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Title: Florida dairy news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00033
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Series Title: Florida dairy news.
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 3d quarter 1956
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00033
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
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Full Text



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Tillie paid the difference


with an extra cup of milk!


MORE income over feed cost? Sure! And Tillie, a Larro
test cow, helped prove it with new Larro SureMilk.
A high producer even before she went on SureMilk,
Tillie still scored substantial gains in milk production. And
she demonstrated that just an extra cup per milking from
her stepped-up flow ... an extra 250 Ibs. of milk per ton
of feed . more than made up any small difference in
cost for this high-performance feed.
But that's only one example of SureMilk's ability to
deliver more results per dollar. Not satisfied with a one-
cow test, Larro researchers checked more than 100,000
herd records, coast to coast. The result: Suremilk boosted
production in 2 out of 3 cases stepped it up in some
instances as much as 2000 lbs. per lactation.
Now that's profit! One you'd like to see. But whether
new SureMilk boosts your cow production by a teacup or
a ton, these tests show it costs less to produce a pound of
milk with new, premium-quality SureMilk.
Try SureMilk in your own herd and see for yourself
the difference it makes. See your Larro SureFeed dealer

General Mills
JACKSONVILLE o ORLANDO o TAMPA MIAMI
Regional Office CORAL GABLES


--SPECIAL OFFER


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periodic check on all cows at all
times . and make the most
profit from your feeding.
It's the new Larrometer -
available now, FREE, from your
Larro SureFeed dealer.
With this handy device, you
dial basic information about each
cow. Then, the Larrometer shows
immediately how much concen-
itable feeding.
Get your FREE Larrometer
from your local Larro SureFeed
dealer. For his name and address,
write to General Mills, Larro
Feed Division, Minneapolis 1,
Minnesota.










EDITORIALS


A California Dairy Program for Florida? Why Not?

The dairy industry of Florida has been keenly aware of the need for and has for
the past several years been seriously considering through its state organization, the
Florida Dairy Association, a new and comprehensive industry promotional program.

After studies and extensive inquiries concerning dairy promotional programs in
other states and areas had been made by the association's Public Relations Committee,
the Board of Directors recommended action in developing a Florida program to the
organization's 1955 annual meeting. This resulted in the adoption of a convention
resolution authorizing the Board of Directors to proceed with the development of a
proposed program. After another year's consideration the Board of Directors decided
to recommend to the 1956 annual meeting consideration of a Florida program to be
patterned after the 12-year old California Dairy Industry Advisory Board program.

In order that the members of the industry might have an opportunity to become
thoroughly acquainted with the California program, the F.D.A. Board of Directors
invited the manager of the California Dairy Advisory Board, W. B. Woodburn, to
attend the Association's June 26-28 annual meeting to bring to Florida firsthand
information on the subject.

Woodburn accepted the invitation and his story of the success of California's
well-financed and operated dairy and dairy products promotional program, many
samples of which were exhibited, proved to be very convincing to Florida dairymen.

When a decision of the Florida Dairy Convention was called for on the ques-
tion of whether the Florida Dairy Industry would adopt a promotional program,
a motion for sponsorship of a law and a program similar to that in California
was unanimously adopted.

Among the substantial results reported by Mr. Woodburn as having been accom-
plished by the California program is a 35% increase in the per capital consumption
of fluid milk in the State of California within about a 15-year period. These results
were obtained, Woodburn said, by an aggressive and uninterrupted statewide program
of research in milk and milk products nutrition, public relations and education on the
food values of milk and milk products.

California's success in increasing school milk consumption under the new Federal
aid for school milk programs as compared to Florida's experience was pointed out as
how effective a well conducted active promotion program can be. California in-
creased school milk consumption to the point of using all the Federal allowance
of 2.6 million dollars with an increase to 4 million dollars, while Florida used
only 600 thousand dollars of an allotment of one million dollars.

The contemplated Florida program to be patterned after the California law and
to some extent similar to the Florida Citrus Commission Law, would be conducted by
a board consisting largely of dairy industry members operating as a state agency under
the State Department of Agriculture.

The program, which would be financed by a small tax on both milk producers
and distributors, would include a statewide consumer education program of dairy
foods and nutrition which is now being conducted under the National Dairy Council
Units in the Tampa, Miami and Jacksonville areas only. It would also include pub-
licity, exhibits, advertising and research designed to promote a better understanding
of and a more widespread use of the products of the Florida dairy industry.

The proposed new law would have no connection with the Florida Milk
Commission Law or other existing laws relating to the dairy industry.

F.D.A. leaders who have given much thought to Florida's dairy industry problems
and to the possibilities of the Dairy Industry Advisory Board program . have been
so favorably impressed with the possibilities of a well-organized industry promotional
campaign, they have named the proposed program "A 10-year Program of Progress
for the Florida Dairy Industry".


VOL. 6


NO. 3


THIRD QUARTER, 1956

THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
W. A. (BILL) GRAHAM, President
Hialeah

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
W. P. WALDREP, President
Hollywood

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
M. A. SCHACK, President
Greenwood

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Miami

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
SAM NOLES, President
Jacksonville

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Committee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
W. A. (BILL) GRAHAM, President
Graham's Dairy Farm, Inc., Hialeah
T. G. LEE, 1st V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Distributors' Division, Orlando
JOHN SARGEANT, 2nd V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Producers' Division, Lakeland

Additional Producers
JACK MCMULLEN, Clearwater
R. L. LUNSFORD, Milton
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville

Additional Distributors
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
JOHN HOOD, Bradenton
WALTER BURTON, Jacksonville

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 615 Park St., Jacksonville,
Florida. Subscription price is $1.00 a
year. Entered as second class mail at the
Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under
Act of March 3. 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 615 Park
Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

SI SSOC aTI

Member Florida Press Association


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 1









ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:

Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.
Dairy Council Material In This Issue Sponsored by
Miami Dairy Council
MISS MARIAN CUDWORTH, Exec. Director

"Let's Make Butter" Helps Teach Children
About the Uses of Milk and Buttermilk
At least 30 girls and boys in Miami, ages seven and eight, know where butter
comes from . and buttermilk, too.
Newest activity to pop out of the Dairy Council's "things-to-do-file" is a primary
sized fun project especially adaptable to summer church school classes. Students in
the Bible School class at Miami Shores Baptist Church recently watched this "Let's
Make Butter" demonstration by the nutritionist.
Each one had a turn at this churning process, turning one cup of cream into
butter, pouring off the buttermilk, then working and washing the butter. Not the
least part of making their own butter is the Tasting Party which followed. With
colored plastic foodpicks the children tasted before any salt was added, then sampled
the fresh buttermilk; finally each had a generous spread of salted butter on a round,
crisp cracker. This was accompanied by a glass of cold, sweet milk.
There were puppets to cut out while waiting a chance to use the churn and
colorful Dairy Council leaflets explaining the process so that they could keep the
story straight.
Yes, 30 boys and girls learned about milk and cream and butter and buttermilk
. . and others will soon see this "magic" in dairy foods, for other primary groups
are scheduled for "LET'S MAKE BUTTER".


"Smile" Campaign Tested in Miami Senior High School
One of the highlights of the past school year in the Miami area was a pilot study
conducted by the Dairy Council in cooperation with a Kiwanis-sponsored Key Club,
a service club for high school boys.
As part of a continuing project extending to June 1957, its purpose was to develop
ways in which nutrition activities could be carried out among teenagers to improve
their eating habits and ultimately establish habits which would increase their milk
consumption.


Key Club Sweetheart presenting tickets
Key Club member tabulating milk sales.


to a winner who also was given a skipper's hat by


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Maxine Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director

School Milk Program
Extended to Hawaii
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Taft Ben-
son has announced that the Special
School Milk Program will be extended to
schools and child-care institutions in the
territory of Hawaii.
The extension followed receipts of a
report on the dairy situation in the Terri-
tory made by Herbert L. Forest, director
of the Dairy Division of the Agricultural
Marketing Service, that fresh fluid milk is
available in sufficient quantities.

1957 NDC Annual Meeting
The National Dairy Council's 42nd
Annual Meeting and Winter Conference
will be held next Jan. 28-30 at the Hotel
Fontenelle, Omaha, Nebraska. Prominent
speakers will participate in the event, the
first national-level dairy industry meeting
of the year.
Serving with the National Dairy Coun-
cil, as co-hosts to the dairy industry for
the three days, is the Dairy Council of
Omaha, Miss Ardith Von Housen, Exe-
cutive Director.
Various devices for doing this were in-
vented by the boys themselves, with the
main theme of "SMILE" used to promote
better eating for better dental health. One
activity . shown here . was the event
of the Prizewinning Milk Bottles. Ten
pairs of theatre tickets plus Skipper's hats
were given to each of ten students who
were lucky enough to be 150th in line to
buy milk for lunch. Milk sales on each
of two days during the event increased
about 81/2%.
Miss Marian Cudworth, Executive Di-
rector of the Miami Dairy Council, gave
a special report of the Key Club Project
during the program of the National Dairy
Council Summer Conference in Chicago
June 24-27, 1.956. A very complete report
of the entire pilot study will be available
by June, 1957.


2 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









councill Unit


'iliated Dairy Council unit,
uncil of Savannah, Georgia,
nmunity health program on
is been announced by J. H.
-nt, who is the manager of
companyy in Savannah.
Ruth Pleasant, formerly of
C., will be the executive
ie new unit.
int brings to her new work
iry Council organization a
iund in home economics....
to 1951 she was Home ......
n Agent for the North
e College Extension Service,
51 to date she has served as
omist with Westinghouse
ly Company.
ng a B.S. degree in home
>m Appalachian State Teach-
Boone, North Carolina, she
graduate work at Woman's
versity of North Carolina.
Fiber of the American Home D IV EL
Association and Home Eco-
usiness organization.
Council of Savannah is the
:ed Dairy Council unit of Save,
e first Dairy Council to be
e State of Georgia. Officers a l o im
Sof the Board of Directors 10t of time
.t, Mr. Dyer; vice-president,
ne, producer, Millen, Ga.; And it's safh
surer, E. R. McCellan, Fore-
Savannah; E. C. Bull, An-
Savannah; R. L. Thompson, on stainless stee.
ries, Savannah; L. C. Har-
er, Sparta, Ga.; and C. N.
)erds Dairy, Savannah.


















































This high-quality temporary summer crop has been used very success-
fully as grazing for cows in heavy milk production and to grow yearlings
at 130% of their normal rate of growth.
One of its principal uses is the production of large quantities of high
protein, very palatable, and highly digestible silage.
The productive season, with March, April, or May planting, can be for
a period of six months.
Millet should be planted on 500 pounds per acre of an Ideal complete
fertilizer. After each grazing or cutting top dressings should be made, al-
ternating between Ideal Nitrogen materials and Ideal complete fertilizers.
Contact your Wilson & Toomer representative now and let him help
you plan a millet crop into your pasture program.





EWILSON & TOOMERI

FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


National Conventions
And Dairy Exposition
October 29 through November 3rd are
the dates for the 1956 Dairy Industries
Exposition and the Annual Conventions
of the Dairy Industry National Associa-
tions in Atlantic City.
The International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers' Convention dates
are October 29-31 with headquarters at
the Shelburne.
The Milk Industry Foundation Con-
vention dates are October 31 through
November 2nd with headquarters at the
Chalfonte-Haddon Hall.
The two Associations will have their
usual joint program on the middle day,
Wednesday, October 31st, and a theatre
party for all groups Wednesday evening.
The convention group this year also
includes the National Association of Re-
tail Ice Cream Manufacturers which meets
November 1 to 3.
Hotel reservation forms on which res-
ervations must be made have been mailed
to members by each Association. Anyone
who is a member of D.I.S.A., M.I.F. or
I.A.I.C.M. and has not received a hotel
reservation form may secure one by writ-
ing your Association.
Hotels assigned to the Ice Cream con-
vention are: The Dennis, Shelburne,
Marlborough-Blenheim and Madison,
with headquarters at the Shelburne.
M.I.F. members will use Hotels Chal-
fonte-Haddon Hall, Colton Manor, La-
fayette and Seaside.
D.I.S.A. members are assigned Hotels
Traymore and Claridge.
Dairy people who are not members
of either association but desiring hotel
reservations may write the Atlantic City
Housing Bureau, giving the names of
three hotels preferred, type of room and
rates desired, approximate arrival and
departure dates and the names of persons
to occupy the rooms. Company letter-
heads should be used in writing.
D.I.S.A. upon request will send from
its headquarters at 1145 19th St., N.W.,
Washington, D. C., to dairy people not
members of the national associations,
printed hotel reservation application
forms which list the available hotels and
indicate their locations and their ranges
of room rates. These forms can then be
sent to the Housing Bureau.
Atlantic City hotels which are unas-
signed and open for occupancy by any
one are the President, Ambassador, Ritz-
Carlton, Chelsea, Abbey, Mayflower, and
the new Belmont, all on the boardwalk.
Off-boardwalk hotels available for gen-
real occupancy include the Carolina Crest,
the Clarendon, the Colton Manor, the
Columbus, the Eastbourne, the Senator
and others.
"Profanity is a blank check on a bank-
rupt vocabulary."










Florida Dairies must spread the news that - - - -

Florida Milk Prices Are As Low Or Lower

Than Comparable Milk In 65 Other Areas

The price of milk in the Miami areas at 25 cents a quart is less than in 41 cities
of 19 different states according to the July national fluid milk and cream price report
of the Agricultural Marketing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture and other
government sources.
The Tampa area price of 26 cents is as low or lower than milk prices in 42 cities
of 18 states and the District of Columbia.
The 27 cent milk price in other Florida areas is as low or lower than the price
in 24 cities of 12 states and the District of Columbia.


These facts about Florida milk prices
should be broadcast by Florida dairies and
dairymen at every opportunity. They
should be reprinted and duplicated and
furnished to every employee of every
dairy plant and dairy farm in the State of
Florida.
Newspaper editors and representatives
who insist on publishing statements that
the price of milk in Florida is the highest
in the nation should be presented with
these facts showing Florida's milk prices
are actually below milk prices in many
other areas and states.
The Florida dairy industry certainly has
a most favorable story to tell about its
reasonable milk prices when quality and
costs of production are also considered.
A summary of the milk prices for the
68 cities and 29 states and the District of
Columbia included in the data referred
to above shows 24 areas at 25 cents, 6 at
251/2 cents, 13 areas at 26 cents, 14 areas
at 27 cents, 1 at 271/2 cents, 3 areas at 28
cents, 4 areas at 281/2 cents and 3 areas
at 29 cents.
The average price for the 68 cities is
26.2 cents as compared to Florida's aver-
age of 26 cents.
The prices quoted are for standard
grade of pasteurized milk for the area,
which in many instances have a lower
cream content milk than Florida milk.
The cities included in the above sum-
mary and the milk price and cream con-
tent for each are as follows:


CITY
Tampa (Fla. Report)
Miami
Jacksonville
Springfield, Mass
Boston, Mass.
Worchester, Mass
Fall River, Mass.
Providence, R. I.
Baltimore, Md.
Hartford, Conn.
New Haven, Conn.
Philadelphia
Rochester, N. Y.
Newburg, N. Y.
Buffalo, N. Y.
New York City
Niagara Falls
White Plaines, N. Y.
Yonkers, N. Y.
Poughkeepsie, N. Y.
Atlantic City, N. J.


*PRICE
PER QT.
26
25
27
$27
t29
426
426
t27
f126
t281/2
1281/2
t27
25
0025
281/2
0-251/2
251/2
"251/2
0251/2
027
$29


CITY

Camden, N. J.
Trenton, N. J.
Gary, Indiana
Evansville, Ind.
Chicago, Ill.
Eau Claire, Wise.
Minneapolis, Minn.
Cincinnati, Ohio
Washington, D. C.
St. Louis
Alexandria, Va.
Norfolk, Va.
Charlotte, N. C.
Asheville, N. C.
Durham, N. C.
Winston-Salem, N. C.
Atlanta, Ga.
Augusta, Ga.
Columbus, Ga.
Macon, Ga.
Savannah, Ga.
Charleston, S. C.
Columbia, S. C.
Louisville, Ky.
Paducah, Ky.
Chattanooga, Tenn.
Knoxville, Tenn.
Nashville, Tenn.
Birmingham, Ala.
Mobile, Ala.
New Orleans
Shreveport, La.
Oklahoma City
Tulsa, Okla.
Austin, Texas
Corpus Christi
Dallas, Texas
Houston, Texas
El Paso, Texas
Galveston, Texas
Denver, Colorado
Colorado Springs
Albuquerque, N. M.
San Antonio, Texas
Tucson, Arizona
Medford, Oregon
Los Angeles


CREAM % *PRICE
PER QT.
3.5 251/2
3.5 26
3.5 28
-- 25
3.5 281/2
26
3.5 25
4-4.2 25
3.5-4. t27
3.5 251/2
3.5 26
4. 25
4.1 26
4. 26
4. 26
4. 26
4. 27
4. 27
4. 27
4. 27
4.3 28
4. 25
4. 25
-- 25
3.5 25
4. 25
4. 25
4.+ t26
3.7-4. 25
4. 25
4. 271/2
4. 29
4. 25
4. 27
4. 27
-- **28
4. 27
4. 26
,4. 25
4. 25
-- 25
25
3.5 25
**27
3.8 25
4. 25
3.8 25


Average, 68 cities ................... 26.24

Prices quoted are carton prices where there is
a difference.
*Price of Standard Milk for area from USDA,
July, 1956, report, Table No. 1
tPrice of Grade A Milk from USDA July,
1956, report, Table 5

$Supplementary Report of USDA Dairy
Branch, March & April, 1956
"Price of Standard Milk Price reported by
N. Y. State Dept. of Agriculture, May, 1956
**May price report of USDA Milk Market
Administrator for the area
'Reported by Louisiana Dairy Association at
Shreveport, May 1, 1956


Milk Cost Survey Begun
In West Coast Areas
The Florida Milk Commission started
July 25th in three Coast areas with its
new program of surveys which are ex-
pected to cover all milk market areas of
the state as rapidly as possible.
Operating cost report forms were
mailed by the Commission July 25 to all
milk producers and distributors of the
Tampa, Pinellas County and Manatee-
Sarasota milk marketing areas.
The producer report forms used had
been revised by the Commission after
recent consultations with a producers
committee of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion and dairy economics authorities of
the University of Florida.
The reports are to cover operation for
the year 1955 and were requested to be
returned by August 20.
The Commission's informational letter
to the dairies of the areas involved stated
that the purpose of the survey is to re-
examine all costs in the areas for use in
and adjusting prices, if necessary, and for
use in considering a possible consolida-
tion of present marketing areas.
It was also stated that after the cost
reports have been received and analyzed
and before making any price changes, the
Commission will hold a public hearing.

Retail Milk Price Control
Re-instated in New Jersey
Resale minimum price control on milk
was re-established in New Jersey, effective
July 1, by the State Office of Milk Indus-
try.
The minimum price for home-deliv-
ered standard grade milk was fixed at
251/2 cents a quart for the North Jersey
metropolitan area. The minimum price in
stores was set at 24 cents.
OMI Director F. R. Hoffman said he
was restoring resale controls on an "emer-
gency and temporary basis" to "prevent
unjust, destructive and demoralizing prac-
tices which tend to cause a demoralization
of the agricultural interests in this state
and interference with the maintenance of
a fresh, pure and wholesome supply of
milk to the consumers in New Jersey."
Hoffman's order represented a reversal
of policy he announced in February, 1955,
when he ordered resale controls aban-
doned.
He said the order was based on evi-
dence collected by his office and on
testimony presented at hearings May 21
and June 4.
The New Jersey milk price stabiliza-
tion law is different from the Florida law
with respect to authority for suspending
and reinstating milk price orders.

First the man takes a drink, then the
drink takes a drink, then the drink takes
the man.-Japanese Proverb


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 5


CREAM %
4. %
4.
4-4.5

4-4.5

4.+
4.+
4.+
3.7
4-4.3
3.7
3.7
3.5
3.5



3.5










Aeptospirosis and Its Incidence in Florida.
By: DR. M.ARISTIC, M. GALTON,
DR. D. A. SANDERS and DR. J. H. STEELE
Department of Veterinary Science, Univ. of Fla.
(Part II of a series)
NOTE: Leptospirosis in dairy and beef cattle represent an economic and public health problem
throughout the country. Since the disease in Florida has been recognized by the Agricultural
Experiment Station, the United States Public Health Service and the State Board of Health, a
cooperative project between these agencies was initiated earlier this year. It is proposed to
conduct basic studies on leptospirosis from both the human and veterinary angles.
Following is the second of a series of articles to be published in this and subsequent issues
of the Florida Dairy News regarding contemporary knowledge of leptospirosis Contributors to
the article series are: Dr. James H. Steele, Chief Veterinary Section and Mrs. Mildred Galton,
Director of Leptospira Laboratories, United States Public Health Service; Dr. M. Ristic, Asso-
ciate Pathologist, and Dr. D. A. Sanders, Head, Department of Veterinary Science.
Leptospirosis commonly affects farm animals, domestic pets and rodents and is
transmissible to man. There has been a sharp increase in its incidence within recent
years as evident from reports of the disease affecting humans, cattle, swine, horses,
sheep, dogs and certain species of rodents in many countries. In addition to its im-
portance from the aspects of public health and civilian disease, letospirosis is known
to constitute a major health hazard among Army troops serving overseas in many parts
of the world.


INCIDENCE
Leptospirosis was recognized as a dis-
ease entity and potential serious problem
in Florida in 1951. Recent investigations
have shown it to be a common infection
among cattle, swine and other animals in
the State. Due to its insidious nature,
varying symptomatology, widespread oc-
currence, host range, cross transmission
among animal species, different serolog-
ical types and the fact that recovered
animals may remain carriers and consti-
tute reservoirs of infection, leptospirosis
is recognized as a disease of major eco-


Leptospira microorganism as seen with the
Electron Microscope X 10,000 diameters.


Ristic Lists Simple Pointers
On Animal Disease Prevention
Concentrating farm animals encour-
ages the natural spread of diseases, warns
Veterinarian M. Ristic with the Florida
Agricultural Experiment Stations. He says
the best practice is to control diseases be-
fore they spread by following five simple
disease prevention rules.
First, isolate all newly acquired animals,
then retreat them for tuberculosis, brucel-
losis, leptospirosis and other common ani-
mal ailments. Second, calves should be
raised in individual pens, or the number
in each pen should be restricted.
Dr. Ristic's third point for livestock
health is to give hogs all the routine
vaccinations. Fourth, high standards of
cleanliness and nutrition should be set
by the individual stockman.
The animal researcher's fifth point is
that farmers should seek the aid of the
local veterinarian for a regular check of
the farm or ranch for possible weak
points in the disease control program.
Such a program should include herd
health, feeding standards and farm sani-
tation, Dr. Ristic said.


In Rochester, N. Y., to mark the June
promotion, a vending company placed
15 milk vending machines along main
street. Theme of these promotional activi-
ties, naturally, was "Milk on Main Street".


TABLE 1.
Summary of Serological Examinations for Leptospirosis in the State of Florida.
1951 1955

(7 Months)
Diagnostic Serum 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 Total
Samples received No. Pos. No. Pos. No. Pos No. Pos. No. Pos. No. Pos. Percent

Bovine 21 13 159 101 308 140 406 249 241 72 1135 575 50.62
Canine 3 0 63 32 135 95 155 102 99 62 455 291 64.0
Human 19 3 17 2 91 2 98 18 55 7 280 32 11.42
Horse 1 0 7 0 72 17 6 4 86 21 24.4
1Pig 3 3 1 0 19 2 6 2 29 7 24.1
Deer 1 0 1 0
TOTALS 43 16 243 138 543 237 750 388 407 147 1986 926 46.6


nomic importance to the livestock in-
dustry of the country. Losses from
leptospirosis among cattle alone have been
estimated at more than 112-million dol-
lars annually. (Agr. Res. Service, losses
in Ag., June, 1954). Unless accurate
laboratory diagnostic tests are available
and used, the disease may not be recog-
nized or the diagnosis may be doubtful
due to the complex clinical syndrome.
SYMPTOMS
The symptoms of bovine leptospirosis
may vary from an acute infection, which
terminates fatally within a few days, to
a chronic debilitating condition of several
weeks duration. The most commonly
(Continued on Next Page)


TABLE 2
Serological Findings of Herd Survey in the State.
Samples Examined for Leptospirosis by Agglutination or
Complement-fixation or both tests.

Herd Number Positive Percent

R 182 159 87.3
M 118 35* 29.6
D 335 50* 14.8
B 172 8 3.6
H 61 36 59.0
Totals 868 288 33.2
IG 35 10 28.5
BD 118 22 18.6
CB 38 0 0
MV 40 0 0
Totals 231 32 13.8
*,Complement-fixation test performed.


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









A IA A,.AAA,-.L Dlr. I rr


Offered To Florida Dairymen I V LI V %.
A simple, low-cost way for dairymen
to keep tab of their milk production
will go into effect this Fall, according to
C. W. Reaves, state extension dairyman,
University of Florida.
Called the "weigh-a-day-a-month" plan,
the nationwide program will help the
farmer to decide which cows to cull,
how to regulate the feed for each cow,
and which cows will bear the heaviest-
producing replacements.
Cost to the dairyman will be about a
nickel a cow each month. The program
is a cooperative venture of the Federal
Extension Service and the USDA's dairy
husbandry research, and county Extension
dairy committees will decide whether to
set up the plan in each county.
The program, Reaves says, is designed
to meet the needs of the dairymen not
taking part in the Dairy Herd Improve-
ment plan. County agents will have
forms for entering the new plan about t.O
September 1.
One day each month the farmer will
weigh the milk produced by each cow
in his herd. This information will go to
a county computing service which will
calculate the monthly yield and yield-to-
date for each cow plus a monthly herd
average.
The new plan has "definite value to
many Florida dairymen, and is a useful
tool in the county extension program,"
Dr. M. O. Watkins, director of the
Florida Agricultural Extension Service,
has commented.
Dairy scientists hi
LEPTOSPIROSIS nearly all the bacte
/ .., .. D 1 come from utensils













Candidates For State Offices And The Legislature



To Be Voted On In The November General Election





Many Democratic Nominees Are Without Opposition


Others Face Competition Of Republican Candidates


Members of the dairy industry will do
well to get acquainted now before the
November election with your candidates
for the legislature. As the legislative
program and policies of the dairy indus-
try become known, these certainly should
be discussed with your candidates for
State Representative and Senator in each
county and district.


House and Senate Leaders
Already Unofficially Named

Although the President of the Senate
and Speaker of the House are not offi-
cially elected until the legislature con-
venes in April 1957, it is the custom of
both the House and the Senate to elect
these leaders by unofficial vote months in
advance.
It is now known by advance pledges of
candidates that the 1957 Senate President
will be the veteran former Senate Presi-
dent, Senator W. A. (Bill) Shands of
Gainesville, and that Representative
Doyle Conner of Starke (Bradford
County) will be Speaker of the House.
These pledged votes for Senate Presi-
dent and House Speaker will become
somewhat more definite when a caucus of
House Democratic Nominees is held in
Jacksonville, August 17-18 and a caucus
of Senate Democratic Nominees is held
in Gainesville, November 3rd.


Dairy Legislation Opponents
Will Not Be Members In 1957

Several members of the House of Rep-
resentatives who were opponents of dairy
legislation in previous sessions will not be
back as members of the House in 1957.
Some of these sought other offices and
did not run for re-election to the House
while others were defeated in the primary
election.
Among those not returning are Volie
Williams, Sanford; Kenneth Ballinger,
Tallahassee; George Okell, Miami; Ted
David, Hollywood; Tom Johnson, Hills-
borough; Sherman Smith, Vero Beach;
Farris Bryant, Ocala; Boone Tillet, Lake
Wales, and Thos. T. Cobb, Daytona
Beach.


CANDIDATES FOR STATE OFFICES

(*Indicates Candidates For Re-election)
For Governor .................................. *LeRoy Collins ................................................ Dem ocrat ............................Tallahassee
Wm. A. Washburne, Jr. .......................Republican ......................................Nokomis
For Secretary of State ....................... *R. A Gray ........ .... .................................... Dem ocrat ............. ..............Tallahassee


CANDIDATES FOR THE STATE SENATE
*Senator G eorge A. Sm others .............. ........................................................................D em ocrat ................................................... M iam i


CANDIDATES FOR REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS


District Candidate
1 cWm. C. (Bill) Cramer
Winton H. (Win) King
2 *Charles E. Bennett
3 *Bob Sikes
4 Leland Hyzer
Dante B. Fascell
5 *A. S. Herlong, Jr.
Arnold L. Lund
6 *Paul G. Rogers
Dorothy A. Smith
7 *James A. Haley
G. M. (Gus) Nelson
8 *D. R. (Billy) Matthews


Party
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat


Address
St. Petersburg
Brandon
Jacksonville
Crestview
Miami
Coral Gables
Leesburg
Daytona Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Ft. Lauderdale
Sarasota
Sarasota
Gainesville


CANDIDATES FOR THE STATE SENATE


District Candidate
1 Newman C. Brackin
3 Harvie J. Belser
5 T. Drew Branch
7 Scott Kelly
9 *James E. Connor
A. S. Eppele
11 Hubert Rutland
*J. Frank Houghton
13 Joe Eaton
Churchill MacCuish
15 *Charley E. Johns
17 H. H. Hair, Jr.
19 *J. B. Rodgers, Jr.
21 *W. Randolph Hodges
23 J. A. Boyd
25 Bart Knight
27 *Doyle E. Carlton, Jr.
29 Tom Adams
31 *Verle A. Pope
33 *Irlo O. Bronson
35 Fred O. Dickinson, Jr.
Carroll S. Shaw
37 *Douglas Stenstrom


Party
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat


Counties Included Address
Santa Rosa & Okaloosa Crestview
Walton & Holmes Bonifay
Liberty, Franklin & Wakulla Sumatra
Polk Lakeland
Hernando & Citrus Brooksville
Hernando & Citrus Brooksville
Pinellas St. Petersburg
Pinellas St. Petersburg
Dade Miami
Dade North Miami
Bradford & Union Starke
Suwanee, Hamilton & Lafayette Live Oak
Orange Orlando
Levy, Gilchrist & Dixie Cedar Keys
Lake Leesburg
Washington, Bay, Calhoun & Gulf
Blountstown
Hardee, DeSoto, Glades & Highlands
Wauchula
Clay & Baker Orange Park
St. Johns & Flagler St. Augustine
Osceola & Okeechobee Kissimmee
Palm Beach West Palm Beach
Palm Beach Delray Beach
Seminole & Brevard Sanford


HOLDOVER MEMBERS OF THE STATE SENATE


District
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38


Senator
Philip D. Beall
John Rawls
Dewey M. Johnson
Wilson Carraway
W. T. Davis
Merrill P. Barber
W. E. Bishop
Harry 0. Stratton
Fletcher Morgan
L. K. Edwards, Jr.
S. D. Clarke
William R. Neblett
B. C. Pearce
E. William Gautier
Ted Cabot
W. A. (Bill) Shands
Paul Kicklighter
Joe Bill Rood
J. C. Getzen, Jr.


Counties Included
Escambia
Jackson
Gadsden
Leon
Madison & Taylor
Martin, St. Lucie & Indian River
Columbia
Nassau
Duval
Marion
Jefferson
Monroe, Lee, Collier & Hendry
Putnam
Volusia
Broward
Alachua
Hillsborough
Manatee, Sarasota & Charlotte
Pasco & Sumter


Address
Pensacola
Marianna
Quincy
Tallahassee
Madison
Vero Beach
Lake City
Callahan
Jacksonville
Irvine
Monticello
Key West
Palatka
New Smyrna Beach
Ft. Lauderdale
Gainesville
Tampa
Bradenton
Bushnell


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS














CANDIDATES FOR STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


County
Alachua
Group 1
Group 2
Baker
Bay
Group 1
Group 2
Bradford
Brevard
Broward
Group 1
Group 2
Calhoun
Charlotte
Citrus
Clay
Collier
Columbia
Dade
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3

DeSoto
Dixie
Duval
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Escambia
Group 1
Group 2

Flagler
Gadsden
Group 1
Group 2
Gilchrist
Glades
Gulf
Hamilton
Hardee
Hendry
Hernando
Highlands
Hillsborough
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3

Holmes
Indian River
Jackson
Group 1
Group 2
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Group 1
Group 2
Lee
Leon
Group 1


Candidate
*Ralph Turlington
*J. Emory "Red" Cross
*John J. Crews, Jr.

Dempsey J. Barron
Wm. E. Harris
*Doyle E. Conner
*A. Max Brewer
Richard B. Muldrew
*Andrew J. Musselman, Jr.
A. J. Ryan, Jr.
George Richardson, Jr.
Edwin H. Peters
*John M. Hathaway
Allison R. Strickland
*S. D. (Sam) Saunders
James Lorenzo Walker
B. D. Williams

George L. Hollahan, Jr.
Arthur A. Atkinson
*John B. Orr, Jr.
Theodore F. Bahlmann
*W. C. (Cliff) Herrell
Hobart Y. Andrews
*S. C. Smith
*Hal Chaires
John E. Mathews, Jr.
*Harry Westberry
*Wm. H. (Bill) Maness
*J. B. Hopkins
George Stone
Julius F. Wernicke, Jr.
W. L. Wadsworth
*W. M. Inman
C. Fred Arrington
*Howell Lancaster
*Joe H. Peeples, Jr.
*Cecil G. Costin, Jr.
*J. W. McAlpin
*G. W. (Dick) Williams
*Elbert L. Stewart
John L. Ayers
Howard Livingston
*James S. Moody
Ed. Richman
Robert T. Mann
Robert F. Byrnes
*Sam M. Gibbons
Charles B. Sloane
Wayne 0. Manning
L. B. "Buck" Vocelle
J. Troy Peacock
*John S. Shipp, Jr.
George H. Anderson
*Homer T. Putnal
Welborn Daniel
*C. E. Duncan
*Walter 0. Sheppard
*Mallory E. Horne


Party
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat


Address

Gainesville
Gainesville
Macclenny
Panama City
Panama City
Starke
Titusville
Melbourne

Pompano Beach
Dania
Ft. Lauderdale
Blountstown
Punta Gorda
Chassahowitzka
Middleburg
Naples
Lake City
South Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami
Miami Springs
Miami
Arcadia
Old Town

Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Pensacola
Pensacola
Pensacola
Bunnell
Quincy
Havana
Trenton
Moore Haven
Port St. Joe
White Springs
Wauchula
Clewiston
Brooksville
Sebring

Plant City
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Tampa
Ponce de Leon
Vero Beach
Marianna
Marianna
Monticello
Mayo
Clermont
Tavares
Fort Myers
Tallahassee


County
Group 2
Levy
Liberty
Madison
Manatee
Group 1
Group 2
Marion
Group 1
Group 2
Martin
Monroe
Group 1
Group 2
Nassau
Okaloosa
Group 1
Group 2
Okeechobee
Orange
Group I
Group 2
Osceola
Palm Beach
Group 1
Group 2
Pasco
Pinellas
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Polk
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Putnam
St. Johns
Group 1
Group 2
St. Lucie

Santa Rosa
Sarasota
Group 1
Group 2
Seminole
Group 1
Group 2
Sumter
Suwannee
Taylor
Union
Volusia
Group 1
Group 2
Wakulla
Walton
Washington


Candidate
Richard 0. Mitchell
*Frank Marshburn
*J. S. Alexander
Otis R. Peavy
*Wm. C. Grimes
Arthur W. Blue
*J. E. Pratt
Wm. G. O'Neill
*Wm. V. Chappell, Jr.
*Marvin H. Rowell
*Bernie C. Papy
J. Y. Porter
T. H. (Tommy) Askins
*Chas. D. Stewart
James H. (Jimmy) Wise
*Nathan Zelmenovitz
*Henry W. Land
John A. Sutton
James R. Fisher
*J. J. Griffin, Jr.
Ralph J. Blank, Jr.

George L. Pink
*Emmett S. Roberts
Beatrice M. Propp
*J. R. A. Williams
Dana Boose
*Fred C. Petersen
Thomas M. Carney
James T. Earle
Howard P. Rives
*B. E. Shaffer

*Roy Surles
Ray Mattox
Ben Hill Griffin, Jr.
*James N. "Gator" Beck
*F. Charles Usina
*Nathan I. Weinstein
Rupert lasen Smith
L. W. Halbe
Morrison Kimbrough
Wm. E. Robertson
George E. Youngberg, Sr.
W. W. (Woody) Jones
*Henry S. Bartholomew
*Mack N. Cleveland, Jr.
Gordon V. Frederick
E. C. Rowell
*Houston W. Roberts
*O. W. Jones
C. A. Roberts
Frederick B. Karl
Kenneth W. Zeh
*James H. Sweeny, Jr.
Bobby Russ
*Thos. D. (Tom) Beasley
Sam Mitchell


Party
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat

Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Republican
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat
Democrat


Rubbing elbows with a man will reveal
things about him never before realized-the
same thing is true of rubbing fenders.


An old-timer is one who remembers when
"on time" referred exclusively to punctuality,
not to a method of making purchases.

Tourist: "Did you see a pedestrian pass
here?"
Native: "Nope. Been sitting' here all day
and ain't nothing passed but one man and
he was walking. "

People will buy anything that's only one to
a customer.

Mark Twain: I am an old man and have
known a great many troubles, but most of
them have never happened.


Why is the guy who has the least privacy
of anybody in the world called a private?


"I conclude that's a fly," said the little
trout.
"You are right, dear," said its mother, "but
never lump at conclusions."


Knowing Florida Counties
By Car & Truck Tag Numbers

If you like to know where Florida motorists are from by their car or truck tag
numbers, keep the following schedule in your pocket book or car compartment-


Fla. Auto Licenses By Number

County Tag No.
Dade ................................... 1
Duval .............................. 2
Hillsborough ..................... 3
Pinellas ....... .................. 4
Po lk .......................................... 5
Palm Beach ............................. 6
Orange ............... .............. 7
Volusia ................. .............. 8
Escambia ........................ 9
Broward ........................... 10
Alachua ................................. 11
Lake ........ ................................12
Leon .......................................13
M arion .................................14
Manatee ..................... 15.........
Sarasota ......................... ..16
Lee .............................................18
Brevard .................................19
St. Johns ................... 20
Gadsden ......................... 21
Putnam ................ ............22


County Tag No.
Bay .................................... 23
St. Lucie .................... 24
Jackson ................................. 25
Osceola ................................. 26
Highlands ........................... 27
Pasco .................................... 28
Colum bia ..............................29
Hardee ................................. 30
Suwanee ...........................31
Indian River .....................32
Santa Rosa ...............................33
DeSoto ...................... 34
Madison .................... 35
Walton ................................. 36
Taylor ....................................37
Monroe ..............................38
Levy ..........................................3 9
Hernando ................... 40
Nassau .................................41
M martin ....................................4 2
Okaloosa ...........................43
Sumter .................................44
Bradford ...........................45


County Tag No.
Jefferson ............. ............ 46
C itrus .......................................4 7
Clay .................................... 48
Hendry .................................49
Washington ...............................50
Holmes .................................51
Baker ...................................52
Charlotte ...........................53
Dixie ...................................54
Gilchrist ..............................55
Hamilton .............................. 56
Okchobee ................... 57
Calhoun ................................58
Franklin ..............................59
Glades .................................60
Flagler .................................61
Lafayette .............................. 62
Union ....................................63
Collier .................................64
Wakulla ..............................65
Gulf .................................... 66
Liberty .............................................67
Office Agency ..................68


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 0 9


Address

Tallahassee
Bronson
Bristol
Madison
Palmetto
Cortez
Bradenton
Ocala
Ocala
Stuart
Key West
Key West
Fernandina Beach
Ft. Walton Beach
Crestview
Okeechobee
Apopka
Orlando
Orlando
St. Cloud
West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach
Belle Glade
West Palm Beach
Dade City
St. Petersburg
St. Petersburg
Snell Isle
St. Petersburg
Clearwater
Clearwater
Lakeland
Winter Haven
Frostproof
Palatka

St. Augustine
St. Augustine
Ft. Pierce
Ft. Pierce
Milton

Sarasota
Venice
Sarasota
Sarasota
Sanford
Sanford
Webster
Live Oak
Perry
Lake Butler

Daytona Beach
Daytona Beach
DeLand
Crawfordville
DeFuniak Springs
Vernon









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Agricultural Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station


FEEDING DAIRY COWS
By: J. M. WING, Assistant Dairy Husbandman, Dept. of Dairy Science, and
J. P. BOGGS, Dairy Foreman, Agricultural Experiment Station,
University of Florida
For most effective feeding, several special characteristics of the cow must be
considered. Few of us realize, for example, just how hard a good dairy cow has to
work. A high producing cow on succulent pasture may eat between 150 and 200
pounds per day. Don't you think eating is work? Think of the amount 150
pounds is a lot of mouthfuls and taking in feed is just the beginning. A tre-
mendous amount of work occurs because of muscular action and removal of heat and
gasses in the rather complicated process of digesting such huge amounts of feed.
After digestion nutrients go into the blood for distribution to the body cells,
and that's a big job. The udder alone must process about 400 pounds of blood to
make a pint of milk. For fifty pounds of milk to be produced (and that's not an
unusual day's work) the heart has to pump ten tons of blood to and from the udder
alone.
We can't discuss the total process, but you can see that the dairy cow is a highly
specialized animal from which we ask much more work than nature designed her


to do.
High milk production is not natural
- modern dairying is a highly artificial,
delicately balanced process which re-
quires constant attention. Lactation has
been compared to a bullet fired from a
gun in the beginning there is tre-
mendous stimulation to the milk produc-
ing mechanism as there is force
which would make a bullet cover a long
distance but if the bullet hits some-
thing and is slowed down, it won't speed
up again and will fall short. Usually
milk production which is decreased by
adverse conditions cannot be brought back
to its original level.
The cow has a great economic advan-
tage in her digestive system. She has
four stomachs let's consider just one
- the rumen; it holds about thirty
gallons. Rough feeds are changed into
a useable form here. Vitamins are syn-
thesized, proteins are made adequate, and
butter-fat constituents are formed from
roughage to mention only a few
rumen functions. The rumen makes it
possible for the cow to use large amounts
of roughage and it is necessary that
we take full advantage of this because
roughage is our least expensive feed.
Young fertilized pasture or green
chopped forage is our best and least ex-
pensive roughage and some of this
type of feed is essential to best produc-
tion something in it stimulates milk
flow, even if cows graze only two hours
per day. The remaining roughage can
e supplied as silage or hay if necessary.
Concentrate feed also is necessary.
This may be a good commercial dairy
feed or a similar home mixture for most


conditions. The good feeder finds the
amount to make the cow produce at her
economical maximum without getting fat.
He knows each cow and varies the con-
centrate with her appetite, production,
and the roughage supply.
When most of the roughage is very
succulent as are oats, rye, clover and
most silage often cows refuse ordinary
concentrates they seem to crave bulky
concentrate feeds containing materials
such as beet pulp, brewers grain, and
citrus pulp. So, the available roughage
determines the physical nature as well as
the nutrient content and amount of con-
centrates. This type of concentrate will
maintain high production and keep the
cows healthy. It helps prevent diarrhea
and may hold the roughage in the diges-
tive tract long enough to increase digesti-
bility of the forage.
In addition to proper feeds and feed-
ing, other good management practices
are necessary. These include keeping the
cows comfortable, milking and feeding
regularly, keeping cows which are sick or
in heat away from the herd, avoiding
feeds which cause undesirable milk
flavors, protecting health, and improving
the quality of the herd by breeding and
selection.


"I like to see a man proud of the place
in which he lives.
"I like to see a man live in it so his
place will be proud of him."
-Abraham Lincoln


University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1956 Special Events
for
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY

August 21-23
25th Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.

October 11-13
DAIRY PLANT OPERATOR'S
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant employ-
ees, producer-distributors, equipment and
supply dealers.

Herdsmen's Short Course
August 21-23, Gainesville
The University of Florida Department
of Dairy Science has announced the fol-
lowing program for the 1956 Annual
Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course to be
held at the University Dairy Products
Laboratory building and the University
Dairy Research Farm Tuesday, Wednes-
day and Thursday, August 21, 22, 23.
This intensive training course is plan-
ned especially for dairy farm owners and
managers, dairy herdsmen and their help-
ers, and any others interested in learning
efficient dairy farm and dairy herd
management.
Dr. R. B. Becker, who is in charge of
the program, is recognized as one of the
country's foremost authorities in Dairy
Husbandry. The well rounded program
covers many important phases of herd
management and milk production and
should attract a large attendance.
Gainesville hotel reservations are avail-
able at the Hotel Thomas, the Hotel
Whitehouse and at a number of modern
Tourist Courts.
Further information can be secured
from Dr. R. B. Becker, Dairy Laboratory
Building, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville.
HERDSMEN'S PROGRAM
Tuesday, August 21
8:30 A.M.-Registration at Dairy Lab.
Bldg.
9:00 A.M.-Forage For All the Year-
S. P. Marshall
9:45 A.M.-Recess
10:00 A.M.-Silage Crops and Methods
-J. M. Wing
10:40 A.M.-Silages, and Their Use in
Feeding-R. B. Becker
11:10 A.M.-Green Chopped Feed, or
Zero Grazing-P. T. Dix
Arnold
NOON
(Continued on Next Page)


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









's Short Course AlK-LViuV lllulvr umni DMHIN.
CONSIDERED IN MIAMI AREA
'ued from Page 10) Some of South Florida's progressive
Methods of Handling For- dairymen are known to be giving serioL
age-Roger Cain consideration to the advantages which
TOUR OF DAIRY RE- might be derived from the air-conditior
SEARCH UNIT ing of their milking barns.
SExperiments and research on the effect
esday, August 22 of high temperatures on milk production
-Management Methods Af- indicate that milk production decline
fect Conception Rates rapidly above certain temperatures.
J. M. Wing
-Ditch Irrigation R. D. (Dick) Saunders, assistant mar
-Recess ager of Southern Dairies at Tampa, rn
-To Irrigate, or Not to Irri- cently became president of the Tamp
gate Sales Executives Club.
-Temporary Pastures for
Dairy Cows
NOON
Handling Frozen Semen in Ea
Breeding-Johnny Boggs
Availability of Breeding
Service-C. W. Reaves
Calves and Heifers, and
Their Management-H. L.
Somers
ening Program
Films: "The Rumen Story"
and "Partners in Progress"
Florida's New Dairy In-
dustry Program: E. T. Lay, / ;;
Sec'y., Fla. Dairy Ass'n.
rsday, August 23 I us
-Pipeline Milkers and Bulk
Handling of Milk-Sam OR
Noles Easy to
-Obtaining Milk Weights, equipm
and Using Production Rec-
ords-C. W. Reaves Useful.
-Recess ant hot
-Control of External Para- I I pens an













Florida Club to Entertain National
Meeting of Guernsey Breeders in 1958
The National Convention and Annual Meeting of the American Guernsey Cattle
Club will be held in Florida in 1958 and already the Florida Guernsey Club is
considering how to make the 81st Annual Convention the biggest and best. A large
delegation of Florida Guernsey breeders attended the May Convention in Philadelphia
at which time the official announcement of the 1958 meeting was made. Next year
the convention will go to Texas.
Representing the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club in Philadelphia were the following:
W. A. Boutwell and Earl Jensen of Lake Worth; Walter Schmid, Jr., Sarasota; Earl
Johnson, Dinsmore; Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Donegan, Largo; Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur
Casey, Clearwater; Mr. and Mrs. Leon H. Sellers, St Petersburg; and Mr and Mrs.
Carroll L. Ward, Goldenrod.
The various events on the program in-
cluded a sale of Guernseys from all sec- MOORE'S DAIRY, INC. BUYS BULL
tions of the country at the Pennsylvania Moore's Dairy, Inc. has purchased the
Guernsey Sale Pavillion at Lancaster; registered Guernsey bull lenwell Raider
visits to several places of interest includ- from Boutwell's airy, Lake Worth. This
ing the Hall Girt Farm where delegates am is Jenwell M Excella and the sire,
were the guests of the Pennsylvania Asso- Gippy Carolina' Prediction.
ciation for dinner; and the annual busi- ADVANCED REGISTRY TESTS
c ones m in a t The Advanced Registry division of the
ness meeting. American Guernsey Cattle Club announ-
The week's activities began with a State American Guernsey Cattle Club announ-
Field Day on May 5 and were concluded ces the following production records su-
with a breakfast meeting on Thursday, pervisedby the University of Florida.
May 10. Several sales were held in the Peerless Emln 10,791 pounds of milk
area while the 79th Annual Meeting Con- Peerless Emlyn, 10,791 pounds of milk
vention had gathered together some 500 and 509 pounds of butterfat, which is
breeders from all the United States, Can- equal to 5100 quarts of high quality milk,
ada and Cuba. in a 305-day test milked three times daily
________ as a junior two-year-old.
Purchases Top Bull CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod
W. A. Boutwell of the Boutwell- -Wardhaven Hazel Liza Jane, 9,618
Matheson, Inc. farm at Stuart purchased pounds of milk and 431 pounds of butter-
the top bull sold at the Eastern Guernsey fat, which is equal to 4650 quarts of high
Sale at Glenburnie Farm, Trenton, New quality milk, in a 305 day test, milked
Jersey. Fifty-one head sold for an average three times daily as a Junior two-year-old.
Jersey. Fifty-one head sold for an average MBr^ T 7 MATHESON, INC.,
of $643.33, the top price being paid for BOUa WELLr- MATHESON ri N .,5
a three-year-old cow purchased for Stuart--Okhust Duchess Sunrise 9,552
$3,700.00. Mr. Boutwell paid the top pounds milk and 536 pounds butterfat
price of $1,150.00 for a bull, Mulhoca- in 305-day test milked two times daily as
way Butterfat Financier, born September a senior three-year-old.
28, 1955, and bred and consigned to the A part of thes Florida group at the National
sale by L. B. Wescott, Mulhocaway Farm, Convention of the American Guernsey Cattle
Clinton, New Jersey. "Financier" is the Club in Philadelphia, clockwise: E. E. Vary,
Sterling, Ill.; W. A. Boutuell, Lake Worth;
son of Mulhocaway Butterfat Adonis, the Mrs. Wilbur Casey, Clearwater; Wilbur
herd sire at Mulhocaway, and out of Casey; James E. Ferguson, Mt. Vernon, Wash.;
Spruce Run Butterfat Lily, classified Very Enrique Cusell, Havana, Cuba; Ed Pruett,
Good. "Lily" has one daughter that has Winchester, Ky.; Earl Jensen, Lake Worth,
clasMrs. Carroll Ward, Jr., and Mr. Ward, Gold-
classified "Excellent" twice, enrod, Fla.


FLORIDA'S 18th ANNUAL SALE
OF REGISTERED GUERNSEYS
September 10
The Florida Guernsey Cattle Club is
holding its 18th annual sale on September
10 at the Fairgrounds in Largo according
to Charles Johnson, Dinsmore, member
of the Sales Committee. Forty-five fresh
or close to fresh springing cows and hei-
fers are to be sold. They come from
some of the very best herds from New
York to Florida. Dairy farmers interested
in improving their herds should put this
sale on their date list.

Old Acquaintances Renewed
W. A. Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy,
Lake Worth and Granville H. Hibberd,
owner of Mill Dale Farm, New Windsor,
Maryland, renewed old acquaintances at
the Annual Meeting of the American
Guernsey Cattle Club in Philadelphia.
The two men had not seen each other
since 1907, when both were at Coastal
College, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. At
that time Coach Hibberd was athletic
director and Mr. Boutwell wrote songs
and led the cheering section at Guelph
College.

ARE PUREBREDS
PROFITABLE?
Following are excerpts from the April-
May 1955 issue of Doane Agricultural
Digest:
"Some people say NO, but there is
evidence to the contrary. R. E. Hogson,
Chief, Dairy Husbandry Research Branch,
passed on the following information in a
speech last Fall: . .The weighted aver-
age butterfat production for registered
cows was twenty-five pounds more than
the weighted average production for
grades over an eleven year period....
In New York in 1951 comparison of the
DHIA production of grade herds with
registered herds shows the registered
herds produced 1,280 lbs. more milk per
cow and returned twenty-two per cent
more income over feed costs. Results
are summarized . and give the indica-
tion that purebreds have the capacity to
return greater profits than grades.
"Besides this better production poten-
tial, purebreds offer a better market for
surplus stock. True, a poor registered
animal will bring no more than an ordi-
nary grade, but a good purebred with
good records behind it may return many
times the price of an ordinary animal ...
If you are contemplating going into the
dairy business or have a grade herd at
present, give some consideration to pure-
bred cattle. They won't make money for
everybody but they can be more profitable
to the conscientious operator."

The most completely lost day is that
on which you have not laughed.
-Sir John Rowring


12 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS




































HOME ON THE RANGE ..
(ELECTRIC, THAT ISI)


R
RK
,27T


No rural kitchen is complete without
an electric range and all the other
modern electric appliances that make
cooking cooler, cleaner, faster! And


800


I I
I

S Reddy is at home" out-
side the home, too, do-
ing scores of chores for
Singsoe fcoe o


I 1i 1


just pennies a day. Look
4 -


every rural laundry should have i L
modern electric washers. dryers, and ? see how electricity can
ironers to ease work and chase those make your work easier
washday blues! and faster, more effi-
cient and profitable!



FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY

THIRD QUARTER, 1956 13


GUERNSEYS


18th ANNUAL STATE SALE

Fairgrounds, Largo, Florida September 10, 1956 1:00 P.M., EST

3 miles from Pinellas International Airport



45 FRESH OR CLOSE

SPRINGING COWS AND HEIFERS
All Vaccinated
Consignors Include Some of the Top Herds from New York to Florida
Write for catalogs JOHN H. CONE, Secretary, P. O. Box 1551, Plant City, Florida

FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB








International Dairy Show
DAIRY NEWS DIGEST n Chicago, October 6-13
DAIRY NEWS DIGEST The 4th Annual International Dairy
Show will run for 8 days at the Interna-
tional Amphitheatre in Chicago, October
Members of tbh Dairy Indtustry throughout the Statle are invited to please 6-13, 1956. The Jersey breed will feature
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the its national show in conjunction with the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry. international dairy show this year. Jerseys,
-The Editor. along with Guernseys and Brown Swiss
will be judged on Tuesday and Wednes-
175 Florida Dairy Farms Close Down In Past Year day, October 9 and 10. Holsteins, Ayr-
This announcement is dedicated to come so unstable and undependable that shires and Milking Shorthorns will be
Florida's crusaders against the Florida as indicated able and undependable that judged on Thursday and Friday, October
Florida's crusaders against the Florida as indicated by the above heading, ap- 11 and 12. The all breed Junior Show,
Milk Commission's program of milk price proximately 175 dairy farmers, constitut- open to 4-H and F.F.A. exhibitors, will
infor the purpo hs of presntinuersince that timed number of milk producers have found it same judges who officiate in the open
strengthening thpurpose ofState's milk supply necessary to quit the business, classes of each breed.
strengthening the State's milk supply. The national committee on 4-H Club
This program operated some twenty To be more specific, we wish to state work, Chicago, announces that the Na-
years with considerable success during that this information comes from the tional Conference and Tour, held at the
which time milk production in Florida records of the Chief Dairy Supervisor of Chicago show for the first time last year,
was more than doubled in volume while the Florida State Department of Agri- will be repeated on a larger scale.
milk quality was also being greatly im- culture. According to these reports (as A great State Street Parade will inaug-
proved, of July 18, 1956) certain apparent trends rate the International Dairy Show on
The Milk Commission's milk price and may be summarized as follows: the great- Saturday, October 6 and will salute the
milk market stabilizing program gave est number of the dairies going out of dairy farmer with a spectacular exhibition
milk market stabilizing program gave business were located in the northwest of both beauties and beasts. A.D.A. state
Florida farmers the courage to invest section of the state, from Suwannee Coun- princesses from the nation's leading dairy
millions of dollars in dairy farms and ty south to Marion County and west to states will provide the beauty as they ride
farm the development benefitting the ecn- Pensacola. The entire East Coast area is in open convertibles. Cows of the six
omy of the State and providing the public very well stabilized. Central Florida has dairy breeds named above will be shown
with an adequate and top quality milk lost a few dairies while the Hillsborough on tractor drawn floats, decorated to show
supply. area has gained several. Those that have the countries of their origin. Also in the
Within the past few years, however, so moved out of Dade County show up as parade will be cowboys and cowgirls on
many monkey wrenches have been thrown an increase in the counties to the North their western horses from the "Golden
into the machinery of the Milk Commis- of them. A true picture of the situation Spurs Rodeo," daily entertainment fea-
sion's milk stablilization program by would also involve the fact that some ture of the International Dairy Show.
political and other self seeking crusaders dairies have new operators, some have
against the program, that a great agri- been consolidated and with a few new Who Invited Him?
cultural enterprise which had grown to operations, the production this year is es- The University of Florida Lecture Con-
third in size among Florida's cash farm timated to equal or slightly exceed that mittee and the School of Journalism and
income crops has almost overnight be- of a year ago. Communications invited the publisher of
the Louisville, Ky., Courier-Journal and
Southern Ice Cream Group Members Appreciate F.D.A. Times to speak at the University of Flor-
Sets Meeting in Houston Efforts In Court Cases After reading (AP) quotations from
The Southern Association of Ice A member of the Florida Dairy As- the address, the question arises as to who
Cream Manufacturers has announced the sociation who at first objected to the in- invited the speaker and why.
dates and place of the organization's 1956 dustry's contesting in the courts the Flor- He strongly condemned Southerners
(42nd Annual) Convention to be Novem- ida Milk Commission's moratorium on who are resisting integration. He was
ber 26-29 at the Shamrock-Hilton at enforcement of its milk price orders on quoted as calling such resistance "the
Houston, Texas. the grounds that it was a lost cause, was spirit of secession" and "black-hearted
Anyone interested in making hotel res- one of the first to congratulate the As- prejudice."
ervations who has not received the As- sociation when the case was won. 'The increase of milk prices in this
sociation's official members reservation This member showed his appreciation "'The increase of milk prices in this
forms may secure them by writing: Ed further by reminding other dairymen of area today is entirely due to the Supreme
Court order re-instating the last Milk
Koontz, secretary, Southern Assn. of Ice obligation to support the Association's Commission order for prices in this area.
Cream Mfrs., Box 5107, Biltmore, N. C. efforts in their behalf. His message to This court fight was led entirely by the
Association reads as follows: Florida Dairy Association and I feel that
The American Dairy Association "Congratulations on winning the cases every dairy should give consideration to
pointed out in a recent statement that relative to the constitutionality of the the support of this organization which
charges that link dairy product consump- Milk Commission Law and the illegality is constantly working for the over-all
tion with the increase in heart diseases of the Commission's one-year moratorium benefit of the Dairy Industry.' "
do not bear up under the actual trends on enforcement of its price orders. Another member of the F.D.A. who
in dairy food consumption. U. S. De- "This was great work and I am sur- decided it was better to sell out and get
apartment of Agriculture records on milk prised that we won, I feel that the As- out of the dairy 'business, paid his mem-
fat usage in this country show an average sociation deserves the support of all bership dues for the entire year out of
consumption of one and one-fifth ounces dairies and am writing a number of dairy- appreciation for the Association's efforts
per day. men the following message: and accomplishments.
14 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









SC I - -


Department of Agriculture,
Milk Marketing has an-
tember 5th as the date for
estigative hearing for dairy-
Miami-Palm Beach area in
he need for the possible pro-
Federal milk price order for
:e of milk in that area.
tI-,r 10n -nrAr-- f n" --

















Handling of milk in bulk has become a reality. Most of
method are well known. Reduced transportation cost is the p
there are others, such as saving in labor, lower bacteria count!
Bulk handling of milk includes the s]
ing, the cooling and/or storage of milk
the transportation of milk in tank trucks.
Some problems have been encountered
to the bulk handling system. Developme
has been of greatest concern. It has been
milk prior to cooling and the mixing of
is the main cause of the defect. By redu<
admitted at the "claw" and at connection:
rancid difficulty has been corrected. Agiti
be kept to a minimum, especially as occi
KRIENKE pump is used to remove milk from th
equipped with milklevel controls.
Some problems of a bacterial nature s r
also have been encountered that were not seat wdu resu ei
troublesome with former methods. Ex- tank during the e
tended holding of raw milk at the farm Handlng of r
for two or three days allows certain bac- tails if trouble isn't
teria to multiply rapidly at the low tem- to ble
perature. The source of the trouble has responsible for the
been the water supplies. Farm tanks system should beco
should be "fogged" with a sanitizer im- with the new roeq
mediately prior to use and not rinsed prescribed proed
results. If propel
thereafter. milk in bulk offei
Outlet valves on vacuum tanks must be and one that will
handled with care. Damage to the valve- high quality milk.


Preservina Foraaes as Si







~OmpTPtc 1.IJpel
of the

[IEGLER DAIRY FA
Estate of Clarence Ziegler, C
ORLANDO, FLORIC
Friday, August 31 Sati
Beginning at 10:00 A.M
(If possible, all the herd will be sold t
AT THE FARM, located 7 miles south of Orlando on
The South Orange Blossom

500 HI-GRADE DAII
HOLSTEINS JER
Every Sound

If you need ...
r Repla
Kr .K










DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION ELECTS
1957 OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
Lee and Sargeant Are Given Top Posts

Officers of the Florida Dairy Association for 1957, six distributor division direc-
tors and 15 producer directors were elected at the Association's Annual Meeting in
Clearwater, June 28 and the Annual Dairy Field Day Meeting in Gainesville, July 20.
Under a new change in the Association By-Laws, distributor directors serve a
three-year term and producer directors a one-year term. This plan requires the election
of all of the 15 regular producer directors annually and one-third of the 15 regular
distributor directors.
The 1957 Officers elected are: T. G. date by the Board of Directors. The
Lee, Orlando, president, representing dis- present directors for these areas are Hugh
tributors; John Sargeant, Lakeland, 1st Adams, Jacksonville, Julian Lane, Tampa
vice-president and chairman of the pro- and Herman Burnett, Bradenton.
ducer members' division; A. R. (Dolph) All active local producers' associations
Allison, Orlando, Borden Company Zone were given the privilege of recommend-
Manager, 2nd vice-president and chair- ing a director for their area and recom-
man of the distributor members' division; mendations from six local groups were
H. Cody Skinner, Jacksonville, Treasurer, accepted.
and Walter G. Burton, Jacksonville, as- Associate Directors Elected
sistant treasurer. In addition to the regular directors, the
The Executive Director, E. T. Lay, presidents of the three Florida dairy breed
serves at the pleasure of the Board of associations were elected associate direc-
Directors. Lay has been with the Associa- tors with the privilege of attending and
tion since 1942. participating in all directors' meetings ex-
tio ic 1 s cept for voting. However, these would be
Distributor directors whose terms ex- eligible to serve as an alternate for an
pire at the end of 1956 and were re- absent director.
elected for another three-year term were: _________
J. N. McArthur, Miami; John Tripson, DAIRY DATES
Vero Beach; H. B. Pownall, Miami, and AIY A
Gordon Nielsen, West Palm Beach. August 15 F
John Cone, Plant City, was elected to Club Annual Meeing-y
replace Earl Lovelace of Tampa. Quincy
Fifteen producer directors, in addition August 16 State Jersey Sale-
to Bill Graham who under the By-Laws Quincy
to Bill Graham who under the By-L August 21-23 Dairy Herdsman's Short
continued as a director one-year after Course-University of
serving as president, were due to be elect- Florida
ed for 1957. August 20-25 DHIA TrainingCourse-
The Nominating Committee nominated For Qualified Applicants
r i r .1 University of Florida
one director each for 12 areas with one September 5-7 International Association
additional director in the West Coast area of Milk and Food Sani-
and two additional in the Miami area tarians, Seattle, Wash.
which provides additional representation Septembe 11 State Guernsey Sale-
for these two larger milk production September 24-28 Milk Merchandising
areas. Courses of Milk Industry
All present directors were re-elected Foundation-Washing-
except in the West Palm Beach area where October 3 she ale-Tampa
i October 3 Ayrshire Sale-Tampa
George F. Johnson requested that he not Fairgrounds
be re-elected. October 6-13 International Dairy
Julian Stewart, who had moved from Show-Chicago
Dade County where he was first elected October 11-13 Dairy Plant Short Course
-University of Florida
as a director to Palm Beach County, was October 28-Nov. 3 Dairy Equipment
replaced in the Miami area by Joe Pereno International Assn. of
and Bob Hall of Hall & Boyd Dairy was October 29-31 Exposition Atlantic City
elected as an additional director for the Ice Cream Mfrs. Annual
Convention-Atlantic
Miami area. City
Directors for the Jacksonville, Tampa October 31-Nov. 2 Milk Industry Foundation
and Sarasota-Bradenton areas were not Annual Convention-
elected by request of the Nominating November 26-29 Souhen Association of
Committee and will be elected at a later Ice Cream Manufacturers
18 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


LEE


ALLISON


SERGEANT


SKINNER


F.D.A. Directors Plan Meeting
November 10 in Jacksonville
The regular quarterly meeting of
F.D.A. directors for the 4th quarter of
the year has been announced for Novem-
ber 9 and 10 in Jacksonville.
Those desiring to do so will have an
opportunity to attend the Florida-Georgia
football game the afternoon of the 10th.
A special directors' meeting is now be-
ing considered for sometime in September.


DAIRY MONTH IS GREATEST
June 1956, just past, was 20th "An-
nual Dairy Month" in the United States
and first as "International Dairy Month"
with England, Canada and others joining
in the program.
The American Dairy Association, which
provides the leadership for the June
Dairy Month program in which all
branches of the industry participate re-
ports that Dairy Month activities for 1956
exceeded those of any previous year and
its boosting of increased sales of dairy
products far ahead of previous years.
The "Dairy News" will review "1956
Dairy Month" activities in Florida in the
Fourth Quarter issue. Claude Kelly,
Florida's 1956 Dairy Month Chairman,
reports that a preliminary study shows
that the Jacksonville area probably used
more of the special "Dairy Month" half-
pint cartons than any city in the United
States.









Strict Enforcement of Florida Milk Laws
Requested by Florida Dairy Association
Directed at securing the greatest possible use of Florida's grade A milk supply
in fluid milk channels, which would aid in providing to the milk producer a higher
average price for his milk, the Producers' Division of the Florida Dairy Association
proposed and the Association's Annual Convention adopted, June 28, a resolution
favoring strict enforcement of the Florida Milk and Milk Products Law which sets
the quality and sanitary standards in milk production and processing.
The resolution calls upon the Commissioner of Agriculture, who heads the ad-
ministration of the law as well as health and inspection departments who also par-
ticipate in the supervision and enforcement of milk standards requirements, to
strictly enforce existing laws and regulations on milk and milk products and offers
the cooperation of the Dairy Association's membership.


Closer Supervision Expected
For Milk Brought Into Florida
One of the benefits anticipated by the
Association in requesting more rigid en-
forcement of the state milk standards re-
quirements is a closer inspection and
regulation of all milk and milk products
which are brought into Florida from other
states.
The Florida law requires that any milk
or milk product imported from out-of-
state sources shall meet all the standards
and requirements for milk produced and
processed within the State of Florida.
Portions of the Florida law and regula-
tions adopted under it, which the Associa-
tion's resolution specifically referred to as
included in the request, provide:
"It is unlawful to sell recombined or
reconstructed milk in the State of
Florida."
"No person by himself or by his agents
or servants, shall sell, offer for sale, ex-
pose for sale, or have in his possession
with intent to sell, any product defined
by this chapter that does not conform to
the standard of the definitions of milk
and milk products contained in this chap-
ter."
"Every person who ships or sells milk
and cream produced in the State of Flor-
ida or brought from points outside of the
state shall cause the same to be labeled
or identified in such manner as may be
prescribed by the Commissioner of Agri-
culture as will advise the purchaser or
consumer of the nature and kind of milk
or cream and will indicate the state in
which same was produced, and all dis-
tributors or receivers of milk and cream
shall furnish all customers, wholesale
or retail, with information to be placed
upon the containers in which the milk
and cream is handled showing the source
of production of the milk and cream as
herein required."
"It is unlawful for any milk, either im-
ported or domestic, to be repasteurized,
and it is unlawful also to mix domestic
milk with milk brought in from any point
outside of the State of Florida prior to
sale to distributors, retailers, or consum-
ers.
"No person shall within the State or
Florida sell, offer, or expose for sale, or
have in possession with intent to sell, any


milk or milk product which is adulter-
ated, misbranded, or ungraded."

Dairy Marketing Aid Requested
In State Marketing Bureau
As a part of its stepped-up emphasis
and program on more aggressive market-
ing of the products of the Florida dairy
industry, the Florida Dairy Association
has officially requested the addition of
a Dairy Marketing Specialist in the Mar-
keting Bureau of the State Department
of Agriculture.
The request is given below in full:
"July 27, 1956
"Honorable Nathan Mayo
Commissioner of Agriculture
Tallahassee, Florida
"Dear Mr. Mayo:
"The Florida Dairy Association adopted
a resolution at both the Annual Meeting
at Clearwater, June 26-28 and at the An-
nual Dairy Field Day meeting, July 19-20
in Gainesville favoring and recommend-
ing to you the addition of a dairy market-
ing specialist to your staff in the State
Marketing Bureau.
"This recommendation was made be-
cause of the increased problems of the
dairy industry in the marketing of Flor-
ida's milk supply in such a way as to
secure to our dairy farmers the best pos-
sible use and prices for their milk.
"It was believed also that a dairy mar-
keting specialist could give a great deal of
assistance to the industry in the assembl-
ing of adequate and correct data and
statistics on Florida's milk production,
milk processing and milk sales. Such
specialist could also make studies and sur-
veys of Florida milk consumption and po-
tential milk demands.
"We trust that you will give this re-
quest your earnest consideration and that
you will call on our Association for con-
sultation about the matter if there is any
further information we may be able to
furnish."
"Yours sincerely,
/s/ W. A. (Bill) Graham
President, Fla. Dairy Assn.
/s/ E. T. Lay
Exec. Director & Sec'y.,
Fla. Dairy Assn."


Dairies Express Appreciation
To Nathan Mayo & Others
Law enforcement officers are sometimes
quite unpopular with the people they
occasionally find it necessary to crack
down on. No doubt, many Florida dairy-
men could recall incidents in their ex-
perience through the years when dairy
inspectors and supervisors from the State
Department of Agriculture or the State
and local health departments have made
themselves very unpopular by their insis-
tence on compliance with milk laws and
regulations.
Notwithstanding these experiences,
there exists today in the dairy industry a
most healthy respect and, in many indi-
vidual cases, a sincere friendship for the
persons who represent these agencies of
the state and the various cities and coun-
ties supervising the industry.
An expression of this respect and ap-
preciation on the part of the dairy industry
was incorporated in a resolution adopted
by Florida dairy farmers and dairy plant
executives at the 1956 Annual Meeting
of the Florida Dairy Association.
The resolution follows:
"That the Florida Dairy Association
and its members desire to express sincere
appreciation to the Commissioner of Agri-
culture and the members of his staff of
Dairy Supervisors and all others who par-
ticipate in carrying out the provisions of
the State Milk and Milk Products Law,
for their friendly interest in the problems
and development of the Florida Dairy
Industry and for their spendid coopera-
tion with the dairy industry through the
years in the solution of its many problems
as a new and growing industry in the
State."

Milk Imports Over 1955
During First Half of Year
The office of Chief Dairy Supervisor,
Florida Department of Agriculture, re-
ports 47,959 gallons of fluid milk im-
ported by Florida dairies for civilian con-
sumption during the first six months of
1956 and 319,332 gallons for military
use.
By comparison with last year, the rec-
ords show no imported milk for civilian
use during the first half of 1955 but
209,698 gallons were imported for mili-
tary use.
The report shows other dairy products
imported from January to July 1, 1956
to be as follows:
40% cream..................1,081,356 gallons
Condensed milk.......... 943,198 gallons
Cottage cheese............4,142,668 pounds
Cheese .....................3,559,278 pounds
Skim milk powder......3,592,860 pounds
Ice Cream mix.......... none
Ice Cream.................... 5,685 gallons
Buttermilk starter........ 7,110 gallons
Sour Cream............... 68,128.84 lbs.
Very little Florida produced milk is
available for use other than as fresh
whole milk.


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 19









NEW MEMBERS APPOINTED
TO MILK COMMISSION
Three new consumer members of the
Florida Milk Commission were named by
Governor Collins, July 27th, replacing
three members whose terms had expired.
This makes four Collins appointees on
the Commission including the producer
member Wilbur Casey of Largo, who was
appointed May 17 replacing Ben S. War-
ing of Madison
who had resigned
some months be-
fore. Casey is a
successful Golden
Guernsey mil k
producer for the
Hood Dairy of St.
Petersburg and
well known
among Fori d a
CASEY Guernsey breed-
ers.
The new consumer representatives are
Howard Walton, Miami C.I.O. Labor
leader; Col. Dexter Lowry of Tallahassee,
a retired Army Colonel, and H. G.
Cochrane, Jr., a Lake City hardware
dealer.
According to a Tallahassee press an-
nouncement, Walton succeeds William
Imand of Miami, Col. Lowry succeeds
Raymond Lee of Clearwater, and Coch-
rane succeeds Mrs. Bertha Elliott of
Jacksonville.
Each of the new members is appointed
for a four-year term with Walton's term
to expire July 27, 1960, Lowry's term to
expire July 22, 1960, and Cochrane's
term to expire May 31, 1960.
The provisions of the Milk Commis-
sion law concerning the consumer mem-
bers of the Commission to be named are
as follows: Sec. 501.03, Florida Statutes
- "Three citizens not connected with
the milk industry other than as consumers
of milk who are citizens of the United
States and residents of the State for a
period of not less than ten years im-
mediately preceding the date of their
appointment."
It is reported that the new commission
members will probably not attend their
first meeting until the regular monthly
meeting for August, the date of which
has not yet been announced. At this
meeting it is expected that the Chairman
and Secretary will be elected for the com-
ing year.
Other members of the seven member
commission are: Henry Schneider, Or-
lando milk distributor; Fred Ragland,
Jacksonville, representing the Florida
State Board of Health, and Alex Shaw,
Gainesville, representing the State De-
partment of Agriculture. L. K. Nicholas,
Jr. is Commission Administrator.


MILK COMMISSION ACTION
MEETING OF JULY 9-10
Actions of the Milk Commission's
Regular Monthly Meeting Held July
9-10, 1956 at the Commission Office
in Jacksonville
Commission members present were:
Lee, Imand, Elliott, Ragland, Casey and
Schneider. Others present were: Ad-
ministrator Nicholas and Commission At-
torney Knight.
Representatives of the dairy industry
present were T. G. Lee, Distributor
Chairman; John Sargeant, Producer
Chairman; Hugh Adams, Jacksonville
Producer Director, and E. T. Lay, execu-
tive Director of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation. There was also a delegation of
Jacksonville producers and distributors
and the Duval County Agricultural
Agent.
Actions taken by the Commission in-
cluded:
(1) Consideration of two State Su-
preme Court decisions recently issued
concerning the constitutionality of the
Milk Commission Act and the legality of
the Commission's order of September,
1955, declaring a one-year moratorium on
enforcement of its price orders.
(2) Were advised by the Commission
Attorney that the Court's ruling that the
price enforcement moratorium is illegal
automatically re-instates all price orders
which were in effect on the date the
moratorium was adopted, September 19,
1955.
(3) Adopted a motion rescinding
previous orders which had provided for
the price enforcement moratorium.
(4) Considered and ruled out of order
for lack of the required number of signa-
tures, a petition that had been filed by a
group of Palm Beach County producers
requesting the Commission to withdraw
operation from that county.
(5) Considered and postponed action
pending the securing of additional infor-
mation, a request by an Alabama milk
distributor for a license to distribute milk
in the State of Florida.
(6) Adopted a motion providing for
the making of complete milk production,
processing and distribution cost investiga-
tions, surveys and audits in each market
area for use in determining whether or not
existing price orders in each area should
be revised. This motion provided for be-
ginning the survey in the Hillsborough
County-West Coast area with the Palm
Beach area survey to be made second.
(7) The Commission invited the Flor-
ida Dairy Association to cooperate in re-
vising the provisions of the Commis-
sion's Code of Fair Trade Practices and
this cooperation was promised.
(8) The Commission also invited the
cooperation of the Dairy Association in
considering revisions in the Commission's


Milk Commission Personnel
Prior to re-establishing milk price en-
forcement as directed by the Florida
Supreme Court decision on July 9, the
Milk Commission had already begun
the reorganization and building up of its
staff of area deputies and auditors for
putting into operation a new service that
had been recommended and requested by
the Florida Dairy Association.
This service was to provide systematic
monthly audits of milk usage and milk
payments to producers by all milk dis-
tributors buying milk from Florida pro-
ducers.
With active enforcement of its milk
price orders re-instated, the Commission
found it necessary to take further steps
to build up an adequate field staff.
The present staff of the Commission,
in addition to the Administrator and
office personnel are: (1) Chief auditor
and deputy, R. Fred Stokes, Jr., Jackson-
ville office; (2) Dairy technician and
deputy, George L. Scott, Jacksonville
office; (3) Lakeland area deputy investi-
gator, P. L. Lilly, P. O. Box 817, Winter
Haven, phone 3-5304; (4) West Coast
area deputy and auditor, Dan L. Myers,
409 E. Cass St., Tampa, phone 2-2369;
(5) Central Florida & East Coast deputy
and auditor, John Kennedy, 209 S.
Orange, Orlando, phone 2-8814; (6)
West Florida deputy and auditor, Willard
L. Henry, Tallahassee.

Says Milk Price Law Is
Beneficial in Rhode Island
J. L. Rego, Rhode Island State Director
of Agriculture, recently told a state agri-
cultural conference, "I believe the Rhode
Island minimum milk price law is a good
one. It has had the effect of keeping
farmer prices for milk 75 cents to $1 a
hundredweight higher than farmers in
nearby states, and yet consumers have not
had to pay higher prices for milk than
other states. If consumers were being
penalized, I would not want the law,
but as it is, I think the law is fine and its
repeal only would bring chaos to the
industry, and less money to local farm-
ers.

milk production cost report form. This
cooperation was offered and arrangements
made with the Administrator and produc-
er member of the Commission to meet
with a Committee of the Association in
Gainesville, July 18.
(9) The Chairman of the Commission
criticised the producers of some areas for
failure to produce cost reports at certain
Commission hearings but the Florida
Dairy Association spokesman defended
the producers' action on the grounds that
the producers could see no need for sub-
mitting reports during the period of the
Commission's moratorium of enforcement
of the prices.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









College Personnel for Teaching
d Research in Dairy Manufacturing
By: PROF. H. B. HENDERSON, Head
Dairy Division, University of Georgia
he third of a series of articles condensed from a Special Committee Survey
e Milk Industry Foundation concerning "Why there is a nation-wide shortage
uates in Dairy Science." Professor Henderson as chairman of the committee,
'port to the 1955 M.I.F. Convention in St. Louis. This series is edited and
ie Dairy News by Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head, Dept. of Dairy Science, U. of F.
tion-wide survey by the Milk Industry Foundation, detailed informa
d which indicates that in terms of academic qualifications, the person
y manufacturing departments of the universities are exceptionally ,

institutions which are offering work in dairy manufacturing, 26 repo
ie dairy manufacturing staff. Eight of these institutions have 2 instruc
I and 7 only have 1. It would appear impossible for a staff of no n
)le to conduct any appreciable research, and to operate a dairy process,
Edition to teaching the usual classes in dairy manufacturing. (The I










JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


American Jersey Cattle Club
Boosts Junior Jersey Program
Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Stuart of Bartow, Florida represented Florida Jersey breeders
at the 88th Annual Meeting of the American Jersey Cattle Club at Springfield,
Missouri June 6, 1956. On the day before the Annual Meeting, an All-American
Sale of Starlets was held at which forty-four high quality heifers donated by breeders
and state associations were sold. The proceeds from the sale goes to the expanded
Junior Jersey Program.
Mr. Stuart purchased four head including Masterman Polish Marie, donated by
Knolle Jersey Farms, Sandia, Texas; Dreamer's Wonderful Snowflake donated by
Happy Valley Farms Rossville, Georgia; Radar Stella Midget, donated by D. I.
Dean, Champaign, Illinois; and Zinnia Fantaine Holly, donated by Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Rice, Portland, Indiana.
"Marie" and "Snowflake" were bought at the second and third highest purchase
prices in the sale, $500 and $475, respectively. The average price was $302.61 and
the highest, $600.00.


SPECIAL AWARDS AND
PRODUCTION RECORDS
Two silver medal awards are announced
for Florida Jerseys. These are made by
the American Jersey Cattle Club for of-
ficial records supervised by the University
of Florida. Gem's Observer Fern, owned
by CLAY COUNTY FARMS, Middle-
burg, recently completed a production
record of 8642 pounds of milk and 501
pounds of butterfat in 305 days at the
age of three years. The other Silver
Medal winner was Observer Sultan Mag-
nolia, owned by WALTER WELKENER,
Jacksonville, that recently completed a
production record of 9388 pounds of
milk and 494 pounds of butterfat in 305
days at the age of two years and three
months.
Two registered Jersey cows owned by
WALTER WELKENER, Jacksonville, and
three owned by MEADOWBROOK FARM,
Jacksonville have won "Ton of Gold" Certifi-
cates for having produced more than a ton of
butterfat during a four-year period on Herd
Improvement Registry Test. The cows and
their record are: Sybil Pompey Bluebell, 44,142
pounds of milk and 2,287 pounds of butterfat;
and Observer Design Patience, 38,616 pounds
of milk with 2,047 pounds of butterfat.
Basileus Golden Mimi, 34,550 pounds of
milk with 2,013 pounds of butterfat; Pompey
Royal Freda, 40,534 pounds of milk with 2,010
pounds of butterfat; and Sovereign Jean,
36,473 pounds of milk with 2,037 pounds of
butterfat. The Ton of Gold Awards have gone
to over 4,000 registered Jerseys since it was
established in 1942. The average production
of the nation's dairy cows is less than half the
production which cows winning this award
must average during a four-year period.
Five other cows belonging to WALTER
WELKENER, Jacksonville have completed
these records recently: Sybil Pompey Susan,
12,045 lbs. milk with 609 lbs. butterfat at age
of ten years and 4 months; X. Standard Ivy
Bambi, 11,607 lbs. milk and 709 Ibs. butterfat
at the age of five years and 4 months; Sybil
Beau Ardath, 8,959 lbs. milk and 491 lbs.
butterfat at the age of two years; X. Standard
Ivy Bly, 12,386 lbs. and 755 Ibs. butterfat at
the age of 4 years and 5 months; and Standard
Volunteer Prim, 9,272 lbs. milk and 556 lbs.
butterfat at the age of 3 years and six months.


RESULTS OF FLORIDA BREEDING
SHOW IN ALVAREZ HERD RECORDS
The Jersey herd of A. T. Alvarez, Jack-
sonville, had the distinction of proving
three "plus" bulls during 1955 entirely
within the herd, including Observer De-
sign Sybil Rex, which had the highest
milk production average for his daughters
of all bulls proved in Florida last year.
His first eight daughters had a 305 day,
twice daily milking, mature equivalent
average of 9,494 pounds milk with 455
pounds butterfat. This was an average in-
crease for the daughters over their dams
of 1,638 pound milk and 44 pounds
butterfat which gives an "equal parent
index" of 11,132 pound milk and 499
pounds butterfat. He was bred by Walter
Welkener and was out of Sybil Pomey
Ruby whose top record was 18,663
pounds milk and 848 pounds butterfat.
Rex's sire and material grand sire were
proved sires with high records.


Pennwood Farms Send Cows
South of the Border
L. V. Minear of Pennwood Farms,
Jupiter, Florida recently sold ten heifers
and two bulls to Mr. and Mrs. Basile Ria-
boukha of Matagalpa, Nicaragua which is
only two hours by air from the Miami
International Airport. Mr. Minear's regi-
stered Jersey herd also has "ambassadors"
in the Dominican Republic, Columbia
and Venezuela. Ten cows and two heifers
from the Pennwood herd will be con-
signed to the Florida Jersey Sale.

Two other cows owned by MEADOW-
BROOK FARMS, Jacksonville, have completed
these records; Observer Pompey Idah, 10,969
lbs. milk and 623 lbs. butterfat at the age of
5 years and 1 month; and Magnolia Basil Irma,
9,867 lbs. milk and 663 lbs. butterfat at the
age of three years and one month.


Florida Jersey Cattle Club
Will Hold Annual Meeting
The annual meeting of the Florida
Jersey Cattle Club will be held in the
conference room of the State Crop and
Livestock Building at Quincy at 2:00
P.M. Wednesday, August 15. The ban-
quet will be held that evening at the
Hotel Quincy. Banquet and hotel reser-
vations should be sent to Frank L. De-
Bord, Box 467, Quincy, Florida.

State Jersey Sale Will
Feature High Production
The Florida Jersey Cattle Club is an-
nouncing the State Jersey Sale to be held
at the State Crop and Livestock Building
at Quincy at 1:00 P.M., Thursday, Aug-
ust 16. The Sale includes forty-six fe-
males and two outstanding bulls. One of
the bulls is a two-year-old ready for heavy
service and both bulls have high star
ratings with excellent production and type
ancestry.
Most of the forty-six females are in
milk, soon to calf, or bred heifers which
will calve soon after the sale. The con-
signors have provided some of their best
stock for this sale which is intended to
acquaint more people with the desirability
of the Jersey breed. Breeders and dairy-
men will be able to buy good foundation
stock as well as increased Fall milk pro-
duction from the animals in this sale.

Another Dairy Selling Out
Announces Herd Dispersal Sale
Announcement has recently been made
by the Clay County Farms Jersey dairy at
Middleburg, twenty miles south of Jack-
sonville, that the dairy is going out of
business.
The all-Jersey milk home delivery routes
of the company were transferred on July
1 to the Meadowbrook Dairy, Jackson-
ville, operated by Chester and Brightman
Skinner.
The sale will be at the Clay County
Farms property one mile West of Bland-
ing Highway turning off just North of
Middleburg some 20 miles Southwest of
Jacksonville. A large sign with the name
of the dairy stands by the roadside at
the intersection.
For further information about the sale,
telephone or write Clay County Farms,
Middleburg, (in the Jacksonville tele-
phone directory).
"Omnis pecunia...pecus fundamen-
tum" is a Roman saying translated "Cattle
is the foundation of all wealth." This
has held true from the earliest days of
history. The Latin word for money, "pe-
cunia" is derived from "pecus" meaning
cattle.
From an ad of Butternut Brook
Jersey Farm, the Southern Branch
of which is at Loxahatchee, Flor-
ida. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Seherr-
Thoss are the owners.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








"MILKMAN'S ECONOMICS" PUBLISHED
"Milkman's Economics," a 24-page
booklet which tells the story of milk
processing and distribution costs, has just
been published by the Milk Industry
Foundation.
The booklet is designed especially for
the use of high school and college stu-
dents and their instructors, and others
connected with or interested in the fluid
milk industry.
Copies are available from M.I.F. at
300 each, F.O.B. Washington, D.C.

CATTLE SHADE
STEEL FARM BUILDINGS
Write for illustrated catalog and
price lists
R. C. Cropper
Macon Georgia


Central Florida

PEAT FARM
Lush green 12-MONTH pastures and feed crops in the
center of Florida's highest priced milk market. One of
the world's most fertile organic soils. NOT dependent
on rainfall, yet adequately drained. Near population
centers, main highways and railroads. Particularly suited
for dairy desiring to grow all its feed at low cost on
year round basis. Also suitable for all phases of the
cattle industry and feeding, nursery, vegetable, seed or
bulk crops. Readily sub-leasable. Excellent enhancement
opportunity. Completely developed to highest standards
including buildings, trench silos, feed lot facilities, com-
plete inventory of farm machinery. Completely fenced
for grassland and maximum pasture utilization with level
fields and crossfenced with over 30 miles of fencing in
20 to 80 acre sizes. Includes two residences. Owners
need money in another business. Cost about $575,000 to
duplicate. Now offered at $445,000. Excellent terms to
right party or lease. Write P. 0. Drawer 6817, Orlando,
Florida.


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 1Oc PER WORD


FOR SALE


RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete, 2% feet wide. $60.00, delivered.
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122. Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.


LIVESTOCK: Dairy cattle for sale-Four
sales in August. Three, in September.
October 3rd sale, Fairgrounds, Tampa.
Write for locations and dates. Bill Carpen-
ter, Rutherfordton, N. C.


"Blitz Diet"
Booklet Available
From the book "Stop Dieting! Start
Losing!" by Ruth West, comes the Blitz
Diet. This timely reprint of the Coronet
Magazine article seems ideally suited as
a real "pusher" for cottage cheese sales.
Reprints are available from Milk Indus-
try Foundation at $5.00 per thousand,
F.O.B. Washington, D. C. Shipment will
be made promptly on receipt of order.

Spuds Johnson says success is attained
by staying awake in the daytime, rather
than lying awake at night.


Beginning
Lunch


Middleburg,

Florida


For Catalogs, Write:


Auctioneers:
S. BRADEN KING, Maryland
C. E. CUNNINGHAM, South Carolin


DAIRY FOODS
IN' REDUCING DIETS
The Dairywide Coordinating Commit-
tee on Nutrition Research has just released
reprints of an article entitled "Promote
All Dairy Foods For Weight Reducing
Diets" by Dr. Zoe E. Anderson, National
Dairy Council, which originally appeared
in the April, 1956 American Milk Re-
view.
Written in layman's language, the mate-
rial in this article would be useful in
sales promotion. A free copy may be ob-
tained from your local Dairy Council
office or the National Dairy Council, 111
North Canal St., Chicago 6, Ill.


at 10:30 A.M.- EST
on the Grounds


I' '" .^"l 20 Miles South
I\J of
Jacksonville


Carl Francisco
CLAY COUNTY FARMS
Box 180, Middleburg, Florida

Sale Manager:
MELVIN CORDING
a North Carolina


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 0 23


Complete Dispersal Sale



CLAY COUNTY FARMS

TWO DAYS-AUGUST 24 & 25, 1956


300 Registered Jersey Cattle


All Ages

All well-known Blood-lines

11 BULLS of SERVICEABLE AGE
3 BULL CALVES

Approximately 75% of all animals,
Calfhood Vaccinated





















































The 1956 Florida State 4-H Dairy Judging Team shown with the
left, assistant extension dairyman of the agricultural extension service
Members of the team, left to right, are Don Hanson, Leon County;
County; Max Beebe, Palm Beach County; and Sandra Dennison, Oran










'est Coast Dairy Show and the
th Dairy Show of the State Fair
in have been merged and the
Sfor the dual show will be the
I Florida State Fair Youth and
Ist Dairy Shows. It will run for
nd will be co-sponsored by the
chamber of Commerce and the
:ate Fair Association.
crease in growth of both shows
st two years has been so great
best interests of participants can
erved by combining them, the
headed by former FDA presi-
now chairman of the agricul-
imittee of the Greater Tampa
of Commerce, Reggie McAteer,
2 basic aim of both shows has
produce and foster the use of
ed dairy cattle and the merging
o shows in no way changes this

and IT
Ailk Handling Studied
-year nation-wide research study U nth
handling of milk from the farm m at
ocessor, to be conducted jointly
on State College, Iowa State Get your hands into
.nd Cornell University, was an- you'll agree "MAN,
July 20 by Mack Gebert, secre- Crimped Oats.
irer of Dairy Products Market- Crmped Oats...
nationn, Inc., Washington, D. C., materials)... Vhat tc
11 finance the project. all "cow-flavored"
it! And dairymen i
Launches Sales Plan and money-making
Storewide Promotion
plan for staging storewide pro- If you're really sei
>uilt around dairy foods has been most milk for leas
by the American Dairy Associa- -.lune *khn V


JA blAlt: IAIK I" -A








supreme court Molds Milk C
And Moratorium on Enforce
Commission Is Directed To Enforce Its Price
Until Such Orders Have Been Legally Revised C
Friday, July 6 was a red letter day for Florida's approximate
and 175 milk distributors whose patience and anxiety was neari
after nine long months of wondering what the Florida Supr
with Florida's milk control law, the Florida Milk Commission i
as a strong balance wheel to the industry for 23 years.
The dairy industry interprets the Court's decision as a st














n the Governor for the adoption of a moratorium on retail price enfo
ems to be generally admitted that this is where the idea originated.
mission adopted their one-year moratorium on enforcement of all p
Jacksonville meeting, September 19, 1955 over the objections and prol
'ida Dairy Association whose spokesman contended such action woulc
SMembers of the Association promptly applied to the Circuit Courl
:y for an injunction against the moratorium and failing in this, immedia
ie case to the State Supreme Court. The Court ruled July 6th that
was "without legal force or effect" . reversed the decision of the Cit
directed "the Commission to continue the enforcement of its prices wi
fect September 1.9, 1955 until such price orders have been revised
, valid order of the Commission."
ns of the dairies as to why the
i's abandonment of enforce- for determination . "they may al,
price orders were illegal are comprehended in the single question
t in the Supreme Court's de- whether or not the Commission
follows: "(1) the resolution authorized to promulgate the resolu
are beyond the powers of the and orders suspending price fixing
i to make and are in violation milk for a period of one year witl
's imposed on it by the legisla- notice and an opportunity to be hear,
aid resolution and orders were provided in Section 501.13(7), Flo
out notice and public hearing Statutes."
d by Sections ..501.06 and "The resolution provided 'that f
Florida Statutes, 1953, and the date of October 1, 1955, a mora
solution and orders are not um be declared and the enforcement
or supported by the record or all price orders in all markets of the 5
ngs of fact justifying the Com- of Florida be held in abeyance fc
action, but are contrary to the period until October 1, 1956.' "
finds contained in Chapter
Continuing discussion of the ques
sons for the Circuit Court's to be decided by the Court, the opil
it the Commission's adoption states that: "Thorough study of these
atorium was legal are summa- other observations by the Commission
ie Supreme Court opinion as gets a slightly different version of
'It appears from the record, real question in this case-when the C
'o appellants' (dairies) brief mission has once established price con,
the Circuit Court proceeded of milk in a marketing area or areas,









STHE PROFESSIONAL STANDING
OF THE MILK SANITARIAN
By: DR. H. H. ROTHE
From an address by Dr. Rothe at the 1956 Annual Meeting of the Florida Association of
Milk and Food Sanitarians as president of the Association.
It is said that the good that men do lives after them. Very true, but too often
the good that men do is of such a nature that it does not come to light so that it can
be of material benefit. This seems to be especially true of the
work done by milk and food sanitarians. The work they do can-
not be and is not shown in glaring news reports. The sanitarian
in a community keeps the milk, food, and water supplies whole-
some and thereby prevents sickness, but no one ever knows about
that: that is, by special report. There is no record made of it
specifically, because it is not apparent. Not apparent in the
same sense as may be the case in severe illness where people are
rushed to the hospital and by expert medical attention are saved
from long suffering and perhaps death. Usually such occurrences
appear in the news and in that way, are made of record. Or, at
ROTHE least the public is made thoroughly aware of the occurrence.
The thought I wish to convey may be more clearly illustrated
by comparison with an automobile acci-
dent in which people are hurt and some- save the lives of people is an important
times killed. Such happenings make head individual in any community. Is it not
lines in the local press, but the thought- reasonable, therefore, that a group of
fulness and care of a good driver who people doing such a well defined type of
prevents accidents rarely gets mentioned work for the betterment of community
in the press. So it is with the sanitarian, life should enjoy professional status?
who goes about his daily job of keeping Then by the same token, is it not reason-
things the way they should be in his able that there should be a law defining
community so that people will not become a sanitarian and his qualifications and his
incapacitated by sickness caused by un- duties? Such a law of course is the
sanitary conditions. It then becomes the stepping stone to professional status.
right and the duty of the sanitarian to There are some very specific reasons
talk about it so the public whom he serves why a licensing law should govern the
will have a better understanding and activities of sanitarians aside from a
appreciation of what he does. Many purely selfish motive to aid the sanitarian.
other occupational groups do this. First, the work is of such vital importance
Most of us remember when improperly to the well-being of the citizens of a
produced raw milk from untested cows community that only well-qualified per-
caused a considerable amount of tuber- sons should be employed to supervise
culosis; we can also remember when and enforce regulations pertaining to
undulant fever and other milk-borne sanitation. Secondly, a person whose
diseases in people were more common premises are entered upon by another for
than now; and we can remember when the purpose of giving advice or enforcing
contaminated water supplies caused out- regulations with respect to sanitation has
breaks of typhoid fever and other water- the right to know that such invasion of
borne diseases which at times reached his property is done by one well-qualified
epidemic stage. Unwholesome and con- for the duty to be performed. Licensing
taminated foods have caused similar will give the property owner that guar-
conditions. But now one seldom hears antee. Thirdly, very specific information
of such a state of affairs, especially in and training is required to give the
areas where sanitarians are regularly em- public the above mentioned guarantee of
played. These facts give rise to the proper service and without it, a license
professional status of the services ren- to practice sanitation is not issued. We,
dered by sanitarians. The time has now therefore, must come to the conclusion
come when sanitarians should receive that the public is entitled to and has a
a professional rating by reason of such right to be served by a licensed sani-
services rendered by them. Statistics can- tarian. These are the kind of arguments
not show just when a sanitarian has that result in political support.
prevented an individual from sickness In conclusion, I leave with you this
which could have been caused by un- picture, shall we say, of a proper pro-
wholesome milk, food, or water. But cedure, of a successful sanitarian. In
statistics clearly show that in communities appearance, always neatly dressed; it be-
where sanitarians are active, there is much speaks cleanliness and sanitation. Perhaps
less sickness than in areas where sanita- we should even adopt the use of a white
tion is neglected. Now let us reason in frock when visiting food plants. In be-
this fashion: where less sickness exists, havior, dignified; it commands respect.
fewer deaths occur and therefore, I wish In approach, friendly and direct; it com-
to emphasize that a sanitarian who can mands attention. In the administration
28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


LAW HELD CONSTITUTIONAL
(Continued from Page 26)
difficult to point out a more convincing
case for legislative intervention. We think
the findings of the legislature supported
by the cases cited herein show conclusive-
ly that while the Florida Milk Act was at
first an emergency measure, the legislature
later found a continued need for it and
thereafter from time to time amended it
by substituting the act under attack and
in 1955 declined to repeal it; that pecu-
liar factors affecting the production and
distribution of milk warranted the exer-
cise of the police power in so doing; that
the matter was one peculiarly in the dis-
cretion of the legislature and there being
no showing that it acted arbitrarily or un-
reasonably to strike the act down in the
face of the factual finding as a predicate
for it would be nothing less than substi-
tuting our judgment for that of the legis-
lature on a purely legislative matter. The
Constitution forbids any such transgres-
sion by the court on legislative preroga-
tive.
Summary of Ruling
On Constitutionality
"Summarized in slightly different style
-we are confronted with no challenge
whatever to the legislative findings. In
view of the consistent and persistent legis-
lative history, the fact that the Milk Act
was incorporated in the Revised Statutes
of 1941 and each subsequent biennial re-
vision to and including 1955, plus the fact
that in 1953 the legislature passed Chap-
ter 28137, purporting to strengthen the
organizational structure of the Milk Com-
mission, and in 1955 a legislative pro-
posal to abolish the Milk Commission
died in committee and never reached the
calendar for consideration, it would be
contrary to every prohibition in the Con-
stitution defining our tripartite system of
government to take over the legislative
function and set the Act aside by court
decree. Courts should rigidly restrict
their activities to those defined by the
Constitution."
Six of the seven Justices of the Supreme
Court concurred in the opinion. These
were Justices J. Terrell, Drew, Roberts,
Thornal and O'Connell. Justice J.
Thomas dissented.
(A complete copy of this Court deci-
sion can be had by request to the Florida
Dairy Association.)
of regulations, know your subject be
both firm and reasonable by giving will-
ingly the reasons for asking others to
follow regulations; it begets confidence
and obedience of regulations. If you
follow this procedure, you will in most
cases create a sense of being helpful and
not a hindrance; you will create friend-
liness and not enmity. And if you do
this, you will find yourself as a welcome
intruder and your work will be both
pleasant and fruitful.










HOLSTEIN CATTLE CLUB NEWS

National Holstein Show in Waterloo
The 1956 National Holstein Show will be held in Waterloo, Iowa during the
week of September 28 to October 6. J. Durno Innes of Woodstock, Ontario, Canada
will be the judge for this show. The following week at the International Dairy
Show in Chicago, Harvey W. Swartz of Waukesha, Wisconsin will judge the Holstein
classes.

Herd Improvement Registry Program
Show High Average for 2,041 Herds
The Holstein-Friesian Association of America recently released figures of their
Herd Improvement Registry program to support their statement that the Holstein
breed is the nation's most numerous and fastest growing dairy breed. Demonstrating
their milk-making efficiency, the average production record of the 55,662 animals-
every cow in 2,041 registered Holstein herds in all parts of the country-was 11,685
lbs. of milk and 428.6 lbs. of butterfat in the 1955 tests.
The Year's highest average was turned
in by a registered herd in Michigan where 17,565 lbs. of milk and 682 Ibs. of butter-
17 cows averaged 17,715 lbs. of milk and fat on twice-daily milking.
685.3 lbs. of fat on three milkings a day. The Herd Improvement Registry pro-
Another herd, in Connecticut, averaged gram, in continuous operation since 1929,
Another ~ ~ ~ herd in Conctct avrgdd1X:I:-:-


re


Jacksonville Holstein Cow
Is Florida's Highest
Milk Producer
The grade Holstein cow, pictured
above, belonging to W. J. Simmons,
Jacksonville, has made the largest milk
production record which has ever been
recorded for a cow on DHIA, AR, or
HIR test in Florida. In 305 days on twice
daily milking, she produced 20,220
pounds of milk, 3.4% test, and 682
pounds of butterfat. The national aver-
age for registered Holstein herds last year
in all parts of the country was 11,685
pounds of milk and 428.6 pounds of
butterfat, making this unusual record by
a grade cow all the more impressive.
Since completion of this test in December
1955, this cow has calved and has started
off the new lactation period fully as
strong as last year.
Simmons started as a milk producer
in the Jacksonville area ten years ago and
now has a mixed herd of 155 dairy ani-
mals and is milking 120 at this time.
The dairy is operated on a 375 acre
farm a few miles southwest of Jackson-
ville. 150 acres are improved pasture.
Artificial breeding is used in all of the
adult herd.


IproVLlC es o a IIIn vi ua I lactalton and
lifetime production records on every
registered Holstein cow in participating
herds. These records form valuable tools
in the constant selection of individuals,
bloodlines and families which must ac-
company a successful system of dairy cattle
breeding.


INFLATION
One of the paradoxical facts of human
experience is that no government will ever
admit it is responsible for, or is even
undergoing, inflation. This is true even
though intelligent people can prove with
facts and figures that the reverse is the
case.
Inflation is caused by increasing the
money supply without a corresponding
increase in the assets back of the money.
Inflation is caused by increasing wages
without a corresponding increase in pro-
duction. Inflation is caused by deficit
financing by living on borrowed
money. Inflation is caused by providing
"benefits" to the people which they do
not earn and for which they do not pay.
Let us take a look at our own country
for a moment. When the government
went off the gold standard in 1933, it
robbed the thrifty of 42% of the value
of their savings by increasing the money
supply without a corresponding increase
in assets. For 23 of the last 26 years
- many of them peacetime years the
government has lived beyond its income,
has increased the national debt from $19
billion to $278 billion.-By Thurman
Sensing, Southern States Industrial Coun-
cil, Nashville, Tenn.

"No horse can run as fast as the money
you bet on him."


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 29


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Action of Florida Dairy Association Convention Said by Observers

Greatest Forward Step Since 1933 for Florida Dairy Industry

Californian Inspires Decision To Sponsor Law Similar to Florida
Citrus Commission and Successful Program in California


Decision To Sponsor New Program for United Industry Support of
Dairy Products Education, Advertising, Promotion, Sales and Public
Relations Should Be Greatest Boon to the Industry Since Enactment
of Florida Milk Commission Law.

Remarks of those who attended the 1956 Florida Dairy Association Annual Meet-
ing and Convention in Clearwater, June 26-28, including dairymen, allied trades,
advisory members, visitors and guests, reveal a united opinion that the Florida dairy
industry faced up to its growing problems of public misunderstanding, misrepresen-
tation of facts concerning the industry and the price of its products when it took the
commendable united producer and distributor stand in favor of a new dairy law which
would tax the industry for support of an aggressive statewide program of education,
public relations and sales of Florida milk and milk products and advancement of
the welfare of the dairy industry.


Review of Program Subjects
Those who did not have the privilege
of attending will be interested in the fol-
lowing summary of the principal subjects
which made up the program:
(a) "An Analysis of Milk Marketing
and Price Stabilization Programs, Federal
and State"-E. W. Tiedeman, American
Farm Bureau Federation, and Charles
Duncan, administrator, Georgia Milk
Control Board.
(b) "A Long Range Dairy Program of
Education, Public Relations, Advertising
and Sales Under a Proposed New State
Law"-George Hennerich and Carroll
Bateman, National Ice Cream and Milk
Industry Associations, Bryan Blalock,
Borden Company Executive, and Bob
Evans, Florida Citrus Commission.
(c) "Need for Better Cooperation with
State School Milk Program" Mrs.
Thelm Flanagan, Fla. State School Lunch
Supervisor.
(d) "Better Regulation of Important
Milk"-Panel Discussion.
(e) "Research on Nutritional Value of
Milk to Young and Old"-Dr. O. D.
Abbott, University of Florida.
(f) "Progress in Dairy Science and
Research"-Dr. E. L. Fouts, Dept. of
Dairy Science, University of Florida.
(g) "Equita'ble Handling of Surplus
Milk Problems.
(h) "Milk and Milk Products Educa-
tion Through the Dairy Council Pro-
grams.
(i) "Problems of the Dairy Farmer."
Action Taken on Problems
Translating the intense interest and
serious consideration given the problems
presented into definite decisions and ac-
tions, the Convention adopted resolutions
favoring:
(a) Industry sponsorship of a new
Florida Dairy Law providing for the fi-
nancing and administration through a
(Continued on Next Page)


Strong factors in leading up to the
unanimous adoption of the proposed pro-
gram was a two-year study of the Associa-
tion's public relations committee resulting
in the recommendation of such a program
to the Board of Directors which adopted
the proposal, recommended it to the An-
nual Convention and authorized an invit-
ation to the manager of a similar success-
ful program of the California Dairy In-
dustry Advisory Board to attend the
Florida Convention and explain the Cali-
fornia program.
Participation in the Annual Meeting's
program and discussions which led up to
the adoption of the program were several
of the country's leading authorities on in-
dustry public relations, education and sales
promotion. Among these were Florida's
own Bob Evans, manager of the Florida
Citrus Commission, Bob Venn, Miami
public relations counsel, and Dr. E. L.
Fouts, head of the Department of Dairy
Science, University of Florida. From out
of the state were W. B. Woodburn, man-
ager California Dairy Industry Advisory
Board; Carroll Bateman, director public
relations, Milk Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C.; E. W. Tiedeman,
director, Dairy Department, American


Farm Bureau Federation, Chicago; Lloyd
Langdon, Executive Vice President, North
Carolina Dairy Products Association, and
George Hennerich, director, American
Ice Cream Merchandising Institute, Wash-
ington, D. C.
(More details of this proposed program
are outlined in a separate story.)
PROGRAM EXCEEDED EXPECTATIONS
The program committee's advance in-
formation about the 1956 Annual Meet-
ing had predicted the meeting would
"probably be the most important ever
held by the Florida Dairy Industry."
Based on the decisions made at the
meeting and the opinions expressed by
many of those who attended, we feel
justified in the statement that the pro-
gram committee's estimate of the impor-
tance of the meeting not only proved to
be true but that the meeting was really
outstanding and one of the Association's
finest from the standpoint of attendance,
interest and participation.
As one of those attending expressed it,
the program was fell-balanced, fully in-
formative, entertaining and coped fully
with the industry's current problems by
presenting recognized leaders from other
areas who had well-tested suggestions and
solutions to offer.


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





















PICTURE ABOVE: Speakers at the Convention Opening Session: (1) Clearu'ater Mayor, Herbert Brown; (2) E. I'. Tiedemen, American
Farm Bureau, Chicago; (3) 1W. B. Woodburn, California Dairy Advisory Board; (4) Charles Duncan, Adminstrator, Georgia Milk Control Board;
(5) George Hennerich, International Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers, Washington, D. C.; (6) Carroll Bateman, Milk Industry Founda-
tion, Washington, D. C.; (7) Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head, Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida; and (8) Jack McMullen, Clearu'ater milk
producer and chairman of F.D.A.'s local Convention Arrangements Committee.


PICTURE RIGHT: (1) F.D.A. President
Bill Graham, opening the Convention Session;
at the speakers' table are, L. to R., George
Hennerich; IV. B. Woodburn; Carroll Bate-
man; Dr. Ouida Abbott, U. of F.; E. IW. Tiede-
man; Charles Duncan; and Dr. Fouts; (2)
Florida Dairy Maids stage special reception in
the Convention opening session for Californian
WI. B. Woodburn, standing in the foreground;
and (3) The Allied Trades reception party
getting underway on the first evening of the
Convention.






ACTION OF CONVENTION
(Continued from Page 30)
Dairy Advisory Board of a program of
milk, milk products and dairy industry
education, advertising, sales, promotion
and public relations.
(b) Favoring the re-instatement of
Florida Milk Commission milk price
orders and their strict enforcement.
(c) Renewing and emphasizing pre-
vious Florida Dairy Association recom-
mendations to the Florida Milk Commis-
sion for (1) an adequate staff of well
qualified area deputies, and (2) regular
monthly auditing of milk plants as a
check on milk usage, payments to pro-
ducers and compliance with Commission
price and fair trade orders.
(d) Expressing the Florida Dairy In-
dustry's belief in the continued need for
and the soundness of a State or Federal
government program of stabilization for
che dairy industry to maintain a safe and
adequate supply of fresh Florida milk for
protection of the public health of Florida
consumers.
(e) Favoring and requesting the addi-
tion of a Dairy Marketing Specialist to
the staff of the Florida State Marketing
Bureau.
(Continued on Next Page)


THIRD QUARTER' 1956 31









Es.


F.D.A. CONVENTION PICG
speaker from Marshall, Texas; Mr.
IVoodburn; (2) Allied Trades nme
Forrester, Atlanta, Associate Editor
F.D.A. director, inspects the Convent

1 LEFT SIDE PANEL: (1) L.
Plant City; and Gordon Nielsen,
NeSmith, Miami; Joe Dulligan, Cle,
Burton, Jacksonville: (3) F.D.A.
Po'wnall, Miami; Allied Trades me
of golf tournament winners.

ACTIONS


(f) Calling upon the State D
of Agriculture for strict enforce
Florida laws and regulations on
duction, processing and quality
(g) Preparation and issuance
bulletin reports to the industry
Commission actions, price and
propriate data and statistics of tf
dairy industry.
(h) Favoring a Commission sl
investigation at least annually
market area to determine the o


























F.D.A. CONVENTION PICTURES: TOP
PANEL: (1) Alf Nielsen, Alfar Creamery,
West Palm Beach, introducing Guest Speaker
Bryan Blalock at the Annual Banquet program;
(2) A portion of the speakers' table during
entertainment at the Annual Banquet, L. to R.,
are: Mr. and Mrs. Bill Graham, Bryan Blalock,
All Nielsen, entertainer Anita just before
climbing into Bryan Blalock's lap, and Mr. and
Mrs. Andy Lay; (3) Guest speaker Lloyd
Langdon, Executive Vice-President, North
Carolina Dairy Association, and E. IV. Tiede-
man, seated.
LOWER PICTURE: (1) The Dairy Maids
making arrangements for the Convention Milk-
ing Contest on the hotel lawn: L. to R., Nancy
Custer, Peggy Miller and La.ddy Lucas; the
other lady in the picture is "Bayou Vista
Roberts Rosalie," a champion Guernsey from
one of Pinellas County's fine dairy herds; (2)
The milking contestants: L. to R., IV. B.
Woodburn (2nd place winner), representing
California; Andy Lay, not a contestant; E. I/.
Tiedeman (the winner), representing the
American Farm Bureau; Bryan Blalock, rep-
resenting Texas; Clearwater Mayor Herbert
Brown, representing Clearwater (3rd place
winner); and Mrs. Harriet Hastings, Assistant
Director Dairy Council, representing Florida.


CONVENTION ACTIVITIES
(Continued from Page 32)
turers, allied trades and Ladies' Auxiliary
in separate business sessions.
The opening general session Tuesday
afternoon in the comfortably air-condi-
tioned roof-garden auditorium was well
filled with interested listeners from 2:00
P.M. to 5:15 P.M.
Opening with friendly welcoming re-
marks from Clearwater's Mayor Herbert
Brown and Chamber of Commerce Secre-
tary Paul Ficht and the President of the
local Dairy Association, the program led
off with the introduction of delegates and
brief remarks from all visiting guest
speakers, each presenting a challenge for
the thinking and action of the convention.
The afternoon session was then devoted
entirely to addresses and panel discussions
on Milk Marketing, Federal and State,
and Ice Cream Merchandising.
A second joint business session on
Wednesday morning from 9:00 to 10:00
was devoted to the all-important subject
of "Public Relations," featuring a review
of Dairy Council programs and dairy in-
dustry public relations problems and their
(Continued on Next Page)


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 33
























F.D.A. CONVENTION PICTURES: TOP PANEL, Some of the many couples who
attended the Convention: (1) the George Johnson's, West Palm Beach; (2) the Jim Jennings',
Jacksonville; (3) the Gene Fulton's, Jacksonville; (4) the Warren Ankerburg's, St. Petersburg;
and (5) the J. D. Harrell's, Pompano Beach.
LOWER PANEL, (1) L. to R., "Doi' Love, Charlotte, N. C., Ed Dibble, Camden, N. J.,
rnd Joe Stanley, Philadelphia; (2) L. to R., Bob Walters, Jacksonville, Mrs. Brady Johnston,
Mr. Johnston, Jacksonville, Walter Roberson, Wilson, N. C., and Jim Brunt, Atlanta, Ga.;
(3) L to R., Foremost Managers: Claude Kelly, Jacksonville; Jack Johnson, Tampa; and
Warren Ankerburg, St. Petersburg; (4) L. to R., Si Tygart, Jacksonville; Harvey Barritt, Tampa;
Syd Lenfestey; Tampa and Bill Decklar, Tampa; (5) W. B. Woodburn, California; Bryan
Blalock, Texas; WIalter Williams, Gainesville and Bill Gooding, West Palm Beach.


CONVENTION PROGRAM SESSIONS
(Continued from Page 33)


34 FLORIDA DAIRY


l solution by the executive vice-president
and director of the North Carolina State
Dairy Association and the director of
public relations of the Milk Industry
Foundation.
DIVIDED SESSIONS
From 10:15 A.M. to 12:00 Noon the
Milk Producers' Division and the Distri-
butors' Division of the Association had
separate programs featuring producer and
distributor problems respectively. The
Allied Trades members of the Association
were also in their own business session
from 10:30 A.M. Wednesday to noon.
The producer and distributor groups
continued their separate sessions during
the afternoon from 3:00 P.M. to 5:00
P.M. while others, who had an interest in
recreation, participated in the golf tourna-
ment and in fishing and sightseeing
parties.
The afternoon Producers' Division
meeting was devoted to discussions of As-
sociation policies and activities for pro-
ducers while the Distributors' Division
program was given over entirely to Ice
Cream Sales and Promotion with George
SHennerich, director of the American Ice
Cream Merchandising Institute, outlining
the new ice cream merchandising program
featuring special fountain sales idea.
The annual banquet program with its
entertainment and dancing that followed
was, as usual, the highlight of the con-
vention.
The music, singing and antics of Anita
and Eddie was a lot of fun and when
'Nita sang and danced herself into the lap
of Bryan Blalock, guest speaker of the
evening and at the speakers' table, we
thought the laughter would raise the roof.
NEWS


Doubtlessly, this amusing incident spurred
Bryan Blalock on to make one of the
funniest and finest addresses he has ever
made as one of the nation's top humorous
speakers.
There was a brief departure from the
fun of the annual banquet program when
O. L. Bobo, on behalf of the Alligator
Club, presented F.D.A. Secretary Andy
Lay with a handsome Longines wrist-
watch, engraved "In appreciation, from
the Alligator Club."
The third general program session held
Thursday morning devoted from 9:00
A.M. to 10:30 A.M. to the subjects of
"The Special School Milk Program" and
"How Research Tells Us Our Need For
Milk," with the last portion devoted to
a panel discussion of the Association's
proposed program of promotion, educa-
tion, public relations, advertising, sales of
dairy products and the Dairy Industry.
This discussion led by W. B. Wood-
burn, manager of such a program in Cali-
fornia under the California Dairy Industry
Advisory Board, sparked the meeting's
unanimous adoption of plans to sponsor
such a program for Florida.
The closing hour of the Thursday
morning session was given over to the
annual business meeting of the Florida
Dairy Association for the annual election
of officers and directors and adoption of
resolutions and other association business.
The convention closed with an impres-
sive luncheon session during which new
officers and directors for the different
units of the association were announced
(Continued on Next Page)














I'


ll


F.D.A. CONVENTION PICTURES: TOP PANEL, M, .. ..., .- ...,
tion: (1) F.D.A. President Bill Graham and Mrs. Graham, M P-.. 1.'. i .. ... .
Hammons and Mrs. Hammons, Milwaukee; (3) Bob Hall ana ... 1. ... P.. 1 .,
(4) Mr. and Mrs. Jim Mott, Jacksonville.


LOWER PANEL, Top picture, F.D.A. Manager And, i. ..,' i..t
producer who acted as assistant for the Convention planni, .. ..,
Other pictures are table groups at the buffet dinner party.


i*' .... f,',*


CONVENTION PROGRAM SESSIONS
(Continued from Page 3-4


and retiring presidents were presented
with gavels and expressions of apprecia-
tion and commendation from F.D.A.'s
Honorary Dean, Alf Nielsen.
Visiting guest speakers were called up-
on to have the last word by briefly sum-
ming up their analysis of Florida's dairy
industry problems after participating in
discussions of them for three days and
with suggestions and recommendations
for their solution.
These speakers did a masterful job of
winding up the convention with an up-
ward swing by commendation for the ob-
jectives adopted by the convention and
encouragement for success with determin-
ed united effort.
To have heard so many say, "It was
Florida's best convention ever," must
have been gratifying to the association
members who had a part in endeavoring
to make it so.
Entertainment and Recreation
Although many consider just being at
the Florida Dairy Association annual
meeting as recreation enough, the pro-
gram committee and the Allied Trades
Entertainment Committee agreed that
planned group activities for the entire at-
tendance is much preferred to room en-
tertainment and small group parties.
The cooperation and participation of
the Allied Trades Alligator Club members
in providing the group recreation and en-
tertainment features of the convention
were a great help and much appreciated.
This group under the leadership of
President Joe Hammons, O. L. Bobo, Bill
Decklar, Jim Stewart, John Manning and
others, sponsored the golf tournament and
prizes, provided refreshments for a ladies'


party, spor'-. r; .l rhc lir.t cnr.:nirn il
hour, floor hli,.'. .and dJiance .rnd pru 'iJc.I
for the exp:.ni : .1 l.ir.ig nunmbcr oI rhc
convention p,.uri ,
Private ihh n-'_ p.irric .irnd ...rhcr l.:.1.
tures such a; Ih.: Milk wnid I.L (_rc rn bliar
the Milkiri: ( .nrcr Ih, \\ trcr Sh '.
the Monda\ rnL'hi Op(,.n H.,u i and 1hL
W ednesda) niL.ht s.u,:.! h .ur. I.),.r .l..'...
and dance. v..rc .Irr.in... I l. I., k M .
Mullen and his Convention Arrangements
Committee.
The numerous attractive attendance
prizes were provided both by the Associa-
tion and by private sponsors.
Courtesy transportation from and to the
Tampa airport for guest speakers and
quite a number of others was furnished
by a local dairy committee headed by
Joe Dulligan, Clearwater manager of
Southern Dairies.
The Dairy Bar, set up in the hotel
lobby with milk and ice cream available
free to convention guests at all times,
was provided and kept well stocked
through the courtesy of Pinellas County
distributors, with Russell Bevan, Borden's
St. Petersburg manager, in charge.
To Those Who Helped Us
Closing the curtains on the story of
the second straight F.D.A. Clearwater
convention at the Fort Harrison Hotel
would not be appropriate without a part-
ing word of commendation to the Fort
Harrison manager, Ed Hunt, and his
staff; to representatives of the Clearwater
press; and to the staff of the Clearwater
Chamber of Commerce Convention Bu-
reau for the contribution each of these
made to the success and enjoyment of the
convention.
(Continued on Next Page)


I


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 0 35


A


irt,


-^; .
'..
re
- "'
:-"


""i rF""*
























CONVENTION RECREATION AND ENTEA
(Continued from Page 35)
Golf Tournament Winners planning and execu
The F.D.A. golf tournament, always concluded in Clear
one of the most popular side events of fully aware of the
the annual meeting, had more than the proper product
usual interest this year with all contestants and I know how
trying to out-score Brady Johnston, who and Mrs. Lay, to,
had already won the tournament three Bill and other lead
years in a row giving him permanent pos- the preparation of I
session of the handsome revolving Alli- "It was well ba
gator Club trophy. tive, entertaining,
When the golf prizes were awarded lems by presentin,
during the annual banquet program, areas who had well
Brady Johnston had won again to stir up solutions.
more determined competition at the 1957 "I enjoyed it th
convention and possibly some extra golf you to know that it
practice in the meantime. tive convention I ha
A half-dozen runners up received con- in some 20 years
solution prizes and other contestants re- averaged no less tl
ceived a new golf ball and best wishes year, I am able to .
for better luck next year. resenting 21 differe
"Of course, I wa
THE F.D.A. CONVENTION because such a lar
AS VISITORS SAW IT time of the meeting


1 0% % 6
























IES CONVENTION PROGRAM

ased attendance of ladies, floor show and dance after the bul
I youth members of dairy dinner.
ie Florida Dairy Association Wednesday morning at 10:30 t
ings indicates, we believe, ladies' group went on a sightseeing t.
L growing appreciation of the by bus up the coast to Florida's fame
which these dairy family sponge-fishing town of Tarpon Sprin
offer for both an enjoyable where they enjoyed a special luncheon
e few days away from home the well-known Pappas Greek Restaura
ad. Wednesday evening the ladies ag"
activities are planned and joined the men for the F.D.A. direct
Sthe F.D.A. Ladies' Auxili- reception and special water show, la
nd local ladies arrangements attending the annual banquet and ent
tainment program followed by dancing
ies this year were capably The Ladies' Auxiliary annual busin
Mrs. George Boutwell, L.A. meeting and program was held at a s]
rs. E. T. Lay, secretary, and cial 9 o'clock breakfast on Thursc
ies arrangements and recep- morning when all present received d(
ee which was headed by Mrs. prizes and favors. This meeting was c(
,gan as chairman and former cluded with the annual election of office
nt Mrs. Leon Sellers as co- Many of the ladies and particular
frs. Boutwell and Mrs. Lay those who had younger members of 1
rs. Donegan and her com- family with them, found much relaxati


- -
















AMBROSIA CHOCOLATE CO. LIQUID CARBON.
Jack Key, College Park, Ga. O. L. Bobo, Po.
AMERICAN MAIZE PRODUCTS, INC. LOWIE, JOE, COR)
Jack J. Binder, Clearwater Jack Hartman,
Earl V. Haynes, Decatur, Ga. M ATH
MARATHON COR
BAILEY, C. A., REAL ESTATE Robert J. Walt
Mrs. Howard R. Payne, Belle Glade
BIRELEY'S INC. MARYLAND BAK
Chas. Engers, Salem, Va. Jim Mott, Jack
BLOOMER BROS. CO. MILLER-LENFEST.
James J. Downs, Alexandria, Va. J. Ralph Kirkla
Walter D. Williams, Gainesville W. R. Waldecl
BOIWEY'S, INC. MILLER MACHINE
Ed Salvatore, Tampa JACKSONVILLE
CROWN CORK & SEAL CO., INC. O. R. Haller, J
Nat Hall, Orlando MILLER MACHINE
DAIRYPAK, INC. MIAMI
Ken Dickson, Athens, Ga. Elroy Decker, I
O. S. Newsom, Jr., Jacksonville Ray Arkley, Mi
DENNERY, CHAS., INC. MOHAWK CABIN
Ira Stone, Lakeland Jess Kaiser, Ea!
DIVERSE CORP., THE
J. K. Bradford, Atlanta, Ga. MOJONNIER BRO
IE. E. Fulton, Jacksonville Lee P. Bickenb
DIXIE CUP CO. Kenneth D. Pyl
R. S. Bonner, Atlanta, Ga. MORRIS PAPER A
ESKIMO PIE CORPORATION Richard P. Slye
Paul Kellenberger, Jacksonville MURPHY BODY I
EX-CELL-O CORPORATION H. W. Murphy
J. W. Radke, Atlanta, Ga. Walter G. Robe
FISCHMAN CO., THE OLIN-MATHIESO1
Leo Fischman, Philadelphia, Pa. CORPORATION
FLA. CITRUS CANNERS COOPERATIVE Watt McCain, 4
R. W. Bennett, Lake Wales Maury L. Dugf
FLA. FEED MILLS OWENS-ILLINOIS
Grady Swope, St. Petersburg W. H. Adams,
FRUIT INDUSTRIES, INC. IRobt. G. Shack,
Robert S. Brown, Bradenton C. W. Parmalec
HACKNEY BROS. BODY CO. PENN SALT MFG.
J. H. Brunt, Jr., Atlanta Ga. Joe Foss, Syossi
HECTOR SUPPLY CO. Roy H. Wilson
R. D. Harrell, Miami PURE CARBONIC



































Are you thinking straight?
Or is it sometimes upside down and
backwards?


DAIRY NEWS NOTES


Georgia Milk Price Increased
One Cent a Quart July 1
The Georgia Milk Control Board, act-
ing upon its automatic price-fixing for-
mula based on production and processing
costs, buying power and other factors,
ordered a one-cent per quart milk price
increase throughout the State of Georgia,
effective July 1.
The new prices for bottled fluid milk
were 26 cents a quart for standard pas-
teurized milk in glass containers and 27
cents in paper cartons.

The Florida State Fair announces the
1957 Fair dates to be January 29 to Feb-
ruary 9. Entries for the dairy show must
be postmarked not later than January 7,
1957, the announcement said.

Florida has shown an increase of 250
percent in milk production since 1940,
according to C. W. Reaves, Extension
Dairyman of the University of Florida.
Reaves also reports that milk production
per cow has increased 56 percent since
1940.


PRICE ENFORCEMENT MORATORIUM HELD ILLEGAL
(Continued from Page 27)


that a plentiful supply of clean milk was
essential to the health and welfare of the
people. It contained elaborate compre-
hensive provisions to effectuate that pur-
pose. Section 501.21 of the act recognized
a continuing emergency to effectuate its
purposes.
One of the most pointed statements
made by the Supreme Court concerning
the Milk Commission's duty under the
circumstances which brought about the
case before the Court was the following:
"Some signs indicate that regulations
and prices may have gotten out of hand,
but if that be true, the Commission had
ample power to correct it under the Act."
Rules No Hearings Held
Quoting further from the opinion, the
Supreme Court said: "The appellees
(Milk Commission) contend that during
the period from November 5, 1947, to
August 31, 1955, the Commission held
thirty-five hearings in different parts of
the state, the purpose of which was to
receive 'testimony and evidence relative
t3 the cost of production, processing and
distribution of milk and milk products'
and that the testimony so secured was
ample to enable the Commission to de-
termine whether the enforcement of price
controls should be continued or were in
the interest of the consumer, the distribu-
tor and the producer. There are sugges-
tions that notice of the meeting of Sep-


tember 19, 1955, was heralded through
the press and through other media but the
record discloses nothing to show that the
Commission had in mind suspending all
price enforcement orders, that any ad-
vance publicity was given of any such
purpose, that no investigation was made
for such a purpose and no public hearing
was had on that point."
Court's Ruling Summarized
"It is accordingly our view that the
action of the Commission in suspending
price controls on milk and milk products
was accomplished without giving notice
of its intention to do so, without receiv-
ing or affording opportunity for the in-
troduction of evidence and without any
public hearing as required by law, for
which the resolution and orders are with-
out legal force or effect and being so,
the judgment appealed from is reversed
with directions to the Commission to con-
tinue the enforcement of its prices which
were in effect September 19, 1955, until
such price orders have been revised or
amended by valid order of the Commis-
sion."
Six of the seven Justices of the Su-
preme Court concurred in the opinion.
These were Justices J. Terrell, Drew,
Thomas, Hobson, Roberts and O'Connell.
Justice J. Thornal not participating.
(A complete copy of this Court deci-
sion can be had by request to the Florida
Dairy Association.)


A Borden's Dairy, Miami, home deliv-
ery driver, Charles Regulinski, left his
truck long enough on the morning of
July 9 to investigate a house on fire and
carry an elderly couple, who were asleep
and unaware of the fire, to safety.

Broward County dairy farm production
was not only the leading farm income
crop in 1954 but was the highest dairy
products producing county in Florida, ac-
cording to a report of the U. S. Depart-
ment of Commerce.

P. D. Shirley, supervisor of the West
Coast Producer's Association at Tampa,
contends that milk sales in that area have
not kept pace with reported increases in
population.

The Miami Labor Citizen reports
(May 10) that the teamsters union won a
National Labor Relations Board election
in the Southern Dairies' Miami plant.
The Borden Dairy is said to be the only
other dairy in the Miami area operating
under a contract with the teamsters union.

B. M. Daniel of Moore Haven an-
nounced June 15 the sale of his retail milk
route to Borden's. Daniel said he planned
to dispose of his processing equipment but
would continue his dairy farm operation,
selling his milk to Borden's.

H. W. Bucks, a Sealtest distributor in
Ft. Myers, reported to police July 2nd
that on the day before (Sunday) his three
trucks had been driven around in his
dairy plant lot and rammed together
causing considerable damage.
Bucks said the keys had been left in
the trucks.

The Velda Dairy, Tallahassee has an-
nounced extension of their operation to
the Perry area. "Red" Roy is in charge
of the Velda business for the Perry area,
the announcement said.

The Enrico Dairy, Deerfield Beach,
Broward County producer for the Home
Milk Miami plant, who moved his dairy
farm from Dade County, has recently
completed one of Florida's most modern
dairy barns constructed entirely of poured
concrete.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Reinhold of Fore-
most Dairies recently contributed a five-
acre tract of land in the edge of Green
Cove Springs, Clay County, Florida, as
the site for a new Clay County hospital.
The hospital authority stated that the gift
was estimated to be valued at $5,000.00.


THIRD QUARTER, 1956 0 39











A U n E -E L m M A 0h


FLORIDA DAIRY AS!

Special Card Ad


LDAMS PACKING ASSN., INC. KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and She
itrus Pulp, Citrus Meal. Citrus Molasses
JOE E. ANDERSON
i Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division
2577 Decatur Rd., Decatu
arndale, Fla. Phone 8-4301 Phone ME 4-8781


KIECKHEFER CONTAIN
ANHEUSER-BUSCH, INC. Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bot
Warehouses: R. J. Evans M. A. Kno
ICE CREAM CABINETS Phone ELgin 6-13:4
MIAMI TAMPA ATLANTA 4700 Pearl St. Jacksor
Walter S. Crawbuck, Dist. Mgr.
Arapahoe Ave. Jacksonville, Fla.
KELVINATO
Division of American Motors C
WM. C. MAYFIEL

S= INC.I Howell llouse Suite 202
chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
Box 86, Tampa Ph. 49-2594

KRIMK4
DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED CHOCOLATE ORANGE
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS MARBLESTONE SYI
O. S. NEWSOM, JR. Douglas J. Headfoi
Phone: EV 7-7383 616 Jessmine Blvd., Daytona I1
Phone: EV 7-7383 Po ln -1
St. Johns Ave. Jacksonville, Fla. Phone Clinton 2-0148
S. H. MAHONEY EXTRI
CHARLES DENNERY, INC. Van-Sal Vanilla ProdL
New Orleans D. C. Mulligan, Florida Repr
Ice Cream Coating. Fruits and Flavors 2840 West 47th Place Chi
Ira Stone 1020 E. Valnut St.
PhI. Alt.4 al 5-2---4








TOP DAUGHTERS OF OUR

SENIOR HERD SIRES

FOREMOST MAY ROYALTY and QUAIL ROOST NOBLE YEOMAN


54 VG & E Daughters
102 AR Daughters, 3 PR Sons
35 Daughters on test
Sire: Foremost Royal Valor
Dam: Foremost Loyalty


Grandsire of 1956 Florida Grand Champion
96 AR Daughters, 2 PR Sons
20 Daughters on test
Sire: Cesor Noble Maxim
Dam: Quail Roost Bright Maid


TO GEORGIA SALE AUGUST 27

AT MACON, GEORGIA FAIRGROUNDS


1. DINSMORE
MAYROYAL


CHOICE


2. DINSMORE NOBLE KIN


3. DINSMORE
VISCOUNT KALMIA


-by Foremost May Royalty and out of a great-granddaughter of Bournedale
Judy 2nd. Due September 11 to Dinsmore Juryman.

-A "Very Good" daughter of Quail Roost Noble Yeoman with a good record
-strong and powerful as Louis Merryman's Ford.

-A show prospect granddaughter of Quail Roost Noble Yeoman due after sale
to Quail Roost Super Herald.


TO FLORIDA SALE SEPTEMBER 10
AT LARGO, FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDS


1. DINSMORE
MAYROYAL

2. DINSMORE
MAYROYAL


IROME


LAURA


3. DINSMORE NOBLE ELLA


-A show winning daughter of Foremost May Royalty finishing a good AR record.
"Very Good."

-Another "Very Good" daughter of Foremost May Royalty out of a daughter of
Dinsmore Majestic Rose King.

-By Quail Roost Noble Yeoman out of a half-sister to Dinsmore Royal May "E"
$10,000. Due October 2 to Foremost May Royalty.


Write us for catalogs then select


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON











THINK eore You Spend/


When you decide to install a Pipe
Line Milker it will pay you well to re-
member these words:
"The very first duty of any milking machine is to
do a really safe, satisfactory and complete job
of milking cows without a lot of help from your
hands."
Many thousands of dairy farmers in many
countries have switched to genuine Surge TUG
& PULL milking because it automatically holds
the teat cups down where they belong.
Pipe Line Milking is still cow milking. The
old problem of getting the cows milked quickly
and safely has not changed in any way. Creeping
teat cups that pinch off milk flow are still creep-
ing teat cups, even though they are on an instal-
lation costing several thousand dollars.


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 W. 19th Street, Chicago 23, Illinois


Surge holds teal cup
down; milk flous freely


Surge teat cups don't creep. Any milking ma-
chine that bears the Surge Nameplate does milk
with genuine Surge TUG & PULL.
Think before you spend! Be sure that you are
paying all that money for a machine that really
will milk cows.
Think before you spend! The greater the in-
vestment the more important it becomes to make
sure of prompt and adequate service.
Is the man who wants to sell you a Pipe Line
the same man that will install it and take care of
it for you? Does he know how to take care of it?
Many thousands of dairy farmers think well
of Organized Surge Service . and organized
service is an important part of any pipe line.
Copyrigh 196 BASON BROS. Co.


.l~JUh'l -


ATLANTA HOUSTON KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOUS SACRAMENTO SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO


i
ti 1




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