natal and baby-care lunchroom managers are valuable con-
booklets to toy-shops, baby and ma- tacts for they teach nutrition by way
eternity departments or stores. These of the foods they serve; they use our
booklets are also used by health de- colorful posters to brighten their
apartments, hospitals, dieticians and lunchrooms.
nurses, but many more mothers are Members of the Senior Center in
reached through the baby shops. Jacksonville are enjoying our new
Two important school lunch work- leaflet, "Foods I Remember." Histori-
shops will keep us busy in August. cal information about foods is com-
Cafeteria managers will be given up- bined with daily food plan suggestions
to-date facts about milk and dairy using the four basic food groups.


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS

DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street Jacksonville 2
Miss Betty Wilkinson, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa 9
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Corinne Cox, Asst. Dir.

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
2175 S. W. 1st St. Miami 35
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Exec. Director
Miss Marie Willoughby, Asst. Dir.

Mrs. Corinne Cox is
New Assistant Director
Mrs. Corinne Cox has been named
to serve as assistant director of the
Dairy Council of Hillsborough and
4 Pinellas Counties,
replacing Sandra
Casteel who re-
signed to move to
Fort Lauderdale
with her husband.
Mrs. Cox holds a
B.S. degree in
Home Economics
cox from The Univer-
sity of Tennessee and has done gradu-
ate work there and at Columbia Uni-
versity. For eight years she taught
Home Economics in Colorado, Calif-
ornia, Louisiana and in Hillsborough
County. She has also done television
work in a cooking show and cafeteria
management.

Campers, TV and Workshops
Keep Miami Unit Busy
The Dairy Council of Dade, Brow-
ard and Monroe Counties are cooper-
ating with the management of "Lend-
a-Hand" Camp in Homestead by lend-
ing films and booklets which will
build a better understanding of the
importance of milk with children who
need it most.
28,764 booklets were delivered to
the Textbook Department of the Pub-
lic Schools of Miami for distribution to
135 elementary, 37 junior high and 25
high school libraries. Deliveries to
private and parochial schools are un-
der way and Broward and Monroe
(Continued on Page 4)


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS











CONSIGNMENTS TO FLORIDA SALE


ON SEPTEMBER 10 AT THE ORLANDO FAIRGROUNDS


1. DINSMORE MAYROYAL GRACE
Born September 18, 1955
Due September 11, 1958 to
Dinsmore Actor Sovereign
Dam: Dinsmore Conqueror Berline (Below)
13268-612-Sr3-365 "VG"
1st Jr. Yr. Tampa 1952
Gr. Champ. Jacksonville 1955


Dinsmore Conqueror Berline


2. DINSMORE MAYROYAL CONCHETTA
Born January 6, 1953 "VG"
1 1509-484-J r3-365-H IR
Due September 1 3, 1958 to
Dinsmore Master Albert
Dam: Mapleton's Maxim Connie (Below)
14063-654-5yr-365C
Classified EXCELLENT


Mapleton's Maxim Connie


GRACE and CONCHETTA are both sired by FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY who now has over 175 AR daughters with records up
to 18000 # milk and 790 # fat. We believe he has more Very Good & Excellent daughters than any other living Guernsey sire.


3. DINSMORE NOBLE CANDY
Born May 28, 1954
7381 -330-J r2-305-2x-H I R
Due September 14, 1958 to
Dinsmore Master Albert
Sire: Quail Roost Noble Yeoman
Dam: Dinsmore Mayroyal Candy
7158-361-J r3-305C


4. DINSMORE JURY CARMEN
Born July 9, 1951
9488-444-5yr-305C
Due September 20, 1958 to
Foremost J. C.'s Dynamic
Sire: Dinsmore Juryman
Dam: Dinsmore Carmen
6314-317-J r3-305C


WRITE US FOR A CATALOG OF THE SALE


Dinsmore Guernseys


FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790
DINSMORE FARMS


J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman
10 Miles North of Jacksonville
Near U.S. 1


NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
DINSMORE, FLORIDA


V. C. JOHNSON


EARL A. JOHNSON


CHARLES F. JOHNSON


BRADY S. JOHNSTON


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 3









DAIRY NEWS DIGEST I

Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor


Sellers Elected President of
Purebred Dairy Cattle Group
Leon H. Sellers, veteran Guernsey breeder of St. Petersburg, Florida, was
elected president of the Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle Association at the
organization's first Annual Meeting held May 29 in Orlando. Sellers, who is
also president of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club, succeeds Herman Boyd of
Miami, who had served as the first president of the Association.


Other officers elected were: Vice
President, Elbert Cammack, Geneva,
Jersey breeder; Secretary, T. W.
Sparks, Asst. Extension Dairyman,
University of Florida; and Treasurer,
Mrs. C. R. Zimmerman, New Port
Richey, Ayrshire breeder.
The State Purebred Dairy Cattle
Association is made up of the officers
of each of the State dairy cattle breed
organizations. Its purpose is the pro-
motion and betterment of purebred
dairy cattle and of the dairy cattle
business in general. The group voted
a $25.00 membership fee for each of
the breed associations for the 195S-59
year.
Among the activities of the Asso-
ciation adopted for the ensuing year
were: (a) To continue awarding of
certificates to herds meeting an 8000
pound, 4% butterfat corrected milk
average; (b) Participation in sponsor-
ship of a Collegiate Dairy Cattle
Judging Team to represent the Uni-
versity of Florida; (c) Approval of
the state program looking to the
establishment of Florida as a modified
Brucellosis free area.
The Association adopted formal
constitution and by-laws which had
been under consideration for some
time and set the next meeting date
for February, 1959, during the Florida
State Fair in Tampa.
Miami Unit Busy
(Continued from Page 2)
County schools will receive theirs
later.
The Miami Unit has also partici-
pated in the lunchroom workshops for
managers and workers and assisted
with a health project for teachers con-
ducted by the University of Miami.
Also, Dairy Council materials have
had a prominent place on the program
of the educational TV station.


Leon H. Sellers, left, new president of Pure-
bred Dairy Cattle group, and W. Herman
Boyd, immediate past president.


COMING DAIRY EVENTS
August 7 West Florida Dairy Show
(4-H, FFA, and Open Shows with Adult and
Junior Judging Contests), Chipley, Fla.
August 9 Southeast Jersey Cattle Sale,
Athens, Tenn.
August 20-Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Annual Meeting, Jacksonville.
August 21 Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Annual Sale at Duval 4-H Park, Jacksonville.
September 10 State Guernsey Sale,
Orlando.
September 18-State Holstein Sale (should
be verified).
September 20-27 Mid-South National
Junior Dairy Show, Memphis, Tenn.
September 29 National 4-H and Inter-
collegiate Dairy Cattle Judging Contests,
Waterloo, Iowa.
October 6-11 International Dairy Show,
International Amphitheatre, Chicago Stock
Yards.
October 18-21 All American Jersey
Show and Sale, Columbus, Ohio.
October 30-31, Nov. 1 Dairy Plant
Short Course, University of Florida.
November 5-8-Southern Assn. Ice Cream
Mfrs., Americana Hotel, Miami Beach.
November 9-11 Fla. Farm Bureau Fed-
eration Annual Meeting, North Miami Beach.
December 8-13 National Conventions in
Chicago: Milk Industry Foundation-Inter-
national Assn. of Ice Cream Mfrs. Dairy
Supply & Equipment Show.


Florida Milk Production, Month of May
Florida milk production shows a seasonal decline in all areas for which
reports are available since April's peak production.
There are no production records for the Pensacola area since the withdrawal
of the area from jurisdiction of the Florida Milk Commission in May.
Production records for the month of May is shown below for all areas except
Pensacola as to total production and utilization. The Pensacola area has a
production of about 445,000 gallons per month.
Source: Fla. Milk Commission and U. S. Dept. of Agriculture
Area Total Plant Receipts Class I Class II Class III
Northeast Fla. 1,611,571 gallons 1,359,493 201,398 50,680
(84.35%) (12.49%) (3.14%)
Tampa Bay 2,445,926 gallons 2,202,690 204,275 38,961
(90.05%) (8.35%) (1.59%)
Tallahassee 535,266 gallons 447,065 48,748 39,453
(83.52%) (9.11%) (7.37%)
Central Fla. 1,267,473 gallons 1,174,605 85,938 6,930
(92.68%) (6.78%) (.54%)
S. E. Florida Fed- 3,845,626 gallons 3,650,283 195,343
eral Order Area (94.9%) (5.1%)
TOTALS 9,705,862 gallons 8,834,136 735,702 136,024
(91.0%) (7.6%) (1.4%)

*The Miami (Federal Order) area is on a slightly different classification basis. The Pensacola
area is not included in above schedule but has an estimated production of 445,000 gallons
per month.


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






National Convention
Dates Announced
The 1958 Annual Conventions of
the Milk Industry Foundation, the
International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers and the biennial na-
tional dairy supplies and equipment
show are scheduled to be held in
Chicago the week of December 8-13,
1958.
The M.I.F. headquarters will be at
the Hotel Sherman; the I.A.I.C.M.
headquarters, at the Conrad Hilton
Hotel; and the Dairy Equipment Ex-
position at the Navy Pier.
Florida dairymen planning to at-
tend can secure hotel reservation
forms and other details of the con-
ventions from M.I.F. or I.A.I.C.M.
Dairy Supply and Equipment Com-
panies will secure reservation forms
from the Dairy Industry Supply Asso-
ciation, 1145-19th St., N. W., Washing-
ton 6, D. C. D.I.S.A. will also furnish
to dairymen upon request a 12-page
booklet designed to assist prospective
visitors to the huge equipment expo-
sition.
Chicago Dairy Show
Scheduled October 6-11
The Sixth Annual International
Dairy Show has been set for October
6-11, 1958. It will be held in the
International Amphitheatre at the
Chicago Stock Yards.
The junior class in which farm
youths exhibit purebred dairy cattle
of their own raising will be judged
on Tuesday, October 7. All open class
judging of the six dairy breeds will
take place Wednesday through Satur-
day.
The Dairy Cattle Judging Contest
will be held on Monday, October 6.
4-H State Champion Judging Teams
will compete as well as college stu-
dent teams. A contest for college stu-
dents will score them on their know-
ledge of the quality of milk and milk
products.
FREE FILM AVAILABLE ON
FARM MILK LINE CLEANING
Filmed especially for the dairy
farmer and those charged with the
responsibility of quality control in
milk is a 40-minute, 16mm. movie in
color covering the proper washing of
farm milk line systems and bucket
milking machines.
There is no charge for this film
entitled "C.I.P.," which may be ob-
tained for showing simply by con-
tacting Babson Bros. Co., 2843 West
19th St., Chicago 23, Illinois.


m ~in the series of tips
First on milkhouse cleanup




bulk tanks
Your big investment can be protected


Chlorine is often considered the most effective of all bacterial kill-
ing ingredients. However, ordinary sanitizers of this type corrode
stainless steel.
But there is one chlorine type sanitizer you know controls
bacteria and is safe on stainless steel-that's Diversey DIVERSOL CX.
Farmers like yourself have been using DIVERSOL ex for over thirty
years. That's quite a record of safe, effective performance. With
your big investment in a bulk tank it makes good sense to rely on
the sanitizer that has never corroded stainless steel!
And, the DIVERSOL CX paste method is one of the most effective
techniques known for cleaning and sanitizing. A DIVERSOL CX
paste is spread on all inside surfaces of your tank. In seconds
its kill-power goes to work protecting the quality of your milk.

pipelines If the top half of the pipe is filled
with foam from a cleaning solution, only the
bottom half will be cleaned . the result is poor
/ cleaning and high count milk.
Avoid this danger by using Diversey DIOKEM.
This non-foaming, non-filming, hardworking
Solution covers every square inch of pipe,
i giving effective cleaning and sanitizing every
time. DIOKEM'S proven record as a cleaner-
/ sanitizer for pipelines makes it ideal for fast,
sure cleanup.


DIVERSE (
1820 ROSCOE STREET CHICAGO 13, ILLINOIS


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 5
























Pasture Contest Winners with Awards Presented at Annual Banquet of Florida Dairy
Association, June 26; Left to Right: Gerald G. Baumeister, Jersey Jug Dairy, Orlando:
Herman Boyd and Bob Hall of Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami; and Elbert Cammack, Fairglade
Jersey Dairy, Geneva.

Two Central Florida Dairies Win Top Awards
In 1957-58 State Dairy Pasture Contest
First place honors in the Fifth Annual State Dairy Pasture Contest for the
year 1957-58 were won by the Fairglade Jersey Dairy, Geneva (in Sumter
County), for "the best pasture and forage program," and Jersey Jug Dairy,
Orlando, for "the most improvement in pasture program."
Other winners in the "best pasture and forage" division were: Second, Velda
Corporation Dairy, St. Augustine; third, Holly Hill Dairy, Jacksonville. Second
and third place winners in the "most improvement" division were Gore's Dairy,
Zephyrhills, and Henry Raattama Dairy, La Crosse.


Awards and certificates were pre-
sented to the winners during the An-
nual Convention of the Florida Dairy
Association at St. Petersburg Beach,
June 26, by J. R. Henderson, Exten-
sion Agronomist, University of Flor-
ida, who served as Chairman of the
Judging Committee.
The two first place winners receiv-
ed engraved silver milk pitchers from
the Florida Dairy Association and all
State and County winners received
appropriate "Pasture Contest Certi-
ficates" from the University of Florida
Extension Service and the F.D.A. Pas-
ture Committee.
The State winners were selected
from the County winners, who were:
Madison, Hillcrest Dairy, Madison;
Duval, Holly Hill Dairy, Jacksonville;
St. Johns, Velda Corp. Dairy, St. Au-
gustine; Alachua, Henry Raattama
Dairy, La Crosse; Pasco, Gore's Dairy,
Zephyrhills; Lake, Floriland Dairy,
Eustis; Seminole, Fairglade Jersey
Dairy, Geneva; Orange, Jersey Jug
Dairy, Orlando; and Dade, Hall &
Boyd Dairy, Miami.
Since its inception, the contest has
been sponsored by the Florida Dairy
Association and directed by the Agri-


cultural Extension Service of the Uni-
versity of Florida. The main purpose
of the contest has been focusing at-
tention on the value of well-planned
pasture and forage programs and on
methods used by winners in the im-
provement of their individual pro-
grams.
First place winners in previous
years in the "best pasture and forage"
program division were: Hall and Boyd
Dairy, Miami; B. W. Judge and Son,
Orlando; M. A. Schack, Greenwood;
and C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee. Top
places in the "most improvement in
forage program" division were taken
by: Floyd Crawford, Lake City; R.
W. Edwards, Bradenton; Velda Corp.
Dairy, St. Augustine; and Hubert
Logue, Bradenton.
In presenting the awards to this
year's contest winners, Mr. Hender-
son said, "The judging committee feels
that the contests have been well
worthwhile and that considerable im-
provement in pasture and forage pro-
grams on Florida dairy farms has been
a direct result of the interest created
by participation of contestants and the
associated publicity."


4-H and F.F.A. Winners
In Pasture Essay Contest
Tallahassee and West Palm Beach
youths won the 1958 Dairy Pasture
Essay Contests sponsored by the Flor-
ida Dairy Association and the Uni-
versity of Florida Extension Service.
Winners were announced by J. R.
Henderson, U. F. Extension Agrono-
mist and chairman of the Pasture
Contest Judging Committee, during
the recent Annual Convention of the
Florida Dairy Association at St. Peters-
burg Beach.
F.F.A. Essay Winners
Winners in the F.F.A. Pasture Essay
Contest were: 1st, C. C. Sellers, Jr.,
Tallahassee; 2nd, Darrel Hobbs, Pax-
ton Chapter; 3rd, Virgil Crosby, Brad-
enton.
The pasture program of the Sellers'
Dairy won first place for the State in
the 1956-57 "Best Dairy Pasture" divi-
sion of the contest.
4-H Essay Winners
1958 winners in the 4-H Dairy Pas-
ture Essay Contest were: 1st, Graham
Hayes, Palm Beach County; 2nd, Al-
fred Hammond, Orange County; 3rd,
Charles Schack, Jackson County.
Other contestants who won "Honor-
able Mention" were: James Balkcom
of Duval County, Corky Gaines of
Manatee County and Michael Fields
of Sumter County.
Winners in both the 4-H and F.F.A.
groups were awarded cash prizes by
the Florida Dairy Association and all
contestants received appropriate cer-
tificates of recognition from the U. F.
Extension Service. Cash awards were:
1st, $25.00; 2nd, $15.00; and 3rd,
$10.00.
Says Advertising Would
Increase Milk Consumption
A New York state newspaper edi-
torial recently cited a lack of aggres-
sive advertising of fluid milk as part
of the reason for "under consumption."
The editorial suggests that dealers
"should . match farmers' contribu-
tions (for programs promoting the
consumption of fluid milk)." Another
editorial writer wonders why Ameri-
cans do not consume as much milk as
some other nations. Another writer
suggests that a Wisconsin congress-
man's statement may be the reason:
"In the 20th Century we have seen
advertising sales promotion of less
healthful substitutes and soft drinks
out-distance dairy products by as
much as 2,000 percent."


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Improved Feeding of Cows
Increases Milk Production
From a Talk at Univ. of Fla.
1958 Dairy Field Day
By: DR. J. K. LOOSLI, Cornell University
Improved feeding of dairy cows rep-
resents one of the important factors in
bringing about the steadily increasing
level and efficiency of milk produc-
tion. Better management and improv-
ed control of certain diseases have also
played a significant role. For example,
although early treatment of milk fever
was almost always effective in saving
the animals, it seems evident that for
optimum health and lifetime milk pro-
duction it is advisable to prevent the
disease. Feeding massive doses of
vitamin D before calving is reported
to be effective in preventing milk
fever in high producing cows. Ke-
tosis, an important cause of reduced
milk yields during early lactation in
many dairies, was prevented in a re-
cent experiment by feeding sodium
propionate for six weeks following
calving. Although the causes of this
complicated disease are not under-
stood at present, Howell and cowork-
ers at Oregon have recently shown
that copper deficiency may cause
symptoms similar to those seen in ke-
tosis at any stage of lactation.
Value of Urea in Ration
The abundant supply and relatively
low cost of urea places this nitrogen
feed material in competition with the
natural proteins. When urea is add-
ed to concentrates containing cereal
grains and by-products at a level of
1.0 to 1.5% to furnish 2.6 to 3.9% of
protein equivalent the urea contain-
ing feed is approximately equal to
those containing true proteins. Urea
is not always equal to protein feeds
when it is used at higher levels, and
it is never superior. For good utiliza-
tion, urea must be fed in a mixture
containing starch, such as corn. When
fed with only poor quality hay or
dried grass, or even with molasses
and poor roughage, urea is not well
utilized. Recent claims that a liquid
feed containing molasses, urea, alco-
hol and phosphoric acid is superior
to ordinary rations including cotton-
seed meal or soybean oil meal have
not been supported by research re-
sults. The addition of alcohol to the
mixture of molasses and urea improves
its feeding value with poor roughage,
but corn starch or corn meal is fully
equal to the alcohol for this purpose.


A pelleted product containing thy-
roprotein and alfalfa meal is being
widely advertised as a stimulator for
milk production. This material in-
creases the milk produced by most
cows (but not all cows) for a few
weeks after it is added to the ration.
This thyroid-active material increases
the heart rate and the respiration rate
of cows, and requires that extra feed
be given to sustain the increased milk
production. After the product is with-
drawn milk yield falls below the level
of cows not fed the material. Studies
at the U.S.D.A. show that the total
milk produced for the full lactation
is no more when thyroprotein is fed
part of the time than when it is not
used, and that feeding extra concen-
trates without thyroprotein will also
increase milk production. Breed asso-
ciations prohibit the use of the prod-
uct for cows on official test. There is
a possibility that it could be used to
advantage with selected cows, if a
temporary increase in milk was need-
ed for a special market, but its general
use in a breeding herd cannot be
recommended at present.
Better Forage Is Recommended
Claims that live cell yeast and dried
rumen preparations will increase milk
yield are not supported by research
findings. I believe that the best way
for Florida dairymen to increase pro-
duction is to develop a better forage
program.


Distant Requests Received
For Field Day Talks
The 1958 Florida Dairy Field Day
held in April did more than attract
the largest attendance and greatest
interest previously experienced by the
popular University of Florida pro-
gram.
The Florida Dairy News has re-
ceived requests from Sante Fe, New
Mexico and Minneapolis, Minnesota
for copies of talks given by several of
the speakers.

Are You Selfish
With Your Ideas?
If you don't share your best ideas
with those who can make effective
use of them you may be doing your-
self great injury.
One merchant whose business al-
ways remained small boasted that he
concentrated on his own business,
never joined any associations or at-
tended conventions.
"Those other fellows don't get any
of my good ideas," he said firmly.
Another merchant, whose father
started life as a pack peddler, built his
store into a multimillion institution.
"My business never really started to
grow," this man said, "until I began
to go out and exchange ideas with
other merchants." Wright Line


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 7


SANITATION

Famous Alternate Cleaning System

K LEER-MOR ALKALINE CLEANER
FARM QUALITY K LR AMO SAFE
PROGRAM NU-KLEEN ORGANIC ACID CLEANER
KLENZADE X- yiLIQUID SODIUM HYPO-
LENZADE X4 CHLORITE SANITIZER

For Sparkling Lime-Free Milk Equipment
Ask Your Dealer About the KLENZADE Program








ADevelopment of Citrus Pulp And
Its Value as A Dairy Cattle Feed
From an Address at the 1958 Annual Meeting of the
Florida Dairy Asso tation June 26, 1958
By: ALBERT J. SNOOKi JR., President
Florida Citrus Processor3 Association
I would like to tell you a little bit about the relationship between the
Dairy Industry and the Citrus Industry in Florida. Those of us associated with
the Citrus Industry, and particularly those of us in the Citrus Pulp Industry,
are very proud that in the short period of 18 years, the Citrus Processors
Association represents a 13 million dollar Industry.
The Citrus Processors Association had its formal beginning in 1941. How-
ever, the first formal records we have on the use of Citrus Pulp for livestock
feed are mentioned in a University of Florida Bulletin, dated October, 1934,


and it says:
"In 1925, one short feeding trial
was conducted at the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station, using
dried grapefruit refuse supplied from
canning factories by the Florida Citrus
Exchange. The six Jersey cows to
which the product was fed gave in-
creased milk yields from additions of
the dried grapefruit refuse to their
rations.
So, in fact, the beginning of our
Citrus Pulp Industry was 33 years
ago.
Going back beyond 1925, we find
the real beginning of the Citrus Pulp
Industry in that it was the cattle, not
man, that discovered quite by acci-
dent the amazing possibilities of Flor-
ida Citrus Pulp as a nourishing, pro-
ductive feed for cattle. It came about
like this. Florida's citrus canneries are
located at widely scattered points
throughout the citrus growing area.
This area is roughly bounded by lines
across the state at Miami on the south
and Orlando-Ocala on the north -
covering the full width of the penin-
sula.
Now it happened that the same geo-
graphical area offered Florida's best
pasture land, too. So, with Florida's
booming cattle industry spreading all
over our State, it was inevitable that
some of the herds would be grazing
near citrus groves and canning plants.
It was only a matter of time until ob-
servant cattlemen noticed their herds
ate the citrus peel with relish when it
was hauled into the woods or pastures
as a means of disposal. Not only that,
but those herds which regularly ate
the citrus fruit residue developed a
sleek, well-fed appearance. Month by
month they put on more beef than
ever before and the herds were up-
graded in every way.


It was only natural that both citrus
men and cattlemen became vitally
interested and scientists were called
in to study this "miracle." They soon
identified and proved beyond all
doubt the value of citrus pulp as a
cattle feed.
To give you some idea of the growth
and expansion of Citrus Pulp produc-
tion, in 1940-41, the total production
was 32,730 tons. Seventeen years later,
the annual production was ten times
as much, with an annual production
of almost a third of a million tons.
It is not generally known that you
people of the Dairy Industry have
had a great deal to do with the devel-
opment of Florida Citrus Pulp, both
in its present quality and volume. As
you know, other regions of the coun-
try have available from a local source,
a carbohydrate concentrate in pulp
form. Some regions use beet pulp,
others use apple pummice or pulp.
Here in Florida, Citrus Pulp was
available, but needed certain degrees
of refinement. It was not the Citrus
Pulp Industry that established what
Citrus Pulp should be, but rather the
Dairy Industry.
The Dairy Industry of Florida has
been one of our larger markets, and,
at times, one of our most severe critics.
This latter is pointed out with deepest
appreciation, for without the close
cooperation and first-hand informa-
tion from our own Florida Dairymen,
our industry would be in no position
to take on the job of selling Citrus
Pulp in other parts of the United
States in direct competition with other
feed supplements.
The growth of the Dairy Industry
has been sound and steady. And if
we are to believe our various Cham-


How to Prevent Milk
Flavor Defects Resulting
From Bulk Handling
By: HOWARD B. YOUNG
Assistant Extension Dairyman
University of Florida, Gainesville
With the conversion to the bulk
handling of milk, many problems have
been encountered. One of the prob-
lems has been the development of a
flavor defect known as "Rancidity."
Rancidity is probably the most com-
mon flavor defect associated with bulk
handling of milk.
Free fatty acids are liberated from
the butterfat when milk becomes ran-
cid and these fatty acids possess very
potent odors. Rancid milk is bitter
in taste and has a very objectionable
odor. Once milk has developed a ran-
cid flavor, the flavor cannot be re-
moved and also, it is difficult or even
impossible to utilize the milk at all.
The causes and control of rancid
flavor have been studied extensively.
It was found that the problem occur-
red most frequently on farms employ-
ing pipeline milkers. Through re-
search, the principal cause has been
found to be excessive foaming under
certain conditions of air intake and
milk flow in these systems.
Excessive air intake and foam for-
mation may be eliminated by (1) re-
ducing the amount of air admitted at
the milker claw and other points for
the purpose of assisting in moving air
through the lines, (2) keeping all joints
in the pipeline tight, (3) eliminate the
use of risers in pipeline whenever pos-
sible, (4) keeping high and low level
probes in good working condition, and
(5) turning the agitator on in the bulk
tank only after it is covered with milk.
(If further information is desired on
this subject, address your inquiry to
the author.)

bers of Commerce, the population o'
Florida is scheduled for a substantial
increase in the future. This, of course,
means the market for dairy products
increases, and, in turn, the market
for Citrus Pulp increases. In short,
the Dairy Industry and the Citrus
Pulp Industry have been engaged in
a common cause. The Citrus Pulp
Industry is constantly striving to pro-
duce a better product. We feel that
Citrus Pulp has been accepted by the
Florida Dairy Industry to the extent
where it has become a common de-
nominator in every feeding program.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






CORRECTION
The article "Why Use DHIA Rec-
ords" on page 11 of the Second Quar-
ter, 1958 Florida Dairy News showed
C. W. Reaves as the author through
an oversight. The article was by I. F.
Harder, the Jackson County DHIA
Supervisor at Marianna, Florida. Mr.
Reaves informs us that Mr. Harder
was a successful DHIA supervisor in
Wisconsin before accepting the posi-
tion with the Jackson County DHIA
in January, 1958. After coming from
Germany where he had training in
agriculture, Mr. Harder worked for
four years on the famed Pabst Hol-
stein Farm at Oconomowoc, Wiscon-
sin. His training and experience give
excellent background for his DHIA
supervisor position. The article which
appeared in the Florida Dairy News
was prepared by Mr. Harder for the
Wisconsin dairy news letter in the
summer of 1957 and was published in
the Jackson County Floridian in Mari-
anna in January, 1958.
John Ruskin, English essayist (1819-
1900): "No amount of pay ever made
a good soldier, a good teacher, a good
artist, or a good workman."


II


DAIRYMEN..... 0olJen


Opportunity


Here are two wonderful sites for your new dairy, or good locations to
move to:
1. Martin County on U. S. Highway 98, 5 miles
northwest of Indiantown, 2700 acres, high pine
land, unimproved, bordering highway and Sea-
board Railway. Several dairies have been es-
tablished in this area. $200 per acre, terms
available.
2. 1800 acres IMPROVED RANCH, fine new
Ranch home, barn, fenced, part muckland and
part sandland. Just right for a Dairy. Ready
to go. Glades County, near Moore Haven. Near
U. S. Highway 27, good State Highway. Price
reasonable, $400,000, with terms.
CALL FOR APPOINTMENT. WILL SHOW YOU AT YOUR CONVENIENCE
OR, WRITE FOR DETAILS.
THURMOND W. KNIGHT, Broker


355 Evergreen Drive, Phone VI 8-2682
LAKE PARK, FLORIDA


HELP

for every businessman who
wants to build more profits
with Sunshine Service. Ask us!

"Reddy," willing, and able ... that's
Sunshine Service Electricity... in step
with Florida's ever-growing business and
industrial development! Investigate
the many new ways Reddy can help you...
to better business, bigger profits



SFLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 9








JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Jersey Club to Hold Annual Meeting
And Sale In Jacksonville August 20-21

The Florida Jersey Cattle Club will hold its annual business meeting at
1 o'clock on August 20 at the 4-H Club Auditorium in Jacksonville according to
F. DuPont Magill, president. This will be followed at 7:30 P.M. by the
Annual Banquet which will be held at the Seminole Hotel, headquarters for
the two day meet.
On August 21 at 1:00 P.M. the Annual Jersey Club Sale will take place at
the 4-H Club Park. Forty-two animals will be offered to the dairymen of the
state and adjoining areas by Tom McCord, auctioneer. These animals were
selected by a committee which included Woodrow Glenn, DuPont Magill,
Walter Welkener, L. V. Minear and Frank DeBoard, Jr. assisted by C. W.
Reaves and Wilson Sparks, extension dairymen of the University of Florida.
Advance registration and bids may be made with any of the Sales Com-
mittee and Catalogs may be obtained from Woodrow Glenn, secretary of
the Club, whose address is P. 0. Box 530, Marianna, Fla.


All American Jersey Show
And Sale to be Revived

The All American Jersey Show and
Sale, which was immensely popular
during the 1940's, is to be revived at
Columbus, Ohio, during October 18
to 21, 1958. Prizes and awards totaling
$10,880 will be offered to the exhibi-
tors and participants in the various
contests. Trophies conservatively esti-
mated at $25,000 will also be pre-
sented to the winning exhibitors. The
All American Jersey Youth Congress
will be a featured part of the event
and plans are being made to accom-
modate 4-H Club and FFA members
from all parts of the nation, Canada
and possibly other countries.
A carefully selected group of 50 reg-
istered Jerseys from the best herds in
the United States and Canada will
be sold on the evening of October 20.
Included in the many functions
planned for the youth is a judging
contest, fitting contest, showmanship
contest, milkmaid's contest t, calf
scramble and Pot of Gold Jersey Calf
Sale. Winning youth in the calf scram-
ble will receive purchase certificates
worth $2,000 which he may apply to-
ward the purchase price of registered
Jersey heifers selling in the Calf Sale.
J. K. Stuart, Jersey breeder of Stu-
art, Florida, is a member of the eight-
man executive committee in charge of
the show and sale. The general public
is invited to attend.


STUART FAMILY OF BARTOW
TOP BUYERS IN NATIONAL SALE
The J. K. Stuart family of Bartow,
Florida, were the top buyers at the
1st National Heifer Sale at Louisville,
Kentucky, June 3. Thirty-four buyers
from fourteen states purchased the
forty-eight heifers for a total of $24,-
125 and an average of $502 each,
which is believed to be the highest
average ever recorded in a heifer sale.
Mrs. Stuart was the contending bid-
der for the top selling animal but lost
out to a California bidder when the
bid reached $1,250. She went on how-
ever to purchase four others, as fol-
lows: Advancer's Design Mary Ann,
Supreme Fair Lady, Whitehall Com-
mand Lottie and Cableknoll Mistress
Tulip.
Kathie Stuart obtained the second
highest selling heifer, How Blie Ad-
vancer Rosemary, 8 mos. old; her sis-
ter Linda bought the fourth highest,
Advancer Commando Mitzi, a bred
heifer 19 mos. old.

"Jottings" About the
90TH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE CLUB
(From a "Jersey Journal" Breeder's Ad)
KENTUCKY ... the land of fast
horses like Swaps and beautiful wom-
en like the Kentucky Dairy Princess
and the radio star who sang for us
at the "burgoo" picnic . a country-
side of acres and acres of pasture . .


Annual
FLORIDA
JERSEY CATTLE CLUB

SALE

42 Particularly
0 Outstanding Animals
0 That Will Make Money
0 In Either
Purebred Or
0 Commercial Herds


AUGUST 21, 1958
1:00 P.M.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
4-H CLUB PARK


Auctioneer -TOM McCORD
Headquarters:
SEMINOLE HOTEL

Catalogs, Reservations and
Advance Bids Write
WOODROW GLENN, Secretary
Box 530, Marianna, Fla.

Sales Committee:
Woodrow Glenn,
DuPont Magill L. V. Minear
Walter Welkener
Frank DeBord, Jr.


the 17 million dollar fairgrounds
buildings and ball park .. the famous
hospitality with everything done for
us ... State Club President King who
worked in his fields night and day be-
forehand to be on hand for the Con-
vention, taking charge of the arrange-
ments . the many who came as
families . old friends and veteran
breeders, as well as new ones . the
many awards to young people .. club
finances in the black for the first time
in years . the unbeatable team of
Kelly and Cavanaugh and their effi-
cient staff . the heifer sale which
averaged $502 . the friendly fight
between Stuart of Florida and Green-
ough of California which resulted in
$1,250 for the top heifer. Hearty
Thanks for a Grand Good Time.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







NEWS OF S. E. FLORIDA

FEDERAL ORDER AREA


Floyd Luckey, secretary of the Independent Dairy Farmers' Association
(of the Southeast Florida area) which operates under a Federal Milk Market-
ing Order, reports milk production and price trends in that area as follows:

Daily Producer Receipts and Class I Sales
In Southeastern Florida by Months


Milk
Produced


815
838
918
972
1,046

1,087
1,101
1,139
1,111
1,067
990


Other
Source
Milk


(Thousands of pounds)
4.15 78
4.12 119
4.11 55
4.13 46
4.15 18


Total % Milk Pro-
Class I duced Is Of
Sales Class I Sales


880
917
959
1,004
985

1,027
1,053
1,071
1,051
1,013
897


92.6
91.4
95.9
96.8
106.2

105.8
104.6
106.4
105.7
105.3
110.4


June milk production was 115,000 gallons per day as compared to 124,000
gallons per day in May-a drop of 7.2%. During the same period, Class I sales
dropped 11.5%. In June, producer milk contained 3.95% butterfat, an increase
of .04% over May.


Prices For June Deliveries
For milk of 4% butterfat delivered
in June, producers received $6.94 per
hundredweight (59.7 per gallon) for
BASE MILK and $4.39 per hundred-
weight (37.7 per gallon) for EXCESS
MILK. The butterfat differential was
7.50 per point per hundredweight up
or down (11.63 gallons equal one hun-
dredweight).

Future Prices
If Class I sales and production dur-
ing July and August follow the same
seasonal pattern that they did in 1957,
for those months, the Base price
should jump back to $7.00 per hun-
dredweight and the Excess price
should take a substantial increase.

Base Fixing Period
Bases for the Southeastern Florida
market are established August 1st
through January 31st each year. Bases
established during this period become
effective the immediately following
March 1st and continue in effect for
12 months. Producers establish new
bases each year and have the option
of accepting the earned base or 75%


base. New producers receive the Base
price for 75% of their production until
they have established a base.

Producer Bases, June 1958
In June, only 6.6% of all the milk
delivered by producers was excess
milk, as compared to 11.2% in May.
Of the 100 farms in the market, 62
were above their base as compared to
86 in June.


Postage Rates Increased
Effective August 1
Complying with recent congres-
sional legislation granting increases in
postal rates, the U. S. Post Office De-
partment increased postage rates Au-
gust 1.
Rate rises which will most affect
the general public are in first and
third class mail, as follows: First class
letters, 40 an ounce; post and postal
cards, 30 each; airmail (not exceeding
8 ounces) 70 an ounce; air post and
postal cards, 50 each; third class mail,
30 first 2 ounces, 1%3 each additional
ounce. Weight limit for third class
mail is increased up to but not in-
cluding 16 ounces.


Is Poor Pasture-Drainage
Your Problem?
We dig drainage ditches, septic tanks, swim-
ming pools, for water mains, etc.
Truck-mounted HOPTO, faster and more
economical than hand labor.
T. C. MUNDY
Rt. 1, Box 269 Jacksonville, Fla.
Call RA 4-8531 after 6 P.M.




Classified Advertising

RATES FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING 12c PER WORD


FOR SALE


AYRSHIRE CATTLE SALE: 60 head Ayrshires,
mostly fresh or springing. Fairgrounds, Dade
City, Fla., Oct. 29. 29. Catalogs: Bill Carpenter,
Rutherfordton, N. C.


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 11


1957
August
September
October
November
December
1958
January
February
March
April
May
June


AYRSHIRES

DEVELOPED BY THE THRIFTY SCOT
for
E EFFICIENT PRODUCTION
and
PROFITABLE LONG LIVES
FLORIDA Dairymen are finding AYRSHIRES unexcelled for
production of 4% milk and grazing efficiency. Ideally
adopted for Florida dairy operations.
Hardy Ayrshire Calves easiest to raise
FOR LITERATURE OR LIST OF BREEDERS WRITE

AYRSHIRE BREEDERS' ASS'N., Box F, Brandon, Vermont






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Agricultural Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station


Outline Given of Dairy Science Training
Program Offered at University of Florida
From a Talk Given at the F.D.A. Annual Convention
By: DR. E. L. FOUTS, Head, Department Dairy Science
University of Florida, Gainesville

The University of Florida provides educational programs for students
who wish to study any phase of dairying which are equal to the best pre-
sented anywhere. Students may take the conventional dairy husbandry course
with particular emphasis on feeding, breeding and management of dairy
cattle or they may select a course in dairy products processing. This last named
course provides training for students who are interested in processing of milk
and the manufacture of dairy products.
Since students studying in this field
find opportunities in many different lize and develop each individual's
areas of work related to food products special talents.
manufacture, a very flexible program Some scholarship money is avail-
of study is provided. Every student able for good students in this field
takes the required dairy courses, giv- and jobs are available in the dairy
ing them basic knowledge in bacteri- plant and laboratories at the Depart-
ology, chemistry and science neces- ment of Dairy Science.
sary in the manufacture of dairy We are making an effort to provide
products and then in addition they opportunities for many young men
may select any one or more other and women who might not otherwise
fields of interest such as economics, be able to secure a university educa-
sales, business, science, chemistry or tion. The dairy and food industries
bacteriology and take several of these need bright, well trained young men
courses to help prepare them for the in greater numbers than colleges are
work of their choice and to best uti- turning them out.


New Dairy Industry Film Herdsmen's Short Course
Available at U. of Fla. Held at University


A new film entitled, "This Is the
Dairy Industry," has been placed in
the library of the Department of
Dairy Science, University of Florida,
for use in Florida through courtesy
of the Florida Dairy Association and
the Dairy Remembrance Fund (cre-
ated by memorial gifts by dairies and
dairy organizations throughout the
United States).
The film is designed to aid in the
recruitment of qualified young men
and women as dairy science students
as well as to inform any interested
groups of the nature and importance
of the dairy industry.
Those desiring to borrow the film
may address a request to Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Department of Dairy Science,
University of Florida, Gainesville.


Thirty-five men, representing dairy
herds from 15 counties over Florida,
attended the Dairy Herdsmen's Short
Course at the University of Florida
May 27-29 inclusive. Orange County
had five representatives and Putnam
and Okeechobee, four each. Many
phases of "Feeding for Profitable Pro-
duction" were covered by members of
the Agricultural Experiment Station
and Extension Service staffs. Also, Dr.
J. K. Loosli of the Dairy Department
of Cornell University assisted in the
course.
Morning sessions were held in the
Dairy Science Building and the after-
noon sessions at the Dairy Research
Unit. A dutch supper in up-town
(Continued on Next Page)


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1958 Special Events
For the
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
October 30-31
and November 1*
DAIRY PLANT OPERATOR'S
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant managers, sales personnel,
superintendents and assistants, owners,
dairy plant employees, producer-distrib-
utors, equipment and supply dealers;
also sanitation and regulatory personnel.
*Tentative Date

U. of F. Dairy Judging Team
Supported by Allied Trades
The Alligator Club, made up of the
Allied Trades members of the Florida
Dairy Association, voted during the
F.D.A. Annual Meeting in St. Peters-
burg Beach to appropriate $100.00 to-
ward the expenses of a University of
Florida Dairy Judging Team for par-
ticipation in the 1958 national inter-
collegiate dairy judging contest.
The University of Florida has not
previously entered a team in this con-
test due primarily to a lack of expense
funds.



Dairy Plant Short Course
Set for Oct. 30-31 Nov. I
The Department of Dairy Science,
University of Florida, has issued a
special reminder to dairy plant man-
agers and superintendents to plan now
for members of the plant dairy prod-
ucts processing staff to attend the
annual three-day conference and short
course on dairy plant problems.
In addition to two and one-half
days of serious study, this group will
have an opportunity on the third day
(Sat., Nov. 1) to attend the Florida-
Auburn football game. Requests for
football tickets, hotel and motel res-
ervations and other information may
be addressed to Dr. L. E. Mull, Dept.
of Dairy Science, Univ. of Florida,
Gainesville.
The Florida Dairy Association Plant
Operations Committee, headed by
Emmitt Dozier, Velda Dairy, Jack-
sonville, is assisting in the plans for
the Short Course program. Mr. Dozier
and Dr. Mull state that copies of the
program will be furnished all dairy
plants well in advance of the Short
Course date.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Causes of Subnormal Butterfat Condition

And Suggestions for Its Correction
From Talks at 1958 Annual
Florida Dairy Field Day
By: DR. R. B. DECKER and WALTER A. KRIENKE
University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The problems of subnormal butterfat and of low solids-not-fat are being
dealt with by the staff of the Department of Dairy Science in cooperation
with the Agricultural Extension Service, the Chief Dairy Supervisor of the
State Department of Agriculture and several cooperating dairymen. These
problems are separate as to causes and are entirely independent of each
other, although they can occur at the same time in milk of a single cow or
of a herd.
In 1893, L. L. Van Slyke of the New dividuals within a breed, than exist
York (Geneva) Experiment Station was between the average composition of
cooperating with 48 cheese factories, milk from different breeds. The aver-
studying milk composition with rela- age compositions of milk samples ana-
tion to yies of c D d1- age compositions of milk samples ana-
tion to yields of cheese. Drouth dur- .l f
g o s lyzed in Florida from selected herds
ing two summer months decreased in 1955 to 1957 are below.
casein content of the milk and conse-
quently lowered the cheese produced Subnormal Butterfat
Relatively little connected informa-
per 100 pounds of milk. The condition tion was available on subnormal but-
corrected itself when pastures again
became more adequate. Two years ter fat percentage when Dr. E. L.
cate, m.re. Ba e Twa yi s Fouts was called to observe the milk-
later, S. M. Babcock was analyzing
ater, S. Babc ws a i ing of 45 registered Jerseys. The local
milk delivered by 55 patrons to the ing of 45 resisted added waterrseys. The local
University of Wisconsin creamery. inspe r s pect a w
University o W sont cr peri sample of mixed milk from these cows
During a two-month drouth period had a lower percentage of butterfat
milk delivered by some patrons de- than ordinarily is expected in milk
creased substantially in solids-not-fat from Holstein herds. Some timothy
content while other milk did not. He hay was on hand, which the dairymen
c d f n p s ad hay was on hand, which the dairymen
compared feeding practices, and fed to the Jerseys as Dr. Fouts sug-
found that farmers were feeding no gested. The butterfat tests began
grain to the herds that were producing gradually to return toward normal.
the milk low in solids-not-fat. Where A survey was made of feeding prac-
the cows were receiving grain to sup- tices in herds with subnormal butter-
plement the very short pasture, the fat percentages and of normal herds.
percentage of solids-not-fat remained Milk inspectors, feed dealers, dairy-
normal. men and the Assistant County Agent
Both Van Slyke and Babcock at- cooperated with station workers. One
tribute the drop in solids-not-fat difference became apparent-that in-
(especially the casein portion) to un- sufficient long leafy forage was avail-
derfeeding of cows during the drouth able to herds involved in subnormal
periods. butterfat tests. In another year many
Heredity is a factor limiting the pastures were under water due to
composition of milk. Significant differ- heavy rainfalls. Some low butterfat
ences occur in butterfat and other tests accompanied this period of in-
solids between breeds. The variations sufficient pasturage. Later, five suc-
are wider in milk from different in- cessive killing frosts were followed


Predominating Selected Samples of Averages
Breed Herds Mixed Milk Butterfat Solids-Not-Fat

Guernsey 14 377 4.64% 9.05%
Holstein 10 389 3.82% 8.65%
Jersey 8 143 4.81% 9.15%
Mixed Breeds 6 351 4.29% 8.82%

As an example of variations, the DHIA records of one herd of registered Jerseys m
Florida averaged 5.40% butterfat over several years.


Identical Twin Calves
Wanted
Seek Identical Twin Calves for
Study at Experiment Stations
Identical twin calves are being
sought by the Department of Veterin-
ary Science of the Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station, Gainesville,
for use in research.
Dr. W. R. Pritchard, head of the
department, says any cattleman or
farmer within a 250-mile radius of
Gainesville who has twin calves sus-
pected of being identical twins should
notify him at once if he will sell them.
He stresses the importance of getting
the calves to Gainesville within three
or four days of birth so they can be
reared free of parasites.
Either purebred or grade animals
are acceptable, as are any breeds, al-
though dairy breeds are preferred.
A fair price will be paid for the
animals. No particular individual will
gain as a result of their purchase, as
the project in which the calves are
used will be of benefit to all livestock
men.

by rainfall that leached the dead
grasses. Milk from cows on one pas-
ture soon decreased in butterfat tests.
Addition of some baled hay corrected
the condition in about two weeks.
Soon after the Dairy Research Unit
at the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station was established, con-
trolled feeding trials were begun to
explore fully causes and methods of
correcting low fat conditions. Experi-
mental rations were patterned after
those observed in the earlier surveys.
(To be continued in next issue on "Causes
of Low Solids-Not-Fat")

Herdsmen's Short Course
(Continued from Page 12)
Gainesville on Wednesday evening
was held with a short talk on the
Guernsey Cattle and Guernsey Milk
Programs by J. McK. Jeter, Golden
Guernsey representative in Florida,
after which slides were shown on the
1952 Florida 4-H Dairy Cattle Judg-
ing Team's trip to the British Royal
Agricultural Show and to the native
provinces of the Ayrshire, Jersey,
Guernsey and Holstein-Friesian breeds
in Europe by C. W. Reaves, Extension
Dairyman, and Steve Simmons, mem-
ber of the Champion team.
On the last day suggestions for top-
ics for inclusion in next year's Short
Course were discussed.


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 13







STATE 4-H DAIRY CATTLE JUDGING TEAM SELECTED
FROM NASSAU, DUVAL, VOLUSIA AND DADE COUNTIES

Winners of the coveted place as members of the Florida State 4-H Dairy
Cattle Judging Team for 1958 are: Tommy Prator, Nassau County; Albert
Magill, Duval County; Jackie Wilson, Volusia County and Ben Franklin,
Dade County. These 4-H'ers will represent Florida in the National 4-H Dairy
Cattle Judging Contest to be held in connection with the National Dairy
Cattle Congress at Waterloo, Iowa, September 29. They won a coveted place
on the judging team during a final contest held the week of June 9 during
the 4-H Short Courses.
The contest was held in Jacksonville on the farms of Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Welkener and Dinsmore Dairy Farms. It was an all day affair in which mem-
bers judged classes of heifers and cows and gave written and oral reasons
on four of the classes. Rules and procedures for this contest was the same


as for the National Contest.
The 4-H'ers spent a full day of
judging and giving reasons. To give
reasons on a class of dairy cattle the
youngster must remember the ani-
mals and be able to tell why he placed
one animal over the other without
looking at notes. The contestants must
not only be good in their knowledge
of good dairy type, but have the
ability to correctly evaluate the strong
and weak points of each animal. They
must also be able to present the rea-
sons clearly with logical explanations
for their decisions. The pressure of
remembering the animals, to think on
one's feet and clearly express the
points on which the decisions were
made is not an easy task.
Additional training will be given
the team members by their agents and
by T. W. Sparks, Assistant Extension
Dairyman, who will coach the team
for the national contest.
Plans are being made to leave Flor-
ida several days before the national
contest for practice judging at the
Mid-South Fair in Memphis, Tennes-
see and for other practice sessions at
well-known herds to be visited en-
route to Waterloo.
Other contestants who were in the
top 14 of all the 4-H members in the
state were: Tommy Gomber, Sarasota
County; David Harrell, Duval County:
Gail Williams, Polk County; Charles
Chason, Duval County; Jeanette
Foote, Orange County; Graham
Hayes, Palm Beach County; Paul
Dixon, Marion County; Johnny Kay-
lor, Polk County; Willis Tate, Jr.,
Sumter County.
The team members were presented
beautiful 4-H jackets which had the
inscription "1958 Florida 4-H Dairy
Cattle Judging Team" and were do-
nated by the Florida Power Corpora-


tion of St. Petersburg.
Sponsors for the teams trips to the
national contest have been the Flor-
ida Dairy Association, the Florida
Jersey and Guernsey Cattle Clubs,
the Florida Times-Union and the
State Department of Agriculture.


COVER PICTURE
State 4-H Dairy Judging Team
Pictured on the front cover
with T. Wilson Sparks, (left) of
the University of Florida Agri-
cultural Extension Division, are
the winners of the recent state-
wide finals in dairy judging for
4-H Club members. Kneeling,
and admiring the best Guernsey
animal in the judging contest,
Dinsmore Mayroyal Vena, is
Tommy Prator, Nassau County,
first place winner. The others,
from left, are Ben Franklin, Jr.,
Jackie Wilson and Albert Magill.

Milk Dating
Recent newspaper editorial com-
ment in Louisville, Minneapolis, Rich-
mond and New York City was favor-
able toward the elimination of milk-
dating laws.


Baldwin Dairy Farms of Pensacola observed June Dairy Month with a "Sell-A-Bration"
featuring white Bermudas and straw hats with red "June Dairy Month" identifactors for
route men as shown above.
In the lower picture, Nemo, the Baldwin Dairy clown, is helping to pep up the
"Milktail Party staged for the convention of Nutrilite delegates held in Pensacola.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS

OFFICIAL PRODUCTION RECORDS
The official production records received since the last issue of this publi-
cation were those for three cows belonging to Carroll L. Ward, Jr., of
Goldenrod, Florida. Their records were:
Wardhaven Hazel Liza Jane, 13,216 pounds of milk and 615 pounds of
fat as a junior four-year-old milked twice daily for 365 days.
Lay Laine Virginian's Mamie, 8,308 pounds of milk and 494 pounds of
fat as a senior two-year-old milked twice daily for 305 days.
Meadow Lodge Trarsusa, 8,644 pounds of milk and 491 pounds of fat,
as a junior two-year-old milked twice daily for 305 days.
The records of two cows belonging to Boutwell-Matheson, Inc., Stuart,
are:
Oakhurst Princess Gladis, 12,981 pounds of milk and 542 pounds of fat
as a ten-year-old milked three times daily for 305 days.
Oakhurst Kings Lucy, 10,769 pounds of milk and 501 pounds of fat as a
six-year-old milked three times daily for 305 days.


Six Purchases Of
Registered Guernsey Bulls
J. T. Stewart, Delray Beach, has
purchased Jenwell Valiant Star from
Boutwell's Dairy, Inc., Lake Worth.
The dam is Pennbrook Walcott's Be-
linda and the sire, Klondike Premost
Valiant.
Mr. Stewart has also bought Jen-


well Glamour from H. D. Perry, Hol-
lywood. The dam is Lanandy Lincoln
Louise and the sire, Dinsmore Glam-
our.
Hunt's Dairy Farm, Inc., Loxahat-
chie, has recently purchased three
registered Guernsey bulls from Bout-
well-Matheson, Inc., Stuart. They are:
Bomaje Champion whose dam is
Langcroft Caroline's Mary Lee and


Buy's


Norman Myrick, editor of the American
Milk Review, New York, congratulates Ida
Schmid of Tallevast, Florida on her new
position with Golden Guernsey, Inc., the
educational and sales program of the Amer-
ican Guernsey Cattle Club. Ida's father,
Walter Schmid, veteran Guernsey breeder
and dairyman of Florida, looks on. The
occasion was during the Annual Convention
of F.D.A. in St. Petersburg Beach.
sire, Jenwell Merry Lad; Bomaje
Gabriel whose dam is Delwake Gab's
Pandora and sire, Wyebrook Impe-
rial; and Torrid Fond Hope whose
dam is Oakhurst Princess Gladia and
sire, Oakhurst Eastern Duke.
L. Eugene Webster, St. Petersburg,
has purchased Donegan Farm's Mis-
ter's Count from C. E. Donegan, Lar-
go. The dam is Dangra's Forsyte Con-
tessa and the sire, Western Glow C. F.
Mister.


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 15


20th Annual Consignment Sale


FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB

September 10, 1958 1:00 P.M.


12 FRESH OR SPRINGING COWS
36 CLOSE-UP BRED HEIFERS

All Vaccinated

From well-known Guernsey herds of Florida,
North Carolina and South Carolina



Sales Headquarters: GIFFORD ARMS MOTEL
Near Fair Grounds . Make Reservations Early


For Catalogs, Write: JOHN CONE, P.O. Box 1551, Plant City, Fla.


."Q








HOLSTEIN CATTLE CLUB NEWS



Florida Holsteins Set New Records
A registered Holstein cow owned by the Florida Agricultural Experi-
ment Station of Gainesville has shattered an all-time Florida production
record on Advanced Registry Test. Hickoryvale Admiral Lana 3705298 VG
totalled 13,959 lbs. of milk and 505 lbs. of butterfat in 305 days, 263 days of
which she was in calf. This sets a new high in "butterfat" for Fla. Jr. 4-year-
olds milked two times daily in the Ten-Months' Division of the AR Program.
"Lana" is one of several Maryland Holsteins which provided the foundation
of the Herd at the Experiment Station in 1955. She was bred by Page I. Ifert,
Middletown, Maryland and is the daughter of Helengeorge Master Admiral-
A Gold Medal Sire.
Another cow owned by the Experiment Station, Gaymont Admiral Julia,
has also completed a testing period starting at the age of two years and 11
months and milked twice daily for 305 days. She produced 15,248 lbs. of
milk and 613 lbs. of butterfat on the Advanced Registry Test.
A registered Holstein cow owned by A. J. Rusterholz, Jr., Apopka, has
established a new high for mature Holsteins milked twice daily in the Herd
Improvement Registry test. Linda Sunny Glen Supreme 3849792 produced
18,067 lbs. of milk and 636 lbs. of butterfat in her 365-day production period.
She was bred in Finch, Ontario, Canada and is the daughter of Goodyear
Illmeracme Supreme 173636 CHB.
The Herd Improvement Registry Program, commonly referred to as HIR,
has been in continuous operation since 1928. It provides individual lactation
and lifetime records on every cow in participating registered Holstein herds.



A Decade of Progress

In Florida Milk Production
Data presented by C. W. REAVES, Florida State Extension Dairyman, at the Florida Dairy
Association Annual Meeting, St. Petersburg, Florida, June 25-27, 1958

% Increase
1946 1956 (1) In Ten Years
Number Milk Cows 127,000 188,000 48
Milk Production Per Cow, Lbs. 3,820 5,250 37*
Total Milk Production, Lbs. 485,000,000 987,000,000 1030
Gross Farm Income From Milk $29,566,000 $67,472,000 128
Number Cows on DHIA Test 1,200 15,616 1202
Number Cows Artificially Bred .... 38,911 ?
Per Cent of Total Feed From
Pasture & Forage 15 to 18 25 to 30
Florida Ranked First Among the 48 States for the Ten-Year Period In:
Per Cent Increase in Production per Cow
Per Cent Increase in Total Production


FLORIDA MILK PRODUCTION 1957 COMPARED TO 1956
% Increase
1957 (2) 1957 Over 1956
Number Milk Cows 205,000 9
Milk Production per Cow, Lbs. 5,370 2.3
Total Milk Production, Lbs. 1,101,000,000 11
Gross Farm Income From Milk $77,059,000 14
Number Cows on DHIA Test 17,991 15
Number Cows Artificially Bred 51,095 31
(1) Data for 1956 are the preliminary data published in April 1957.
(2) Data for 1957 are the preliminary data published in April 1958.
All above data are from published U. S. Agricultural Marketing Service Reports, except the DHIA
and Artificial Breeding data are from the Dairy Office of the Agricultural Extension Service.


Discount In Registration Fees
Voted for Members of State Groups
One of the actions of the 73rd An-
nual Convention of the Holstein-Frie-
sian Association of America in June
was the adoption of a new schedule
of fees for the registration and trans-
fer of purebred Holstein cattle. This
new schedule becomes effective No-
vember 1, 1958 and increases the pen-
alty for tardy filing of applications
for both registry and transfer.
The plan includes a discount for
Holstein breeders holding member-
ship in one of the 48 state Holstein
organizations as well as the National
Association who register calves at
early ages. Formerly the dual mem-
bership discount was applied only to
transfer fees. Since animals registered
greatly outnumbered those transfer-
red, the change is expected to attract
many new members to the state
groups.

American Holstein Cows
Are Thriving in Israel
The Holstein cow is milking her
way to new popularity in Israel ac-
cording to Dr. Solomon Bloom of the
Agricultural Research Station at Re-
hovot. Dr. Bloom in a recent report
points out that dairying is on the
upswing throughout Israel and Hol-
steins have become the "breed of
choice" in Israel's semi-tropical con-
ditions. Herds are thriving from the
Galilee down to the Southern desert
where the biblical Abraham tended
his flocks, land which had produced
almost nothing for 2000 years.
Holsteins, many of them descend-
ants of animals imported from this
country, are playing a major role in
the development of this new dairy
area with some of the black and white
herds averaging well over 12,000 lbs.
of milk per cow per year.

AN INVESTMENT IN FREEDOM
One of the most precious Ameri-
can Heritages is the right to worship
as you please. But protecting our
American heritages costs money-be-
cause peace costs money.
It takes money for strength to keep
the peace. Money for science and edu-
cation to help make peace lasting.
And money saved by individuals.
Your Savings Bonds, as a direct in-
vestment in your country, make you
a Partner in strengthening America's
Peace Power.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








41 Areas Report Milk Prices As High

Or Higher Than Florida's Price of 27c
(Many with Less Cream Content than Florida Milk)
July milk price reports of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and other
sources as shown on the accompanying table disclose that the retail price of
pasteurized home-delivered milk in 41 cities was as high or higher than the
270 price which prevails in most of Florida.


Twenty-three cities had a price
ranging from 3 to 43 a quart higher
than the Florida prevailing price of
270.
The average price for Florida of
27.50 compares favorably with the
27.10 average for the 70 cities of
other states included in the table.
Florida's average milk price of 27.50 a
quart for the month of July remained
the same as compared to May as also
did the Class I farm price of milk.
In contrast to this, however, the farm
price of milk in about 160 markets in
early July averaged 180 per hundred-
weight above the June farm price.
This is the equivalent to an increase of
approximately 1%0 per gallon to the
farmer.
Quality and Cream Content Compared
While the price of a quart of milk
is usually the first consideration of the
consumer, it's just as important that
the quality and cream content of the
milk be compared. Florida milk,
which in most areas tests 4% or higher
in cream, is too often compared in
price only with milk which contains
only from 3.2% to 3.8% cream, and, in
some instances, Florida's 100% Grade
A milk is compared in price with
Grade B milk.
Of the 70 cities with prices and
cream content reported in the accom-
panying table, 33 have milk with less
than 4% cream content.
The average cream test of sales of
all items for 39 Federal Order mar-
kets was 3.75% in May 1958 as com-
pared with 3.79% in May 1957.
The average cream test of receipts
from dairy farms in 64 Federal Order
markets during May was 3.66% as com-
pared with 3.70% in May a year ago
and 3.70% in April.


MILK PRICE COMPARISONS
FOR MONTH OF JULY, 1958

(Standard Creamline Pasteurized Milk)

CREAM *PRICE
CITY % PER QT.

FLORIDA-6 Areas
Tampa 4.0 27c
Ft. Myers -- 28
Jacksonville 4.0 29
Orlando --- 27
Miami 4.01 27
Pensacola --- 27

(Fla. Average-2732 Cents)

OTHER STATES-70 Areas


Augusta, Me.
Portland, Me.
Concord, N. H.
Portsmouth, N. H.
Boston, Mass
Fall River, Mass
Lowell, Mass.
Springfield, Mass.
Worcester, Mass.
Providence, R. I.
Hartford, Conn.
New Haven, Conn.
Albany, N. Y.
Binghamton, N. Y.
Buffalo, N. Y.
New York City
Rochester, N. Y.
Schenectady, N. Y.
Syracuse, N. Y.
Elmira, N. Y.
Niagara Falls N. Y.
White Plains, N. Y.
Yonkers, N. Y.
Atlantic City, N. J.
Camden, N. J.
Trenton, N. J.
Northeastern, N. J.
Philadelphia, Pa.
Pittsburgh, Pa.
Scranton, Pa.
Gary, Ind.
Cleveland, Ohio
Cincinnati, Ohio
Chicago, Ill.
Wilmington, Del.
Duluth, Minn.
St. Louis, Mo.
Baltimore, Md.
Washington, D. C.
Alexandria, Va.
Norfolk, Va.
Richmond, Va.
Wheeling, W. Va.
Asheville, N. C.


3.7

3.6


-__ **26
--- **27
-_-- **26
--- **26
3.7 **27
3.7 **27
-3.8 **26
-__ **29
6-3.7 "*27%
3.7 **27
3.8 27%
3.7 283
'1 a C)s


CREAM *PRICE
% PER QT.


CITY


Charlotte, N. C. 3.8-4.1 27
Durham, N. C. -- 26
Charleston, S. C. 4.0 26
Columbia, S. C. 4.0 26
Greenville, S. C. 4.0 26
Atlanta, Ga. 4.0 26
Augusta, Ga. 4.0 26
Columbus, Ga. 4.0 26
Macon, Ga. 4.0 26
Savannah, Ga. 4.0 27
Louisville, Ky. 3.7 26
Mobile, Ala. 3.5-4.0 26
Jackson, Miss. 4.0 27
Little Rock, Ark. 3.53 26
Shreveport, La. -- 27
Baton Rouge, La. 3.8-4.0 26
New Orleans, La. 3.95 26
Oklahoma City, Okla. 3.6 27
Austin, Texas 3.7 26
El Paso, Texas 3.5 26
Galveston, Texas 4.0 28
Houston, Texas 4.0 28
Dallas, Texas 4.0 26
Albuquerque, N. M. 3.5 27
Los Angeles, Calif. -- 27
San Francisco, Calif. 3.55 $26
Average of 70 cities outside Florida .. 27.10
Florida average ............................... 27.50
* Prices are for Standard Pasteurized Milk for
Area from U.S.D.A. July 17, 1958 Report, Table
No. 1, unless otherwise indicated and except for
Orlando, Ft. Myers and Pensacola, Fla., which
are not reported by U.S.D.A.
t Price of "High Fat" Milk from U.S.D.A. July
17 Milk Price Report, Table No. 6, believed to
be comparable to Florida "Grade A" 4% to
4.5% butterfat milk.
Price of Standard Milk reported by N. Y. Dept.
of Agriculture, April 16, 1958.
o Price per single quart with discount on all over
first quart.
**Price of Standard Pasteurized Milk in markets
having price changes between June and July
1958, from U.S.D.A. July 17, 1958 Report, Table
No. 5.


3.6-3.8 **29 Remarkable That Milk Price
3.6-3.7 t31 Is As Low As It Is
___ *030% A ruling by the U. S. Supreme Court
3.6 27 that found a Kansas dairy to be en-
3.7 **28 gaged in interstate commerce because
3.7 0*28 it spent about $100 a month for out-of-
--- 28 state supplies caused one editor to

--- 29 comment that "just about every busi-
--- 29 ness in the U. S., no matter how small
3.65 *030 or how local in nature, will be inter-
3.9 *0273 state commerce." Referring to a local
3.6-3.8 "027 teamster union dispute over working
__ **28 conditions for milk deliverymen, a
3.5 26 Wichita editor pointed out that "un-
3.7 26 necessary" demands by unions cause
--- *28% higher milk prices for the consumer.
-- t27 "In view of the situation," he declared,
3.5 26 "the remarkable thing seems to be
3.5 29e.'
3.7 *027 that milk is as low as it is."
3.5 2731
-- 27 Milk Wars
3.7 27 A recent Missouri newspaper edit-
4.0 26 orial urged that a law be passed by
4.0 26 Congress "to halt, quickly and deci-
4.0 26
3.7 26% sively, trade practices (such as price
3.5 26 wars) so clearly inimical to business
4.1-4.2 27 competition and to consumers."


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 17




































F.D.A. MEMBERS PROPOSE REORGANIZATION PLANS

AT GROUP'S 12th AND LARGEST CONVENTION


Study of Dairy Problems and Planning for Progress
Receive Major Consideration at Annual Meeting
The Florida Dairy Association's 1958 Annual Meeting and Convention,
held June 24-27 at St. Petersburg Beach, was acclaimed the largest, one of the
best and one of the most enjoyable of the many such sessions which the organ-
ization has held since its first in 1947.
The Southern Dairy Products Journal, which had a special representative
at the convention, concluded an eight page story in its August issue about the
meeting (including numerous pictures) with the remark, "It was the greatest."
A representative of "Golden Guernsey, Inc.," national Guernsey organiza-
tion, who attended said in a letter, "The convention was a gigantic event. I
enjoyed the excellent information provided by the featured speakers."
One of the convention guest speak-
ers, a national dairy authority on his program and there was a good spirit
first visit to Florida, has written the of open discussion on the part of all
F.D.A.: "It was a most enjoyable those present."
and instructive experience. I enjoyed Still another has written the Asso-
becoming better acquainted with the ciation . "While I have attended a
dairy industry of Florida which, in number of the Annual Meetings of
many respects, has been setting the the Florida Dairy Association, none
pace for the nation." was so enjoyable as the current one."
One of Florida's own best known A Hot Convention
dairy leaders, particularly among pro- While we feel sure all those who
ducers, wrote the F.D.A. following the attended will remember their stay at
Convention: "I think the Florida St. Petersburg Beach and the events
Dairy Association does a remarkable of the F.D.A. Convention Program as
job in arranging and handling its a most enjoyable occasion, we are
Annual Meetings. This year's conven- certain many will label some of it
tion was excellent from the stand- as "a hot time." This was on account
point of both the attendance and the (Continued on Next Page)


PICTURES ABOVE tell the story of the
1958 Annual Meeting and Convention -
TOP ROW, left to right: Part of the regis-
tration desks and staff; F.D.A. President
John Sargeant presides; Speakers' table and
portion of men's group at a luncheon ses-
sion.
SECOND ROW: Gordon Ellis, Nassau
County Farm Agent; Mrs. John Hood;
Tommy Prator, 4-H State Dairy Judging
Champion. Guest Speakers: Norman Myrick,
Editor, American Milk Review; Dick Wer-
ner, Milk Industry Foundation; Clayton
Rand, Mississippi, author and newspaper
editor; and Russell Wilhelm, Toledo. Wel-
coming speaker Charles Ankerberg, Fore-
most Dairies, St. Petersburg. Pat Chism,
Southern Dairy Products Journal represen-
tative.
BOTTOM ROW: Dr. Fouts, University
of Florida, presents membership emblems
for "F.D.A. Order of Bell Cows" to Andy
Lay, Dick Werner, Herman Boyd and Bill
Graham; F.D.A. Presidents for 1957 T. G.
Lee, Mrs. Brady Johnston and John W.
Manning receive president's gavels; Brady
Johnston and Mrs. Johnston show the con-
vention golf trophy which Brady won; and
Bill Decklar presenting golf trophies to Tom
Powers and Art Boutwell.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS











of room air-conditioners getting out
of order and the inadequate air-con-
ditioning in the banquet rooms. How-
ever, for most of us, the clever enter-
tainers and the ready wit and humor
of that great Mississippian, Clayton
Rand, with the help of a few fans,
made a couple of "hot" evenings most
enjoyable events.
A Timely and Helpful Program
The Convention Program Commit-
tee, consisting of the President, the
Producer and Distributor Vice Presi-
dents, the Allied Trades President,
the Ladies' Auxiliary President and
the Executive Secretary, planned from
the beginning that the program should
be the best possible and should in-
clude speakers well qualified to give
timely information and advice to the
Florida dairy industry.
The Committee was most fortunate
in being able to carry out these goals
for the convention program.
National Dairy Leaders Speak
Representing the industry nation-
ally were the nation's top leaders in
milk and ice cream distribution-Dick
Werner of the Milk Industry Founda-
tion and Bob North of the Interna-
tional Association of Ice Cream Manu-
facturers. These two speakers, to-
gether with Norman Myrick of New
York and editor of the American
Milk Review magazine, were able to
furnish Florida dairymen an up-to-
date report and analysis of today's
conditions, progress and trends and
needs in the American dairy industry.
Four other out-of-state speakers-
Clayton Rand of Mississippi, Russ
Wilhelm of Toledo, N. D. Smithson
of Atlanta, and George Neely of Phila-
delphia-contributed expert informa-
tion on the important subjects of
"public relations" and of "proper pack-
aging of milk and dairy products."
Florida's Top Dairy Leaders
The Florida Dairy Association for
many years has considered those who
educate and train, supervise, inspect
and regulate the industry as Advisory
Members of the Dairy Association.
These who are so closely associated
with the industry are always invited
and accorded full membership privi-
leges at the meetings and conventions
of the Florida Dairy Association.
Many of this group including the out-
standing leaders attended the 1958
convention and a number of them


were on the official program.
Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the Uni-
versity of Florida Department of
Dairy Science, and Walter Krienke
of his staff; C. W. Reaves, State Ex-
tension Dairyman, and his assistant,
Howard Young; Dr. Ralph Eastwood,
Extension Specialist in Marketing;
and Dr. Ouida Abbott, recently re-
tired head of the University Depart-
ment of Home Economics Research,
contributed much to interest and prac-
tical value of the program.
Col. Dexter Lowry, administrator
of the Florida Milk Commission, con-
tributed timely information concern-
ing the Commission's program.
Gordon Ellis (Nassau County
Agent) and Tommy Prator were able
to inform dairymen of the value and
importance of the State 4-H Dairy
Shows and the 4-H Dairy Judging
Contests. Tommy Prator recently won
first place in Florida 4-H dairy cattle
judging and was named one of the
four members of the State 4-H Team
which will compete in national judg-
ing contests at Waterloo, Iowa in
September.
Other Important Speakers
Honorable Doyle E. Conner, 1957
Speaker of the House of the Florida
Legislature, was well received in his
dinner address on "The Bright Future
of Florida Agriculture" and Mrs. John
Hood of Hood's Dairy, Bradenton,
with her panel of newspaper men put
on one of the best panel discussions
on "public relations" ever to appear
on a dairy meeting program.
In addition to their worthwhile
business programs, Florida dairy con-
ventions have become well known for
good fellowship and good times and
interesting recreational features. Much
of the credit for this important part
of this year's convention goes to
F.D.A.'s permanent "Master of Cere-
monies," singing and contests, Jack
Dew of Southern Dairies, Jackson-
ville; the Sergeant-at-Arms and dis-
penser of attendance prizes, Jim Jen-
nings; and the officers and members
of the Alligator Club who provided
liberally of their money and their per-
sonal efforts toward the entertainment,
fellowship and recreational features
of the convention.
Recreational Activities
The wonderful opportunity for re-


1958 Dairy Convention
(Continued from Page 18)


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 19


creation afforded by the convention's
site directly on a beautiful stretch of
Florida's West Coast beach with
swimming pools, fishing, boating, ski-
ing and golfing facilities nearby in
abundance and perfection attracted
the greatest participation and enjoy-
ment of this important side of the
convention in the history of Florida
dairy meetings.
Association officials noted with
satisfaction that several members and
their families arrived days early and
stayed over extra days, making the
convention an opportunity for a pleas-
ant family vacation.
The sightseeing attractions of the
West Coast area led one group over
the Sky-Way bridge across Tampa
Bay and all the way to Sarasota fol-
lowing a tour of the sights of the
beaches.
Special Ladies' Activities
The Ladies' Auxiliary of F.D.A. en-
joyed both a record attendance and
one of their finest programs at the
1958 convention. Mrs. Kathryn Casey,
President, with the splendid help of
her local arrangements committee and
Mrs. Marjorie Lay, Secretary, provid-
ed the over 100 ladies with a most
enjoyable and entertaining program.
The program included a "Get Ac-
quainted" Party during the afternoon
of the first day. On the second day
there was a special Ladies' Auxiliary
luncheon, the finest we have ever seen,
which provided a guest speaker on
"nutrition"-Dr. Ouida Abbott of the
University of Florida; a fashion show;
and prizes and favors for all those
present.
Mrs. Jessie Johnson of Tampa, a
past president of the Auxiliary, was
roundly applauded by the group for
the unusual job she did in securing
many of the prizes for the occasion.
Convention Queen Selected
One of the surprises in connection
with the record family attendance at
the convention was the discovery that
13 teenage daughters of members
were adorning the lobbies and meet-
ing rooms as well as the swimming
pools. This led the convention com-
mittee to plan a Convention and Dairy
Month Queen Contest among this
group as a part of the Annual Banquet
program.
Linda Casey, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Wilbur Casey of Clearwater, was
named Queen. Bonnie Hood, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. John Hood, Braden-
(Continued on Page 21)

































FRIENDLY GROUPS AND HAPPY FACES DISPLAY THE
PLEASURE AND RELAXATION ENJOYED BY EVERYONE AT
THE 1958 FLORIDA DAIRY CONVENTION-MEN, WOMEN
AND YOUNG PEOPLE-INCLUDING MANY FAMILY GROUPS.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


4'






F.D.A. Convention
Pictures
Opposite Page
TOP ROW: Linda Casey, named the
Convention and Dairy Month "Queen," re-
ceives a crown of flowers from Jack Dew,
master of ceremonies; Joe Guagliardo, Flor-
ida Dairy, Tampa, with Mr. and Mrs. Earl
Haynes, Atlanta; Al Shendel, Southern
Dairies' manager of St. Petersburg, and
Charles Capri of Jacksonville, Southern
Dairies' assistant zone manager; Barbara
Boutwell with her proud grandpa, W. A.
Boutwell, Sr., Lake Worth; Bob Evans,
Fla. manager, Kieckhefer-Eddy Div., and
assistant, L. K. (Nick) Nicholas, Jr.
SECOND ROW: Jim Mott of Jacksonville,
new Vice President of the Alligator Club
and Mrs. Mott; Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pereno,
Royal Dairy Farms, Miami; J. K. Bradford,
Mrs. Gene Fulton and Mrs. 0. L. Bobo; Joe
Radke, Ex-Cell-O Corp.; Russ Wilhelm, To-
ledo, and Bill Parmalee, Jacksonville, both
with Owens-Illinois Glass Co.
THIRD ROW: Jimmy Laher, Southern
Dairies' Florida District Manager, Miami,
and Mrs. Laher, who spent two weeks at the
convention headquarters on St. Petersburg
Beach; 4-H member, Tommy Prator; the
Queen, Linda Casey; Bonnie Hood, second
in the Queen contest; and Dick Werner,
Executive of the Milk Industry Foundation,
congratulating these outstanding dairy fam-
ily teen-agers; Joe Hammons, Bill Decklar,
Tom Powers and Bill Cass, prominent F.D.A.
Allied Trades members, and Gordon Nielsen,
Alfar Creamery Co., West Palm Beach.
Hammons, Cass and Nielsen had just been
awarded prizes won in the golf tournament.
The lucky two men with ladies are R. L.
Dressel, Sr., Dressel's Dairy, Miami, and
Larry Hodge, Standard Packaging Corp.
Export Manager, also of Miami.
FOURTH ROW: The Ladies' Auxiliary
first-day "Get Acquainted Party" group has
refreshments (courtesy, Alligator Club), in-
formal table groups and attendance prizes.
FIFTH ROW: Lady golfers receive prizes
from Bill Decklar of the Alligator Club;
next, Mrs. Wm. E. Shrewsbury, Vero Beach,
and Mrs. Herman Boyd, Miami; and others
at ladies' Get Acquainted Party.
SIXTH ROW: Mrs. Emmett Hood and
daughter (left), Mrs. Lester Hood and Sara
Jane Burnett; ladies' group enjoy informal
visiting in the lounge (center, Mrs. Kathryn
Casey, president of the Ladies' Auxiliary);
and the Convention Queen and Princesses,
left to right: The Queen, Linda Casey;
Penny and Sandy Coates; Barbara and Sue
Boutwell; Mary Jo Froehlich, Bonnie Hood
and Judy Hull.


ton, was first runner-up and Sue Bout-
well, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. A.
Boutwell, Jr., Lake Worth, was the
second runner-up. All the girls who
participated other than the Queen
were named Dairy Convention Prin-
cesses. They were, in addition to those
above, Mary Jo Froehlich of West
Palm Beach, Judy Hull of Gaines-
ville, and Penny and Sandy Coates of
Auburndale.
Convention Resolutions
Four special resolutions and actions
voted by the 1958 convention were:
(1) A resolution conferring Honor-
ary F.D.A. Membership on Dr. Ouida
Abbott, recently retired from her
position as head of the Department
of Home Economics and Nutrition
Research, University of Florida.
(2) A resolution expressing appre-
ciation of the members of the F.D.A.
to Andy Lay for his long and efficient
services to the organization as Execu-
tive Secretary.
(3) A resolution proposing and
authorizing the Board of Directors to
plan and put into effect a reorganiza-
tion of the Association so that the
producer and distributor members
would have independent state organ-
izations and a central group through
which the two could meet and co-
operate in all matters of common
interest.
(4) A resolution providing for the
1959 Annual Meeting and Conven-
tion to be held July 8-9-10 at the new
Robert Meyer Hotel, Jacksonville.
Special Awards Presented
Golf Tournament Winners
Brady Johnston of the Dinsmore
Dairy, Jacksonville, won the conven-
tion golf tournament trophy presented
by the Alligator Club. Johnston had
retired one convention golf trophy
and is now started on a new one.
Bobo Receives Service Award
0. L. "Bo" Bobo, Atlanta represen-
tative of the Liquid Carbonic Cor-
poration and past president of the
"Alligator Club," was awarded a
"Distinguished Service Certificate" by
the Alligator Club for his long service
to that group as well as to the Florida
Dairy Association. "Bo" has not only
rendered the Association a great serv-
ice for many years in connection with
Annual Convention Arrangements,
which is one of his specialties, but


through his hobby in photography has
acted as official convention photogra-
pher for several of the Annual Con-
ventions.
New Bell-Cows Elected
In an impressive ceremony during
the Annual Banquet, Dr. E. L. Fouts,
acting for Alf Nielsen who is presi-
dent of the F.D.A. "Order of Bell-
Cows," initiated five new members
into this "honorary" group of the
Association who are selected by the
existing members for "leadership and
service" to the Florida Dairy Industry.
The new members named are: Dick
Werner, Washington, D. C., Executive
Director, Milk Industry Foundation;
Bob North, Washington, D. C., Exe-
cutive Secretary of International Assn.
of Ice Cream Mfrs.; Andy Lay, Execu-
tive Director of F.D.A. since 1946;
Herman Boyd and Bill Graham, both
of Miami and both producer past
presidents of the F.D.A.
Special Meetings at Convention
Several groups of the Dairy Indus-
try like to take advantage of the op-
portunity offered at F.D.A. conven-
tions to hold special sessions of their
own organization. Meetings were held
during the F.D.A. 1958 Annual Meet-
ing by (1) the F.D.A. Board of Di-
rectors, (2) The Florida Guernsey Cat-
tle Club, (3) The Florida Assn. of
Milk and Food Sanitarians, and (4) a
State Conference of Milk Producers'
Local Associations.
Officers Elected for 1959
The F.D.A. Ladies' Auxiliary elect-
ed Mrs. D. E. Perret of Jacksonville
as president for 1959 to succeed Mrs.
Wilbur Casey of Clearwater.
The Alligator Club elected W. H.
Adams of Owens-Illinois Glass Co.,
Miami, president for 1959 to succeed
E. E. Fulton of the Diversey Corpora-
tion, Jacksonville. Jim Mott, Maryland
Baking Co., Jacksonville, was named
Vice President and Tom -Powers, Robt.
A. Johnston Co., Tampa; Secretary-
Treasurer. F.: -, ,
The officers and directors of the
F.D.A. for 1959 were not elected due
to the resolution adopted providing
for reorganization of the Association
on or before: January 1, 1959. Present
officers and directors of all groups of
the Assqoiation will serve to the end
of 1958 unless the F.D.A. should be
reorganized before that date.


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 21


1958 Dairy Convention
(Continued from Page 19)








MILK COMMISSION NEWS


CHANGES MADE IN COMMISSION MEMBERSHIP


Walton Becomes Administrator
About July 15 some significant
changes were made in the administra-
tion and membership of the Florida
Milk Commission.
The milk producer member of the
Commission, Wilbur Casey of Clear-
water, whose partial term expired, was
replaced by Jim Acree, Jacksonville
producer.
Dexter Lowry, who had served
about a year as administrator, resigned
his post and was replaced by Howard
Walton of Miami, who had served
for some three years as a consumer
representative on the Commission.
Walton was replaced as a member
of the Commission by Mrs. Charlotte
Tomlinson of Lake Wales.
Walton, who had served as repre-
sentative of the Communications
Workers of America local union in
Miami for several years, said he had
resigned this post in order to take the
Milk Commission assignment. He is
considered business-like and efficient
and says he had some experience in
dairying as a boy on his father's small
dairy farm in Dade County.
Mrs. Tomlinson is the wife of Dr.
J. P. Tomlinson, Jr., an M. D. of
Lake Wales, and has a married daugh-
ter and a son who is a medical stu-
dent. The Tomlinsons have lived in
the Lake Wales area for many years
and own a cattle ranch near LaBelle,
Fla.
August Meeting in Tallahassee
The August meeting of the Milk
Commission has been announced for
August 20-21, Wednesday and Thurs-
day, in Tallahassee.
Among the subjects to be consider-
ed at the August meeting are two
matters postponed from the July
meeting. These am (1)~ An order set-
ting hauling charge wbich may be
made by distributors qq their pro-
ducer's milk which the distributor
hauls from farna to plant and handling
charges which distributors Xqay make
on their own base produoe's milk
which is diverted or trainfeed to
some other plant; (2) f.posed
changes in the classification and regu-
lations of military milk.


WALTON

Commission Wins Court Decisions
But Faces Supreme Court Appeals
The circuit court in Tallahassee is-
sued a ruling on two cases in which
distributors had challenged the legal-
ity of certain Commission orders, hold-
ing that the orders are legal. The
distributors involved in the cases have
indicated that appeals will be made to
the State Supreme Court.
One of these cases challenged the
legality of the Commission's order
setting up a producer base plan
throughout the state and the other
challenged the Commission's author-
ity to set the price of Class II and
Class III milk.
A third case which was originally
brought and argued along "with the
two mentioned above has not been
decided by the court. In this case the
right of the Commission is challenged
to require a distributor to purchase
all milk produced by his base pro-
ducers and pay prices determined by
the Commission.
Pensacola Area Withdraws
From Commission Control
During their May meeting in Talla-
hassee, the Milk Commission received
a petition from producers of the Pen-
sacola marketing area to withdraw its
jurisdiction over that area. After con-
siderable investigation of the petition
by deputies of the Commission and
some of the members of the Commis-
sion, the petition was recognized by
the Commission at its June meeting.


They removed from the Commis-
sion's control the counties of Escam-
bia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton
and Holmes, making a total of 16
counties now without Milk Commis-
sion jurisdiction. The Southeast Flor-
ida Federal Market Order covers 10
counties and Indian River County is
under neither the Federal Order or
the Milk Commission. These 16 coun-
ties represent approximately 50% of
total milk production and milk sales
in the state of Florida.

Jax. Store Milk Prices
Steady Under M.C. Order
The serious milk price cutting situ-
ation which developed in the Jackson-
ville area a few months ago through
"tie-in" and "loss leader" sales appears
to be completely stabilized by the
Milk Commission's order which de-
clared the "tie-in-sales" of milk or
"limiting the quantity" of milk a cus-
tomer could buy, as illegal.

Open New Milk Stores
In Jacksonville Area
The dairy owned and operated
"milk store" method of reaching milk
consumers, which has spread rapidly
in recent months in central, west
coast and Miami areas, is apparently
about to move into the Jacksonville
area.
The Skinners' Dairy opened a dairy
store across town from its plant a few
weeks ago because of Cash and Carry
and store competition and a few days
ago, the Meadowbrook Farms Dairy
opened an attractive new drive-in
dairy store on the main highway South
on the Southside of the City.

Southern Ice Cream Mfrs.
Meet Nov. 5-8, Miami Beach
The Southern Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers' 1958 Annual
Convention is scheduled to be held
November 5-8 at the Americana Hotel,
Miami Beach.
Information regarding hotel reser-
vations can be secured from Ed
Koontz, Secretary, P. 0. Box 5107,
Biltmore, N. C.

HERD IMPROVEMENT TEST
The registered Jersey herd of the
Gulf Wind Dairy, owned and operated
by the Gombers brothers of Venice,
Florida, recently completed a 12-
month test period on Herd Improve-
ment Registry. The 43 Jerseys pro-
duced an average of 9,003 lbs. of milk
containing 464 lbs. butterfat per cow.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Reorganization Is Considered
By Florida Dairy Association
Following over two years of informal consideration of the possible advan-
tages of separate organizations of its milk producer and milk plant members,
the Florida Dairy Association adopted a resolution at its June Annual Meeting
calling upon the Board of Directors to plan such a division of the organization's
membership.
The resolution specified the reor-
ganization plan as follows: thought the necessary preparations
"That the members of the F.D.A. might be ready by October 1st.
desire and approve the development The F.D.A. Annual Meeting resolu-
and adoption and making effective tion for reorganization was based on
by the Board of Directors of a reor- the belief that it would strengthen the
ganization which will provide for the industry-wide programs and influence
separate and independent function of of the Florida Dairy Industry as a
producers and distributors as associa- whole.
tion units with separate names, separ-
ate Board of Directors, separate man- Know Your Candidates
agement and separate financing; For State Legislature
providing, however, that provision be
made for the cooperation and joint All members of the House of Repre-
functioning of these separate mem- sentatives and half of the 38 Senate
bership groups of producers and members will be elected in the com-
distributors in dealing with all matters ing September state elections.
and problems of an industry-wide Members of the Florida Dairy In-
nature and of common interest, that dustry will no doubt have a consider-
such joint operating plan provide for able interest in the 1959 legislature
a joint conference or executive com- and should carefully consider all
mittee with equal membership from candidates concerning their views on
the two organizations and that the our dairy laws and their administra-
holding of joint membership meetings tion.
and particularly joint Annual Meet- Now is the time to become person-
ings and Conventions of the two ally acquainted with each candidate
groups be provided for." and to inform those who do not al-
ready know what the more important
Joint Planning Committee problems of the dairy industry are.
A joint producer and distributor re- Anyone desiring information of the
organization planning committee of record of legislative candidates who
three producers and three distributors have previously served in the legis-
were named following the Annual lature may inquire from "The Florida
Convention to prepare recommenda- Dairy Association."
tions for the Board of Directors.
The Board of Directors met July Florida Livestock Board
28th for their third quarterly meeting Screwworm Eradication
and approved a report from the com- Program
mittee of six, which provides for con-
tinuing the Florida Dairy Association Florida's screwworm quarantine
as a central medium for voluntary regulations and state-employed screw-
cooperation and meetings together by worm inspectors will be operating
the new and separate producer and shortly with full regulatory authority
distributor associations, each of which of the Federal government, it was
would function under a separate char- announced today by Dr. M. E. Mead-
ter and by-laws. ows, Jr., and Dr. D. L. Williams, State
The directors' committee of six was and Federal Directors, respectively,
requested to prepare recommenda- of the Screwworm Eradication Pro-
tions for amendments to the present gram which has its headquarters here.
F.D.A. Charter and By-Laws and pro- Action is being taken to give state
ducer and distributor directors were inspectors authority to enforce Fed-
requested to proceed with prepara- eral screwworm regulations, the two
tion of a charter and by-laws for directors said. This will expand their
each group. powers to include control of interstate
January 1, 1959 was set as a tenta- shipments of livestock and other ani-
tive date for beginning operation mals besides intra-state controls under
under the new organizations but some the quarantine of 32 southern Florida


F.D.A. Directors Oppose
A.D.A. of Florida
At a July 28 meeting in Tampa,
producer and distributor directors of
the Florida Dairy Association in joint
session voted unanimously that they
do not favor the organization of a
unit of the American Dairy Associa-
tion in Florida at this time. Reasons
for this action were:
(a) Florida is only a fluid milk
producing state while American Dairy
Association spends its funds for pro-
motion of all dairy products.
(b) Florida needs most a "fluid
milk" promotion such as extension of
"Dairy Council Programs" throughout
the state with possibly additional
"fluid milk" promotion and advertis-
ing through a strictly Florida pro-
gram planned and financed by both
"producers and distributors" rather
than by producers alone as A.D.A.
does.
(c) The cost of A.D.A. to Florida
producers would be 20 per 100 lbs.
on all milk produced. This is 1/5-cent
per gallon .. 2 times the amount pro-
ducers now pay to the Florida Milk
Commission (1/10-cent per gallon,
Class I) . and .. 5 times the pro-
ducer membership rate (40 per 100
gallons, Class I milk) for the Florida
Dairy Association.
(d) The F.D.A. believes in A.D.A.
and desires to support it but not by
the plan now proposed by A.D.A.
organizers in Florida.

counties established May 1, 1958, by
the Florida Livestock Board.
This action ties in with the screw-
worm quarantine line being establish-
ed along the Louisiana-Mississippi
border by Federal authorities co-oper-
ating with regulatory agencies of those
states. Inspection stations along that
line are established to prevent trans-
port of screwworm-infested animals
from the Southwest into Southeastern
territory. Objective of the Florida line
is to prevent movement of any infest-
ed animals north of State Highway
No. 40 which runs east and west,
through Ocala.
Operation of the two quarantine
lines is necessary to success of the
Eradication Program, the directors
said. The program is increasing its
dispersal of millions of sterile flies over
Florida and southern Georgia to pro-
gressively reduce, and eventually wipe
out, the entire native population of
the costly pest.


THIRD QUARTER, 1958 23



















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
CITRUS PULP, CITRUS MEAL, CITRUS MOLASSES
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division


Auburndale, Fla.


Woodlawn 7-1104


ANNHEUSER-BUSCH, INC.
Warehouses:
ICE CREAM CABINETS
MIAMI TAMPA -- JACKSONVILLE
Walter S. Crowbuck, Dist. Mgr.
4650 Arapahoe Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.



- I INC. 2kri-Rih
Chocolate Products Egg Nog, Orange
Ice Cream Fruits & Flavors
ED SALVATORE
P. 0. Box 86, Tampa Ph. 25-0164





COMMERCIAL BODY BUILDERS
1807 SECOND AVENUE
Ph. 4.*2720 TAMPA, FLA.
F,2/GfeATD Tiw/cfwsOw/FRe kT#EA4/eky//mffJTey

DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
0. S. NEWSOM, JR.
Phone: EV 7-7383
2965 St. Johns Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
ICE CREAM COATING, FRUITS AND FLAVORS
IRA STONE
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
1026 E. Walnut St. Lakeland, Fla.


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVOY


50 E. Magnolia St.


Pensacola, Fla.


HAVEN SUPPLY
Hackney Bros. Bodies, Gulf Dairy Waxes
"lIllini" Non-Fat Milk Solids
MONTY SCHOENTHALER JOHN WILKES
Phone: FR 2-1115
P. 0. Box 834 Winter Haven, Fla.

INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Pure Pak Milk Containers
WALTER M. SCOTT E. H. BROWN
1731 Indian Rocks Rd. 2820 Eastern Parkway
Clearwater, Florida Orlando, Florida
Phone--3-7247 Phone Winter Park


Route 9, Box 356


Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
COCOA DIVISION
Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
TOM POWERS


830 E. River Dr.


Tampa 4, Fla.


Temple Terrace


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer
JOE E. ANDERSON
2577 Decatur Rd., Decatur, Ga.
Phone ME 4-8781


KIECKHEFER-EDDY DIVISION
Weyerhaeuser Timber Co.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R.J.EVANS, M.A. KNOWLES, L.K. NICHOLAS, JR.
Phone ELgin 6-1334


4700 Pearl St.


Jacksonville, Fla.


KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD

Howell House-Suite 202, Atlanta 8, Ga.


KRIM*KO
CHOCOLATE ORANGE 0 EGGNOG
MARBLETONE SYRUPS
DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
616 Jessamine Blvd., Daytona Beach, Fla.
Phone Clinton 2-0148

LIBERTY GLASS COMPANY
F T P MILK BOTTLES
HAROLD ROGERS
2260 Peachtree Rd., N.W. Atlanta, Ga.
Phone CEdar 7-3030


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Van-Sal Vanilla Products

D. C. MULLIGAN, Florida Representative


2840 West 47th Place


Chicago 32, III.


MURPHY BODY WORKS, INC.
REFRIGERATED TRUCK BODIES
E. D. "Ed" PENNELL
310 Herring Ave. Wilson, N. C.
Phone: 7-1146


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land 0' Lakes Non-Fat Milk Solids
Petrans Vanillas, Dairy Powder,
Fine Fruit Flavors


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
LARRY HODGE


1121 duPont Bldg.


Miami, Fla.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINES
Division of National Cooperatives
World's Most Complete Line of Milking
Equipment
L. H. HALL, Dealer
5240 N. W. 7th Avenue Miami, Fla.

MANUFACTURERS OF
DAIRY EQUIPMENT


JOHN W. MANNING
Phone: Wilson 7-0503
17750 N.E. 19th Ave., N. Miami Beach, Fla.


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

_____&&dad _ _ _ _L_________


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. HEAD
Phone Norfolk, Va. HOward 4-0828
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.

NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksonville, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami, Fla., Phone: MUrray 8-8431

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. PARMALEE R. G. SHACKELFORD
1601 Prudential Bldg. Jacksonville 7, Fla.
W. H. ADAMS
7630 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 38, Fla.

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Rennet for Cottage Cheese
Cottage Cheese Coagulator-Ice Cream Color
Lactivase for prevention of off flavors in
bottled milk.
Cottage Cheese literature available
4253 North Port Washington Ave.
Milwaukee 12 Wisconsin

PENNSALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Moultrie, Georgia
Riverside Masterbilt Uniforms

JAMES M. STEWART DAVE FREEMAN

























-. .. o1


How would you feed a BEST OF BREED?


Milk production per cow increased 20%
during the last 10 years on a national basis,
and is still gaining according to a report by
the United States Department of Agricul-
ture. This production increase is due in part
to increased feeding of concentrates, the re-
port states. Because concentrates for use
in dairy rations are in heavy demand these
facts about Florida Citrus Pulp are impor-
tant to dairymen interested in getting top
milk production on a year-round basis.
Florida Citrus Pulp is a proven concen-
trate made from the peel and pulp of fresh
citrus fruit. Feed trials show that, from
an energy standpoint, a hay-citrus pulp mix-
ture equals a hay-grain mixture, and when
fed as a carbohydrate concentrate, Florida


'. 1


Citrus Pulp can replace up to 50% of grain
requirements.
Morrison's tabulation on total digestible
nutrient content lists dried Citrus Pulp
higher (74.9%) than either ground oats
(68.5%) or beet pulp (67.8%). Feeding and
production tests show milk stimulating fac-
tors and important trace elements to be pres-
ent in Florida Citrus Pulp.
Available on a year-round basis, Florida
Citrus Pulp requires no special equipment
for handling or storing, and can be fed sat-
isfactorily in its dry form.
Put your herd in the top milk production
class by using the proven concentrate -
write for free booklet on how to feed Florida
Citrus Pulp.


Write for your copy of the booklet
about Florida Citrus Pulp gives
complete analysis and feeding in-
structions. Write to:


IM-"


S P.O. BOX 1459 WINTER HAVEN FLORIDA DEFT.

SUNSHINE FEED FOR CATTLE


REPRODUCTION OF ANIMAL ILLUSTRATION, SUITABLE FOR FRAMING, AVAILABLE ON REQUEST AT NO CHARGE.



































Really Good Cow Milkin9

is what we have to sell !


Until you have really good cow milking, your
breeding and feeding won't help your produc-
tion or profits very much.
Surge Breaker Cups put Genuine Down-
ward and Forward TUG & PULL in your barn
to hold the teat cups down where they be-
long. They put the pulsator close to the teat
cup to insure quick and positive relief they
fix you up with really good cow milking.
After you are sure that you have the best
cow milking that you can possibly buy and
only after you are sure . then it is time to
worry about milk handling.
Safe Surge Milking gets the milk out of
the teats ... then ... the Surge self-draining


pipe line carries it to where you want it to go.
After that, the Surge ELECTROBRAIN supplies
you with a timesaving, work-saving, push-
button job of washing up.
True a Surge Outfit does cost a little
more at the start . for the long pull, we
think that it is a highly profitable investment
in better cow milking . better milk han-
dling and in comfort and work saving.
Copyright 1958, Bobson Bros. Co.
Surge Parlors, Surge Pipe Line Milkers
and Surge Bucket Milkers are sold on

EASY TERMS


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 W. 19th Street Chicago 23, Illinois


ATLANTA DALLAS KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS SACRAMENTO SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs