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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00039
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 1st quarter 1958
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00039
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front cover 1
        Front cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text


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Sample of Experimental Pastures Dairymen Will See During Univ. of Fla. Annual Dairy Field Day, April 24-25.


-7


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NEW FIRST-AID FEED

FOR CALVES

Larro pre-starter knocks out scours,
starts calves 30% faster, cuts costs


Now, from Larro Research Farm, a
new calf feeding formula for the
dairyman who has "given up" on
raising calves. It's Larro SureRaise,
a new first-aid feed that cuts losses
while it cuts your costs... speeds
growth while it steps up bloom and
vigor.
This new "safety first" pre-starter
and milk replacer combats scours
with a combination of Dynafac, an
antibiotic and pectin. And these
same ingredients give an extra nu-
tritional punch to Larro's exclusive
balance of highly digestible, ap-
petizing nutrients.


The pay-off comes in 30% faster
growth than accepted standards.
Calves are ready to eat low-cost
Larro SureCalf by the 5th day...
Larro SureMilk at 10 weeks.
Get complete details on Larro
SureRaise and calf-feeding plan
from your Larro Sure Feed dealer
now. For his name and free folder,
write Dairy Dept., care of the ad-
dress below.


GM... -1
MOMS


Pail-feed colostrum (first milk) the
first 4 days without letting calf
nurse. Avoid overfeeding.


FEED DIVISION
Jacksonville Miami
Orlando Tampa
Regional Office: Coral Gables


SRE/SCF-3-7R3
- ---- ------------------------------------

Get your FREE Larro Dairy Guide-
a book of helpful management and feeding tips that
can help boost your profits. Just mail coupon to . .
FEED DIVISION, GENERAL MILLS, INC.,
2515 Galiano St., Coral Gables, Fla.
NAME ...................................................... .........
CITY ........... ............... .. ................ STATE ....................................
Limit one guide
to a customer. I milk..................cows.


Feed SureRaise from the 5th day
through the 29th day. Mix with
water. Feed at 100 F for best re-
sults. Start SureCalf the 5th day,
then switch to SureMilk at 10 weeks.







EDITORIALS


"FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS" BEGINS EIGHTH YEAR


University of Florida Presented with Bound Issues

At their first meeting in 1958, the Board of Directors of the Florida Dairy
Association paid tribute to the completion of seven years publication of the "Florida
Dairy News" with a surprise presentation to the University of Florida Depart-
ment of Dairy Science of two beautifully bound volumes of all issues of the
magazine from 1950 through 1957.

The two-volume set was also presented to Editor E. T. Lay and a set to
the F.D.A. as a permanent record in the Association office.



U. of F. Letter Received in Appreciation


February 14, 1958


"Mr. John Sargeant, President
"Florida Dairy Association


"Dear Mr. Sargeant:
"At a recent meeting of the Board of Directors of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation, I was presented with two bound volumes containing Volumes I through
VII of the 'Florida Dairy News', the official publication of the Florida Dairy
Association, for the Library of the University Department of Dairy Science
and the use of our staff and students.
"We have of course all read these journals as they came to us through the
years, but these bound volumes will give our Library a permanent record of
the activities of the Florida Dairy Industry as well as of the Association during
the period 1950 through 1957.
"I know that these volumes represent much work in procurement of news,
manuscripts and advertising, editing, proof reading, and conducting the business
related to the publishing of a journal of this kind.
"In my opinion, this has been a very worth while project of the Association,
and I think the dairy people of the state owe Mr. E. T. Lay a debt of grati-
tude for carrying on this activity which has benefitted the entire industry.
"In looking through the pages of these volumes I find many references to
the University of Florida, many articles of interest by members of the Dairy
Science staff, and I am grateful for the opportunity the Association and your
publication has afforded our department in working with a large segment of the
dairy industry which your organization and publication represents.
"We appreciate greatly the support the members of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation individually and collectively have given to us, and we wish your organi-
zation success in its continuing efforts to work toward a more unified industry
in the years to come."
"Sincerely yours,


"Dr. E. L. Fouts,
"Head, Dept. of Dairy Science,
"University of Florida.


"ELF/pl"


Seven Year Record of "The Florida Dairy News"

Number of issues published, 39. Total number of copies, 11o,ooo. Total
pages of news and editorial copy, three million. Number of standard pages re-
quired to mimeograph the same quantity of material, approximately 4~2 million.
Cost of mimeographing and mailing the same material would have required
mailing one 4-page bulletin each week for seven years at a cost of about $50,000.00.
The Florida Dairy News has been largely self-sustaining.


VOL. 8
FIRST QUARTER, 1958


NO. I


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
JOHN B. SERGEANT, President
Lakeland

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
LEON H. SELLERS, President
St. Petersburg

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
F. DUPONT MAGILL, President
Dinsmore

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
A. J. RUSTERHOLZ, JR., President
Apopka

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
D. L. LICHTY, President
West Palm Beach

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Committee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
JOHN B. SERGEANT, President
Sargeant Dairy Farms, Lakeland
A. R. (DOLPH) ALLISON
1st V. Pres. & Chairman
Distributors' Division, Orlando
JOHN L. McMULLEN
2nd V. Pres. & Chairman
Producers' Division, Clearwater

Additional Producers
JOHN B. SERGEANT, Lakeland
R. L. LUNSFORD, Milton
C. C. SELLERS, Tallahassee
E. F. FROEHLICH, West Palm Beach

Additional Distributors
T. G. LEE, Orlando
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
CLAUDE D. KELLY, Jacksonville
H. CODY SKINNER, Jacksonville

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 615 Park St., Jacksonville,
Florida. Subscription price is $1.00 a
year. Entered as second class mail at the
Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under
Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 615 Park
Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

UTASOC1 AT N


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 0 1







DAIRY NEWS DIGEST

Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor


NATIONAL ICE CREAM MEETING

APRIL 21-23 IN FLORIDA

The Annual Spring Board Meeting and national conference of the Inter-
national Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers is scheduled to meet in Florida
for the third time in the past four years, which shows a liking by this organiza-
tion for Florida meetings.
The April Conference will be held at the Boca Raton Hotel and is ex-
pected to have an attendance of about two hundred including directors and various
committee chairmen and members of I.A.I.C.M. Also, State Ice Cream and
Dairy Association leaders, State Presidents and Secretaries hold a special meeting
of their own at the time of this conference and State Secretaries serve as a panel
group on the general conference program for discussion of State problems and
activities of Ice Cream Manufacturers and the Dairy Industry.
Florida directors of the National Association expected to participate in the


meeting are W. J. Barritt, Jr., Borden
most Dairies, Jacksonville.
The 1959 national conventions of
both this Association and the Milk In-
dustry Foundation are expected to be
held in Miami Beach with a joint atten-
dance of several thousand.


Dairy, Tampa, and Claude Kelly, Fore-

ida Dairy Association will be given free
guest tickets on all four days of the
Show if they plan to be in England
at that time.


Agriculture Commissioner Mayo
Feels Department Is Efficient
Florida's "longest-in-service" Cabinet
Member, Nathan Mayo, made a lengthy
statement to the press recently defending
the organization and efficiency of the
Department of Agriculture which has
been under his management for a great
many years.
A Committee of the House and Sen-
ate was created by a resolution adopted
by the 1957 legislature on recommenda-
tion of Governor Collins for the pur-
pose of studying all agricultural services
of the Florida State Government and
reporting to the 1959 legislature its
findings and recommendations. There
have been some suggestions by the chair-
man of the Committee, Senator Tom
Adams of Clay County, that the Depart-
ment of Agriculture might need a com-
plete reorganization and all laws per-
taining to agriculture recodified.
Mr. Mayo expressed the belief that
little change would be found necessary
in the present organization of the De-
partment of Agriculture.

Wisconsin, with a total of 16.9 billion
pounds, continued to lead other states
in total volume of milk production in
1956. New York ranked second with
9.9 billion pounds.


Chicago Dairy Show
Announces 1958 Dates
The Sixth Annual International Dairy
Show has been set for October 6 to II,
1958. It will be held in the Interna-
tional Amphitheatre at the Chicago J.
Stock Yards.
The junior class in which farm youths
exhibit purebred dairy cattle of their
own raising will be judged on Tuesday,
October 7. All open class judging of
the six dairy breeds will take place
Wednesday through Saturday.
The Dairy Cattle Judging Contests
will be held on Monday, October 6.
4-H State Champion Judging Teams
will compete, as well as college student
teams. A contest for college students
will score them on their knowledge of
the quality of milk and milk products.
JOE DULLIGAN WI
Royal Show of England Joseph P. Dulligan, Clearwater manager
Announcement has been received from o the 1957 Bilgore Award, in recognition of
Announcement has been received from summer. Dulligan is also credited with g,
the Royal Agricultural Society of Eng- Minor League for boys too small to compete
land that the Royal Show, attended sev- The award is given annually in memory
eral years ago by the Florida 4-H Judg- leader, to a person who in the opinion of
ing Team on their trip to Europe, will toward a better community spirit.
be held this year at Bristol, July I In the picture, Dulligan, third from left,
through July 4. Members of the Flor- residetof Kiwanis At left is Mor is e


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I .". gore packing firm who sponsor he


=-?'A


C-S


NS CITIZEN AWARD
for Southern Dairies, was named the winner

e in the Little League Baseball teams.
of David Bilgore, pioneer resident and civic
some 10 service clubs contributes the most
accepts the trophy from George Smith, past
ea and at right is Jules Braggin, both members


rb*7







Purebred Dairy Association
Actions Taken At Tampa
The Florida Purebred Dairy Cattle
Association, which is made up of the
officers of the various Florida Dairy
Breed Associations, met in Tampa dur-
ing the State Fair with Herman Boyd,
president of Miami, presiding.
Boyd is immediate past president of
the Florida Holstein Cattle Club and
also is a past president of the Florida
Dairy Association.
The Purebred Association voted at the
meeting to continue to award certificates
to herds making 8000 pounds or more of
our percent butterfat corrected milk.
This group also went on record as
heartily endorsing the Florida Livestock
Board's Bang's program and advised the
board that they feel the January I, 1958
deadline as set up by the board in regard
to the Bang's program is to the benefit
and advancement of Florida's dairy in-
dustry. Other action included a recom-
mendation that the University of Florida
train a collegiate dairy judging team with
the advisement that this group is willing
to help sponsor the team's activities. Mrs.
C. R. Zimmerman of Largo was elected
treasurer of the organization and it was
announced that the next meeting will be
held in April at Orlando.

Dairy Representative Named
In State Market Bureau
Because of increasing problems in the
dairy industry, The Florida Dairy As-
sociation last year requested that a full
time dairy representative be included in
the personnel of the Florida State Mar-
keting Bureau, under the supervision of
the Department of Agriculture. Acting
upon this request the Marketing Bureau
and Department of Agriculture recom-
mended inclusion of the expense for such
a representative in their 1957 budget,
which was approved by the 1957 State
Legislature. Chosen for this full-time
dairy representation was Dick Stark,
Tallahassee, Florida, who has been as-
sociated with the bureau for the past
four years, doing dairy work and live-
stock sales reporting for the bureau.
Factual information has been sadly
lacking regarding Florida's dairy indus-
try. Before a reasonable solution to any
problem can be reached, facts and figures
must be available. The dairy industry,
with its phenomenal growth and lack
of facilities for gathering this informa-
tion should benefit from this new office,
as it would appear that helping to gather
and assemble that material would be one
of the first duties of the marketing
specialist. Marketing and public rela-
tions are so related that the furthering
of good public relations could also be
considered of prime importance to this
office.


SUPERMATIC MILKING
PULSATOR
Most reliable for
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trouble-free operation.
Lifetime guarantee of
labor on repairs.


SUPERMATIC MILKING
BALANCED CLAW
Exclusive design with
air release to prevent
rancidity. Simple, sani-
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action for faster, more
uniform milking.

UPERMATIC
IN-LINE CARRYING
# AND FILTERING
Milk is transferred un-
der vacuum from the
cow to the cooling
equipment without con-
tamination. Filtering is
done in the line.


UNIVERSAL MILKERS
Suspended models, floor models and cow-
to-can designs that mean higher quality
production from smoother action milking
Sand exclusive sanitation features.

FREE!
12-page book
on pipeline
mni ers / MILKING EQUIPMENT
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DEPARTMENT C-29 ALBERT LEA, MINNESOTA
Branches in Syracuse, New York and Waukesha, Wisconsin
Backed by Over 40 Years of Milker Manufacturing "Know-how"
FIRST QUARTER, 1958 3






ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils

Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.

Dairy Council Material in this issue Sponsored by

MISS NANCY HINCKLEY, Executive Director

Dairy Council of Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties


Jim Wolf giving a free toothbrush to Marilyn Shanahan


KEY CLUB OF NORTH MIAMI HIGH SCHOOL

LEADS SUCCESSFUL DENTAL HEALTH PROJECT
With the assistance of the Dairy Council of Dade, Broward and Monroe
Counties, the Key Club of North Miami High School conducted a project dur-
ing National Dental Health Week with a different activity marking each day
of the week. The climax of the program came on Friday, January 31, when Dr.
Harold K. Terry addressed the student body and approximately eight dozen
toothbrushes were given away during the lunch period-ONE WITH EVERY
25th CARTON OF MILK SOLD.
Posters and pamphlets were furnished by the Dairy Council, 3,000 SMILE
cards were printed for distribution to the students by Florida Power and Light
Company and the Block Drug Co. of New Jersey donated the toothbrushes.

Teenage Nutrition Is Studied
Another project at the same high school was an intensive drive to improve
teenage nutrition. The Student Council and the Nurses Club onsored the
project and provided display materials for each classroom. Prizes were given
for the best posters made by students Films o go nutrition and good eann
were shown during physical education periods good nutrition and good mannersath,
American Institute of Baking, National Live o The State Board of Health,
Spatnona' Live Stock and Meat Board, Quaker
Oats Company, United Fruit Company, National Apple Institute and the
Dairy Council all provided free instructional aids for the project.
4 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street-Jacksonville 2
Miss Betty Wilkinson, Exec. Director
DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry-Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Sandra S. Casteel, Asst Dir.
DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI-Including
DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
2175 S. W. 1st St.-Miami 35
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Exec. Director
Mrs. Patricia Critzer, Asst. Dir.

New Regional Representative
of National Dairy Council
G.F.W. "Dutch" Cavender joined the
staff of the National Dairy Council as
Southern Regional Representative ef-
fective March 3, 1958. He succeeded
John Warrington who resigned to study
law at Emory University.
Mr. Cavender is a native of Tennessee
and will operate from an office in Nash-
ville. He holds a Bachelor's and a Mas-
ter's degree from the University of Ten-
nessee and has had considerable experi-
ence as a County Agricultural Agent.
From 1949 to 1954 he was Assistant
Commissioner of Agriculture of Tennes-
see. For the past several years he has
been executive secretary of the Tennessee
Dairy Products Association.

National Food Conference
Held in Washington, D.C.
Twenty national food organizations,
including the National Dairy Council
and the American Dairy Association,
have united in an effort to encourage
Americans to eat adequate and balanced
meals. The National Food Conference
held in Washington, D.C., February 24,
provided a dramatic, authoritative, direct
and practical setting for all segments of
the food industry to restate the facts
concerning good nutrition.
With Vice President Nixon giving the
keynote address, nutrition authorities
from member organization expressed
grave concern at the rising Consumer in-
difference to the necessities of adequate
diet. Food faddists and self-prescribed
diets have become popular with many
people literally going hungry in the midst
of plenty through failure to comply with
nutritional rul to comply with
nutritional rules. Plans for combating
this casual attitude toward food were
formulated by the conference.








DAIRY COUNCIL NOTES
From the Tampa Area
The Dairy Council of the Tampa
area has served the communities and the
dairy industry of Hillsborough and Pi-
nellas Counties for eight years and some
items of their summary report distributed
in December 1957 reveal the scope of
their activities.
Although there is a basic program of
educational work which continues year
after year with the schools and health
departments, there is also an everchang-
ing series of activities which vary ac-
cording to the needs of the community.
"Firsts" during 1957 which deserve
special mention were:
The Girl Scouts of South Pinellas
worked with the DC as part of the re-
quirements to obtain their nutrition
badges.
The DC worked with the regional
nutritionist of the State Board of Health
as consultants to a new St. Petersburg
Diet Club which started off with 1oo
overweight women and is still active.
The director was named official Red
Cross nutritionist for the Tampa chapter
and taught the emergency feeding course.
In cooperation with the St. Petersburg
Florida Power and Pinellas Home De-
monstration Agent the DC prepared a
"Guide" for 4-H club food demonstra-
tions and an outline for teen-age nutri-
tion.
The State Board of Health made a
special grant of $50 to each of their six
nutritionists to buy materials from the
DC to be used and distributed in the
areas not served by the three Florida
Dairy Councils.
The total amount of material distrib-
uted by the Tampa Dairy Council is
so great that it is difficult to comprehend,
but the actual count of pieces of material
is 188,970. The recipients of these ma-
terials include school pupils, people who
attend the many classes, conferences and
public meetings and those sent out by
mail to nurses, doctors, health depart-
ments, homemakers and those requested
following radio and television programs.

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, management, and
circulation required by the Act of Congress of
August 24. 1912, as amended by the Acts of
March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946 (Title 39, United
States Code 233) of Florida Dairy News published
quarterly at Jacksonville, Florida, for October 1,
1957.
1. The names and addresses of the publisher,
editor, managing editor, and business managers
nre: Publisher, Florida Dairy Association, Inc., 615
Park St., Jacksonville 4, Florida; Editor and Busi-
ness Manager, E. T. Lay, 615 Park St., Jacksonville
4, Florida.
2. The owner is: Florida Dairy Association, Inc.,
615 Park St., Jacksonville 4, Florida. (Non-Profit
Corporation, no capital stock.)
3. The known bondholders, mortgagees and
other security holders owning or holding 1 percent
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or
other securities are: None.
E. T. LAY, Business Manager.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 30th day
of September, 1957,
L. H. CANOVA, Notary Public
(My commission expires March 15, 1958)


PENNSANo



...a New 5-in-1


bulk tank sanitizer


PENNSAN is a new 5-way
action liquid sanitizer that
has been developed at the
request of dairy equipment
manufacturers and is espe-
cially recommended for use
with bulk milk cooling tanks,
W4 tank trucks and CIP lines.


Here are PENNSAN's 5-in-1 features:


* sanitizes
. ..effective against the
bacteria that cause poor
quality milk.
* controls milkstone
...prevents milestone


buildup . removes milk-
stone formations.
* passivates stainless steel
...conditions surface of
stainless steel tanks and
other equipment.
* cleans


... prevents hard water
-- buildup .. used for brush-
1 ing, spraying or circulating.
S t guards against corrosion
S . will not corrode or dis-
color equipment.

PENNSAN is only one product of the complete line of Pennsalt
B-K cleaners and sanitizers developed specifically for the
dairy industry. Ask your dealer about PENNSAN, or write
B-K Dept. 598, Pennsalt Chemicals Corporation, Three
Penn Center, Philadelphia 2, Pa.


5. 6 8

Cic


I


1


FIRST QUARTER. 19511


I, c, I I - -~ -


* 5









GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


RECENT PRODUCTION RECOF
FOR FLORIDA REGISTERED
The following Herd Improvement Registry pr
reported by The American Guernsey Cattle Club
News through March xo. The University of Flo:
production records through their extension service.


Owner and Record


Age


BOUTWELL MATHESON, INC., Stuart
Oakhurst Valors Gracefull ................ Sr.-3
Jenw ell V Bella .......................... 7
Kilmac Zeniths Pat ...................... 5
CONE, J. H., Plant City
Valkyrie Nobly Alicia .................... Jr.-2
DINSMORE DAIRY CO., Dinsmore


Camerons Independent Susie ..............
Dinsmore Mayroyal Lita ...............
Dinsmore Milton Adelaide ................
Dinsmore Milton Gladine ...............
Dinsmore M ilton Cecile .............. ....
Camerons Jewel Prim ...................
Dinsmore Faymax Mathilda ..............
Dinsmore M ayroyal Janis ................
Dinsmore Mayroyal Flower Girl ..........
Dinsmore Rosemost Susanna .............
Dinsmore Mayroyal Rosina ..............
Dinsmore Noble Dairymaid ..............
Dinsmore Mayroyal Cutie ................
Dinsmore Jury Selby .....................
Camerons Vesta Silver ...................


5
Jr.-3
Jr.-3
Jr.-3
Jr.-3
Jr.-4
7
5
Jr.-4
Sr.-3
Sr.-3
Sr.-3
Jr.-3
Jr.-3
Sr.-4


DONEGAN, C. E., Largo
W ilburn Le Ada ......................... Sr.-4
SCHMID, WALTER, & SON, Sarasota


M atoaka Lucius Special ..................
Dinsmore Jury Justina ................. ..
Matoaka Lucius Radiant Ruby ...........


Sr. -2
6
Jr.-2


WARD, CARROLL L., JR., Goldenrod
Vaughandale Verona ...................... 5


Guernsey Bulls Purch
JOHN H. CONE, Plant City, has recently pure
sev bulls. Sonenta /H ..., ... L .


Dinsmore Cow Wins
National Distinction


_I A new record, placing her eighth in
milk production among the ten highest
of the Guernsey breed in her class has
IDS REPORTED just been completed by the registered
cow, Dinsmore Mayroyal Mabel, a jun-
GUERNSEYS ior four-year-old, owned and bred by
n r h b Dinsmore Dairy Company, Dinsmore.
oduction records have been "Mabel" produced 13,507 pounds of
direct to the Florida Dairy milk and 513 pounds of fat in 305 days
rida supervises these official on three times daily milking. She is
classified Very Good for type. "Mabel"
was sired by Foremost May Royalty, that
Days Lbs. Lbs. has four sons and 171 tested daughters
In Lbs. Lbs.
Milk Milk Butterfat in the Performance Register of the
American Guernsey Cattle Club.

365-3X 12,966 595 Group Tours
305-3X 12,949 564
305-3X 12,850 574 Latin America
W. A. Boutwell, Sr., Lake Worth,
Florida, left New Orleans February 23
305-2X 9,966 507 on a special Guernsey tour through Latin
America, co-sponsored by the American
Guernsey Cattle Club.
365-3X 12,134 670 The tour has two major objectives.
305-3X 11,111 505 First, to give the members (all regis-
365-3X 11,986 540 tered Guernsey dairy cattle breeders) an
365-3X 10,811 583
305-3X 9,614 516 opportunity to see Latin America. Sec-
305-3X 11,881 562 ond, to give them a chance to meet
352-3X 11,996 569 Guernsey breeders in these countries and
365-3X 14,785 638
365-3X 14,785 638 promote the Guernsey breed.
365-3X 10,725 552 There are I8 Guernsey breeders from
305-3X 12,093 536 8 States going on the tour. They will
305-3X 10,505 518 visit Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama
346-3X 14,184 570 in Central America, and all the South
332-3X 12,645 580 American countries except Paraguay, Bo-
365-3X 11,231 567
livia and the Guianas.
The group will return to the United
365-3X 11,300 542 States on March 25.
Special Reports and Visitors
305-3X 11,291 527 At Guernsey Annual Meeting
305-2X 11,859 543 At the Annual Meeting of the Flor-
305-2X 10,037 457 ida Guernsey Cattle Club in Orlando,
March 19, members unanimously en-
dorsed the program of the Livestock
365-2X 9,632 602 Sanitary Board and the State Veterinary
Department on health requirements for
all animals entering the State and their
based efforts to enforce present regulations.
Prof. P. T. Dix Arnold of the Dairy
hased two registered Guern- Department of the U. of Florida re-


m. wa~ uougnt rrom the estate of M. G. Seath, Far
Hills, New Jersey. His dam, Coronation Majestic Hopeful, has a record of
13,569 lbs. milk and 694 lbs. of fat, made on three times daily milking in 365
days. His sire was Fairlawn Actress' Hornet.
Mr. Cone bought Edisto Farms G. uryman from Edisto Farms, Denmark,
South Carolina His dam, Edisto Farm's Jackie, has a record of 14,539 lbs.
mi and 634 bs. at, made on two times daily milking in 365 days. His sire was
Fairlawn Hornet's General.
bull, eaC. D. GOODWYNE Jacksoill, as Purchad th'gist Guernsey
oore lrt aOw Cherokee from ni I L .
S sire rams, Jacksonville. Te dam is Di

L. S Thas Purchased the regioor Ch ero sey bull Shantituc
Ben s Jury, from lob_ ,-, Barron Wisconsin. The dam is Sha
Jur inda d the sire, Cobble Creek Lads Benny. ntituck
6 FLORIDA DAIRy NEWS


ported on the Guernsey animals n the
Experiment Station herd. Seven of the
original animals are still in the herd,
begun in 1950, and the progeny of the
original animals now number 35 head,
Visitors introduced by Extension
Dairyman C. W. Reaves were Herb
Howell, Astoria Experiment Station O
the University o and Prof
John K. Loo Animal Husband De
Apartment, Cornels bnivm San
New York. Trnee haUve brsiy ate-
ing animal nutrit.emen haveibeen study
gathered at the and o motion
era] requirement of Florida on in-
cattle Of dairy and be








American Guernsey Cattle Club to Meet


in Miami Beach May 4-7, 1958

The 81st Annual Meeting of the American Guernsey Cattle Club is sched-
uled to meet in Miami Beach, May 4-7 with headquarters at the Balmoral
Hotel, site of the Florida Dairy Association's 1957 Convention. George Bout-
well of Lake Worth is chairman of the Florida arrangements committee for
the convention.
Florida Guernsey breeders and others who may consider attending will be
interested in the convention program schedule which is as follows:


Sunday, May 4
5:30 P.M.-Welcoming Reception
Monday, May 5
I:oo P.M.-Miami Area Tour, In-
cluding Barbecue Dinner
Tuesday, May 6
9:00 A.M.-Special Events
Afternoon, Miami Tour
Dinner at the Balmoral
Wednesday, May 7
Io:oo A.M.-Convention Business Pro-
gram
Group Luncheon
Adjournment for side
visits to Cuba and Nassau


Sellers Elected By F.G.C.C.
At Orlando Annual Meeting
Leon H. Sellers, veteran Guernsey
breeder of St. Petersburg, was elected
president of the Florida Guernsey Cattle
Club for the coming year at the organi-
zation's annual meeting held Wednes-
day, March 19, at the T. G. Lee Dairy,
Orlando.
Sellers was advanced from the office
of vice president to succeed Wiley P.
Waldrep of Hollywood, who had served
as president for the past two years.
Other officers elected were George
Boutwell, Lake Worth, vice president;
John H. Cone, Plant City, re-elected
secretary-treasurer; and J. McK. Jeter
of Winter Haven, Florida Golden
Guernsey Representative.
Directors elected in addition to the
officers are: Earl Jensen, Stuart;
Charles Johnson, Jacksonville; Jack P.
Dodd, Orlando; Carroll L. Ward, Jr.,
Orlando; Mrs. Wilbur J. Casey, Largo;
C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee; and Walter
Schmid, Sarasota. Dr. Roberto Parajon
of Havana, Cuba, is an honorary di-
rector.
The Walter Schmid Guernsey Dairy
was presented with the Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club "Sargeant Trophy" for
ownership of Guernsey cow having the
highest butterfat production (figured to
mature equivalent) in Florida during
the past year.
The Carroll Ward, Jr., "Lay Laine
Dairy" was presented the F.G.C.C.


trophy for his Florida State Fair grand
champion Florida bred bull and another
for his grand champion Florida bred
cow.


Guernsey Cattle Club
Meeting Held In Tampa
The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club held
its usual meeting and banquet in Tampa
at the conclusion of the State Fair Dairy
Show honoring Guernsey exhibitors as
well as Fair officials and judges for the
dairy show.
Wiley Waldrep, Ft. Lauderdale,
president of the organization, presided.
The Annual Meeting of the Guernsey
Cattle Club was set for March 19, to
be held at the T. G. Lee Dairy, Or-
lando.

Good Housekeeping "Seal"
Given Golden Guernsey Milk
Announcement was recently made by
Golden Guernsey, Inc., national market-
ing organization of Golden Guernsey
milk, that the Good Housekeeping maga-
zine "Guarantee Seal" has been awarded
"trademarked Golden Guernsey Milk."

New Dairy Film Available called
"White Magic of Milk"
The Milk Industry Foundation has
just released a new 12-minute, I6mm
color film titled "The White Magic of
Milk", which is available for loan to
high school and college classes in home
economics and any interested consumer
groups.
The theme of the film is "how the
proper use of milk helps to balance the
family budget as it balances the family
diet." It is a simple and entertaining
explanation of the way in which milk
contributed to good health and is suit-
able for either children or adult audi-
ences.
To secure the film in Florida send
your request, well in advance of your
showing date, to the Florida Dairy As-
sociation, 615 Park St., Jacksonville.


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Regular stiff Du Pont "Tynex" ny.
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fine nylon filaments. Holds up to
50% more cleaning solution.
"Bi-Nu'" Blocks
Sanitary white composition blocks.
Won't split, crack, chip, mark or
mar. Waterproof; unaffected by
cleaners.


Powerful cleaning action. Du Pont "Tynex"
white nylon "stay.put" bristles in white "B-lNu"
waterproof block.


rk .. I "BEAVER"
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Heavily tufted Du Pont "Tynex" white nylon.
Will outwear many vegetable fibre brushes. A
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for lasting service.

Order From Your Dealer
KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
BELOIT. WISCONSIN


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 7








Jersey Tops Florida Record
of Butterfat Production


JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NI



NATIONAL HONORS WON UNDER T
OF AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE C
WALTER WELKENER, Holly Hill Farm, Jacksonville, h
national honors for an outstanding Jersey bull he bred and o
Observer Design Sybil Elmno, has been named a Senior Superior
that he has passed on both high production and good breed type
ten of which have been tested for production. They averaged
containing 518 lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-milking, 305-day
lent basis. The bull also has ten daughters classified for bree
average rating of 87.oo00%. The average classification score for all
last year was 85.49%..
Welkener's Senior Superior Sire has been officially classified
achieving the top rating of Excellent.
A. T. ALVAREZ, Jacksonville, owns a registered Jersey co
rated a Tested Dam, indicating that she has three offspring w
duction records. The three daughters of Royal Standard Fanny
lbs. milk containing 467 lbs. butterfat on a twice-daily-milking,
equivalent basis.
SKINNERS' DAIRY, Jacksonville, also owns a registered J
a recent rating of Tested Dam. Three daughters of Cornelii
averaged 9,Io6 lbs. milk containing 495 lbs. butterfat on a twi
305-day mature equivalent basis.
Two new Florida members of the American Jersey Cattle
during the past quarter are Kenneth L. Paterson, Orlando, and Ro


Venice.
The following production records were supervised by
Florida. Reports direct to the Florida Dairy News are included
Days
In


Owner and Record
A. T. ALVAREZ, Jacksonville
Elect Standard Bossy ................
Elect's Fillpail Irene ...............
Alvarez Rex Dust Vale ......... . ... ..
Alvarez Rex Fanny's Favorite ..............
Alvarez Rex Bessie's Bet ..........
FAIRGLADE JERSEY DAIRY, Geneva
Butterking Nadine M imi ...................
X enia G low Theresa ............. ........
Louwood Basil's Glady ..............


Age Milk


GULF WIND DAIRY, Venice
X Standard Ivy Ida ....................... 5-3
JUDGE, B. W., Orlando
Brampton Records Signal Dinah ........... 6-3
Hubertine's Caroline Louise ............... 3-2
Sybil O nyx Irm a ...................... 1-10
MAGILL, F. D., Grand Crossing
Standard Design Edwina .................. 4-3
X. Standard Design's Jo ................... 1-10
MEADOWBROOK FARMS, Jacksonville
Viola Draconis M ati .............. ...... 6
SKINNERS' DAIRY, Jacksonville
Xenia Design Pansy ..6-8
Elixir Design Pansy ....... ............ 6-
STUART, J. K., Bartow 5
Biltmore Signal Queenie
Glencoe Zipper Edith ............. .. 5-1
Jester Standard Margaret .......... -6
WELKE"" ""****** 3-1
WELKENER, WALTER, Holly Hill Farm, Jacksonville
X. Standard Ivy Emblem
Sybil Pompey Rosalie .................. 6-8
8 . ... ... ......... .. . . 7-7


th
thr


S A Jersey, owned by T. G. Lee of
Orlando, finished a DHIA 305-day,
twice-daily-milking, record in February,
ESTING 1957, of 12,590 lbs. milk and 897 Ibs.
ILUB butterfat, the highest 305-day butterfat
record reported to date for any cow of
as been awarded any breed tested in Florida. The cow
wns. The bull, milked over a year, making 13,960 lbs.
Sire, indicating milk and I,oog lbs. butterfat in the first
to his daughters, 365 days of her lactation. While DHIA
9,572 lbs. milk lactation records are reported for the
mature equiva- first 305 days and no lactation records
d type with an of over 305 days are filed in the Na-
erseys classified tional DHIA Record System, it is
Jerseys classified .
worthy of note that this cow produced
over I,ooo lbs. butterfat in twelve
for breed type months on DHIA test.
It is the first and only 1,000 lb. butter-
w that has been fat record made by a cow on test in
ith official pro- Florida. This cow was part of the 450
averaged 9,066 cow herd of T. G. Lee. This herd was
305-day mature also one of the top ten in average pro-
duction in the 1956-57 year (9,oo9 lbs.
Jersey cow with 4% fat-corrected milk).
a Design 'iolet Unlike the herd with the champion
ce-daily-milking, milk producer, the Lee herd was not
owner-milked but was cared for by com-
SClub reported petent interested herdsmen. Also, a farm
bert J. Gomber, program to produce maximum pasture
and forage has been followed for several
e University of years, and the quality was excellent the
ough March Io. year the record was made. Some months,
the cows had rotational grazing, with
one feeding of chopped green forage and
Lbs. Lbs. one feeding of silage daily. This record
Milk Butterfat certainly is inducement that a herd feed-
ing program that includes maximum
9,258 443 amounts of high quality forage is con-
9,366 508 ductive to high production at economical
8,579 397 per unit cost.
7,792 385
7,735 347 (C. W. Reaves' D.H.I.A. Newsletter)

.. No Substitute For Work


3u0 IU,L293 54
305 9,678 468 "There is a time in every man's edu-
289 10,729 473 cation when he arrives at the convic-
tion . that he must take himself for
298 11,035 638 better for worse as his portion, that
though the wide universe is full of good,
305 9no kernel of nourishing corn can come
294 8,421 405 to him but through his toil bestowed
295 7,011 348 upon that plot of ground which is given
to him to till." (Ralph Waldo Emerson)


305 8,624
305 7,354


Free Film Available On
Farm Milk Line Cleaning


301 10,039 531 Filmed especially for the dairy farmer

and those charged with the responsibll't
280 10,122 s41 of quality control n ml S a 40-minute
S 476 6m movie in color covering the
Proper washing of farm milk line sys-
305 9,942 515 teams and bucket milking machines.
305 8,992 475 T'here is no charge for this film, en-
30; 8,270 444 titled "C. I. P.", which may be obtained

for showing simply by contacting Babson
305 11,767 720 Bros. Co., 2843 West I9th St., Chicago
305 12,925 658 23, Illinois.


EWS


*^'


rLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Jersey Club Meeting Held
At Florida State Fair
Directors and members of the Florida
Jersey Cattle Club present at the State
Fair in Tampa for the Dairy Cattle
Show held a special meeting there Feb-
ruary 6th honoring Jersey exhibitors and
visitors to the Fair.
Dupont Magill of Jacksonville, presi-
dent of the Association, presided.
Announcement was made at the meet-
ing that the organization had selected
Charles Schack, F.F.A. member of
Greenwood, to represent Florida in the
National Jersey Achievement Contest.
Also that the organization would sponsor
a "plaque" for the State Winner in this
Contest each year.
Announcement was also made that the
Club will sponsor sending 4-H members
with creditable animals to the annual
Mid-South Fair at Memphis next Sep-
tember.
The Club also voted to sponsor a "re-
volving trophy" to be presented to the
high individual cow on Herd Improve-
ment Registry on a io-year basis.
Announcement was made that the
1958 Annual Jersey Sale of the Florida
Jersey Cattle Club has been set for Au-
gust 21 in Jacksonville, and the annual
meeting of the organization will be held


Dupont Magill, president of the Florida Jer-
sey Cattle Club, with his mother, Mrs. J. D.
Magill, his son Albert, and daughter Mary,
at Jacksonville District 4-H Dairy Show. Al-
bert and Mary both won honors at the Show.

in Jacksonville also, the evening before
the Sale.

Georgia Dairy Convention
The Georgia Dairy Association, a
dairy-wide organization including both
producers and distributors in its mem-
bership, reports a successful Annual
Meeting and Convention held March
5-6 in Atlanta.
Phil McGinty, president of Irving-
dale Farms, Atlanta, was re-elected
president and James E. Jackson, Execu-
tive Secretary.


Lafayette County Dairymen
Form Artificial Breeders Group
The Lafayette County Dairymen's As-
sociation have organized a new Artificial
Breeders Association to be chartered and
start operation as soon as supplies are
received and arrangements completed
with the American Breeders Service.
Progressive dairymen who have re-
ceived special training in artificial breed-
ing at Clemson, S. C., include R. A.
Jackson, L. C. Jackson, Bishop Jackson,
Foye Jackson, Pasco Jackson and R. L.
Koon. Wyatt O'Steen and Foye Jack-
son have qualified to serve as breeding
technicians.

Milk Price In Miami Area
Milk producers in South Florida's
Federal Milk Market Area received a
blend price of 59.IC per gallon for their
milk during the month of January.
Producers received the Class I price of
6o.2c for 94.5% of their milk while
the Class II price was 39.9c by the
market price formula which uses a freight
differential and a butterfat differential
of 7.5c per point up or down from 4%
milk.
Dairy feed prices for the area in Jan-
uary were $3.75 per cwt. for 20%
mixed dairy feed and $2.80 per cwt. for
citrus pulp.


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FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 9








HOLSTEIN CATTLE CLUB NEWS



Official Records of Holstein-Friesian Cows

at Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

Several registered Holstein-Friesian cows in the herd of the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station, Gainesville, have completed official production tests
under Advanced Registry rules. Testing was supervised by the University of
Florida in cooperation with the Holstein-Friesian Association of America.
Oak Lucy Willeln 3636103 produced 14,253 lbs. of milk and 440 Ibs. of
butterfat in 305 days at the age of 4 years and 2 months, on 2 milkings daily.
Remcrest Fond Millie 3797666 produced 12,942 Ibs. of milk and 448 lbs.
of butterfat in 305 days at the age of 3 years and 6 months, on 2 milkings daily.
In the Ten-Months' Division of the Advanced Registry which includes
special calving requirements in addition to high production records, Hickoryvale
Admiral Lana 3705298 (VG) produced 13,959 lbs. of milk and 505 lbs. of
butterfat on 2 milkings daily.


South Is Rapidly Growing
New Holstein Herd Area
Throughout the 48 states, seed stock
was officially transferred to 19,369 "new
buyers"-dairymen who had never be-
fore owned a registered Holstein during
the year 1957. 2,645 of these new
owners of Holsteins are located in the
Southern and Southwestern states and
24 are in Florida. According to esti-
mates made by the national association,
the gain during the past ten years in
the southern states has been 169 per cent.

Holsteins Exported
Registered Holsteins literally "got
around" in 1957. The Holstein-Friesian
Association of America reports that
1,51o head were officially transferred to
new owners in 28 other countries with
Mexico, Venezuela, Peru, Canada and
Cuba buying the greatest numbers. It
is estimated that 90 percent of all dairy
cattle in Mexico, Central and South
America and the Caribbean countries are
of Holstein origin.

New Registered
Holstein Handbook
The Holstein-Friesian Association of
America has announced the publication
of a new reference guide to its extensive
programs of breed improvement and pro-
motion.
"Registered Holstein Handbook", just
off the press, is a concise, 20 page outline
of all major phases of organized Holstein
activity.
In addition, it provides Holstein
breeders a ready reference to more spe-
cialized publications of completely de-
tailed information on various Association
programs.
The new Handbook is built around
capsule descriptions of the workings and


applications of official breed improve-
ment programs.
It also contains sections on registry
and transfer procedures, local-level Hol-
stein clubs, breed promotion and the Hol-
stein Junior Program.
Big and attractive, "Registered Hol-
stein Handbook" is printed in red, green
and black. It is profusely illustrated with
35 outstanding photographs.
Copies are available from The Hol-
stein-Friesian Association of America's
national headquarters at Brattleboro,
Vermont.


Buddy Hull (left) shows his two blue-
ribbon Holstein heifers to Tommy Harrell.
For the last three months prior to the Florida
State Fair where he showed the heifers,
Buddy kept them at the high school in
Gainesville and was assisted with their grom-
ing by C. W. Reaves, extension dairyman,
and E. B. Turlington, vocational agriculture
teacher. Buddy also was a member of the
F. F. A. Dairy Judging Team from Gainesville.
His father is L. B. (Red) Hull, dairyman of
Micanopy and producer director of the Florida
Dairy Association.


Holstein Breaks Own Record
For New Florida Record
In Milk Production
A grade Holstein cow, owned by W.
J. Simmons of Jacksonville, completed
a 305-day record in December, 1956,
of 21,960 Ibs. of milk and 683 Ibs.
butterfat. This is the highest milk record
reported to date in Florida in any pro-
duction testing program. The record of
this cow is more impressive in that
her previous year's record was 20,220
lbs. milk and 682 lbs. fat, the highest
milk record reported to that time.
She calved January 27, 1955, and
made the 20,220 lbs. milk on a DHIA
305-day record. She calved again on
February 22, 1956 (just 12 months and
26 days from her previous calving) and
proceeded to break her own record as
well as the state record, giving two
great records in successive years. This
record disproves the thought that one
outstanding record is succeeded by a low
one.
The cow was fed and handled with a
herd of approximately I50 cows, mostly
grades. She received no special feed
during either record, but was fed accord-
ing to her production. She was milked
twice a day and was not pampered, but
received the good practical feed and care
provided all his cows by W. J. Simmons.
His entire herd averaged 8,8o0 lbs. milk,
a.6% test, and 404 lbs. butterfat (9,580
lbs. 4% fat-corrected-milk). It is an
excellent example of the development of
a high production herd by one who is
in the dairy business to make a living,
(as most dairymen are).
(C. W. Reaves' D.H.I.A. Newsletter)

Important For Consumers
To Study Nutrition
(Fla. Times-Union Editorial)
"Important as it is for producers to
keep up with scientific progress, it is
equally important for consumers to keep
up with scientific progress in the field
of nutrition. If they did, these products
-meat, eggs, and milk-would be the
ones to gain the most, for the average
American, though he eats too much of
many things, still eats less meat, eggs,
and milk than nutritionists advise. These
foods are high in protein, and nutrition-
ists say Americans ought to consume a
higher proportion of high protein foods."


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I ~


,i~g=L'




















ED NEUENDORF, Babson representative in
Florida, pushes the button on the Electrobrain,
automatic push button pipe line washer, as
he explains its new, improved features to
the Florida Surge Dealers. Left to right:
Bill Rooks, Sales Manager for Harry Blair;
Harry Blair, West Hollywood; Bob Jameson
and Earl Jackson, Tampa. Not pictured are:
A. C. Mohs, Marianna, and Y. Herlong Pal-
mer, Jacksonville.


Good Cow Milking
Stressed At Meeting
Good Cow Milking is a necessity for
dairymen today with the need for high
production at the lowest possible cost.
At Babson Bros. Co. annual sales meet-
ing in Toledo, Ohio, on January 23 and
24, Florida Surge Dealers learned how
they can help farmers get better cow
milking.
The importance of following a set of
rules of good cow milking was stressed
since pipe line milking is so prevalent
in Florida. Pipe line milking takes a
lot of work out of cow milking but the
rules for money making milking still
must be followed in order to have less
udder trouble and higher milk produc-
tion.
Good practices to follow when milk-
ing cows includes washing and massaging
the udder about one minute before at-
taching the machine, take a sample of
milk from each quarter in a strip cup,
milk the cow out completely and remove
the machine as soon as she is milked out.
The latest model pipe line equipment
to help dairy farmers was introduced
at the meeting. A new cleaned-in-place
milk valve that needs no brushing and
that can be adapted to existing pipe lines
was shown.
Many improvements were made on
the automatic push button pipe line
washer, the Electrobrain. The Electro-
brain is now in a sealed, stainless steel
case which protects the mechanism from
moisture.


U. S. Milk Consumption Is Up
U. S. per capital consumption of fluid
milk and cream in 1956 moved up to
355 pounds as compared with 352 pounds
in 1955. For 1957, this figure is ex-
pected to exceed 356 pounds.


Florida Holstein Breeders
Elect Rusterholz President
The Florida Holstein Cattle Club
elected A. J. Rusterholz, Jr., of Apop-
ka, president and re-elected Kent Price,
Palm Beach, Assistant County Agent, as
secretary-treasurer.
Rusterholz succeeded Herman Boyd,
who had served as president of the or-
ganization since it was formed about
three years ago. Mr. Boyd was con-
tinued as an officer of the Association
as vice president.
The group discussed encouraging more
youngsters in being interested in dairy-
ing and decided to make every effort to
provide more and better calves for 4-H
and F.F.A. members in the state.
Bob Cain, Southeastern field repre-
sentative with the Holstein-Friesian As-
sociation of America, told the group
that more Holsteins had been classified
in Florida this year than in any previous
year, which he felt indicated more pure-
bred activity and more interest in better
dairy animals.
The group also discussed its annual
sale which is usually held in August of
each year and instructed the sale com-
mittee to decide on the sale site and final
details at its next meeting.


THE VALUE OF COWS
"The people of the United States de-
pend on cows," said Johnny in school
one day.
"Why?" asked his teacher.
"If it wasn't for cows," he replied,
"there wouldn't be cowboys, and if it
wasn't for cowboys, most folks in movies
and TV wouldn't have no way to make
a living, and the rest of us wouldn't
have nothing to live for."


A GOOD RULE FOR ALL
A little brother and sister were late
on their way to school. He began to
cry, and said, "Oh, Sissy, let's kneel
down and pray that we won't be late."
"Oh, no, Buddy," she replied, "let's
keep trotting and pray as we trot."


TRI COUNTY DAIRY CATTLE
ASSOCIATION
Let us help you select high-quality
producing cattle and calves from Wis-
consin's finest dairy area. Orders filled
at your direction. Fieldman service avail-
able.
WRITE OR CALL:
FRANCIS DARCEY & SONS
Phone: 264
Box 143, Watertown, Wisconsin.


JOHN DARCEY
555 S.W. 14th Ave., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Phone: Jackson 4-3362


WISCONSIN DAIRY CATTLE
For Sale
We have 20 head of high grade Hol-
stein and Guernsey cows and first calf
springers, being shipped in from Wiscon-
sin weekly. All calfhood vaccinated and
Bangs tested. Can be seen 2 miles west
of Brandon or 5 miles east of Tampa, on
U.S. 60.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION WRITE:
WILLIAM O. CAREY
Rt. 1, Box 216 Phone: 44-4564
LIMONA, FLA. TAMPA



Classified Advertising


RATES FOR ALL CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
12c PER WORD


FOR SALE

DAIRY EQUIPMENT: Used pasteurizers, compres-
sors, Enreco papermachine, bottling and capping
machines, motors, other pieces. Good condition
and reasonable. BILL CARPENTER, Rutherfordton,
N. C.

YEARLING HOLSTEIN HEIFERS, Calfhood vacci-
nated, from artificial breeding. Priced at $150
to $175 per head. RAY REILLY, Route 4, Janes-
ville, Wisconsin.

COASTAL BERMUDA HAY, $30 per ton, FOB Tal-
lahassee. Write or call CHAS. COBLE, Velda
Farms, Tallahassee, Fla.

MILK TANK TRUCK: 1,000 gal. Heil tank, 1954
International, 150 series chassis. Good paint, good
tires (new recaps). Needed larger tank. $3,000
cash. E. F. FROEHLICH, Rt. 1, Box B-50, West
Palm Beach.

GREENGATES, LIVESTOCK GATES-Steel tubing,
woven wire, light weight, tough, attractive-ten
foot $13.90-other lengths. Silver Lakes Estates,
Route 2, Leesburg, Florida.

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel reinforced
Concrete, 21/2 feet wide. $60.00 delivered, $50.00
your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00 and
$70.00. Atlas Concrete Products, Inc., Box 6122,
Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone CRestwood
7-0841.


FARM FOR SALE

UP-STATE FLORIDA DAIRY. Profitable, well es-
tablished 450-acre Grade A operation. COMPLETE
with 130 milk cows and heifers, 2 tractors, farm
and dairy equipment, new harvester, 1-ton truck,
etc. 350 acres tillable, includes 50 bottom, bal-
ance wooded, 75 acre pasture for 130 head stock.
Good set improvements, modern 6-room house,
fireplace-see picture in Catalog. 62-ft. barn, 20
stanchions, Grade A milk house, silo, tenant house,
2 tobacco barns, few other buildings. On paved
U.S. Highway, handy to town. Disabled owner
offers a real moneymaker at $100,000, $40,000
down. Free WINTER catalog, bargains coast to
coast. UNITED FARM AGENCY, 721-fd West
Colonial Drive, Orlando, Fla.


WANTED TO BUY


truck combination if price is moderate. Write J.
D. FUQUA, Altha, Fla.

FIRST QUARTER, 1958 11







Twenty-one Counties Send Teams To State 4-H

Dairy Show for Judging Contest

The IIth annual state 4-H Club Dairy Show and Judging Contest at
the Central Florida Fair in Orlando the week of February 24 was declared
to be the best in both numbers and quality of animals, as well as participation
by boys and girls interested in dairy cows. Club members from 17 counties
exhibited 152 animals of the five principal dairy breeds, and teams from 21
counties participated in the judging contest.
Twenty-one judges from 13 counties earned the right to enter final com-
petition in June for the state 4-H dairy judging team which will represent
Florida at the national judging contest in Waterloo, Iowa, in October. The
finalists include Johnny Kaylor, Gail Williams and Paul Sheffield, Polk; David
Harrell, Charles Chason, Betty Bowie and Albert Magill, Duval; Jeanette
Foote and Larry Hiatt, Orange; Graham Hayes and J. D. Windsor, Palm
Beach; Dennis and Leslie Diaz, Hillsborough; Ben Franklin, Jr., Dade; John
Sellers, Leon; Rick Allan, Pinellas; Tommy Prator, Nassau; Thomas Gomber,
Sarasota; Willis Tate, Jr., Sumter; Jackie Wilson, Volusia; and Paul Dixon,


Marion.
The Polk County team, composed of
Johnny Kaylor, Gail Williams, Paul
Sheffield and Caroline Thornhill, took
first place as a county group and was
awarded a beautiful silver tray by
the Florida Times-Union. Duval and
Orange teams were second and third,
receiving plaques from the Florida Re-
tail Federation and Florida Power and
Light Company. The American Jersey
Cattle Club awarded plaques to the
top three individuals in the contest,
Johnny Kaylor, Polk; John Sellers,

Entries came from Holmes and Jack-
son counties in western Florida to Palm
Beach and Dade in the south. Other
counties represented in the show included
Orange, Duval, Polk, Nassau, Manatee,
Brevard, Volusia, Leon, Jefferson, Pasco,
Seminole, Hillsborough, and Marion.

IN THE PANEL AT LEFT, From Top to
Bottom:
C. T. Bickford, manager of the Central
Florida Fair, presents $100 bills to Tom
Peter Chaires III, Old Town, and Gail Wil-
liams, Winter Haven, as Florida's outstanding
4-H members. The awards were provided by
O. P. Swope, past president of the Fair As-
sociation.
Al Hammond, State winner in 4-H Dairy
Achievement and winner of a National Prize
of a $400 scholarship, with one of his 4-H
animals, a grade Holstein.
Ernest Fischer, Windermere, with his junior
champion Jersey, and Paul Sheffield with
Caroline Stuart's cow, the grand champion
and senior champion Jersey. Fischer and his
Jersey, Sybil Advancer Elaine, also won the
M. A. Schack trophy for the best Jersey bred
by the exhibitor.
Virginia Thornhill, Polk County, with the
grand champion registered Ayrshire, and Jane
Vernon, Hillsborough County, with the re-
serve grand champion.
Robin Alvarez, Jacksonville, receiving the
Florida Feed Dealers Association trophy for
the best butterfat production during 1957
from J. P. Bowers, Wayne Feed Supply Co.,
Orlando. Robin's cow tied for the fat record
with one owned by Martin Schack, Green-
wood, but excelled all others in milk produc-
tion.
12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


The show was conducted by the dairy
and 4-H Club departments of the Agri-
cultural Extension Service and sponsored
by the Central Florida Fair, which pro-
vided close to $3,500 in prize and ex-
pense money. The State Department of
Agriculture contributed $500.
C. W. Reaves and T. W. Sparks,
extension dairymen, were co-chairmen of
the show. R. E. Burleson, dairyman
with the USDA Agricultural Extension
Service, and J. McK. Jeter, Florida
Guernsey fieldman, Winter Haven,
judged the animals. Don Adams, Florida
Power and Light Company, and Jack
Dodd, Guernsey dairyman, judged fit-
ting and District Agents K. S. McMul-
len and W. J. Platt judged showman-
ship.
County agents and assistants coached
the judging teams and assisted the club
members in getting their animals to the
show. Howard Taylor, Flagler, served
as master of ceremonies, and Ben Floyd,
Dixie, and R. K. Price, Palm Beach,
were ringmasters. Clerks of the show
were Howard Young, assistant exten-
sion dairyman, Dick Stark, State Mar-
keting Bureau, Miss Ann Thompson,
assistant state girls' 4-H Club agent, and
Miss Helen Holstein, district home de-
monstration agent.
Tommy Edge, Winter Park, who had
already won the state efficient dairy pro-
duction contest, showed the senior and
grand champion registered Guernsey cow
and won both fitting and showmanship
contests. Ann Smith, Pasco, showed the
junior and reserve champion registered
Guernsey. In grade Guernsey classes,
Jimmy Kilcrease, Manatee, exhibited
junior and grand champion, while Donna
Dell Miller, Polk, had the senior and
reserve champion.
Caroline Stuart, Polk, showed the
senior and grand champion registered
Jersey, with Robin Alvarez, Duval, cap-
turing reserve championship honors.
(Continued on Next Page)
























Jackie Wilson, DeLand, receives bouquet as
"Dairy Sweetheart" from R. T. Tucker, presi-
dent of the Central Florida Fair, at the State
4-H Show in Orlando, February 24.

STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
Ernest Fischer, Orange, had the junior
champion, which was also the best bred
by exhibitor. Jeanette Foote, Orange,
showed junior and grand champion in
the grade Jersey classes, with R. C.
Braddock, Duval, taking reserve cham-
pion honors.
Virginia Thornhill's senior champion
from Polk County went on to become
grand champion in the registered Ayr-
shire classes. Nancy and Toni Vernon,
Hillsborough, and Bill Parent, Manatee,
had the best three animals bred by ex-
hibitor. Larry Hiatt, Orange, showed
the junior champion.
Palm Beach County came in strong
on the registered Holsteins, with Harold
Price taking junior and grand champion-
ship on his heifer and J. D. Windsor
showing the reserve champion.
A senior yearling entered by Clifton
Lyon II, Holmes, took junior and grand
championship ribbons in the grade Hol-
stein classes. The cow owned by Alfred
Hammond, Jr., Orange, was senior
champion, while the junior yearling
shown by Mike Harris, Manatee, was
reserve grand champion.
Pug Causey, Palm Beach, copped jun-
ior and grand championship ribbons with
his heifer, while Ben Franklin, Jr., Dade,
showed the reserve champion Brown
Swiss.
In showing groups of three animals,
first Io counties, in order, were Orange,
Duval, Palm Beach, Manatee, Nassau,
Polk, Jackson, Volusia, Brevard, and
Jefferson.
Awards were presented at the annual
4-H dairy banquet Monday night, given
by the Central Florida Fair.
Trophies were presented to first three
county group exhibitors by the Florida
Dairy Association and the Central Flori-
da and Northeast Florida Milk Pro-
ducers Associations. American Federal
Savings and Loan Association, Orlando,
gave the trophy to the showmanship
winner, while Dinsmore Dairy Farms


presented the trophy to the exhibitor
of the best fitted animal.
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club pro-
vided the trophy for the grand champion
Jersey and the American Jersey Cattle
Club gave plaques to those who had
shown the reserve grand champion,
champion and reserve champion grade
Jersey, and junior champion registered
Jersey.
Florida and American Guernsey
Cattle Clubs presented trophies to ex-
hibitors showing grand and reserve cham-
pions in this breed.
The Florida Ayrshire Club presented
a model Ayrshire cow to the exhibitor
of the grand champion, while the Ayr-
shire Breeders Association gave subscrip-
tions to The Ayrshire Digest to ex-
hibitors of grand and reserve champion
registered Ayrshires.
An imported Swiss cow bell, an un-
usual trophy, went to the exhibitor of
the grand champion Brown Swiss, do-
nated by the Brown Swiss Cattle Breed-
ers' Association. This group also gave
subscriptions to the Brown Swiss Bulle-
tin to exhibitors of grand and reserve
champions.
The Florida Holstein-Friesian Club
gave a model cow to the exhibitor of
(Continued on page 14)


IN THE PANEL AT RIGHT, From Top
to Bottom:
Efficient Dairy Production Contest winners
receiving checks and plaques from E. P.
Yocum, representing Southern Dairies and the
National Dairy Products Corporation, spon-
sor of the contest. Left to right are: Ben
Franklin, Dade; Linda Dixon, Polk; Corky
Gaines, Manatee; Tommy Edge, Orange, state
winner; Tommy Prator, Nassau; John Sellers,
Leon; and Al Cribbett, Assistant County
Agent of Orange County, which won the i
plaque for the top overall county 4-H program.
Tommy Edge, Winter Park, with his grand
champion Guernsey, just after he won the
showmanship contest; he also won the fit-
ting contest. Others shown, left to right,
sixth to second showmanship winners: Braxton
Powell, Cocoa; Frank Powell, Cocoa; Ernest
Fischer, Windermere; Robin Alvarez, Jackson-
ville; and Tommy Prator, Callahan.
Winners in the Ayrshire calf class, left to
right, first to seventh place: Nancy Vernon,
Tampa; Toni Vernon, Tampa; Corky Gaines,
Bradenton; Bill Parent, Bradenton; Martin
Overstreet, Bradenton; Janis Overstreet, Bra-
denton; Melvin Vernon with Nancy Vernon's
calf; and Ronald Stewart, Bradenton.
Palm Beach County animals in the State
4-H Dairy Show; Palm Beach had the cham-
pion registered Holstein and Brown Swiss.
Jackson County members and their animals.
Winning Senior Yearling Jerseys, first to
sixth places, left to right: James Smith, Hills-
borough; Ernest Fischer, Orange; Denny Den-
nison, Orange; James Balkcom, Charles Cha-
son, Duval; Yonnise Swanson, Orange; and
Eldridge Thornhill, Polk.
One aisle of the Show Barn. The cow in
the foreground is Basileus Design Star, the
reserve champion of the show, belonging to
Robin Alvarez, Jacksonville. .
FIRST QUARTER, 1958 13









Florida's Regular 27c Milk Price

Reported in Forty-Five Cities

(Many With Less Cream Than Florida Milk)

The accompanying table of milk prices during February, 1958 discloses
that the retail price of milk (standard, Grade A, pasteurized) per quart, delivered
to homes, was as high or higher than the Florida average price of 27'2c in
23 cities in other states. The price in 17 cities of eight southern states averaged
27.4c, reflecting the higher milk production costs in southern states.
The information in the table was secured from the February milk price
report of the U. S. Department of Agriculture and other reports as indicated.


Of the 63 cities listed outside of
Florida, all have a milk price of 26c
or higher as compared to the average
of 25y2c for the 25 principal cities of
the country. Of the 63 cities listed, 18
have a price of 26c to 26I2c; 24 have
a price of 27c to 27Y2c; 7 have a price
of 28c; 13 have a price of 29c to 29/2c,
and one has a price of 3112c.
It is interesting to note that 21 cities
had a price higher than the Florida
average of 27/2c while 14 cities had
a price as high or higher than Florida's
highest price of 29c in Jacksonville.
In comparing milk prices it is im-
portant that the quality and cream con-
tent of the milk be also compared.
Florida milk consumers should be in-
terested to know that only 16 of the
63 cities listed in the accompanying re-
port show milk with a cream content
as high as 4% which is reported for
Florida.
Farm Milk Price Is Up
Although the Florida milk prices to
farmers remained the same under the
stabilizing program of the Milk Com-
mission, the U. S. Department of Agri-
culture report for February shows that
the farm milk price was up 7c per hun-


STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW
(Continued from Page 13)
the grand champion registered cow in
this breed, and the Holstein-Friesian
Association of America presented plaques
and medals to exhibitors of grand and
reserve champions.
The annual butterfat record contest
ended in a tie between Robin Alvarez
of Jacksonville and Martin Schack of
Greenwood. They were awarded a
trophy, on which both names will be
engraved, by the Florida Feed Dealers'
Association.

A study of milk processing and dis-
tribution cost for 425 milk distributors
in 45 states and the District of Columbia,
made by the Indiana University School
of Business, for the year 1956 shows
that the average profit per quart of
milk is about 2c, or slightly more than


dredweight over February, 1957 and
14c above the 1952-56 average.
The retail price of milk in Jackson-
ville, Florida was increased ic a quart
early in February for home-delivered
milk but the store price remained the
same. Jacksonville milk distributors said
the increase was necessary because of
increased costs for milk from dairy
farmers of the area and an inadequate
distributor spread which had existed in
the area for many years.
Chain grocers run reduced milk prices
principally in half-gallon containers in
Jacksonville, Tampa and Miami. In
some instances, these reductions were
limited to certain days of the week.

(In the Accompanying Table)
"Prices are for Standard Pasteurized Milk
for Area from U.S.D.A. February 20, 1958
Milk Price Report, Table No. 1, unless
otherwise indicated and except for Orlando,
Ft. Myers and Pensacola, Fla., which are
not reported.
IPrice of "High Fat" Milk from U.S.D.A.
February 20 Milk Price Report, Table No.
5, believed to be comparable to Florida
"Grade A" 4.% to 4.5% butterfat milk.
Price of Standard Milk Price reported by
N. Y. Dept. of Agriculture, December 1957.
TPrice per single quart with discount on all
over first quart.


2% of the milk distributor's milk in-
come dollar.
America's milk dealers spent more
than $60 million for advertising and
promotion in 1956, according to a na-
tionwide survey conducted by Professor
G. W. Starr of Indiana University for
the Milk Industry Foundation.
Advertising and promotion expendi-
tures utilized i.i6c out of each dollar
of sales income for the milk dealers in
1956. This represents the highest ratio
expended for advertising since 1941, with
the exception of 1955, when the ratio
was I.20c.
While the milk dealers' profit margin
averaged about %c a quart, the industry
spent about 4c per quart for advertis-
ing and promotion. And it cost dealers
about twice as much (2.8c of each sales
income dollar) for taxes and licenses as
they spent for advertising and promotion.


MILK PRICE COMPARISON
March 10, 1958
(Standard Creamline Pasteurized Milk)

CREAM *PRICE
CITY % PER QT.

FLORIDA
Tampa, Fla. 4.0 27 c
Ft. Myers, Fla. 28
Jacksonville 4. -4.5 29
Orlando 27
Miami 4.1 27
Pensacola 27
(Fla. Average-27.5c)

OTHER STATES
Boston, Mass. 3.7 27
Fall River, Mass. 3.7 26
Lowell, Mass. 3.7-3.8 26
Springfield, Mass. -- 27%
Worcester, Mass. 3.6-3.7 26%
Providence, R. I. 3.7 t29
Hartford, Conn. 3.8 28
New Haven, Conn. 3.7 28
Albany, N. Y. 3.8 27
Binghampton, N. Y. 3.6-3.8 29
Buffalo, N. Y. 3.6-3.7 :31%
New York City -- 29/2
Rochester, N. Y. 3.6 27
Syracuse, N. Y. 3.7 27
Elmira, N. Y. 27
Niagara Falls, N. Y. 28
White Plains, N. Y. 29%
Yonkers, N. Y. 29%
Atlantic City, N. J. 3.65 29%
Camden, N. J. 3.9 27
Trenton, N. J. 3.6-3.8 27%
Northeastern, N. J. 29
Erie, Pa. 3.5-3.7 26
Harrisburg, Pa. 3.7 26
Johnstown, Pa. 26
Philadelphia, Pa. t29Y
Pittsburgh, Pa. 3.5 t29
Reading, Pa. 3.6 26%
Scranton, Pa. 3.7 27
Cincinnati, Ohio t29
Chicago, Ill. 3.5 29
Baltimore, Md. 29
Washington, D. C. 4.0 27
Alexandria, Va. 4.0 27
Norfolk, Va. 4.0 27
Richmond, Va. 3.7 26%
Wheeling, W. Va. 3.5 26
Asheville, N. C. 4.1-4.2 27
Charlotte, N. C. 3.8-4.1 27
Charleston, S. C. 4.0 26
Columbia, S. C. 4.0 26
Greenville, S. C. 4.0 26
Atlanta, Ga. 4.0 27
Augusta, Ga. 4.0 27
Columbus, Ga. 4.0 27
Macon, Ga. 4.0 27
Savannah, Ga. 4.0 28
Louisville, Ky. 3.7 26
Memphis, Tenn. 4.0 28
Nashville, Tenn. t29
Mobile, Ala. 3.5-4.0 26
Jackson, Miss. 4.0 27
Little Rock, Ark. 3.53 26
Baton Rouge, La. 3.8-4.0 26
New Orleans, La. 3.95 27
Oklahoma City, Okla. 3.6 27
El Paso, Texas 3.5 26
Galveston, Texas 4.0 28
Houston, Texas 4.0 28
Albuquerque, N. M. 3.5 27
Reno, Nevada 3.5 26
Los Angeles, Calif. 3.55 t27
San Francisco, Calif. 3.55 t27

Average of 63 cities outside Florida..27.38c
Florida Average ................... 27.5 c


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









MILK COMMISSION REPORT
December, January, February and March


December Meeting
The Commission's previously adopted order, revoking all orders and setting
of milk prices at the wholesale and retail level, became effective December 15.
Considerable time was devoted to discussion of several court cases which
had been brought against previous Commission orders involving payments to
producers by the Borden Dairy and a petition by distributors for a court injunc-
tion to prohibit the Commission from carrying out threatened revoking of licenses,
should their Class II and III price order effective January I not be complied
with. Distributors also attacked the Commission's order as being illegal.


The court injunction was issued and
applied only to the four distributors
whose names were entered in the case-
Foremost, Southern, Borden, (all state-
wide) and Perret's Dairy, Jacksonville.
Commission Chairman Brailey Od-
ham accused distributors of bringing the
court cases against the Commission for
the purpose of destroying it or of making
its operation ineffective. Distributors
privately said that their only object in
resorting to court action was to keep the
Commission's actions according to the
law. The Commission voted to request
the addition of $30,000.00 to its current
budget for use as attorney fees in defend-
ing its actions contested in the courts.
January Meeting
The Commission's order setting Class
II and III prices became effective Janu-
ary I.
The Commission adopted a recom-
mendation of Chairman Odham that it
request the president of the State Senate
and the Speaker of the House to name
committees for the purpose of sitting in
on Milk Commission meetings so that
they could properly inform the 1959
legislature about the Milk Commission
Law.
Adopted plans to hold a public hearing
at its February meeting on the subject
of hauling and handling charges made
to producers. A committee was named
to study the question.
Adopted an order providing for a
statewide "producer base plan" excepting
for the Pensacola area, which was held
up for consideration of policies involving
the flow of milk between Florida and
Alabama.
February Meeting
The public hearing on hauling and
handling charges was held and continued
to the March meeting.
A Foremost Dairies special contract
with 23 producers in the Chipley area
was reviewed by the Commission and
left in force due to the fact it was made
prior to the time the Commission as-


sumed control in the area. The contract
blend price of 5oc a gallon was ques-
tioned by other distributors who are
under the Commission's statewide price
order of 6Ic a gallon plus butterfat for
Class I milk, as well as fixed prices for
Class II and III milk.
Discussed and again postponed action
on revision of the producer base plan in
the Pensacola area.
Discussed defense of Commission's
statewide base plan order against a court
suit brought by Southern, Borden and
Foremost Dairies, attacking the legality
of the order.
Discussed also another new court case
brought by distributors attacking the
legality of all the Commission's present
price orders and the right of the Com-
mission to require a distributor to buy
all the milk tendered by his base pro-
ducers at prices set by the Commission
without regard to the plant's need for
the milk or the market value of the milk
according to its utilization.

To Study Producer Costs and Prices
When Chairman Odham heard two
Foremost producers testify that they
were satisfied with their 50c a gallon
blend price and received a petition from
23 other producers that they wanted the
contract continued, he commented that
it is about time the Commission make a
statewide survey and study of milk pro-
duction costs and whether or not the
present Commission price to producers
of 61c a gallon plus a butterfat differ-
ential is justified.
March Meeting
Accepted the resignation of former
Commission administrator L. K. Nicho-
las, who had been classified as assistant
administrator since Col. Dexter Lowry
was appointed administrator last August
when Nicholas' term expired.
Held a further hearing on handling
and hauling charges made to producers
and continued the hearing to the April
meeting.


Discussed and continued to the April
meeting, consideration of revising the
producer base plan for the Pensacola
area.
Discussed plans for possible additional
staff members to do regular butterfat
testing for producers, after a request for
a test-check was received from a Tampa
area producer.
Says Dairy Laws No Good
Chairman Brailey Odham, in speaking
at a hearing of the Special House and
Senate Committee for study of Florida
Agricultural Laws and possible re-or-
ganization of the State Department of
Agriculture held in Senate Chamber at
the time of the Commission's March
meeting, was quoted by the press as
saying, "Florida's milk laws are strictly
no good." A member of the "Agricul-
tural Services Study Committee" quoted
Odham as saying to the Committee about
the Milk Commission Law, "It stinks."


Florida Dairy Industry
Gains On Other States
According to reports of the U. S. De-
partment of Agriculture for 1956, the
Florida dairy industry continues to grow
faster than in other states.
Florida advanced from its 1955 po-
sition of thirty-third place to thirty-sec-
ond in milk production of 987,000,000
lbs.; from fourteenth place to thirteenth
in ice cream production of 15,887,ooo
gallons; from tenth place to ninth place
in sherbet production of 1,051,ooo gal-
lons; from eighth place to seventh in ice
milk production of 3,262,000 gallons;
and from sixteenth to fifteenth in soft
frozen dairy products of 1,528,000 gal-
lons.
Leads in 10-Year Milk Increase
Florida led all states for the past ten
year period in percentage gain of both
total milk production and milk produc-
tion per cow.


Consumers Milk Digest
Available Upon Request
The Florida Dairy Association offers
to "Dairy News" readers upon request a
20-page, illustrated booklet of "FACTS
and USEFUL INFORMATION"
about milk and milk products.
Published by the Milk Industry Foun-
dation of Washington, D. C., this
booklet is an ideal source of authentic
information on the nutritional values
of milk in the diet as compared to other
foods and contains answers to many milk
consumer questions. (Address request to
615 Park St., Jacksonville.)


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 15








1958 F.D.A. CONVENTION TO BE HELD JUNE 25-27


AT NEW "COLONIAL INN", ST. PETERSBURG BEACH


With Complete Air-conditioning, Beautiful Rooms at Moderate Rates,
Three Swimming Pools Plus Beach Swimming and Tropical Grounds,
Here F. D. A. Members Will Enjoy Florida at its Very Best.


The Florida Dairy Association Convention Arrangements Committee and
the Board of Directors believe they have provided a treat of a life-time for mem-
bers and guests who will attend the organization's 1958 Annual Meeting and
Convention at the new, modern "Colonial Inn" and its adjoining affiliated unit,
"The Desert Ranch Motel", which is equally as fine and attractive.
Three hundred and fifty modern, finely furnished, air-conditioned rooms are
available and half of these have kitchenette facilities, at special summer convention
rates of from only $6.00 to $Io.oo; children's beds will be furnished extra for
$2.oo. These rates will apply for the entire week with seven days at the price of six.
All rooms are either ground level or second floor with no worries about
elevators and with handy car parking near all rooms. Convention meeting rooms
and dining facilities are also all air-conditioned, attractive and adequate with a
modern dinner and entertainment club as an added attraction.

Less Program, More Recreation
The F.D.A. Board of Directors instructed the Program and Arrangements
Committee to plan good but shorter business sessions with more time for recreation
and rest. Such a program fits in perfectly with the facilities available at St.
Petersburg Beach and the Colonial Inn.
Recreation offered includes golf, swimming, beach hiking, just plain sunbathing,
fishing, parties, boating, sightseeing and shopping.

National Dairy Leaders on the Program
Two of the dairy industry's most popular national leaders have already
accepted a place on the Florida Convention Program. These are Dick Werner,
Executive Director of the Milk Industry Foundation, and Bob North, Executive
Director of the International Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers.


-. 41Lt St. Petersburg Beach I
The "Desert Ranch Motel," sister unit and adjacent to the "Colonial Inn" at St. Peters-
burg Beach where the 1958 Annual Meeting and Convention of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion will be held June 25 through June 27.
16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


These speakers will bring Florida
dairymen up-to-date on the important
news and happenings in the dairy indus-
try throughout the nation.
The Program Committee consists of
President John Sargeant and Producer
Chairman Jack McMullen for the pro-
ducers' program, while immediate past
president Tom Lee and F.D.A. Distrib-
utor Chairman Dolph Allison are in
charge of the distributors' portion of
the program.
Joint producer and distributor pro-
grams will include speakers, panel dis-
cussions and conference group meetings
on today's major dairy problems in Flor-
ida.
Will study Future Programs
An important feature of the F.D.A.
Convention will be progress reports and
discussion of the industry's present edu-
cational, promotional and public rela-
tions programs now being conducted by
the local Dairy Council units in Jackson-
ville, Tampa and Miami areas, and the
activities of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion.

Special ladies' sightseeing and party
features are also planned by the Ladies'
Auxiliary program committee.

Room Reservations

Members are requested to send all
convention room reservation requests to
the Florida Dairy Association office, 615
Park St., Jacksonville 4.

Program Time Schedule

June 24-Evening "Early Bird" Party
June 25-Morning Registration
Afternoon Business Session
Night Dinner and Program
June 26-Morning Business Session
Noon Luncheon
Afternoon Recreation, Etc.
Night Dinner and Entertain-
ment
June 27-Morning Business Session
Noon Luncheon
Afternoon Adjournment














THE COLONIAL INN


St. Petersburg


Beach


Cordially


invites


all Members


and Guests


of the


FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION, INC.

to attend the

1958 CONVENTION and ANNUAL MEETING


JUNE


25,


26,


27


And Spend


a Full Week


With Us


Make your reservations now to the Association Office
E. T. Lay, Florida Dairy Association, 615 Park St., Jacksonville 4
LOW CONVENTION RATES
FIRST QUARTER, 1958 17







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Agricultural Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station



DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE


COMBINES VARIED ACTIVITIES
By: DR. E. L. FOUTS, Head
Department of Dairy Science, U. of Fla.

For many years, the University of Florida has conducted research programs
in dairy husbandry and dairy products dealing mainly with matters which are
vital to the dairy industry of Florida. To make this possible,
a dairy farm consisting of 1200 acres of land, with suitable
buildings including a milking barn, laboratory and offices is
maintained at Hague, Florida. Jersey, Guernsey and Holstein
cows are kept for research, teaching and demonstration pur-
poses. A modern dairy plant is maintained for teaching and
experimentation in the field of dairy manufacture.
The teaching program in Dairy Husbandry includes a
study of breeding, production and management of dairy cattle
along with suitable courses in chemistry, biology, bacteriology
FOUTS and related subjects. In the study of dairy products, processing
and manufacturing are taught with complete facilities for
pasteurization, making of ice cream, cottage cheese, condensed milk and chocolate
milk.


Graduates may elect to find employ-
ment in many fields related to these
studies. He will be trained for a career
in production of milk, processing, sales,
supplies and equipment used by the dairy
industry, plant management, dairy tech-
nology or dairy engineering.
A series of conferences, short courses
and demonstrations are held throughout
each year to provide opportunities for
people in all segments of the industry to
come to the University of Florida for a
few days of specialized training in some
specific branch of the industry. Infor-
mation concerning these courses with
dates for the 1958 conferences are given
on this page.
Plans for the future include a con-
tinual revision of curricula to give better
training to students in all fields of dairy-
ing; also an expanded program of re-
search to bring answers to new problems
as they occur in Florida dairying. In
Dairy Manufacturing present projects
include "New Methods for Processing
Cultured Buttermilk," "Growth Rates
of Dairy Organisms under Controlled
Temperatures and Hydrogen Ion Con-
centration" and "Continuous Fermenta-
tion of Dairy Products." In Dairy
Husbandry, projects in progress include:
"A Study of the Ensilability of Florida
Forage Crops," "Factors Affecting


Breeding Efficiency and Depreciation in
Florida Dairy Herds," "Post Partum
Development of the 'Bovine Stomach
Compartments and Observations on
Some Characteristics of Their Con-
tents," "A Study of Production, Repro-
duction and Conformation of the Flor-
ida Agricultural Experiment Station
Herd," "Sub-Normal Milk: Its Pro-
duction, Correction and Utilization,"
"Irrigation of Temporary Pastures for
Dairy Cattle" and "Medicated Feeds
for Dairy Calves."
The teaching and research staff of the
Department of Dairy Science includes:
E. L. Fouts, Head, Department of Dairy
Science; R. B. Becker, Dairy Husband-
man; S. P. Marshall, Associate Dairy
Husbandman; J. M. Wing, Assistant
Dairy Husbandman; P. T. Dix Arnold,
Associate Dairy Husbandman; L. E.
Mull, Professor, Dairy Manufactures;
W. A. Krienke, Associate Professor,
Dairy Manufactures; and B. J. Liska,
Assistant Professor, Dairy Manufac-
tures.
The Dairy Extension workers are:
Clarence W. Reaves, Extension Dairy-
man; T. W. Sparks, Assistant Exten-
sion Dairyman; Howard Young, Assist-
ant Extension Dairyman (Dairy Manu-
facturing) and Ralph A. Eastwood,


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1958 Special Events
For the
FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
March 25-26
LABORATORIANS' SHORT COURSE
For laboratory personnel from state,
county, city and commercial laboratories,
who test dairy and food products, and
for milk sanitarians.

March 26-27
MILK AND FOOD SANITARIANS'
CONFERENCE
For milk and food sanitarians, labora-
tory technicians, public health workers,
veterinarians, dairy plant operators, pro-
ducers, distributors, quality control per-
sonnel, and equipment and supply dealers.
April 24-25
DAIRY FIELD DAY
For milk producers, producer-distributors,
dairy processors, herdsmen, county agents,
vocational agriculture teachers, veterinar-
ians, DHIA workers and equipment and
supply dealers.
May 27-29
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT
COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, pro-
ducer-distributors and milk producers.
October 30-31
and November 1*
DAIRY PLANT OPERATOR'S SHORT
COURSE
For dairy plant managers, sales personnel,
superintendents and assistants, owners,
dairy plant employees, producer-distrib-
utors, equipment and supply dealers;
also sanitation and regulatory personnel.
*Tentative Date

Economist, Dairy and Poultry Market-
ing.
In addition, key non-academic per-
sonnel includes: Herman Somers, As-
sistant; Johnnie Boggs, Farm Foreman;
and R. F. Bennett, Plant Superintend-
ent, Dairy Products Laboratory.
Bulletins and Circulars are published
giving results of the various projects in
research. These will be sent to anyone
requesting them and the more recent
ones are:
Bulletins
382-Manufacture of Cultured But-
termilk and Cottage Cheese.
449-A Laboratory Program for the
Dairy Plant.
527-Value of Pearl Millet Pasture
for Dairy Cattle.
539-Some Trends and Character-
istics of the Dairy Industry
in Florida.
540-Productive Life-Span of Dairy
Cattle.
(Continued on Next Page)


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







SLet's Look at Pasture Irrigation
By: DR. SIDNEY P. VIARSHALL and PROF. J. M. MYERS
University of Florida
How much will irrigation of well-fertilized pangola-white clover pasture
stretch the grazing season, increase the yield of nutrients, improve the uniformity
of feed supply obtained from pasture, and will it pay? These are some of the
factors investigated in a joint project between the departments of Dairy Science
and Agricultural Engineering.
Pangola-white clover pasture grown on high-quality, limed flatwoods soil
was fertilized annually with 90 to 126 pounds of P205 per acre in the fall, 180
to 210 pounds of K20 applied in the fall and winter, and 142 to 226 pounds
of nitrogen per acre spread during the spring, summer, and early fall. An over-
head sprinkler system was used to irrigate the pasture. Irrigations were made
when about 75 percent of the available moisture had been removed from the
top six inches of soil and sufficient water was applied each irrigation to restore
soil moisture to field capacity in the top 18-inch strata. When rainfall was in-
adequate, the interval between irrigations generally was 4 to 7 days and the
size of application varied from 0.8 to 1.2 inches. Intervals between irrigations
were shorter and water applications were larger during June, July, and August.
During the last spring, water was available to the irrigated clover pasture at
a rate equivalent to 0.3 inch per day with intervals between irrigations of 2


to 3 days.
Separate groups of milking cows were
used to graze rotationally the plots of
irrigated pasture and those of the un-
irrigated pasture during the three-year
experiment. The average initial grazing
date of March 5 for the irrigated pas-
ture was 14 days earlier than that of
the unirrigated pasture. The average
date that grazing terminated was No-
vember 7 for both pastures. Grazing
was continuous on the irrigated pasture,
but was interrupted on the unirrigated
once each year for an average period of
18 days.
The irrigated pasture furnished an
average of 6,809 pounds of total digest-
ible nutrients per year which was 21
percent more than that obtained from
the unirrigated. The productivity of the
two pastures varied by seasons and years
depending primarily on the quantity and
distribution of rainfall. However, two-
thirds of the increased yield of nutrients
by the irrigated pasture occurred during
the clover season.
Productivity by the irrigated pasture
was more uniform than that of the un-
irrigated. Since the herd requirement for
forage is rather constant, this means that
under an irrigation program forage de-
ficiency periods were minimized and
smaller amounts of surplus forage ac-
cumulated during the grazing season.
Value of the increased yield of total di-
gestible nutrients obtained by irrigation
averaged $2.13 per acre inch of water
applied during the three-year period.
The returns were higher for water ap-
plied to clover than they were for grass.
The average return per acre inch of
water was $2.43 for clover and $1.56
for grass.
Sprinkler and surface irrigation are
the two general methods used on pas-
ture. Rotary sprinklers, perforated pipe,
and certain types of rotary or stationary


nozzles come under the sprinkler system
while the surface system is made up of
a series of main and lateral ditches. The
"best system" for irrigating pasture on
a specific area is dependent on such
factors as water supply, type of pasture,
soil type, available capital, and labor
supply. Initial investment usually is
lower for surface systems ranging from
about $50 to $120 per acre as compared
to $70 to $150 per acre for sprinkler
systems. Power requirement is less for
surface systems. Labor is a major ex-
pense item.
Economic studies have shown that the
cost of owning and operating irrigation
systems vary widely and is influenced
by location, management, and type of
system. Total cost figures that are used
widely in Florida are from $1.oo to
$2.50 per acre inch of water applied
by surface systems and $2.00 to $3.50
for that from sprinkler systems.

BULLETINS AVAILABLE
(Continued from Page 18)

542-Value of Alyce Clover Pasture
for Lactating Cows.
576-Building a Dairy Herd.
584-Oat Pasture for Dairy Cattle.
Circulars
S- 3-Causes of and Remedies for
Certain Abnormalities of
Milk.
S-40-Dried Citrus Pulp in Dairy
Rations.
S-6o-Orange and Companion Fruits
Prepared Into Injection-Type
Products for Flavoring Ice
Cream.

Station Press Bulletin
649--Processing Market Cream.


Wins Borden Award
James A. Thornhill was the winner
of the annual Borden Company Award
at the University of Florida for the
1957-58 school term.
Each year the Bord-
en Company grants
an award of $300.00
to an outstanding
senior student in
agriculture who has
had the highest
point average in his
class in all work
THORNHILL taken prior to the
beginning of his sen-
ior year and has taken at least two dairy
courses.
Thornhill, who is a native of Lake-
land, is a major in the department of
dairy husbandry and will receive his
degree in June, 1958. He plans to
continue his studies working toward a
Master of Science degree in animal hus-
bandry. He was the winner of the
Ralston Purina scholarship in 1957.
Wide experience in 4-H Club work,
in which he won the State Dairy
Achievement Award in 1953, and work-
ing in the dairy products laboratory at
the University of Florida for 4 semesters,
have given Thornhill an unusual sound
background for his studies. He is also
very active in campus organizations,
having served as president of the Dairy
Science Club, representative to the Ag.
Council, and chairman of display at the
agricultural fair. He is a member of
the Alpha Gamma Rho social fraternity.
James is married and he and his wife
call Winter Haven their permanent
home.


Milk and Food Sanitarians
Meet In Gainesville
Members of the Florida Milk and
Food Sanitarians Association will hold
their 1958 annual meeting and two-day
conference March 25-27 at the Univer-
sity of Florida, Gainesville. A two-day
conference of the group is sponsored by
the Department of Dairy Science, Uni-
versity of Florida.
The program of the laboratory section
of the group is held on the first day and
the milk sanitarian part of the program,
during the last two days.
Subjects for the laboratorians' meeting
are Coliforms, Antibiotics, Mastitis and
Rancid Milk.
Subjects on the milk sanitarians' two-
day program are: Florida's Poisonous
Plants, Low Solids from Improper Feed-
ing, Trends to Milking Parlors, Ice
Cream, Milk Dispensers, Sampling Pro-
cedures, Deodorizing of Milk, and Ultra
High Temperature Pasteurization.


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 19








EXCELLENT DAIRY FIELD DAY PROGRAM


PLANNED FOR APRIL 24-25 AT U. OF F.


National Dairy Husbandry Authorities Will Speak On
Theme: "Dairy Feeds and Feeding For Greater Profits"

S T. G. Lee of Orlando, selected by the University of
Florida as chairman of the 1958 Dairy Field Day Program
and Promotion Committee, has issued a plea to all Florida
dairymen to plan now to attend the fine two days' program
which the Committee and University of Florida have planned
for this 23rd annual dairy farmers' training program.
Mr. Lee, who served last year as president of the Florida
Dairy Association and many years ago as president of the
\ Florida Dairymen's Association, is one of a very few Florida
LEE dairymen who has participated in the Annual Dairy Field
Day since its beginning as such, 22 years ago.


Committee Helps Plan Program
Tom Lee's 30-member "Program
Committee" sent in program suggestions
and many attended the program plan-
ning meeting which the Committee held
January 30th with members of the staff
of the University of Florida's Depart-
ment of Dairy Science. In a full half-day
session at the U. F. Dairy Science Build-
ing, the Committee and the Dairy De-
partment Staff selected as the program
theme, "Dairy Feeds and Feeding for
Greater Profit." To keynote the pro-
gram on this subject, the group selected
two Dairy Husbandry Professors from
Cornell University in New York, one
of the nation's greatest dairy states.
These speakers are Dr. J. K. Loosli and
Dr. F. B. Morrison.
Dr. Loosli is author of prominent
books on animal nutrition and is now
editor of the "Journal of Animal Sci-
ence." He received prominent national
awards in 1950 and 1951 for this out-
standing research in animal husbandry.
Dr. Morrison has served on American
Livestock Survey Commissions in Ger-
many, the Philippine Islands, Argentina
and Venezuela. He is author of the
textbook, "Feeds and Feeding," which
has been widely used around the world.
Program to Help Dairymen
(See Program Subjects and Schedule)
Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the U. F.
Department of Dairy Science, and his
staff say this year's program should be
one of the most helpful to dairymen of
any yet held and urged the dairy farm-
ers of the state to double last year's
record attendance. Field Day Chair-
man Tom Lee has issued a call, on be-
half of his Committee, to all dairymen
and producer organizations to help boost
Field Day attendance.
Room reservations for the Field Day


should be made in advance to the Hotel
Thomas or Hotel Whitehouse in Gaines-
ville, or one of the following modern
close-in motels: Casa Loma Lodge,
Ocala Road; Gator Court, Ocala Road;
Florida Motor Court, Ocala Road;
Bambi Motel, S.W. 13th St.; Hil-Top
Motor Court, N.W. 13th St.; Manor
Motel, N.W. 13th St.


10 Commandments of 'Human
Relations
I. Thou shalt love people.
II. Thou shalt develop thine under-
standing of thyself and of others.
III. Thou shalt compliment more than
thou shalt criticize.
IV. Thou shalt not argue.
V. Thou shalt not get angry at any
time.
VI. Thou shalt be kind.
VII. Thou shalt have a sense of humor.
VIII. Thou shalt smile.
IX. Thou shalt practice what thou
preacheth.
X. Thou shalt go to school.


F.D.A. Special Events
at Gainesville
DURING ANNUAL FIELD DAY

Headquarters for F.D.A. Members
will be the ... HOTEL THOMAS

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23
Day Before the Field Day
F.D.A. Producer Directors' Meeting,
4:00 P.M., Hotel Thomas
Directors and Members Dinner, 6:30
P.M.
State-Wide F.D.A. Producers Con-
ference F.D.A. Members and Local
Association Members

THURSDAY, APRIL 24
9:30 A.M.-Hotel Thomas
Opening Registration
for the FIELD DAY


-D I R E C T 0 R S'
MEETING at U. of
F. President's Office
F.D.A. Earlybird
Luncheon at Hotel
Thomas


6:15 P.M.-F. D. A. Fellowship
Hour, for All Field
Day Delegates, at the
Hotel Thomas

FRIDAY, APRIL 25
7:30 A.M.-F.D.A. Breakfast
Get-together
All Field Day Dele-
gates Invited


F. D. A. Producer Directors Plan Gainesville Meeting

And State Producer Conference At Annual Field Day
Jack McMullen, chairman of the Producers' Division of the Florida Dairy
Association, has announced plans for three special meetings of the group in
Gainesville at the time of the Annual Dairy Field Day Meeting, April 24-25,
at the University of Florida, Gainesville.
Two meetings of the Producer Division's 17 directors will be held. The
first, at 4:oo P.M. the afternoon of April 23, the day before the Field Day
begins. The other will be at Io:oo A.M. the morning of April 24, when the
group will hold their Annual Conference with the President of the University
of Florida and various faculty members of the Dairy Science Department and
College of Agriculture.


10:15 A.M.


12:15 P.M.-


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








1958 FIELD DAY COMMITTEE
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION


T. G. Lee, Orlando
Chairman


Members of the 1958 Annual Dairy Field Day Program Committee when they met Janu-
ary 30 at the University of Florida.


DAIRY FIELD DAY PROGRAM
Thursday, April 24th
1o:oo A.M.-REGISTRATION at Dairy Lab. Bldg. or Hotel Thomas with
Fla. Dairy Ass'n.
1:30 P.M.-PROGRAM BEGINS-McCarty Hall Auditorium, College of
Agri. Bldg.
LOW BUTTERFAT AND SOLIDS-NOT-FAT MILK-Dr. R. B. Becker,
Dairy Husbandman and W'. A. Krienke, Associate Dairy Technologist
ROUGHAGE-CONCENTRATE RATIOS AND LEVELS OF INTAKE
IN RELATION TO FEED EFFICIENCY-Dr. J. K. Loosli, Professor
of Animal Husbandry, Cornell University, New York
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN DAIRY CATTLE FEEDING AND
NUTRITION-Dr. F. B. Morrison, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Animal
Husbandry, Cornell University, New York
GRAZE OR FEED CHOPPED FORAGE?-Panel Discussion
QUESTION AND ANSWER PERIOD
6:15 P.M.-FELLOWSHIP HOUR-Hotel Thomas-Guests of Fla. Dairy
Ass'n.
7:15 P.M.-DAIRY FIELD DAY DINNER AND PROGRAM-Student
Service Center
Address: THE FARM PROBLEM IN RUSSIA-Dr. I. W.
Philpot, Vice-President, University of Florida
Friday Morning, April 25th
9:00 A.M.-PROGRAM BEGINS-McCarty Hall Auditorium
THE DAIRY INDUSTRY OF VENEZUELA AND ARGENTINA-Illus-
trated Talk-Dr. F. B. Morrison
LET'S CONTROL COSTLY ANIMAL DISEASES-Dr. W. L. Pritchard,
head, Dept. of Veterinary Medicine, U. of F.
THE HERRINGBONE MILKING SYSTEM-Norman Plass, Farmer Feeder
Co., Inc., Cambridge City, Indiana
TOUR DAIRY RESEARCH FARM UNIT-The Staff, U. F. Dept. of Dairy
Science
12:15 P.M.-BARBECUE LUNCHEON at Dairy Research Unit, Hague


PLAN STATEWIDE PRODUCERS' CONFERENCE
The other meeting of the group will be a "Statewide Producers' Conference"
to be held at the Hotel Thomas, 8:oo P.M., April 23, the night before the
Field Day begins. This conference was started by the F.D.A. Producers' Council
at the time of the 1956 Field Day as an Annual Conference of F.D.A. Producer
Members and members of various Local Producers' Associations.
Jack McMullen, F.D.A. Vice President and Producers' Division Chairman,
will be in charge of these events.


C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee
Vice Chairman

Jack McMullen, Clearwater
Attendance Chairman

John Sargeant, Lakeland
Registration Chairman

Bill Graham, Miami
Fellowship Hour Chairman



John Adkinson, Pensacola
Herman Boyd, Miami
Jimmie Branton, Blountstown
Wilbur J. Casey, Clearwater
Jack P. Dodd, Maitland
W. L. Ford, Quincy
E. F. Froehlich, West Palm Beach
Carlos Griggs, Summerfield
L. B. Hull, Gainesville
C. Ray Johnson, Wimauma
Earl Johnson, Dinsmore
Louis E. Larson, Delray Beach
Hubert Logue, Oneco
Earl Lovelace, Tampa
Richard Nesler, Gainesville
Marshall Osteen, Mayo
A. J. Rusterholz, Jr., Apopka
M. A. Schack, Greenwood
Philip C. Shuford, Moore Haven
Brightman Skinner, Jacksonville
V. Paul Simmons, Orangedale
Carroll L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod
L. D. Watts, Haines City
F. E. Willis, Jr., Tallahassee
R. Floyd Luckey, Jr., Ft. Lauderdale


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 21







Entries In Pasture Contest Urged


By State Pasture and Dairy Specialists

By: C. W. REAVES, State Extension Dairyman
and J. R. HENDERSON, U. of F. Agronomist

(Special Letter to Dairymen)

"U. of F., Gainesville, Fla., March 20, 1958.
"Dear Dairyman:
"We urge strongly that you enter the fifth annual Florida Dairy Pasture
Contest which covers your pasture program from April, 1957, to April, 1958.
"All you have to do to enter the contest is to submit a report on your
pasture program to your county agent by May I, 1958. A copy of the report
form was mailed to you recently. Additional copies are available at the office
of your county agent.
"Engraved trophies are awaiting state winners in 'Best Pasture Program'
and 'Most Improvement in Pasture Program'. First, second and third place state
winners in both divisions will receive award certificates. In addition, county
winners in each division will receive award certificates and each dairyman who
enters the contest and scores 75 percent or better will receive a 'Certificate of Merit'.
"By entering the contest you open the door to opportunity for recognition
and acclaim by fellow dairymen and the general public. Of more importance,
however, is the information that you will gain on the weak as well as the strong
points of your program. As you fill out your report, you should evaluate all
phases of your program and note any opportunities for improvement.
"Improvement of forage production and utilization programs on every dairy
farm in the state is the ultimate goal of the Florida Dairy Pasture Contest
sponsored by the University of Florida and the Florida Dairy Association.
Annual recognition of county and state winners has as its main purpose focusing
attention on opportunities for improvement and methods that are being used in
the development of better programs.
S "Again, we urge you to enter the contest. You may not receive an award
this year, but a critical appraisal of your pasture program should be of in-
estimable value to you in making plans for the future.
"Very truly yours,
"C. W. REAVES"
"J. R. HENDERSON"


PASTURE CONTEST WINNERS
FOR FIRST FOUR YEARS
The Florida State Dairy Pasture Contest was started in 1954 under the
joint auspices of the University of Florida Dairy Extension Service and the
Florida Dairy Association.
The Dairy Association provides the awards and promotes interest and par-
ticipation in the Contest while C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman, and
Dr. Russell Henderson, Pasture Specialist, in the University College of Agri-
culture, are in charge of directing and judging the Contest.
Announcement of winners and presentation of awards in the contest are
normally made at the Annual Dairy Field Day at the University of Florida,
but because of the Field Day being held during April this year, instead of
the usual time in July, this year's winners will probably be announced at the
F.D.A. Annual Convention at St. Petersburg Beach, June 25-27.


Previous Winners
State Winners in the "Best Pasture
Program" Contest have been Hall &
Boyd Dairy, Miami, 1954; B. W..Judge
& Son, Orlando, 1955; M. A. Schack,
Greenwood, 1956; and C. C. Sellers &
Sons, Tallahassee, 1957. State Win-
ners in the "Most Pasture Improve-
ment" Contest include Floyd Craw-


ford, Lake City, 1954; R. W. Edwards,
Bradenton, 1955; Aldon Sanchez, St.
Augustine, 1956; and Hubert Logue,
Oneco, 1957.
Dairy Pasture Essays Due
From F.F.A. and 4-H Members
May Ist is the deadline for filing with
county agents of essays for entry in the


1957-58 Dairy Pasture Essay Contest
by 4-H and F.F.A. Members.
Cash awards are offered for first, sec-
ond and third place winners in both of
these groups for essays of not over 8oo
words on the subject, "The Development
and Use of Better Dairy Pastures."
The winning essays are published in
the Florida Dairy News.
Previous .Essay Winners
First place winners in the 4-H group
have been-1954, Robert Parisian, Nas-
sau County; 1955, Sandra Dennison,
Orange County; 1956, Virginia Bell,
Palm Beach County; and 1957, Jean-
ette Foote, Orange County.
The F.F.A. group did not participate
in the Essay Contest until 1957 when
first place was won by Charles Schack
of the Greenwood Chapter; second place,
Don Shaw of the Miami Edison Chap-
ter; and third place, T. J. Lambert, Jr.,
Havana Chapter.


Praises Dairy Members
Florida Livestock Board
Dr. Clarence Campbell, State Veteri-
narian and Secretary of the Florida
Livestock Board, recently wrote the
Florida Dairy Association the following
letter in answer to an inquiry as to how
the dairy representatives on the Board
were performing:
"In my opinion, the dairy farmers of
the State are extremely fortunate in
having as their representatives on the
Florida Livestock Board dairymen of
the caliber of R. L. Dressel of Miami
and M. A. Schack of Greenwood. Both
of these men have long been associated
with Florida's dairy industry and their
knowledge of the industry and its many
disease problems has been of great value
to the Board in formulating disease con-
trol programs which will benefit the
dairy industry as a whole.
"So far as our brucellosis activities
are concerned, the Florida Brucellosis
Eradication Committee has worked very
closely with the Board in the formula-
tion of policies and procedures to be
followed in stamping out this disease,
and here again the dairy farmers are
very effectively represented by William
Graham, past president of the Florida
Dairy Industry Association from Hia-
leah, and V. C. Johnson of Dinsmore,
who has long been an outstanding mem-
ber of the dairy industry of this State.
"The present brucellosis program in
Florida is a sound progressive program,
and is designed to eradicate a disease
which is costing the dairy farmers of
this State several millions of dollars each
year."


22 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








SECOND PRIZE F. F. A. PASTURE ESSAY


1957 STATE PASTURE ESSAY CONTEST



j, i


Pictured at left is Don Shaw's award-winning F. F. A. muckland pasture of Para grass
after mowing and fertilizing. At right, irrigation of Don's Bahia grass pasture.


HOW A BETTER PASTURE WAS DEVELOPED

ON OUR FARM

By: DON SHAW, Miami Edison F.F'.A. Chapter

Furnishing an abundant supply of good pasture twelve months of the year in
Florida is quite a task. With a wet season for six months and then a dry season
for six months, long-time planning and excellent management practices are required.
The pastures at the Dade County School Farm were not producing as they
should from over-grazing and poor management practices. The pasture contained
weeds, brush, and low producing pasture grasses. Some areas of the pasture were
rough and poorly drained, which made it difficult to mow, fertilize and scatter
the manure droppings.
On the School Farm we have two area was fenced with electric fences to
areas of pasture high well-drained give the Clovers a better chance to be-
sandy land and low wet muck land. For come established and to control the graz-
the sandy land we selected Argentina ing during late winter and spring. In
Bahia grass because of its adaptability September the three acres were turned
to well-drained soil. We seeded four with a tiller plow, disked several times
acres of Bahia last May when the rains and seeded the latter part of October.
began. We disked the land, seeded A mixture of 25 pounds per acre of
twenty pounds per acre, covered the Peruvian Alfalfa, Hubam Sweet Clover,
seed with a spike tooth harrow, and White Dutch Clover and Ladino Clover
fertilized with 5-7-5 at 300 pounds per was used. The seed was sowed with a
acre. ,, _., L d ... ...i _.. l- -.. ._ -.L


On the wet muck land we have quite
a different problem in pasture establish-
ment. Our first improvement was made
by cutting the large brush along the
drainage ditches, fence rows and wet
areas. The small brush and weeds were
sprayed with Dalphon. We leveled the
cattails and submerged water weeds were
sprayed with Dalphon. We leveled the
rough areas and filled in the low areas
when possible.
About 15 acres of the muck land was
selected for permanent pasture. Where
there were poor stands of Para and St.
Augustine grasses we sprigged in Pan-
gola grass.
Three acres of the muck land was set
aside to be seeded in October to Alfalfa
and Clovers for winter grazing. This


pll LUULI arroUW anll 1T I111ZeCU withl
4-7-5 at the rate of 400 pounds per acre.
Controlled grazing was begun on the
Alfalfa and clovers in March.
To further supplement the other pas-
tures, two acres of the Vegetable Crops
land was seeded to oats in February.
The oats were ready to start grazing
the first of April. The wet areas in
the crops land which are too wet to farm
are kept mowed and fertilized. These
wet areas are ideal for the growth of
Para grass and furnish additional graz-
ing during April and May.
The pasture on the sandy land is fer-
tilized three times'each year at the rate
of 400 pounds an acre of 5-7-5 (with
minor elements) per application. The
muck land is fertilized three times per
year at the rate of 300 pounds of o-io-io


(with minor elements) per application.
The pastures are mowed regularly to
control weeds and brush. The cattle
droppings are scattered as needed.
Although we still have a long way to
go in our pasture development on the
School Farm, we feel that we definitely
have made big improvements in the right
direction. We plan to install a system
of irrigation on the sandy land pasture.
This will be done in sections, over a
period of several years. We will con-
tinue to work toward better establish-
ment of grasses and clovers for the total
pasture area and to produce supple-
mentary pasture to carry our livestock
through the dry winter seasons.

Flagler Junior 4-H Group
Deserve Honorable Mention
County Agent Howard Taylor of
Flagler County and his sixteen junior
4-H members deserve "honorable men-
tion" for their dairy calf project. These
16 boys with their 16 entries of four
and five-month-old grade dairy heifers
lined up at the Jacksonville District V
4-H Dairy Show in late January, were
a sight to see.
The calves won five blue ribbons and
five red ribbons. Howard Taylor, Flag-
ler's new energetic county agent, former-
ly assistant agent in Duval County, is
doing a fine job with these boys.
Boys showing calves were: David
Lewis, Eddie Pellicer, Flyn Edmonson,
Mike Cook, David Cook, Johnnie Metts,
Levi Brannam, Tommy Kahlert, John-
nie Simpson, Carl Johnson, Jesse Over-
by, Mickey Ramsey, Arthur Carle, Mike
McMillan, Jerry Burnsed and Jim
Burnsed.

Changing Weight?
Milk Is Your Ally
When reducing weight is the goal,
milk pays its way by contributing gener-
ous amounts of protein, calcium, and
other needed nutrients, along with a very
moderate number of calories. For the
calories in one 4-inch wedge of pie, you
can have a pint of whole milk or almost
a quart of skim milk. If you are keeping
down calories, remember that you get all
of the many nutrients in whole milk, ex-
cept fat and vitamin A, when you choose
skim milk (fluid or dry) or buttermilk.
Research has shown that an individual
gets along best during slimming when
more protein than usual is in the diet.
It's an added reason for including a good
deal of milk, particularly skim milk or
buttermilk, in reducing diets.
For those counting calories, a table
showing approximate calories in milk
and milk products will be furnished
upon request to the Florida Dairy News,
615 Park St., Jacksonville.


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 23








DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


A summary of activities of the Florida Dairy Association, an organization formed in 1946 by consolidation of
Florida's original Milk Producers' organization, "The Florida Dairymen's Association" and "The Florida Milk
Products Association."


FULTON


MRS. CASEY


Top Officers of the Florida Dairy Association for 1958, Left to Right, President John
B. Sargeant, Sargeant Dairy Farms, Lakeland; 1st Vice-President and Chairman of the
F. D. A. Distributors' Division A. R. (Dolph) Allison, Orlando Zone Manager of Borden's
Dairy; 2nd Vice-President and Chairman of the F.D.A. Producers' Division, John L. (Jack)
McMullen, McMullen Dairy Farm, Clearwater.


F. D. A. SETS NEW OBJECTIVES FOR 1958

FOLLOWING ASSOCIATION'S BEST YEAR IN '57

President, Two Vice-Presidents and 31 Directors of the F.D.A.
Assure the Dairy Industry of Capable, Experienced Leadership

When the 1957 president of the Florida Dairy Association, T. G. (Tom)
Lee, turned over the reigns of the Association at the January directors' meeting,
he was able to report that 1957 was a record year for the organization. It was
a record year, he said, because in addition to attaining success in its various
programs and activities the Association increased its membership in all groups-
producers, distributors and allied trades-to the largest number since its organi-
zation in 1946. Financial support of the Association also increased during the
year to a new record amount, Mr. Lee said.
Although Tom Lee was conceded to have been the Association's hardest
working president, he brushed aside the praise given him by the Board of Directors,
expressing conviction that the Association's successes in 1957 and throughout the
past eleven years was accomplished by the unusual teamwork among the members
and leaders of the Association. This teamwork has been unusual, President Lee
said, because producers and distributors have worked together as members of an
industry-wide State Association in a manner that has been done in no other state.


In taking over the presidency and
leadership of the Association for 1958,
President John Sargeant brought to the
organization continued sound and ca-
pable leadership based on a lifetime of
experience as a Florida dairyman, the
presidency of the Florida Guernsey
Cattle Club, years of constructive serv-
ice on the F.D.A. Board of Directors,
and two years as Vice President and
Chairman of the Producers' Division of
the Association.
President Sargeant said he believed


firmly in the soundness and necessity, in
a state like Florida, of the joint mem-
bership plan of the F.D.A., which com-
bines the interests and efforts of both
milk producers and milk distributors in
programs and activities designed to pro-
tect and promote the best interests of
each while also working for the advance-
ment of the dairy industry as a whole.
In reviewing the Association's major
accomplishments in 1957, Mr. Lee said
that he felt that the organization's suc-


E. E. (Gene) Fulton, president of the
F.D.A. Allied Trades Division "Alligator Club",
and Mrs. V. J. (Kathryn) Casey, president
of the Association's "Ladies' Auxiliary", for
1958 have an important role in the Annual
Convention and other members' meetings dur-
ing the year.

cessful efforts to maintain the various
dairy laws of the State against damaging
amendments by the State legislature, was
undoubtedly the most important.
He expressed his sincere appreciation
to the Association's executive staff, to
the directors and to the chairmen and
members of the various Active Com-
mittees who, he said, deserved much of
the credit for the industry's accomplish-
ments during the past year. Special
commendation, he said, was certainly due
the Association's Legislative Committee,
Annual Meeting Committee, Annual
Field Day Committee, State Pasture
Contest Committee and June Dairy
Month Committee.
Serious Problems Encountered
One of the most serious of the many
problems of the year, he continued, was
the efforts of the Milk Commission and
the Governor to bring about the repeal
or suspension of wholesale and retail
milk price authority of the Milk Com-
mission.
After its failure to pass on two votes
by the Commission and by the legisla-
ture, it was finally accomplished by the
Commission after the Governor had re-
placed its chairman and several members
and the administrator.
In this matter, Lee said, we have both
won and lost. Although resale controls
were dropped, we still have the farm
price control and the law itself is left
intact.
Recontrol of School Milk
"I consider," Lee continued, "that
possibly our Association's major accom-
plishment of the past year was the suc-
cess of our efforts to get the producer
(Continued on next page)


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Objectives for 1958
(Continued from page 24z)
price of school and institutional milk
placed back under the Milk Commis-
sion's price regulations. As you know,
the Association pledged at the beginning
of the year to bring this about, either
through action of the Commission, by
legislation, or by the voluntary action
of our distributor members. Its ac-
complishment has been a great benefit
to both producers and distributors, bring-
ing added returns to producers of several
hundred thousand dollars a year."
Appreciation to Friends
In conclusion, Mr. Lee said that "dur-
ing the year of my presidency, our Asso-
ciation and the Dairy Industry of Flor-
ida has had the interest and help of many
loyal friends who have been of great
benefit to us and to these we want to
express our sincere thanks. Among
these are: (a) The University of Florida
and those of the staff who have devoted
their time and talents to helping the
Dairy Industry; (b) The Florida State
Chamber of Commerce and particularly
the Dairy Study Committee; (c) The
Florida Farm Bureau; and (d) The
many friends of the Dairy Industry in
the State Legislature. I pledge to our
new president and to all of you my
continued wholehearted interest and ut-
most cooperation with you in carrying
on the important and essential work of
our Association."
Sargeant Pledges Best Efforts
As he received the president's gavel
to assume the leadership of the F.D.A.,
President Sargeant expressed apprecia-
tion to the membership for their confi-
dence in him when they selected him as
president for 1958 and pledges his best
efforts to the Association and to the
Industry, reminding them that "we face
serious and difficult problems which call
for and will require not only the dedi-
cated service of your selected leaders,
but of every member of the Association
and all the industry."
In conclusion he said, "The fact that
this large number of over 50 of the As-
sociation's directors and members are
here today for consideration of our prob-
lems and the adoption of our plans and
programs for the year for dealing with
these problems, gives me the faith and
belief that we will have a successful
year.
Vice Presidents Installed
Following the remarks of the retiring
president and the incoming president,
the Association's two vice presidents
were installed as the chairmen of the
Producer Members' Division and the
Distributor Members' Division.


A. R. (Dolph) Allison of the Borden
Dairy, Orlando, was installed as First
Vice President and head of the Distrib-
utors' Division and John L. (Jack)
McMullen, producer of Clearwater, was
installed as Second Vice President to
head the Producers' Division.
Allison has served on the F.D.A.
Board a number of years and the past
year as Second Vice President and Chair-
man of the Distributor Membership.
McMullen, one of the Association's
popular producer leaders, has served as
a producer director for several years and
during the past two years was chairman
of the Annual Dairy Field Day. He is
a graduate of the University of Florida
College of Agriculture.
Included in the installation ceremony
were all 17 producer directors, who are
elected annually, and five of the distribu-
tor directors, who were re-elected for
3-year terms.
New producer directors who came on
the F.D.A. Board for 1958 are Louis
Larson, Hollywood, who replaced Bill
Graham in the South Florida area; Paul
Simmons, replacing Hugh Adams in the
Jacksonville area; A. L. Hammond, re-
placing B. W. Judge, Sr., in the Or-
lando area; and C. Ray Johnson, who
became an additional director in the
Tampa area.
Distributors re-elected were George
H. Boutwell, Lake Worth; Walter G.
Burton, Claude D. Kelly, and H. Cody
Skinner, all of Jacksonville; and W.
Fred Zirkelbach of Pensacola.
The impressive installation ceremony
for officers and directors was conducted
by Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science, University of
Florida.


New Booklet Describes Milk
As A Man's Drink
Milk is described as "the juice of
life" and "a man's drink" in a most
interestingly written and illustrated ar-
ticle by Thomas R. Carskadon in the
"Esquire" magazine and reprinted in a
12-page booklet in color by the Milk
Industry Foundation.
A free copy will be furnished upon
request to "The Florida Dairy Associa-
tion", 615 Park St., Jacksonville.


If You Are Tired . .
Dr. E. Stanley Jones, the world
famous missionary says when you are
tired and tense . think of that won-
derful Bible passage, "They that wait
upon the Lord shall renew their strength;
they shall mount up with wings as
eagles, they shall run, and not be weary;
and they shall walk, and not faint."


FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
1958
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS

Officers
President........JOHN B. SARGEANT
1st Vice-Pres......... A. R. ALLISON
Chairman Distributors' Division
2nd Vice-Pres. JOHN L. McMULLEN
Chairman Producers' Division
Treasurer. ........... H. C. SKINNER


Asst. Treas .......
Executive Director.


.W. G. BURTON
...... E. T. LAY


Producer Directors
JOHN B. SERGEANT, Lakeland
JOHN L. McMULLEN, Clearwater
R. L. LUNSFORD, Milton
C. C. SELLERS, Tallahassee
E. F. FROEHLICH, West Palm Beach
JOHN T. ADKINSON, Pensacola
JOHN D. FUQUA, Altha (Marianna)
L. B. HULL, Gainesville
W. PAUL SIMMONS, Green Cove
Springs
A. L. HAMMOND, Orlando
IRA C. BARROW, Orlando
LOUIS E. LARSON, Delray Beach
ROBERT W. HALL, Miami
JOE PERENO, JR., Miami
HERMAN BURNETT, Bradenton
JULIAN LANE, Tampa
C. RAY JOHNSON, Wimauma (Tampa)
Distributor Directors
A. R. ALLISON, Orlando
H. C. SKINNER, Jacksonville
WALTER G. BURTON, Jacksonville
T. G. LEE, Orlando
CLAUDE D. KELLY, Jacksonville
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
WILMER BASSETT, Monticello
JOHN M. HOOD, Bradenton
DONALD E. PERRET, Jacksonville
JOHN H. CONE, Plant City
J. H. LAHER, Miami
J. N. McARTHUR, Miami
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
H. B. POWNALL, North Miami Beach
JOHN TRIPSON, Vero Beach
GEORGE H. BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
J. F. W. ZIRKELBACH, Pensacola
Additional Directors
ALF R. NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
E. E. FULTON, Jacksonville
DR. E. L. FOUTS, Gainesville
C. W. REAVES, Gainesville


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 *








F. D. A.'S 34 Directors Adoot 1958 Program F.D.A. MEETINGS HELD


The Florida Dairy Association program and objectives for 1958 were con-
sidered and adopted at a day and night session held in Orlando early in January.
Attendance of interested members swelled attendance at the meeting of 34 directors
to over fifty.
Producer and distributor directors first adopted their separate objectives and


then their joint objectives.
37 Point Policies & Objectives
The entire field of interests in the
dairy industry is covered in the 37 points
that make up the policies and objectives
adopted for the Association for 1958.
Possibly the major objective adopted
by the joint group of producers and dis-
tributors is that of continuing and
strengthening their joint state organiza-
tion plan which has functioned well for
the industry since the formation of the
Florida Dairy Association in 1946,
which is really two Associations in one.
A campaign was planned to increase
the Association's membership in both the
producer and distributor divisions. This
is expected to be accomplished by increas-
ing the local activities of the membership
through separate local associations of
both the producer and distributor mem-
bers.
Code of Fair Dealing
A second major joint objective of the
producer and distributor division is the
developing and adoption of a voluntary
code of fair dealing between producers
and distributors. Committees have al-
ready been appointed to draft proposed
provisions of a code which will be con-
sidered and proposed for adoption at the
F.D.A. Annual Meeting and Conven-
tion, June 25-27, in St. Petersburg
Beach.
Policies on Dairy Laws
F.D.A. producer and distributor di-
rectors were unanimous in their endorse-
ment and support of present dairy laws,
including those providing for milk price
stabilization. Committee studies are be-
ing put in motion to determine if im-
provements might be made in the various
laws governing the industry, either by
amendments to the laws or by some
changes in their administration.

Milk Costs and Price Studies
An important and timely objective of
the Association for the year which is
already under way is that of urging the
Florida Milk Commission to make sur-
veys in all their supervised areas of
current milk producing costs to be used
as a basis for determining whether or
not present prices set by the Commission
are adequate, in the light of increased
costs since such surveys were last made.
The F.D.A. Producers' Division will
assist its members, as well as local asso-


ciations, in developing proper and neces-
sary operating cost reports which will
be needed if and when the Milk Com-
mission makes surveys and studies of
milk producer's costs.
The Department of Agricultural Eco-
nomics of the University of Florida has
been requested to give all possible guid-
ance and assistance in the making and
properly analyzing of these milk produc-
tion cost studies as they have done in two
previous such surveys.

State Conferences Are Planned
Two or more statewide conferences
during the year, including both F.D.A.
members and non-members, are planned
by both the producer and distributor di-
vision chairmen as a means of providing
better opportunities for open discussion
of the problems of each group. These
conferences will be in addition to the
three-day joint and separate meetings
which the producer and distributor mem-
bers have at the Association's annual con-
vention.
The Distributors' Division held its
first state conference in Jacksonville,
March 6.
The Producers' Division has its first
state conference scheduled for the eve-
ning of April 23 at the Hotel Thomas,
Gainesville. This is the day before the
opening day of the two-day Annual
Dairy Field Day meeting at the Uni-
versity. F.D.A. producer directors will
hold a Gainesville meeting during the
afternoon of April 23 and on the morn-
ing of April 24.


1958 has been a busy year thus far
for the Florida Dairy Association. The
following meetings have been held and
participated in:

JANUARY
* Milk Commission
Tallahassee .......... Jan. 15-16
* Directors
In Orlando .............Jan. 23
* Annual Convention Committee
St. Petersburg Beach. .Jan. 24-25
* Annual Dairy Field Day
Program Committee
U. of F., Gainesville ..... Jan. 30

FEBRUARY
* Distributor Members' Meeting
M iami Area ............Feb. 12
* F.D.A. Executive Committee
Tallahassee ............. Feb. 17
Milk Commission Meeting
Tallahassee .......... Feb. 18-19
Miami Distributor Members
M meeting ............... Feb. 21
0Jacksonville Distributor
Members Meeting ........ Feb. 28

MARCH
Distributors' Division
State Conference
Jacksonville ........... March 6
Pensacola Members'
Meeting ............. March 12
Marianna Area Members
Meeting ............. March 13
F.D.A. Executive Committee
Orlando ............ .March 14
Milk Commission Meetings
Tallahassee ........ March 18-19


A bill in the U. S. Congress (H.R.
7794) to equalize milk standards
throughout the United States could se-
riously affect Florida milk producers.
Section 5 of the Bill is quoted below.
Read it and consider if you should write
Florida Congressmen and U. S. Senators
that you are opposed to it.
Sec. 5 (H.R. 7794) U. S. Congress
"The standards of identity, sanitation
standards, and sanitation practices gov-
erning sanitation in the production,
processing, transportation, sale, and of-
fering for sale of fluid milk and fluid
milk products, as defined in the United
States Standard Milk Ordinance and


Code, shall apply uniformly throughout
the United States to all fluid milk and
fluid milk products which are shipped
in interstate commerce to any munici-
pality of the United States for consump-
tion as fluid milk and fluid milk prod-
ucts, or which affect interstate com-
merce in such fluid milk and fluid milk
products."
Real Milk Price Is Down
In 1890 the average U. S. factory
worker had to toil for 26 minutes to
earn the average price of a quart of milk.
Today, he has to work only seven
minutes
(U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Write Your Congressmen and U. S. Senators








New Study Discloses Florida Milk Production

Reaches 120 Million Gallons Annually

Florida milk production, which for years has been estimated to be between
85 and 1oo million gallons annually, has been dicslosed by a recent study of the
Florida Milk Commission to be closer to 120 milloin gallons based on production
data for the month of December, 1957.
Florida Dairy Farmers received the Class I, or fluid milk price, for approxi-
mately 90% of their production for the one month period covered by the study,
which was December for North Florida and January for South Florida. This
is a very good record for a period having several days of school vacation with
no school milk consumption.
The report combines production during December, 1957, in all State Control
areas and during January, 1958, for the Federal Order area, making a combined
total for one month's production of approximately Io million gallons of milk.
Of the total 10,265,910 gallons, 6,346,528 gallons (60%) was marketed
in the Northeast, Central, West Coast and Tallahassee-Pensacola areas under
jurisdiction of the Florida Milk Commission, and 3,919,382 (40%) in the
lower eats coast area which is under the federal marketing order.
In the areas under Florida Milk Commission control, 5.7 million gallons
(or 89.8%) were sold as Class I; 546,788 gallons as Class II; and 99,242 as
Class III.
In the South Florida "Federal Order" area, producers received 90.3% Class
I for the same period. This area has always been higher in Class I utilization
due to rapid population growth.
Nationally, only about 48% of milk produced is utilized in fluid form, or
Class I.


Area


Northeast (Dec. 1957)
Tampa Bay (Dec. 1957)
Central Florida (Dec. 1957)


(in gallons) Class I


1,398,968
2,237,766
1,183,614


Tallahassee-Pensacola (Dec. 1957) 880,150
*Miami area (Jan. 1958) 3,704,079
TOTALS 9,404,577


Class II Class III


127,340
225,358


125,099
68,991


48,015


16,519
34,708


215,303


762,091


99,242


Total


1,574,323
2,463,124
1,325,232
983,849
3,919,382
10,265,910


*The Miami (Federal Order) area is on a slightly different classification basis.


Table Showing Milk Commission Producer "Milk Prices"
(Effective 1-1-58)

CLASS I CLASS II CLASS II CLASS III
% Butterfat 1st 5% of Class I Over 5%
6&l + bf. 430 + bf. Formula + bf. a60 + bf.


4.0%
4.1%
4.2%
4.3%
4.4%
4.5%
4.6%
4.7%
4.8%
4.9%


61.000
61.6504
62.304
62.954
63.600
64.250
64.904
65.550
66.200'
66.854
67.200


43.004
43.650
44.30
44.95(
45.60"
46.25<
46.904
47.550
48.204
48.850
49.503
50.154


38.900
19.550
40.20<
40.850
41.500
42.154
42.80<
43.45'
44.100
44.750
45.40<
46.05e


26.000
26.6504
27.30<
27.950
28.60(
29.250
29.900
30.55;
32.204
31.850
32.500
33.154


*Butterfat differential is .650 for each 1/10 of butterfat over or under 4%.


F.D.A. NAMES CHAIRMEN
OF 1958 COMMITTEES



President John Sargeant has an-
nounced appointment of the following
Florida Dairy Association Committee
Chairmen for the year 1958:

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
generall Chairman, John B. Sargeant,
Lakeland
Distributor Chairman, A. R. Allison,
Orlando
Producer Chairman, John L. McMul-
len, Clearwater


ADVISORY MEMBERS'
COMMITTEE
Chairman, Dr. E. L. Fouts, Gaines-
ville


ALLIED TRADES "Alligator Club"
COMMITTEE
Chairman, E. E. Fulton, Jacksonville


ANNUAL FIELD DAY
COMMITTEE
Chairman, T. G. Lee, Orlando
Fice Chinn. C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee


ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM
COMMITTEE
Co-Chairmen, A. R. Allison, Orlando
John L. McMullen, Clearwater


DAIRY HUSBANDRY
COMMITTEE
Co-Chairilen, M. A. Schack, Green-
wood, R. L. Dressel, Miami


DAIRY PROCESSING, FDA
SHORT COURSE COMMITTEE
Chairman, Emmitt Dozier, Jackson-
ville


PASTURE DEVELOPMENT
COMMITTEE
Chairman, C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee


PUBLIC RELATIONS
COMMITTEE
Co-Chairmen, J. H. Laher, Miami
Julian Lane, Tampa


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 27






S Activities Review of florida Livestock Board

By: DR. C. L. CAMPBELL
Secretary of the oard and State Veterinarian

Brucellosis Eradication
Florida has made a number of changes in its brucellosis eradication program
during the past year, all designed to speed eradication of the disease from our
cattle. Since the adult vaccination of cattle has proven to be a deterrent to
eradication efforts, the Florida Livestock Board has discontinued the vaccination
of adult cattle and has adopted measures for conversion of adult vaccinated herds
to an approved plan of brucellosis eradication.
Realizing the necessity of guarding against importation of the disease from
outside the State, Florida has adopted regulations that all cattle imported into
the State, with the exception of slaughter and feeder cattle, and those from
certified brucellosis free herds, shall be identified as official calf vaccinates.
Over 304,000 cattle were tested in the accelerated program in 1957, and
approximately Ioo,ooo calves were vaccinated. These increases in calf vaccinations
and animals tested are indications that the dairymen and cattlemen of Florida
are interested in eradicating this costly disease from their herds, and with the
continued support of the livestock groups and adequate appropriations of funds
from the state and federal levels, the Florida Livestock Board and the U. S.
Department of Agriculture can bring about complete eradication in this State.
The brucellosis area testing program has progressed to where Florida now
has 14 counties which have been officially designated as modified certified brucellosis
free areas. Area testing is nearing completion in four additional counties, and
has just begun in four others.

TOP TEN DHIA HERDS IN STATE FOR 1956-57
The record is based on yearly per cow averages of 4% fat-corrected-milk
equivalents. It is of interest to note that four herds averaged over io,ooo lbs.
milk production and six averaged over 400 lbs. butterfat production.

Herd Owner
and No. Pounds Test Pounds Pounds 4%
Association Cows Milk % Fat Fat-Corrected-Milk


M. A, Schack,
Jackson DHIA
Walter Welkener,
Duval DHIA
A. J. Rusterholz,
Orange DHIA
B. W. Judge & Son
Orange DHIA
W. J. Simmons,
Duval DHIA
Fairglade Jersey Dairy,
Orange DHIA
Hanson Collins,
Orange DHIA
T. G. Lee,
Orange DHIA
Kenneth Paterson,
Orange DHIA
Martin Vanderwerf,
Jackson DHIA


30 8,294
108 8,380
205 9,730
167 9,130
152 8,801
130 8,314
83 8,538
448 8,159
46 8,266
37 9,117


5.7 473 10,412
5.5 458 10,222
4.2 412 10,072
4.6 425 10,027
4.6 404 9,580
4.9 409 9,461
4.6 395 9,340
4.7 383 9,009
4.5 376 8,946
3.8 351 8,912


Beginning of Screwworm Eradication
With the allocation of federal funds
and personnel, the screwworm eradica-
tion program has gotten into full swing,
with headquarters at Sebring, Florida.
The Board has leased the large hangar
building at the Sebring Air Terminal,
and contracts have been let for the reno-
vation of the hangar building into a
screwworm rearing laboratory.
The facilities at Orlando and Bithlo
have been kept in operation for the pur-
pose of training personnel, testing equip-
ment, and developing methods of oper-
ation. These facilities were designed for
raising 2 million flies per week. Due
to the extreme cold weather and the
possibility that the screwworms have
been killed back deep into Florida, it
was decided to expand these facilities to
produce from 7 to 9 million flies per
week. These flies are being dropped at
the rate of 1oo sterile males per square
mile in an area that is at least 50 miles
north of the overwintering line. By do-
ing this, a buffer zone will be formed
which we hope the native flies will be
unable to penetrate as they begin mi-
grating north when the weather warms
up. If this can be accomplished, there
will be a much smaller area to cover in
the full scale eradication program, pro-
vided reinfestations do not occur from
outside the state.
The screwworm multiplies so rapidly
that a few cases can explode into an
outbreak unless the early occasional in
infestations are stamped out. The more
cases treated early, the fewer will remain
for the eradication program when it goes
into all-out operation. The following
steps are suggested to stockmen:
I. Inspect animals frequently. It is
necessary to find every case, including
infested animals that hide out.
2. Report screwworm cases to the
county agent, or to state or federal live-
stock inspectors. Collect Io worms from
each wound, put them in a bottle of
clean water, store in a cool place, and


(Continued on Next Page)


Winners in the District V 4-H Dairy Show held in Jacksonville in January are: (1) Laura Cameron, Jacksonville, and her grand
champion Registered Guernsey. (2) Tommy Prator, Callahan, and his grand champion Registered Jersey, which was also judged "Best
Fitted" animal. (3) Albert Magill, Jacksonville, winner in individual judging with his red ribbon Registered Jersey. (4) The winning
County Judging Team, representing Duval County, and the grand champion grade Jersey cow. Team members, left to right, are: Betty
Jane Bowie, Albert Magill, Charles Chasson and David Harrell.
28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


~







State Fair Has Record Dairy Shows


In Both Open and Youth Show Groups

Orlando Dairies Take Top Honors
As Premier Breeder and Premier Exhibitor

The 1958 Florida State Fair experienced one of its largest and best dairy
shows in both the Open Show and Youth Show, but attendance fell short of
previous record years because of bad weather conditions.
There were 295 head of dairy cattle entered in the Open Show, 91 entries
in the 4-H Show and 43 in the F.F.A. Show.
The Fair officials praised the cooperation of the National and State Breeders'
Associations representing the various dairy breeds for their cooperation and
assistance in making the Show the fine success that it was.
Competition was keen between Florida and out-of-state breeders of Guernseys,
Jerseys, Holsteins and Ayrshires, with herds from Ohio, Alabama and New York
showing several of the Champions.
C. Hilton Boynton, Extension Dairyman of the University of New Hamp-
shire, judged both the Open and Youth dairy shows.


Breeder and Exhibitor Awards
The Premier Exhibitor Trophy
awarded by The Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation was won by Christmas Acres
Dairy of Orlando, which belongs to the
firm of Shadel, McKibben and Hall,
Inc., comparative newcomers to the Flor-
ida dairy industry.
The Premier Breeders Trophy award-
ed by The Florida Grower and Rancher
Magazine went to Carroll L. Ward,
Jr., Lay Laine Guernsey Farm at Gold-
enrod, Orange County.
Open Show Breed Winners
(Number in parentheses indicates total num-
ber of entries in the various show events.)
JERSEYS (138)-Grand champion bull:
Jester Basil Sleeper Fill Pail, Sanitary Dairy,
Dothan, Alabama; Grand champion female:
Clarendon Itaska Pride, Arco Jersey Farm,
Sylacauga, Alabama; Reserve grand cham-
pion bull: Don Head S. A. Records, Arco;
Reserve grand champion female: Royal Pride
Jewel, Christmas Acres, Orlando.
GUERNSEYS (109)-Grand champion
bull: Lay Laine Virginian's Emory, Lay
Laine Guernsey Farm, Goldenrod; Grand
champion female: Edisto Farms Bft. Fable,
Edisto Farms, Denmark, South Carolina;
Reserve grand champion bull: Lakemont's
Pride's Steadfast, Lay Laine; Reserve grand
champion female: Edisto Farms G. Melinda,
Edisto.
AYRSHIRES (93)-Grand champion bull:
Vale Haven Crown Duke, owned by Ronald
V. Musser, Huntsville, Ohio; Grand cham-
pion female: Strathglass Lively Ann, Strath-
glass Farm, Port Chester, New York; Re-
serve grand champion bull: Snyd-Ayr Hot
Stuff, Musser; Reserve grand champion fe-
male: Flint Rock Bar's May, Dixie Farms,
Tampa.
HOLSTEINS (40)-Grand champion bull:
Andy Raider Lad Pabst, Green Field Farms,
Winter Haven; Grand champion female:
Inka Pieterje Ormsby Elsie, Green Field;
Reserve grand champion bull: A J R Grena-
dier Supreme, Rusterholz Dairy, Apopka;
Reserve grand champion female: Texal
Foyageur Pabst, Airport Livestock Corpora-
tion, Miami.


4-H & F.F.A. Winners
In State Fair Dairy Show
Awards were made in both 4-H and
F.F.A. Divisions in showmanship, fitting and
team judging, in addition to awards for
winning animals in various classes.
Showmanship Winners
4-H Group
1st-Tommy Edge, Orange County
2nd-Virginia Thornhill, Polk County
3rd-Mary Frances Fischer, Orange County
4th-Caroline Thornhill, Polk County
5th-Alfred Hammond, Orange County
F.F.A. Group
1st-George M. Casey, Largo Chapter
2nd-Edward Cochran, Bartow Chapter
3rd-John Dallas Shaw, Wildwood Chapter
4th-Ed Cunningham, DeLand Chapter
5th-Dale Utter, DeLand Chapter
Fitting & Grooming Winners
4-H Group
1st-Ernest Fischer, Orange County
2nd-Mary Frances Fischer, Orange County
3rd-Bob Lee, Polk County
4th-Jimmy Seymour, Polk County
5th-Charlotte Lee, Polk County
F.F.A. Group
1st-Edward Cochran, Bartow Chapter
2nd-Dale Utter, DeLand Chapter
3rd-Dennis Dias, Chamberlain Tampa
4th-Melvin Vernon, Jr., Hillsborough Chap-
ter
5th-Ed Cunningham, DeLand Chapter
4-H Judging Team Winners
A Polk County team of Caroline
Thornhill, John Sargeant, Virginia
Thornhill and Linda Dixon scored
357 x 450 points to win the 4-H Clubs
dairy cattle judging contest. Another
Polk team of Paul Sheffield, Johnny
Kaylor, Missy Jo Williams and Gail
Williams took second place; a Pinellas
team finished third; Sarasota, fourth,
and Orange County, fifth.
High individual judges were Caroline
Thornhill, first; Johnny Kaylor, sec-


ond; and Harrison Gerstlouer, Sarasota,
third.
The F.F.A. Division had no Inter-
Chapter Judging Contest at the Fair due
to the fact that another state judging
contest of this group was being held
during he same week also in Tampa.
4-H Dairy Class Winners
(Numbers in parentheses indicate the number
of entries.)
GUERNSEYS (32)-Champion, Tommy
Edge, Orange County. Reserve Champion,
George Casey, Pinellas County.
JERSEYS (30) Champion, Caroline
Stuart, Polk County. Reserve Champion,
Dennie Dennison, Orange County.
HOLSTEINS (9)-Champion, Robert Les-
ter, Hillsborough County.
AYRSHIRES (20)-Champion, Jane Ver-
non, Hillsborough County. Reserve Cham-
pion, Nancy Vernon, Hillsborough County.
F.F.A. Dairy Class Winners
(Numbers in parentheses indicate number
of entries.)
GUERNSEYS (16)-Champion, Dennis
Diaz, Hillsborough County. Reserve Cham-
pion, George Casey, Pinellas County.
JERSEYS (13)-Champion, John Hebb,
Jr., Polk County.
HOLSTEINS (12)-Champion, Benjamin
Franklin, Jr., Dade County.
AYRSHIRES (3)-Champion, Melvin Ver-
non, Hillsborough County.

FLORIDA LIVESTOCK BOARD
(Continued from Page 28)
notify your county agent, who will ar-
range to have them picked up for labora-
tory identification.
3. Promptly treat wounds with ap-
proved remedies. EQ-335 and Smear
62 are recommended by the USDA.
4. Keep animals in pens until wounds
are healed. Treating and releasing an
animal may only give temporary relief
and fails to reduce the screwworm popu-
lation. It is important to keep the ani-
mal under observation until the wound
has completely healed.

Mastitis Control Program
With the eradication of brucellosis in
this state, mastitis will emerge as the
disease of greatest economic significance
to our dairy herds. The number of
dairy herds participating in the Board's
voluntary mastitis program continues to
increase.
The importance of this program can-
not be over emphasized in view of its
economic value through increased milk
production and longer milking life of
the dairy cow.
181,217 dairy cows were examined
by representatives of the Board in the
field during 1957. 13% of the cattle
examined showed some degree of mastitic
infection. Corrective measures for re-
ducing the infection were recommended.


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 29




















Old-timers among Duval County dairymen
as seen at the January District 4-H Dairy
Show are, left to right: V. C. Johnson, Walter
Welkener, Albert Lawton (former Duval
County agent), Dupont Magill and Joe
Cameron.


NEW DAIRY OWNERS
SUFFER LARGE FIRE
Milford Burdsall and Vinton Heit-
field bought out the Fortner and Glide-
well Dairy of St. Petersburg, located one
mile east of Route 19, early this year.
On February I, fire broke out in the
hay barn and did an estimated $50,000
damage. Buildings were leased but the
equipment was owned by the new opera-
tors of the dairy. None of the cattle
were harmed as none were in the barn
when the fire started.

It is not ignorance that is so harmful
. . but the fact that so many people
know so much that is not so!


Hood's Dairy Takes Over
Two Tampa Dairy Routes
Hood's Dairy, oldest established dairy
on Florida's West Coast, has bought
seventeen trucks and a 6,ooo-customer
home delivery business in the Tampa
area from Plantation Dairies, owned by
James B. Turner. Turner will concen-
trate on distribution through retail out-
lets other than home delivery and will
maintain all phases of its own produc-
tion and plant. Hood's has also pur-
chased the routes of Main Line Dairy,
owned by Sac Diaz, who will also con-
tinue to produce milk.


Jack McMullen Develops
Pastures Near Oldsmar
Jack McMullen, Pinellas County Soil
Conservation District vice chairman and
Producers' Vice President of the F.D.A.,
has been working for the past two
months on the clearing and planting of
new pastures north of Oldsmar, to which
he will later move his dairy operation.
A land level survey preceded laying
out of shallow ditches 1oo feet apart
to provide drainage for excess surface
water during rainy seasons and to be
used for seepage irrigation during dry
weather.

Not Interested
Have you heard of "the man who
thought he was possessed of so much
information that FACTS no longer in-
terested him"?


LEST WE FORGET
You cannot bring about prosperity
by discouraging thrift.
You cannot strengthen the weak
by weakening the strong.
You cannot help the wage earner
by pulling down the wage payer.
You cannot help the poor
by destroying the rich.
You cannot establish sound security
on borrowed money.
You cannot keep out of trouble
by spending more than you earn.
You cannot build character and courage
by taking away man's initiative and
independence.
You cannot help men permanently
by doing for them what they could
and should do for themselves.
-Abraham Lincoln


Live Happier and Longer
If you want to live the full life in
your mature years, set up a plan that
will provide basic security for your
family and your old age, but let it go
at that. Enjoy your job but resolve
to leave your work responsibilities be-
hind when your day's work is over.
Spend your leisure hours with your
family and friends. Learn to love them
deeply, and learn to find pleasure in the
love they hold for you. And keep telling
yourself what a lucky person you are
to be alive and kicking in the most pros-
perous, exciting and wonderful era the
world has ever known.
(Robert Peterson)


w

A!


Pictured at left are winners in the Dairymen's Division of the 1956-57 DHIA Efficient Dairy Production Contest. They are, left to
right: A. J. Rusterholz, Orlando, East Florida District winner; Walter Schmid, Tallavast (Manatee County), West Coast District winner;
Walter Welkener, Jacksonville, second place North Florida District and second place in state contest; and M. A. Schack, Greenwood
(Jackson County), first place North Florida District and first place in state contest. At right are winners of the State DHIA Supervisors
Division of the 1956-57 Efficient Dairy Production Contest, left to right: L. C. Shook, Bradenton, second place; Mrs. Walter Delaney;
and Walter Delaney, Jacksonville, first place.
30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Bill Graham Is Re-Elected
By South Florida Producers
The Independent Dairy Farmers As-
sociation, which includes about 93 pro-
ducers of the South Florida Federal
Milk Market Area of seven counties,
held its 1958 annual meeting February
1I in Ft. Lauderdale, re-electing all
officers and directors.
Bill Graham has served as president
of the Association since its organization
early in 1956. Floyd Luckey, Execu-
tive Secretary, was re-elected along with
the following directors: L. H. Brecken-
ridge, Wilson Rucks, E. C. Mattson,
Tom Perry and Joe Pereno, Jr., all of
Broward County; Louis Larson, J. H.
Medlin, Marcus Weavers and C. R. Me-
lear, all of Palm Beach County. Bob
Hall and Bill Graham are directors for
Dade County. P. C. Shuford and W. K.
Bixby are directors-at-large.
Dr. Spencer Is Speaker
Principal speaker at the meeting was
Dr. Leland Spencer of Cornell Univer-
sity who had assisted the Association
as advisor in their efforts to secure the
Federal Market Order. Dr. Spencer
told the group they should consider them-
selves fortunate as producers in a mar-
ket which uses from 90% to 98% of
their milk at the Class I price. He
pointed out by comparison that while
the about 93 producers of this group
receive this high percentage of Class I
milk, the approximately 53,ooo producers
of the New York Federal Market Area
receive Class I for only about 60% of
their milk.
Dr. Spencer advised the organization
that according to Kiplinger, population
increase predictions for the four counties
making up the principal South Florida
market, there would be a 45% popula-
tion increase in the area by 1963 and a
Ioo% increase by 1968-1970 with cor-
responding increases in the demand for
milk.
Dr. Spencer's advice to the group was
to produce a constant supply of fluid
milk equal to the current demands and
to avoid production of any sizeable sur-
pluses.
The meeting was concluded with a
barbecue lunch at the Agricultural Ex-
periment Station, east of Ft. Lauderdale.

Free Bulletin Available
On Cattle Parasites
A ten-page bulletin describing ."In-
ternal Parasites of Cattle and Their
Control" is published by the University
of Florida, Department of Veterinary
Science.
A copy will be furnished upon request
to The Florida Dairy Association, 615
Park St., Jacksonville.


The new plant of Foremost Dairies-Hawaii, Ltd., is now in full production following
its dedication with impressive Polynesian rituals November 1. The two-story plant and
office buildings in Honolulu is constructed in contemporary Hawaiian style. Some 220
people work in the new facility which combines the operations of three dairy plants merged
with Foremost in 1954.


Why I Am a Member of the

Florida Dairy Association

MY DAIRY AND MY INVESTMENT NEEDS THE PROTEC-
TION OF THE COMBINED JUDGMENT AND EFFORTS AND
STRENGTH OF THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE STATE-WIDE AND
INDUSTRY-WIDE ASSOCIATION OF DAIRIES AND DAIRYMEN.
Not a single one of us, among the more than I,ooo Florida Dairies, large
or small, is smart enough, big enough or has time enough to protect our invest-
ment and our business against the numerous things that constantly arise to
threaten our welfare.
This makes it necessary that we work Executive Director and Secretary; the
together and provide for an organization careful thought and action of the organ-
that can do these things for us. Such ization's 34 Directors selected, 17 from
an organization was formed in 1946 among the recognized leaders of Florida
when the old Florida Dairymen's Asso- Milk Producers and 17 from among
ciation and the Dairy Products group Producer-Distributors and Distributors,
joined together to make the F.D.A. and the experience, judgment and active
While working together as a unit group, work done for the welfare of the Dairy
the Producer and Plant Members each Industry through the numerous active
has a chairman who is a Vice-President committees of the Association.
of the Association so that either group The publication by the Association of
may meet and act together when they The FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS for
like. .,., ..... .... --- b --- L --


There are numerous occasions when
the Dairy Industry of Florida must have
a spokesman or a committee of spokes-
men who are both well informed and
capable of speaking for and representing
the whole Dairy Industry. Such repre-
sentation is always available through the
Florida Dairy Association.
An active organization such as the
"Florida Dairy Association" can usually
prevent the adoption of unnecessary, im-
practical and unfair proposals affecting
the Industry which are advocated from
time to time by usually well meaning
sponsors who do not, however, realize
the effects of such proposals.
A member of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation has the benefits of the full time
service of the Association's Office and


L e pasL seven years las ueen a os
important source of information to all
Dairymen and carries the Dairy Industry
message not only to all Florida Dairy-
men and all Dairies but to over 2,000
others whose knowledge of and under-
standing of our problems is most im-
portant.
IT IS MY JUDGMENT THAT I
CANNOT AFFORD ... NOT TO
BE A MEMBER OF THE F.D.A.
. . CAN YOU?
(Submitted by a member)

About 47.5% of the total U. S. 1956
fluid milk supply went into fluid uses
while approximately 8o% of the milk
produced in Florida was utilized in
fluid form during this period.


FIRST QUARTER, 1958 31

















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.

CITRUS PULP, CITRUS MEAL, CITRUS MOLASSES
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division


Auburndale, Fla.


Woodlawn 7-1104


ANNHEUSER-BUSCH, INC.
Warehouses:
ICE CREAM CABINETS
MIAMI TAMPA JACKSONVILLE
Walter S. Crawbuck, Dist. Mgr.
4650 Arapahoe Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.




= INC. ari-Rich
Chocolate Products Egg Nog, Orange
Ice Cream Fruits & Flavors
ED SALVATORE
P. O. Box 86, Tampa Ph. 25-0164





COMMERCIAL BODY BUILDERS
1807 SECOND AVENUE
Ph. 4-2720 TAMPA,FLA.
RfEF/GERATFArD 7TR'/CeOD/' SOeR oFeA/,Y///#06'reY

DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
O. S. NEWSOM, JR.
Phone: EV 7-7383
2965 St. Johns Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.

CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
ICE CREAM COATING, FRUITS AND FLAVORS
IRA STONE
Ph. Mutual 5-3284


1026 E. Walnut St.


Lakeland, Fla.


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVOY


50 E. Magnolia St.


Pensacola, Fla.


HAVEN SUPPLY
Hackney Bros. Bodies, Gulf Dairy Waxes
"Illini" Non-Fat Milk Solids
MONTY SCHOENTHALER JOHN WILKES
Phone: FR 2-1115


P. O. Box 834


Winter Haven, Fla.


INTERNATIONAL PAPER CO.
Single Service Division
Pure Pak Milk Containers
WALTER M. SCOTT E. H. BROWN
1731 Indian Rocks Rd. 2820 Eastern Parkway
Clearwater, Florida Orlando, Florida
Phone--3-7247 Phone-- Winter Park

32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Route 9, Box 356


Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
COCOA DIVISION
Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
TOM POWERS


830 E. River Dr.


Temple Terrace


Tampa 4, Fla.


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer
JOE E. ANDERSON
2577 Decatur Rd., Decatur, Ga.
Phone ME 4-8781


KIECKHEFER-EDDY DIVISION
Weyerhaeuser Timber Co.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. EVANS M. A. KNOWLES
Phone ELgin 6-1334


4700 Pearl St.


Jacksonville, Fla.


KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation

WM. C. MAYFIELD

Howell House-Suite 202, Atlanta 8, Ga.


KRIM*KO
CHOCOLATE ORANGE EGGNOG
MARBLETONE SYRUPS
DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
616 Jessamine Blvd., Daytona Beach, Fla.
Phone Clinton 2-0148

LIBERTY GLASS COMPANY
F T P MILK BOTTLES
HAROLD ROGERS
2260 Peachtree Rd., N.W. Atlanta, Ga.
Phone CEdar 7-3030


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Van-Sal Vanilla Products

D. C. MULLIGAN, Florida Representative


2840 West 47th Place


Chicago 32, III.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. HEAD
Phone Norfolk, Va. HOward 4-0828
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land O' Lakes Non-Fat Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Bireley's Dairy Grape Base


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages-Liner Materials
LARRY HODGE


1121 duPont Bldg.


Miami, Fla.


THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative
3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N. C.
Phone FR 5-5645


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINES
Division of National Cooperatives
World's Most Complete Line of Milking
Equipment
L. H. HALL, Dealer


5240 N. W. 7th Avenue


Miami, Fla.


MANUFACTURERS OF
L DAIRY EQUIPMENT


JOHN W. MANNING
Phone: LOgan 2-3151
17750 N.E. 19th Ave., N. Miami Beach, Fla.


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

SpciaL CmUA dad 0Dbi"doAqj.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.

Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksonville, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami, Fla., Phone: MUrray 8-8431

OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Duraglas Milk Bottles
C. W. PARMALEE R. G. SHACKELFORD
1601 Prudential Bldg. Jacksonville 7, Fla.
W. H. ADAMS
7630 Biscayne Blvd., Miami 38, Fla.

PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Rennet for Cottage Cheese
Cottage Cheese Coagulator-Ice Cream Color
Lactivase for prevention of off flavors in
bottled milk.
Cottage Cheese literature available
4253 North Port Washington Ave.
Milwaukee 12 Wisconsin

PENNSALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.

RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Moultrie, Georgia
Riverside Masterbilt Uniforms

JAMES M. STEWART DAVE FREEMAN








SOME GOOD ONES TO NEW HOMES


Sire:
Sire:


m:
Dam:


May Royalty
AR Daughters


Dinsmore
2 AR


Princess Sybil
Daughters


Umsmore Mayroyal Sylpn
15604-760-Sr4-365 (State Champion)


0

Sire:
Foremost May Royalty
55 VG & E Daughters


Dam:
Dinsmore Noble Lucia
12126-531-Jr3-365C


*


minsmore Mayroyal Lucia Vb
10191-453-Sr3-305-HI R


The above two outstanding cows were sold to Harry Marion at
Lindale, Georgia, who like many other progressive dairymen are
getting into the GOLDEN GUERNSEY business. He purchased sev-
eral other good ones. Below are excerpts from his correspondence
to us:
"The boys got home about 2:30 Saturday afternoon with a
trouble-free trip and the cows that were in milk, milked twenty
gallons the first milking about two hours after being unloaded and
they haven't come under that since. I don't believe I have ever
seen cows do as well as these are doing. We are interested in
keeping the bull calf out of Dinsmore Conqueror Amelia (May


Royalty) as a herd sire and would like your opinion on it. Would
you please send us Amelia's previous production records? She is
now milking around 60 lbs. a day
"Mr. Jacobs of the American Guernsey Cattle Club, is coming
by in about two weeks to inspect us for Golden Guernsey Milk.
Ie have eleven Holsteins left in the herd to dispose of before
he will O.K. us. Would like to have another truckload of cattle
ichen ie dispose of the Holsteins.
"Let me hear from you real soon. I was very much impressed
niith the job that you fellows are doing with your colws."


WE HAVE HAD OTHER RECENT SALES TO SATISFIED CUSTOMERS. WE CAN STILL SPARE MORE, OCCASIONALLY.


Dinsmore Guernseys


FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790
DINSMORE FARMS


J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman
10 Miles North of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JUHNSON


NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
DINSMORE, FLORIDA
BRADY S. JOHNSTON


Foremost
Over 100


V. C. JOHNSON





777 r 79


no

risers

churn


SURGE


CLEAN


MILK

A long time ago, someone around here was wise enough
to write these words:
"DO NOT install a pipe line with a riser, as that
almost certainly will lead to trouble ... it always has ...
it seems to us that it always will. If there is just no pos-
sible way to install the line without a riser, then don't
sell or install it."
Since then, people who have made a study of pipe
lines tell us how right we were . .how milk churns up
and down in risers . how rancidity and off-flavors
result... and how nearly impossible it is to get a pipe
line with risers really clean.
That's why we still walk away from a job rather than
install a riser. No risers churn Surge clean milk... ever.
Copyright 1957- Bobson Bros. Co.


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 WEST 19TH STREET CHICAGO, ILLINOIS


ATLANTA DALLAS KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS SACRAMENTO SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO


eurge




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