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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00031
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 1st quarter 1956
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00031
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text

























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F,


/1


Hazel had the answer

on the tip of her tongue


HAZEL'S an important cow at the
Larro Research Farm. Given her
choice of feeds in recent palatability
tests, she unhesitatingly selected new
tasty-texture SureMilk ... and downed
58 pounds on top of a full feed of
roughage!
Small wonder dairymen say their
cows like Larro's new coarse, appetiz-
ing feed the best of anything yet.
The reason: Larro SureMilk is light,
but not loaded with dusty, parching
fines. These essential nutrients are
pelleted .. well mixed with the coarser
ingredients. Then, just enough molas-
ses is added to sweeten the mixture
without covering up the natural flavor.
What's more, Larro SureMilk's un-


matched milk-making power is proved
by thousands of herd records. It sup-
plies every nutrient that hard-work-
ing cows need to stay healthy and milk
their best on even poor pasture or
roughage. These nutrients include Lar- o
romin ... General Mills' exclusive min-
eral blend that makes separate mineral
feeding unnecessary. And SureMilk
doesn't pack in a cow's stomach. Its
slightly laxative quality helps promote
good cow condition.
Your Larro SureFeed dealer invites
you to try this modern dairy feed soon.
Like Hazel, your own cows will be glad
you did.

General Mills Minneapolis 1, Minn.


* * ** 9*** * *
SUREMILK SURECALF
CONCENTRATE STARTER
Larmro Gives
SSureMilk %cmu calves all
32 is for- thebenefitsof
mulated by ( Larro's new
General Mills tasty-texture
for dairymen pn s super-
who want to mix their nourishment for
own rations. It supplies the kind of start they
all themilk-making nu- need to develop fast.
trients needed with breed early and be-
home-grown grains.., come profitable milk-
and adds appetite ap- ers in your dairy herd
peal to the ration, far sooner.
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EDITORIALS


A GUEST EDITORIAL by J. M. Forbis, editor of the "McClain Newsletter" in answer to an
article on "The Price of Milk" which appeared in "Changing Times" magazine, published by
Kiplinger.
The E. B. McClain Company of Memphis, Tennessee, publisher of the monthly "McClain
Newsletter" to the dairy industry, is a nationally recognized authority on milk costs and milk
prices.

"What About The Price of Milk"
This headline appeared over an article in the November 1955 issue of the maga-
zine, "CHANGING TIMES," published by W. M. Kiplinger. The publisher is better
known for his KIPLINGER WASHINGTON NEWS LETTERS that have been on
the market a good many years.
This article, like its two predecessors in READERS DIGEST and COLLIER'S,
contains two mills worth of fact and five cents worth of distortion and falsehood.
The main difference being that CHANGING TIMES, being relatively new and
hungry for circulation, pulled out the stops and turned on the tremolo to attempt
sensationalism. The sub-head says: "In most places the consumer takes a beating.
What you should know and what you can do in order to get cheaper milk more
conveniently."
Each article in the issue carries a quotation from the classics that is supposed to
harmonize with the article's theme. The one used with this price-of-milk story is
from Samuel Johnson: "Surely the voice of the public, when it calls only for mercy,
ought to be heard." Now that almost broke our heart-after we recovered from our
nausea. After all the publicity that has been given milk's record in the market basket
index, showing that its price increase under inflation has been far less than the aver-
age of other foods-to think that ignorance would have the temerity to speak of the
public "calling for mercy" in milk prices.
The writer of the Changing Times article seems to be opposed to producer co-
operatives, agricultural price supports, federal marketing orders, sanitary regulations
(except the most elementary), anything less than a 3 or 4 cent store differential, the
disinclination of consumers to use concentrated fresh milk, labor unions and most of
the laws of economics.
He is quite right in his apparent conclusion that if milk could be delivered from
a good clean bucket by a man willing to work for a dollar a day, the price would be
lower.
Typical of the spurious conclusions is the one about concentrated fresh milk.
The writer says that milk driver unions usually insisted on three times as much com-
mission on the concentrated, in spite of the fact that it should have been cheaper to
deliver one quart of concentrated than its equivalent three quarts of whole milk.
So, there being no price advantage, the consumer passed this innovation by.
He completely ignored the very elementary fact that milk going into concentrate
had to be of the same quality, and consequently the same price, as whole milk going
into bottles. Therefore, with the same raw cost, the concentrated had the extra cost
of the concentrating operation and the housewife had the extra trouble of reconsti-
tuting it. And experiments showed that the water supply of many cities contained
minerals that would not produce reconstituted milk that was palatable. Thus it was
soon learned that concentrated fresh milk had no place except for export to remote
places.
But we have not reached the real "heart" of the story yet. The writer lists 23
cities under a sub-heading that asks: "Are you in a high-priced milk area?" The
explanation says its a study comparing actual wholesale milk prices with what they
would be if bulk milk could be shipped to those cities from an area centered around
Eau Clare, Wisconsin, if economic barriers and sanitary restrictions were eliminated
from the present situation. The writer says the information comes from a U.S.D.A.
recent study. The list showed "actual" prices to be from 1% to 12% higher than
"free" prices would be.
One of the Memphis wire news services called our office for comments on the
article before releasing the story. On November 9, Herbert L. Brown, Jr., Managing
Editor of CHANGING TIMES, wrote: "The study referred to in our milk story is
called 'Regulations Affecting the Movement and Merchandising of Milk', Marketing
Research Report No. 98, published in June, 1955 by the Agricultural Marketing
Service, U.S.D.A."


(Continued on Page 19)


FIRST


VOL. 6 NO. 1
FIRST QUARTER, 1956

THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
W. A. (BILL) GRAHAM, President
Hialeah

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
W. P. WALDREP, President
Hollywood

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
M. A. SCHACK, President
Greenwood

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, President
Miami

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
DR. H. H. ROTHE, President
Gainesville

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Committee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
W. A. (BILL) GRAHAM, President
Graham's Dairy Farm, Inc., Hialeah
T. G. LEE, 1st V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Distributors' Division, Orlando
JOHN SARGEANT, 2nd V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Producers' Division, Lakeland

Additional Producers
JACK MCMULLEN, Clearwater
R. L. LUNSFORD, Milton
J. H. ADAMS, Jacksonville

Additional Distributors
GEORGE BOUTWELL, Lake Worth
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
JOHN HOOD, Bradenton

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 615 Park St., Jacksonville,
Florida. Subscription price is $1.00 a
year. Entered as second class mail at the
Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under
Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 615 Park
Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL

~iB^ASSOC ITI N

Member Florida Press Association
QUARTER, 1956 0 1


,








































NO, NOT QUITE, but they looked that big if you wanted to buy
some seed last year.
Fertilizing Pensacola Bahia grass in February is a good investment.
You have three routes of return.
(1) Good grazing from a cold to tolerant and drought resistant
grass at a time when your cattle are needing it badly; (2) a seed crop
which will more than pay the fertilizer bill in many cases, and (3) a
hay crop behind the combine.
After fertilizing in March this grass can be grazed in most cases
till early June before cattle should be taken off for the seed crop to
make. At this time it should be top dressed with a nitrogen-potash
mixture or a nitrogen material.
The hay will not be high-quality hay but it is salable, particularly
to dairymen who have a very succulent pasture of oats or clover or
who are using a succulent fresh-cut forage. A small amount of this
fibrous low-quality hay fits in well with the succulent roughage used
by many dairymen.
Contact your Wilson and Toomer Representative and let him help
you plan your Bahia grass fertilization program.





IWILSON & TOOMER

FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Florida Elections Important
To All Of The Dairy Industry
All those who have an interest in the
welfare of the Florida dairy industry
either as owners, employees or otherwise,
including milk consumers who want to
preserve their plentiful high-quality
home-produced milk supply, must re-
member that those they elect to their
legislature and the governor's office will
have the power to decide the future of
this industry.
Every county will elect from one to
three representatives in the legislature,
19 districts will elect half the members
of the State Senate and the governor for
the next four years will be elected.
Also all Florida Congressmen and one
United States Senator are to be elected.
Those having an interest in the future
of the dairy industry will certainly regis-
ter and vote and encourage their associ-
ates and friends to do likewise.

Warren, Bryant and Lowry
Announce For Governor
Florida's thousands of voters associated
with the Dairy Industry will be keenly
interested in the platforms announced
by the various candidates for Governor,
as well as for members of the House and
Senate of the Florida Legislature.
Possibly no industry is as completely
regulated in its operation by all levels
of government as the dairy industry.
The twenty-three year old Florida Milk
Commission Law, which is credited with
stabilizing milk production conditions in
the state and greatly aiding the rapid de-
velopment of the state's high quality and
now adequate fluid milk supply, has in
recent elections been made a political
football by some vote-seeking candidates.
Candidates who favor government
policies which will encourage the agri-
cultural and industrial development of
Florida would do well to consider
whether or not other policies they may
advocate are likely to retard or destroy
the state's dairy farming industry which
is now developed to the point that it is
the third largest cash farm income crop
in Florida.
The dairy industry has and continues
to make enormous investments in de-
veloping the state's basic wealth, the land.
Its annual investment in payrolls, equip-
ment and supplies also plays a large role
in the state's economic life.

Approximately 56% of the veal and
33% of all beef were supplied by cattle
and calves of milk herds in 1953, ac-
cording to unofficial calculations by the
Agricultural Estimates Division AMS-
USDA.










DAIRY INDUSTRY MUST TAKE
AN INTEREST IN POLITICS
By: JOHN G DU PUIS, JR.,
Miami Producer
I have become almost disgusted with
The Dairy Industry, and with Business
Men in general, including myself for
their lack of interest in our government.
We confine our attention to our own
particular business, and we say this con-
cerns me; this is all I am going to do.
And that is all we do. We express con-
tempt for Politicians, for Government,
and Taxes. We say we know nothing
about Politics. We don't care to mix in
Politics, and we do nothing about Poli-
tics.
Now, what is the difference between
Business Men, Dairymen, and the men
we elect to represent us in Government?
Nothing. Every last one of us wants to
increase the volume of his business, and
the politicians want to increase the vol-
ume of their votes. You may talk your-
self hoarse to him about the good of the
Nation and the necessity of protecting
private ownership and rights of people
and the constructive work you do.
Many of us probably don't even vote.
We take no interest in politics, either the
issues, or the men who are being elected.
Then we whine and cry when the poli-
tician or the Government does something
that may hurt us.
We have no influence because we ex-
ert none, and we are entitled to have
none.
I don't expect all Business Men will
agree on everything but I do say there
are certain fundamental principles on
which all can agree. Why can't we as
Dairymen and Business Men get togeth-
er? Why can't we become more adhe-
sive? Why can't we take an interest in
politics? Why can't we register? Why
can't we agree to vote together on sound
general principles? We will never exer-
cise influence, we will never be able to
enjoy any security, we will never receive
the consideration to which our industry
is entitled from our representatives in
government until they believe we will
hang together and present a United
Front of Votes.
Business and Agriculture are the pil-
lars of the Nation. In my opinion, it is
time the Dairy Industry and all other
industries, and thinking citizens get to-
gether and take an interest in politics
and government. Let's all of us see to it
that we register and vote and urge our
families and associates to vote and, if you
have employees, arrange plans for them
to take the necessary time to vote.

"Good morning, ma'am. I'm from the gas
company, I understand there's something in
the house that won't work."
"Yes, he's upstairs."


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SFASCO















FLORIDA MILK PRICES ARE LOWER

THAN THOSE IN MANY AREAS
The U. S. Department of Agriculture's February 17 report of fluid milk prices
shows again that Florida milk prices are not only not the highest in the country, but
actually lower than in many parts of the country.


The following prices are quoted from
the U.S.D.A. report and certain state re-
ports for areas not listed in the U.S.D.A.
report:


City Cream %r


*Price
Per Quart


Tampa (Fla. report) 4. % 254
Miami 4. _J"O,_o
Jacksonville 4-4.5 27
Boston 4-4.3 t29
Newport, R. I. 4.+ f28
Providence, R. I. 4.+ t28
Baltimore, Md. 4.+ t26
Hartford, Conn. 4.+ +271/2
New Haven, Conn. 3.7 261/2
Philadelphia 4-4.3 t27
Buffalo, N. Y. 3.5 27
New York City 3.5 $261/2
Niagara Falls 251/2
White Plains, N. Y. -27
Yonkers, N. Y. -- 27
Poughkeepsie -27
Atlantic City, N. J. 3.5 271/2
Camden, N. J. 3.5 251/2
Trenton, N. J. 3.5 251/2
Gary, Ind. 3.5 27
Chicago, III. 3.5 271/2
Cincinnati, Ohio 4-4.2 t27
Asheville, N. C. 4. 26
Durham, N. C. 4. 26
Winston-Salem 4. 26
Atlanta, Ga. 4. 26
Augusta, Ga. 4. 26
Columbus, Ga. 4. 26
Macon, Ga. 4. 26
S vannah, Ga. 4.3 28
Nashville, Tenn. 4.+ 26
New Orleans 4. 261/2
Shreveport 4. 28
Oklahoma City 26
Tulsa, Okla. 27
Austin, Texas 4. 26
Dallas 4. 26
Galveston 4. 26
Houston 4. 26
*Price of Standard Milk for area from USDA
Feb. report, Table No. 1.
tPrice of Grade A Milk from USDA Feb.
report, Table No. 5.
tPrice of Standard Milk Price Reported by
N. Y. State Dept. of Agriculture, Nov. 1955.
AVERAGE 39 Cities....................26.6
FLORIDA AVERAGE ..................26. 0
It should be noted that 8 of the above
cities have milk of .3% to .5% lower
cream content than Florida milk.
In addition to above prices which equal
or exceed Florida's average price of 26 ,
there were 15 cities which have a price of
250, the same as Tampa, Florida.

The best way to be somebody is just to be
yourself.--From "The Fezsez."

You can not build a reputation on things
you are going to do.


National Milk Price Trends
Shown in U.S.D.A. Reports
Florida milk prices continue to show
favorable comparisons with prices of oth-
er areas of the country, according to the
monthly Fluid Milk and Cream Price Re-
port of the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture for the month of February.
The report shows that while the Janu-
ary average quart price of milk in 25
major cities of the country average 4-
tenths of a cent higher than for January
1955, the Florida price remained the
same.
The report shows in a comparison of
February 19.56 milk prices with those of
February 1955, that while only two of
these 25 major areas had a seasonal milk
price reduction, 10 cities had a price in-
crease.
Florida prices remained the same.
Among those showing a price increase
over a year ago was the Portland, Oregon
area which had a 11/2-cent quart increase.
Interestingly enough, Portland is the area
which the highly questionable "Collier's"
magazine article of some months ago
pointed out as an example to the nation's
milk consumers who want to buy cheap
milk.
New York and Boston had 1/2-cent
milk price creases over a year ago, while
Minneapolis, in the heart of the nation's
area of highest milk production area, had
a 2-cent per quart price increase.
The 1955 average price of home de-
livery standard milk was 3-tenths-cent
above 1954 for the 25 cities reported.
The Jacksonville, Florida, price (which
was one of the 25 reported) remained
the same.

Milk Advertising Less
Than Other Beverages
An unofficial report by the American
Dairy Association on amounts spent in
advertising by dealers and distributors of
various beverages shows milk advertising
is less than that of five other principal
beverages.
The beverages referred to and the per-
cent of total sales spent for advertising
are: Tea, 8.4%; Soft drinks, 5.5%;
Beer, 3.3%; Coffee, 1.8%; Fruit Juices,
1.5%, and Milk, 1.0%.


Farm Production and Price
Of Milk Show 1955 Increase
Milk produced on farms in 1955 total-
ed 123.5 billion pounds on the basis of
National and State estimates recently is-
sued by the Crop Reporting Board of the
Department of Agriculture. The total
was 1.4 billion pounds or 1 percent above
the revised estimate of 122.1 billion
pounds for 1954.
The 1955 milk production was an all-
time high annual output for United States
milking herds, 3 percent above a decade
earlier and 23 percent above the 1925-39
average. Production in 1955 was charac-
terized by a slightly smaller number of
milk cows producing at a higher rate per
cow. The number of milk cows on farms
in the United States in 1955 was 2 per-
cent less than in 1954. Milk production
per cow reached an all-time high of 5,815
pounds in 1955, 3 percent above 1954.
Higher production per cow was encour-
aged by liberal concentrate feeding, im-
proved inherent producing ability of milk
cows from wider use of good bulls in
the greatly expanded artificial breeding
program, and the improved management
practices that have accompanied the
grouping of the Nation's cows into fewer
and larger milking herds.
The weighted average price to produc-
ers for Class I milk in about 150 mar-
kets on an f.o.b. city basis in 1955 aver-
aged $5.19 per hundredweight, 4 cents
above the 1954 average. This was the
fifth highest average in the 21 years of
record-57 cents per hundredweight un-
der the record high set in 1952. Class
I buying prices in 1955 were 13 cents
per hundredweight below the 5-year
(1949-53) average but 29 cents per hun-
dredweight above the 10-year (1944-53)
average.

FLORIDA IMPROVES
MILK PRICE COMPARISON
While the U.S.D.A. national milk price
summary for February shows the Florida
farm price of milk as second highest in
the country, 7 cities reported had a retail
price as high or higher than Florida's
highest price of 27 cents for grade A pas-
teurized milk and 20 cities had a price
higher than Florida's average price of 26
cents a quart. The average price of milk
for these 39 cities, including Florida was
26.60 a quart.
Many of these areas had milk of lower
quality and cream content than Florida's
grade A milk.


4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


TRENDS IN MILK PRODUCTION, FARM & RETAIL MILK PRICES

AS REPORTED BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE






National Economics Authority
Joins Florida Dairy Studies
Florida dairymen have decided to spon-
sor some research of their own for facts
on milk production costs and have re-
tained one of the nation's foremost au-
thorities on agricultural and dairy eco-
nomics to personally conduct a three-
months' study.
Dr. Leland Spencer of the School of
Business Administration, Cornell Univer-
sity, New York, has been retained as spe-
cial consultant by the Miami Area Pro-
ducers Association beginning March 1st
to supervise a complete survey of dairy
farm conditions and milk production costs
in the South Florida area.
The survey is expected to serve the
two-fold objective of providing compari-
sons with recent milk production cost
audits of the Florida Milk Commission
and to provide necessary data for use in
substantiating the need for and in pre-
paring the provisions of a Federal milk
marketing order for the Miami area if
such an order is approved by the U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
Dr. Spencer was the principal speaker
at a February 14 meeting of the South
Florida producers' group and is sched-
uled to address a March 15 state-wide
producers conference of the Florida Dairy
Association to be held in Orlando.

Milk Price Spread Fallacy
(From an editorial in the Rutland Daily
Herald, Rutland, Vermont)
"The dairy industry . offers the best
possible illustration of why 'spread' just
as a price differential, has no meaning as
a bogey word. The spread in the dairy
business is greatest on fresh, fluid milk.
In other words, the farmer gets a smaller
proportion of what the consumer pays
for fresh milk delivered to his doorstep
than he gets of the retail prices of other
dairy products. But is he worse off be-
cause of this? Far from it. The share of
his milk that's sold fresh brings him a
bigger return than he gets for what goes
into butter, cheese or ice cream. He may
be getting less of the consumer's dollar
... but he's still getting about $2 a hun-
dredweight more for his milk (in Ver-
mont). If people want their foods handy,
processed, packaged, delivered... and cur-
rent trends indicate that they do, and
are willing to pay for these services...
there's no point in decrying the increased
costs that are inevitably involved."

A recent realtors convention, held at
the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, spon-
sored a well-attended "Milk Bar."

With but 6% of the population, the U. S.
produces and consumes almost 50% of the
world's annual output of goods and services.
*. *


FOR LOW-COST



DAIRY SANITATION


WITH SAFETY..


CHLORINE-BEARING

POWDER


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For further information, write B-K, Dept. 151
Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Company
THREE PENN CENTER PLAZA, PHILADELPHIA 2 PA.

FIRST QUARTER, 1956 0 5










DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Jacksonville Dairy Club
Gains Wide Recognition
The North Florida Dairy Tech Club
is doing an important job for its mem-
bers and for the Florida dairy industry.
This group not only provides excellent
and well attended monthly dinner meet-
ings for members of the industry in
North Florida but has raised funds for
a series of well planned advertisements
on milk in the Jacksonville newspapers.
The last meeting of the Club, held
February 27, had as the principal speak-
er, Lee Bickenbach, Sales Engineer for
Mojonnier Brothers Company of Chi-
cago.


JAMESON IS SURGE DEALER
FOR NINETEEN COUNTIES
M. E. Jameson of Tampa, Florida, has
been named the exclusive Surge Service
Dealer for the Surge line of dairy farm
equipment in 19 counties of Florida ac-
cording to a recent announcement by
Babson Bros. Company, builders of Surge.
Jameson pledges efficient servicing of
all dairy farm equipment which he sells.
His Dairyman's Supply Company is locat-
ed at 6702 East Broadway in Tampa.
The counties for which he is the au-
thorized Surge Service Dealer include
Citrus, Seminole, Hernando, Orange, Lee,
Hendry, Pasco, Polk, Osceola, Hillsbor-
ough, Brevard, Manatee, Hardee, High-
lands, Sarasota, DeSoto, Glades, Charlotte
and Pinellas.
Jameson will feature a complete line
of Surge pipe line equipment, including
the Surge Siphon and Surcingle Breaker
Cup Milking Machines which feature
complete visibility of the milk as it comes
directly from the cow. These milkers fea-
ture the famous Tug and Pull which is
know internationally as a fast and effi
cient helpmate in milking cows.
One of the newest items in the Surge
line which Jameson will be selling is the
"Electrobrain," the famous automatic
washing machine which not only cleans
milk lines in place but washes and sani-
tizes all the milking machines as well.
All the farmer has to do is push a
button and this machine will do all the
cleaning automatically and then shut it-
self off when all equipment is clean.


Consumers' Magazine Honors
Several Florida Dairies
Parents' Magazine, a national publica-
tion, has given Parents' Commendation
Seals to at least three Florida dairies re-
cently, according to Golden Guernsey,
Inc., a milk marketing organization estab-
lished by the American Guernsey Cattle
Club. The magazine's consumer service
bureau has thoroughly investigated the
national Golden Guernsey program, in-
cluding the operations of both distribu-
tors and producers.
In Orlando, the T. G. Lee Dairy has
been given the Commendation Seal and
in Sarasota, both the Land O'Sun Cream-
ery and Walter Schmid and Son Dairy
were similarly honored.

Farm Bureau Re-Elects Finlayson
E. H. Finlayson of Greenville was
unanimously re-elected president of the
Florida Farm Bureau Federation at their
14th annual meeting held recently in Tal-
lahassee.
Other officers also re-elected were:
Jimmy Gaunt, Ochopee, vice president;
W. R. (Buster) Hancock, Tampa, secre-
tary; John Tiedtke, Winter Park, treas-
urer; and T. R. McClain, Jr., Winter
Park, executive vice president.

Florida, Farm Frontier State
A recent report of the Washington
Bureau of the Census states that Florida
is the only State in the Union to register
an increase in the number of farms.
Florida showed a gain of 622 farms from
1950 to 1954 while the Nation as a
whole showed a 11% decline in farms.
The report points out that while the
increase is accounted for largely by small
part-time farms, the trend is for small
farmers and tenant farmers to give way
in the face or rising farm costs and de-
clining prices for farm products.
Dairy farming in Florida, however,
showed a reduction in number with the
smaller operators giving way to the spe-
cialized larger dairy operation.

A series of institutional advertisements
keyed to fostering the traditional Amer-
ican philosophy of free enterprise has
won for Florida Power & Light Com-
pany the top national award of Freedoms
Foundation of Valley Forge, Pa.


PERSONAL MENTION

Charles Williams, formerly with Bor-
den Southern, Jacksonville, is now oper-
ating the V. & W. Dairy at Delray
Beach with his father.
Charles Wentworth is the new man-
ager of Foremost Dairies in Orlando
taking over from former manager Jack
Tierney.
Carl Caudill replaces Al Wells as man-
ager of Velda Corporation in the Jack-
sonville area.
Charles Birdsong, former assistant
manager of the Blue Ribbon Creamery
in Jackson, Mississippi, has taken over
as manager of the Polk County Co-Oper-
ative Dairies in Winter Haven.
Jack P. Dodd, a 4-H Club product
from Maitland, will be graduated from
the University of Florida in June. Jack
started a 4-H project in 1949 with one
Guernsey heifer; today he has a herd of
55 fine animals and plans to increase it
to 200 cows producing Golden Guernsey
milk. He is already a member of the
American Guernsey Cattle Club.
R. A. Shearin, Trenton dairyman, is
president of the Suwannee Valley Dairies
Coop., Inc., which is the successor to Co-
lumbia Dairies in Lake City. The co-op
is owned and operated by milk produc-
ers in Gilchrist, Columbia and Suwannee
Counties. H. E. Stevenson is the man-
ager of the plant.

Bob Alexander Announces
R. K. (Bob) Alexander, for many
years district manager for Security Feed
Mills in Tampa, Florida, has announced
the formation of a Feed and Grain Bro-
kerage Company under the name of Crit-
tendon-Smith, Inc., in which he is a
partner with W. F. Smith of Limestone,
Tennessee, and K. S. Crittendon of
Charlotte, N. C.
Bob is vice president and general man-
ager of the company with headquarters
in the Wallace S. Building, Tampa.
* *
Success is nothing but a "good idea"
coupled with work.

Frank Flack Back South
For Standard Packaging
Frank Flack, one of the Florida "Alli-
gator Club's" live-wire members for
many years, is back South as Southeastern
Representative of Standard Packaging
Corporation.
Frank has been sales manager for
Standard Packing stationed in the Chi-
cago home office for a number of years
but says he expects to be much happier
back South in his home country with
headquarters at 2352 Knollwood Ter-
race, Decatur, Georgia.


6 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







CHARLES DENNERY ERECTING
NEW PLANT IN NEW ORLEANS
Construction is now underway on a
new factory-office building for Charles
Dennery, Inc., ice cream manufacturers'
supplies. Located on a three acre site on
the outskirts of New Orleans, the build-
ing will occupy a total of 90,000 square
feet with additional areas to provide load-
ing and parking facilities. The modern
reinforced concrete structure will feature
an auditorium and laboratories for re-
search and quality control with the newest
in food processing equipment and pro-
visions for efficient stream-line produc-
tion throughout.
George Dennery, president of the com-
pany, states that this progressive step has
been taken to insure continuance of the
traditional Dennery quality and service to
the industry which began 62 years ago.
Completion of the project is expected by
late 1956. The company has branches in
Dallas, and Houston, Texas.
Holds Sales Meeting
The Charles Dennery Company, manu-
facturers of a complete line of Ice Cream,
Fruits, Flavors and Coatings, recently con-
ducted a sales meeting and demonstration
in New Orleans.
George Wiell, sales promotion man-
ager and Ira Stone are well known as the
Florida representatives of this company.

Representative At Inauguration
Aaron Block, president of the Reddi-
Wip Co. of Florida, represented the
president of the College of the City of
New York at the recent inauguration
ceremonies at the University of Florida.
Mr. Block was graduated from the New
York college in 1926.

Wage And Employment Laws
Changes Become Effective
Changes in the Florida Unemployment
Compensation Law which became effec-
tive January 1st place employers of "four
or more" under the law, rather than
"eight or more." Strictly agricultural em-
ployers are still exempt from the law.
All employers (regardless of the num-
ber employed) were requested by the
Florida Industrial Commission to file a
report which will enable the Commis-
sion to determine those who are subject
to the law.
The new minimum wage of $1.00 per
hour, adopted by Congress in the Fed-
eral Wage and Hour Law, was effective
March 1st on all employers in interstate
commerce.


How can anybody who has it make fifteen
bushels of corn from one bushel of corn and
we don't mean plant it? Answer, "Pop it."


BaE liquid cleaner



developed specifically



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General purpose cleaners are fine for
many jobs, but cleaning milking
equipment calls for a special type of
cleaner. Now Diversey chemists have
developed the one cleaner that's made
specifically for milk house use. It's

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because it penetrates. It's made spe-
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works fast, gets equipment shiny-
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elbow-grease. LIQUID DIVO holds its
cleaning power longer. You get supe-
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less cleaner! LIQUID DIVO is harmless
to hands or equipment, fully effective
in hard or soft water. You'll like the
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your hauler tomorrow.


THE DIVERSE CORPORATION
1820 Rscoe Street, Chicago 13, IlIHnois
(In Canada: The Diversey Corporation (Canada) Ltd.,
Port Credit, Ont.)


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 0 7


^A.
-,,Z








DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Court Delays Decision
On Milk Commission
The Florida dairy industry continues
its anxious wait for the State Supreme
Court to decide two important cases per-
taining to the Florida Milk Commission
which have been before the Court since
November.
The first case is one in which the dairy
industry challenged the legality of an
order adopted by the Commission last
October 1st, declaring a moratorium for
one year on enforcement of its milk price
orders.
The second case is one brought by a
Miami grocer challenging the constitu-
tionally of the Milk Commission Law,
principally on the grounds that the con-
ditions which made necessary the original
passage of the law no longer exist.
The Chief Justice of the Court was
quoted by the press as saying back in
November that a decision could be ex-
pected late in December. Since that time,
there has been no further indication of
when the Court will announce a decision.
Some have the opinion that nothing
should be expected until after the primary
election late in May.

Federal Court Grand Jury
Studies Dairy Price Actions
An investigation of milk pricing poli-
cies in the Florida dairy industry is cur-
rently under way by the U. S. Department
of Justice through the grand jury of the
Federal Court, Southern Florida District
in Miami.
Records of various dairies over the
state, as well as those of the Florida Milk
Commission and the Florida Dairy As-
sociation, have been subpoened by the
Court.

M.I.F. Sales Courses
The Milk Industry Foundation has an-
nounced the following dates for its re-
maining five 1956 milk sales training
school sessions, which are held in Wash-
ington, D. C.: April 9, May 7, October
1, November 5 and November 26.
This constructive milk sales building
program has had 43 sessions with 774
graduates from 42 states.
Sessions are limited to 20 and applica-
tions must be filed with the M.I.F. far in
advance to assure admission.


Dairies Ask Suspension
Of Milk Commission Tax
The Florida Dairy Association recent-
ly filed an official petition to the Florida
Milk Commission to adopt a moratorium
on further collection of its administrative
tax on dairy farmers and dairy plants
during the time that it continues a mora-
torium adopted last October on enforce-
ment of its milk price orders.
The Commission postponed action on
the petition when an advisory opinion
given by the Commission's attorney held
that the Commission is without authority
to discontinue collection of the tax.
Dairy Association attorneys held that
it is just as legal for the Milk Commis-
sion to discontinue collecting the admin-
istrative tax on the dairy industry pro-
vided by the law as it was for the Com-
mission to discontinue the duty imposed
upon them by the law to enforce their
milk price orders.

Central Florida Producers
Elect Bill Judge President
At a December 10 annual meeting, the
Central Florida Milk Producers Associa-
tion elected B. W. "Bill" Judge, Jr., of
Good Luck Dairy as president succeeding
Theo Datson.
Other officers elected are Elbert Cam-
mack, Fairglade Jersey Dairy, vice presi-
dent; Kenneth Paterson, Paterson Dairy,
secretary. Directors elected in addition
to the officers are Martin Tarte, Lake
County; Tommy Knight and Gordon
Eunice, Orange County.

FLORIDA MILK CONSUMPTION
UP 40% IN FIVE YEARS
Florida's total annual milk sales have
increased about 40% since 1950, accord-
ing to sales records reported by the Flor.
ida Milk Commission.
Total sales reported for the Commis-
sion's fiscal year 1949-50 were about 54
million gallons. Additional unreported
sales from 20 counties not under the
Milk Commission Law, are estimated to
be 10% additional, bringing the State
total to about 60 million gallons.
The total of reported and estimated
Florida milk sales for the fiscal year
1954-55 are 85 million gallons, or a
5-year increase of 40%.


"BRIGHT WHITE" MILK CONTAINER
A brighter, fresher and more inviting
milk package that is made of new "bright
white" paper has
been announced by
American Can Com-
pany.
"The new pack-
age, because of the
brighter hue of the
paper, increases the
visibility of the dai-
ry's label up to 25
per cent compared
with previous fiber
milk containers," said William F. May,
general manager of Canco's Fibre Con-
tainer department.

New Certification Plan
For Dairy Laboratories
Florida dairies operating plant labora-
tories are being offered an opportunity
to share in a voluntary certification pro-
gram designed to improve the quality of
their laboratory services, according to an
announcement from the Florida State
Board of Health.
Doctor Albert V. Hardy, Director of
the State Board of Health Bureau of Lab-
oratories with headquarters in Jackson-
ville, stated that the voluntary certifica-
tion program would provide "definite
benefits" in helping to maintain high
standards.
"The State Board of Health," the an-
nouncement continued, "has been evalu-
ating the milk testing procedures in its
own laboratories for a number of years.
This has been done for the purpose of
assuring more uniformity in the results
of the tests being performed.
"This service is now being extended
to the laboratories of the dairy industry.
Such an evaluation and certification pro-
gram will assure closer agreement in re-
sults obtained from work performed both
by public health and the industry' own
laboratories.
Another activity designed to improve
quality and compatibility of laboratory
endings is the instruction made available
in the "Milk Laboratorians' Short
Course" held annually at the University
of Florida's Department of Dairy Sci-
ences. Certification and this training to-
gether should assure the producers, dis-
tributors and the citizens of Florida of
the highest possible quality of laboratory
work in this field.
Cooperating dairies which meet stand-
ards as outlined by the U. S. Public
Health Service for dairy laboratories
which perform tests on milk for inter-
state shipment, will be issued an "Ap-
proved Laboratory" Certificate by the
State Board of Health, it was stated.
Further information may be obtained
by writing Hugh F. Butner, Florida State
Board of Health Bureau of Laboratories,
Jacksonville, Florida.


8 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







SALARIES AND RETURN ON CAPITAL
WITHHELD IN MIAMI COST AUDIT
A much publicized audit of milk pro-
ducer and distributor costs made by Flor-
ida Milk Commission auditors in the Mi-
ami area appears to have been somewhat
unfair to the dairies in the fact that cost
data was released to the public without
the inclusion of the cost of salaries or
other compensation to managing dairy
owners or any return on investment.
A University of Florida milk produc-
tion cost survey made in May 1955 stated
that an allowance of from 1/5 to 1/10th
of the total cost should be allowed for
these items, in computing milk costs.
If these items in the Miami farm pro-
duction cost of milk had been allowed as
71/2 % of the cost, which economists say
was the fair thing to do, then the average
Miami producer's profit before income
taxes would have been reported as about
21/2 cents a gallon instead of 91/2 cents
a gallon.
As to the audit figures on milk plant
profits, which was reported before in-
come taxes, it is important to note that
the profits before income tax of any in-
corporated business firm of reasonable
size will be reduced about 52% which
the corporate income taxes are paid.
Thus, if the Commission's report of
9.560 per gallon profit on premium milk
in the Miami market had made allowance
for income taxes, the net profit shown
on a gallon of milk would have been re-
duced to about 4.
It is interesting to note that in the fact
of constant attacks on the price of milk in
the Miami area, this much publicized
audit by independent auditors for the
Milk Commission showed that the dis-
tributor's profit on a gallon of pasteur-
ized milk even before income taxes was
only 2.57 or slightly over 1/2C per quart.
This is almost the identical finding of a
1954 national survey of milk distributor
profits on milk made by the University
of Indiana.

Florida Imports 2% of Milk
A report of fluid milk importation into
Florida in 1955 recently released by the
State Department of Agriculture shows
importation of about 800 thousand gal-
lons.
This represents less than 2% of the
total fluid milk sales for the year.
Importations in August, September
and October represented about one-half
of the total for the year. September was
the high month with 413,271 gallons.
The Chief State Dairy Supervisor esti-
mates that Florida exports about the same
amount of milk which is brought into
the State.
Both export and import sales of milk
are largely for military use.


MILK PROMOTION PLANS
CONSIDERED BY F.D.A.
The Public Relations Committee of the
Florida Dairy Association has before it
for consideration a public relations and
milk promotion plan based on such pro-
grams now in operation in the States of
California and Washington, and which
some believe may be the solution to the
Florida dairy industry's urgent need for a
program to furnish to the public the facts
about milk, milk prices and the milk
industry.
The proposed plan, like those in Cali-
fornia and Washington, provides for a
law to be passed creating a Dairy Ad-
visory Council under the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture for the administra-
tion of a program of milk and dairy in-
dustry advertising, publicity and promo-
tion through various educational methods.


C


-~-

NIl~


Junior F.D.A. Adopts Objectives
Bill Gunter, University of Florida stu-
dent in Agriculture and Dairying and
chairman of the Honorary Junior Mem-
bers group of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation, has announced that the Commit-
tee adopted the following objectives at a
meeting in Gainesville:
"1. To promote more interest, know-
ledge, and enthusiasm concerning dairy
cattle and the dairy industry on the part
of more of our able young people.
"2. To help present the dairy picture
to the public by such activities in assist-
ing in June Dairy Month campaigns, ex-
hibits, essays and talks on dairy subjects
as value of milk in the diet, why I drink
milk, the place of the dairy industry in
the states' economy, etc."


There once lived a King who loved milk. He
constantly dreamed of a supply of rich, fine-
flavored milk and in his search he traveled to
many foreign lands. He had promised to give a
solid silver milk pail to the dairyman who
could give him the milk he sought.
Returning home, he met a traveler driving
a herd of fine cows. They were strong-boned
cows with fine coats. He stopped the traveler
and asked to sample the milk from his cows.
He could hardly believe it! This was the milk he
had traveled so far to find.
Finally, when the dairyman and his cows
were safe in the castle, the King asked the
dairyman for the secret of his rich, fine-tasting
milk. The dairyman gave the King a handful
of sweet-smelling dried material. "What is
this?" asked the King.
The dairyman explained that the wonderful
material was Citrus Pulp* dairy feed, the King
rewarded him with a silver milk pail for each of
his cows. The King then ordered all dairymen
in the kingdom to use Citrus Pulp*.
Citrus pulp is an economical carbohydrate
concentrate that is high in T. D. N. and low in
fiber content. For your copy of the booklet
"Florida Citrus Pulp" write today to:


VRO


S P. 0. Box 1459 Winter Haven. Florida Dept
;sociAo P. O. Box 1459. Winter Haven. Florida Dept.


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 9


THE SILVER MILK PAIL .
1
















11?; t N- 1



Top Awards of Florida State Fair
Won By Dinsmore Dairy Farms
Good weather and good cattle brought thousands of people from all over the
country to see one of the finest dairy cattle shows held anywhere in the South.
Cattle of four breeds and from six states were exhibited with Guernseys predominat-
ing. L. O. Colebanks, noted dairy cattle judge from Knoxville, Tennessee, judged all
breeds. T. W. Sparks, Assistant Extension Dairyman, University of Florida, served
as superintendent. Sparks was assisted by Elton Henton, Voc. Ag. teacher and two
University of Florida students, George Malicivic and Erny Sellers.
Following the Dairy Show judging Thursday afternoon, February 2nd, the
parade of all dairy champions was held in the arena. C. W. Reaves was Master of
Ceremonies and introduced the breed fieldmen and the donors who presented the
various trophies and plaques to the owners of the champions.


Record Guernsey Show
The Guernsey show at the 1956 Flor-
ida State Fair, boasting 165 animals, was
the biggest in Florida State Fair history.
Florida breeders took the two big awards.
Boutwell-Matheson Inc., Stuart, showed
the Grand Champion Bull in Oakhurst
Eastern Duke," an aged bull, and Dins-
more Dairy Company won the Grand
Champion Female award with the lovely
"Dinsmore Jury Linnie." Bayville Farm,
S .. Norfolk, Virginia, showed both the Re-
serve Grand Champion bull and cow.
The coveted "Premier Breeder" and
the "Premier Exhibitor" awards were won
by the well-known Florida Guernsey
breeders, Dinsmore Dairy Farms, Dins-
more, Florida. The Dinsmore group also
won the Herdsman award with Velda
Dairy, Tallahassee, Second, and Lay-
Laine Guernsey Farm, Orlando, Third.
Most of the classes were strong. The
two outstanding classes were the Two
Year Old Bull Class and the Age Cow
Class. The judge remarked that these
two classes were of the finest that he had
ever judged. There were 23 animals in
the Aged Cow Class. Milk and breed type
was certainly evident here. C. J. Jacobs,
American Guernsey Field Representative,
was on hand to assist the Guernsey exhi-
bitors and to assist the superintendent
with the Show.
The stands were comfortably filled
most of the day. Many out-of-state
breeders were present to watch this won-

The Florida Guernsey Club sold Gold-
S. en Guernsey milk at their Breed booth
all week.
* FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


10


The Jersey exhibit was down in num-
bers but was up in quality. The Grand
Champion Bull, Jester Basil Sleeper Fill-
pail, was exhibited by Sanitary Dairy,
Dothan, Alabama. The Reserve Grand
Champion was exhibited by Clay County
Farm, Middleburg, Florida, and Joe Min-
ter of Camp Hill, Alabama walked away
with the award for the Grand Champion
Jersey Cow showing Brompton Lea
Bridget, a five year old. J. K. Stuart,
Bartow, had the best udder cow and the
Reserve Grand Champion in Jester Lela
Cynthia, a two year old.
Many noted Jersey breeders were on
hand to see Jerseys at their best.
Ayrshires Show & Sale
Ayrshires and Holsteins were shown
the opening day of the Fair. The Ayr-
shires exhibit was again principally made
up by out-of-state entries. Strathglass
Farms, Port Chester, N. Y. and Logan
View Farm of Chrisman, Illinois, took
most of the awards.
The annual Ayrshire sale was again
successfully held. The top price paid in
the sale was for a two year old bull con-
signed by Logan View Farm and pur-
chased by Herman Boyd, Miami. Mr.
Boyd was the top buyer, purchasing eight
animals.
The Holsteins show is in its infancy
and the numbers were small. The Flor-
ida Holstein-Friesian Club met prior to
the Show. One of the items discussed
was a better Holstein show at next year's
State Fair.















ti







STATE FAIR PICTURES
ABOVE: Officials of Dinsmore Dairy
Farms, Jacksonville, are seen receiving the
Florida Dairy Association "Premier Exhibi-
tor" Trophy which was awarded for their
Guernsey show exhibit at the 1956 State
Fair. T. T. Lay, F.D.A. Executive Secretary
presented the trophy to Charles Johnson,
right, Earl Johnson, 2nd from right and
their father, V. C. Johnson, left.
ON OPPOSITE PAGE-SIDE PANEL:
(1) Grand Champion Jersey Bull "Jester
Basil Steeper Fillpail"; owner, Sanitary
Dairy, Dothan, Ala. (2) Grand Champion
Jersey Cow "Brompton Lea Bridget"; owner,
Joe Minter, Camp Hill, Ala. (3) Grand
Champion Ayrshire Bull "Strathglass Lively
Frank"; owned by Strathglass Farm, Port
Chester, N. Y. (4) Grand Champion Ayr-
shire Cow "Strathglass Lively Flo"; owned
by Strathglass Farm, Port Chester, N. Y.
Shown by Gus Bowling, Manager, Strath-
glass.
TOP PANEL: (1) Grand Champion
Guernsey Cow "Dinsmore Jury Linnie";
owner, Dinsmore Dairy Farms, Dinsmore,
Fla. Led by Earl Johnson. (2) Grand Cham-
pion Guernsey Bull "Oakhurst Eastern
Duke"; owner, Boutwell Matheson Dairy,
Stuart, Fla. (3) Tom Hughes, left, of the
"Florida Grower and Rancher," presenting
the magazine's "Premier Dairy Breeder"
Trophy to (L to R) V. C. Johnson, Charles
Johnson and Earl Johnson, co-owners of
Dinsmore Dairy Farms, Dinsmore, Fla., win-
ners of the trophy at the 1956 State Fair.
State Fair Guernsey Show
RESULTS OF THE GUERNSEY OPEN
SHOW INCLUDES:
Bull calves: Dinsmore Farm, Dinsmore,
Fla., 1st; Bayville Farms, Norfolk, Va., 2nd
and 3rd.
Junior yearling bulls: Carroll L. Ward, Jr.,
1st; Sellers, 2nd; Bayville, 3rd.
Senior yearling bulls: Velda Dairy Farms,
Tallahassee, 1st; Lakemont Dairy, Winter
Park, 2nd; Ward, Jr., 3rd.
Junior champion bull: Ward, Jr. (Lay-
Laine Highness Supreme, the winning Junior
yearling).
Two-year-old bulls: Bayville, 1st; Dins-
more, 2nd; Sellers and Thomas Christian, St.
Petersburg, 3rd.
Aged bulls: Boutwell-Matheson, 1st; Ward,
Jr., 2nd; Dinsmore, 3rd.
Senior champion bull: Boutwell-Matheson
(with Oakhurst Eastern Duke, the winning
aged bull).
Grand champion bull: Boutwell-Matheson
(with the senior champion).


Reserve Grand Champion bull: Bayville
(with Bayville General Gale, the winning
two-year-old bull).
Heifer calves: Bayville, 1st; Bayville, 2nd;
Dinsmore, 3rd.
Junior yearling heifers: Dinsmore, 1st; Bay-
ville, 2nd; Paul K. and James L. Switzer,
Union, S. C., 3rd.
Senior yearling heifers: Bayville, 1st; Leslie
Smith, Zephyrhills, 2nd; Boutwell-Matheson,
3rd.
Junior champion female: Dinsmore (with
Dinsmore Nobly Georgella, the winning junior
yearling).
Junior get-of-sire (four animals, under 2
years): Bayville (with get of Bournedale
General Mars), 1st; Dinsmore, 2nd; Ward,
Jr., 3rd.
Two-year-old cows: Velda, 1st; Ward, Jr.,
2nd and 3rd.
Three-year-old cows: Bayville, 1st; Dins-
more, 2nd; Bayville, 3rd.
Four-year-old cows: Bayou-Vista, 1st; Hill
Top, 2nd; Lakemont, 3rd.
Five-year-old cows: Dinsmore, 1st; Bay-
ville, 2nd; Switzers, 3rd.
Senior champion female: Dinsmore (with
Dinsmore Jury Linnie, winning aged cow).
Grand champion female: Dinsmore (with
the senior champion).
Reserve grand champion female: Bayville
(with Walker Farm Majesty Fairlie, the 2nd
place aged cow).
Dairy herd (three animals): Bayville, 1st;
Dinsmore, 2nd; Bayou Vista, 3rd.


NOW


Three females: Dinsmore, 1st; Bayville,
2nd; Bayou-Vista, 3rd.
Get-of-sire (four animals): Bayville, 1st
(with get of Bournedale General Mars);
Dinsmore, 2nd and 3rd.
Produce of dam (two animals): Ward, Jr.,
1st; Waldrep, 2nd; Bayou-Vista, 3rd.
Best cow in milk (judged on udder alone):
L. H. Sellers (with Burkeville Clark's Killy,
3-year-old cow), 1st; Bayou-Vista, 2nd;
Dinsmore, 3rd.
State Fair Jersey Show
RESULTS OF THE JERSEY SHOW
INCLUDE:
Bull calves: Harry Griffin, Bartow FFA,
1st; J. K. Stuart, Bartow, 2nd; Clay County
Farm, Middleburg, Fla., 3rd.
Junior yearling bulls: Stuart, 1st.
Senior yearling bulls: No entries.
Junior champion bull: Griffin (Zinnias Ad-
vancer Commassie, bull calf).
Two-year-old bulls: Sanitary Dairy, Do-
than, Ala. 1st; Clay County, 2nd; Bobby Ray
Durden, Havana, FFA, 3rd.
Aged bulls: Clay County Farm, 1st.
Senior champion bull: Sanitary Dairy (Jes-
ter Basil Sleeper Fillpail, top two-year-old
bull).
Grand champion bull: Sanitary Dairy (with
the senior champion).
Reserve grand champion bull: Clay County
Farm (with the winning aged bull, Basil Fi-
nancial King).
(Continued on page 12)


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FIRST QUARTER, 1956 0 11


I j














JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



DISTINCTION EARNED BY FLORIDA JERSEYS
Four registered Jersey cows in Florida have earned special certificates in recogni-
tion of their outstanding production records made on Register of Merit test, according
to recent announcements made by the American Jersey Cattle Club. The tests of
these animals were verified by officials of the University of Florida and the AJCC.
Production testing is a basic program of the AJCC and it enables Jersey breeders to
determine their most profitable and efficient cows.
Three of these registered Jerseys, owned by WALTER WELKENER, Holly Hill
Dairy Farm, Jacksonville, have earned the following certificates:
Observer Design Elissa, earned a Gold Med- the Silver Medal award after completing a
al Certificate, with a record of 13,051 lbs. production record of 8,387 lbs. milk and 451
of milk and 660 lbs. of fat in 365 days at lbs. fat in 305 days at the age of 2 yrs. and
the age of 7 yrs. and 6 months. 5 months.
Another registered Jersey cow owned by
Two cows qualified for Silver Medal Cer- Another registered Jersey cow owned by
WALTER WELKENER, Holly Hill Farm, Jack-
tificates-Observer Design Lelia Lady, with a sonville, has been made a Tested Dam by the
record of 10,376 lbs. milk and 512 lbs. fat AJCC. The distinction was awarded Biltmore
in 305 days at the age of 3 yrs. and 2 months, Xenia Lady for having three offspring with
and Observer Sultan Elizabeth, with a record official production records. The cow's prog
of 11,172 lbs. milk and 565 bs. fat in 305 eny averaged 10,802 lbs. milk containing 571
days at the age of 4 yrs. and 2 months. lbs. fat on a twice-daily-milking, 305-day ma-
A registered Jersey cow, Florida Onyx Bella, ture equivalent basis. The Tested Dam rating
owned by FLA. AGRICULTURAL EXPERI- aids Jersey owners in the selection of superior
MENT STATION, Gainesville, has earned breeding stock.


STATE FAIR JERSEY SHOW
(Continued from page 11)

Heifer calves: Stuart, 1st; Mary Frances
Fischer, Orange County, 2nd; Joseph Brady,
Orange County, 3rd.
Junior yearling heifers: Clay 'County, 1st;
Stuart, 2nd; Clay County, 3rd.
Senior yearling heifers: Linda Stuart, Bar-
tow, 1st; David Kincaid, Polk County, 2nd;
Clay County Farm, 3rd.
Junior champion female: Linda Stuart (with
Basileus Select Penelope, top senior yearling
heifer).
Junior get-of-sire (four animals, under two
years): Clay County Farm, 1st (with get of
Basil Financial King) ; Stuart, 2nd.
Two-year-old cows: Stuart, 1st; Clay Coun-
ty Farms, 2nd; Ernest Fischer, Polk County,
3rd.
Three-year-old cows: Chipola, 1st; Brenda
Dennison, Orange County, 2nd; Clay County
Farm, 3rd.
Four-year-old cows: Stuart, Ist; Clay County
Farm, 2nd; J. K. Stuart, 3rd.
Senior champion females: Minter (with
Brampton Lea Bridget, winning five-year-old
cow).
Grand champion female: J. K. Stuart (with
Jester Lela Cynthia, the winning two-year-old
female).
Dairy herd (four cows in milk): J. K.
Stuart, 1st; Clay County Farm, 2nd.
Best three females: J. K. Stuart, 1st; Clay
County Farm, 2nd; Chipola, 3rd.


Best cow in milk (judged on best udder
alone): Stuart, 1st and 2nd; Clay County,
3rd.
Get-of-sire (four animals): J. K. Stuart,
1st (with get of Jester Dawdy Oxford).
Produce of dam (two animals): J. W. Stu-
art, 1st; Virginia Stuart, Bartow, 2nd.
State Fair Ayrshire Show
RESULTS OF THE OPEN AYRSHIRE
SHOW INCLUDED:
Bull calves. Logan-Vue Farm Chrisman,
Ill., 1st and 2nd; Strathglass Farm, Port Ches-
ter, N. Y., 3rd.
Junior yearling bulls: Strathglass, 1st and
2nd.
Junior champion bull: Strathglass (Lively
Frank, the top junior yearling).
Two-year-old bulls: Logan-Vue, 1st.
Senior champion bull: Logan-Vue (Dutch
Boy, the top two-year-old bull).
Grand champion bull: Strathglass (with the
junior champion).
Reserve grand champion bull: Logan-Vue
(with the senior champion).
Heifer calves: Strathglass, 1st, 2nd and 3rd.
Junior yearling heifers: Strathglass, 1st and
2nd; Logan-Vue, 3rd.
Senior yearling heifers: Strathglass, 1st and
2nd; Robert Thornhill, Polk County 4-H, 3rd.
Junior champion female: Strathglass (with
Strathglass' Lively Janice, the top senior year-
ling heifer).
Junior-get-of-sire (four animals, same sire,
under two years): Strathglass (with the get
of Cowgrove Lucifer, imported bull), 1st;
Logan-Vue, 2nd; Strathglass, 3rd.


OFFICIAL JERSEY CLUB
HERD IMPROVEMENT TESTS
Recent Herd Improvement Registry
Tests supervised by the University of
Florida in cooperation with the Amer-
ican Jersey Cattle Club reveal the follow-
ing records:
MEADOWBROOK FARMS, Jacksonville,
have a registered Jersey cow, Brampton
Estella Star, that produced 12,307 lbs.
milk containing 633 lbs. fat at the age
of 9 years and 9 months.
WALTER WELKNER, Holly Hill Dairy
Farm, Jacksonville, has three registered
Jersey cows that have received special
recognition for their outstanding produc-
tion records: Observer Design Ellen
produced 10,129 lbs. milk with 550 lbs.
fat at the age of 12 years and 1 month;
Magnolia Basil Design Sue produced
12,046 lbs. milk with 599 lbs. fat at the
age of 6 yrs. and 4 months; and Sybil
Pompey Bluebell produced 12,022 lbs.
milk with 618 lbs. fat at the age of 5
yrs. and 6 months.

ASKS MORE MONEY FOR
SCHOOL MILK PROGRAM
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Benson
is requesting Congress for additional
funds to insure that the school milk pro-
gram may be carried forward intact
through the current fiscal year. The sec-
retary is recommending that $10,000,000
be added to the already authorized
amount of $50,000,000. In the farm
message by President Eisenhower, it was
noted that "the school milk program is
a good example of constructive use of a
surplus product to meet a present need,
contributing to better health habits and
at the same time promoting an enlarged
market for the future."

Two-year-old cows: Logan-Vue, 1st; Strath-
glass, 2nd; Melvin Vernon, Jr., Tampa, FFA,
3rd.
Four-year-old cows: Strathglass, 1st and 2nd.
Five-year-old cow's: Strathglass, 1st and 2nd.
Senior champion female: Strathglass
(Strathglass' Lively Flo, top four-year-old
cow).
Grand champion female: Strathglass (with
the senior champion).
Reserve grand champion female: Strathglass
(with Strathglass' Chippy Flo, the top five-
year-old cow).
Dairy herd (four cows in milk): Strath-
glass, 1st.
Best three females: Strathglass, 1st; Logan-
Vue, 2nd; Baumberger, 3rd.
Get-of-sire (four animals): Strathglass
(Cowgrove Lucifer, imported bull, the sire),
1st; Logan-Vue, 2nd.
Produce-of-dam (two animals): Strathglass,
1st and 2nd; Logan-Vue, 3rd.
Cow-in-milk (on udder alone): Strathglass
(with Strathglass' Lively Flo, the grand cham-
pion), 1st; Strathglass, 2nd and 3rd.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







WEST FLORIDA DAIRY SHOW
HAS RECORD OF 91 ENTRIES
By: ED DRIGGERS, Eagle Farm Editor
and
J. E. DAVIS, Washington County Agent
Two Leon County boys carried home
junior grand championship rosettes while
Washington and Jackson Counties re-
ceived many of the top honors from the
10th annual West Florida Dairy Show
and Judging Contest held in Chipley.
The show had a total of 91 entries
including 37 4-H entries, 28 FFA en-
tries, and 26 Open Show entries.
Erny Sellers and Don Hanson, the
Leon Countians, exhibited Grand Cham-
pion Jersey and Grand Champon Guern-
sey cows, respectively. Arthur Aukema
of Chipley, an adult, showed the Grand
Champion Holstein.
Martin Schack, 13-year-old son of Mr.
and Mrs. M. A. Schack of Greenwood,
swept past all competition to win both
the showmanship and fitting contests.
Showmanship considers the boy; fitting
is a contest to determine the best
groomed animal.
Young Schack won the fitting contest
last year. He also was on the champion-
ship judging team at this show. Others
in the group were Earl Crutchfield, Tom-
my Stadsklev and Robert Olive. Leon
County's 4-H team was second and an-
other Jackson County group of 4-H
judges, third. This quartet was Milton
Pittman, Carlton, Robert and Edward
Crutchfield.
In the FFA judging division, the Chip-
ley High School chapter placed first.
Working as a trio were Donald Rhodes,
Jack Morris and Edison Creel. The Ha-
vana FFA team was second and the Cot-
tondale group third. They were Edwin
Green, Dixon Creel and Frank Williams.
The day of many highlights also saw
Miss Peggy Compton of Vernon crowned
dairy queen, the first time this contest has
been held. The queen received a $75
savings bond from the Chipley and Ver-
non Lions which promoted the contest.
More than $1,500 went into the batch
of prizes distributed during the day as
boys, girls and adults from a dozen coun-
ties exhibited animals. Upwards of 100
prized dairy heifers and cows were on
display.
There was also a judging contest for
adults. William Schack, older brother
of Martin, took the top prize here and
their father, the runner-up position.
The event was staged in the Livestock
and Crops Pavilion under sponsorship
of the following groups and agencies:
The State Department of Agriculture and
Vocational Agriculture, the Lion's Clubs
of Chipley and Vernon, Chipley Kiwanis
Club, Florida Extension Service, City of
Chipley, Washington County and co-
operating dairies.
Judging was done by C. W. Reaves,


WEST COAST DAIRY SHOW
On Saturday, January 28, just before
the opening day of the State Fair, the
West Coast Dairy Show was held at the
Florida State Fair Grounds, Tampa. This
event is sponsored by the Greater Tampa
Chamber of Commerce and the State Fair.
There were about 75 4-H animals and
about 35 FFA animals exhibited. George
Casey of the Bayou Vista Dairy, Pinellas
County, showed his 4-H Guernsey cow to
a first in her class, then to the Queen of
the Show. Jenette Foote, Orange County
4-H girl, won the fitting class and Ginger
Stuart, Polk County, won the showman-
ship award.
Animal judges for the West Coast Show
were Dr. R. B. Becker, University of
Florida and T. W. Sparks, Assistant Ex-
tension Dairyman.

Gainesville, Extension dairy specialist;
and Fred Turner, Auburn, fieldman with
the American Breeders Service.
An estimated 700 persons visited the
show arena during the day and took part
in a free barbecue served on the grounds
through the courtesy of the Washington
County Board of Commissioners and oth-
er local county groups.
J. E. Davis, Washington County agent,
was general show manager and W. W.
Glenn, Jackson County agent, the master
of ceremonies.


BUCKET or PIPELINE MILKING


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LOW DESIGN
BULK COOLER
For use with conven-
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Ask for Bulletin 290.

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For direct tie-in with
pipeline milker. No re-
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clean. Can be fur-
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Available in 200. 300.
400, 500, 600. 800 and
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Ask for Bulletin
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FIRST QUARTER, 1956 13


Classified Advertising
BATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10e PER WORD



FOR SALE

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete, 2A feet wide. $60.00, delivered,
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.


REGISTERED SERVICE AGE MILKING -
SHORTHORN BULLS. Championship stock,
priced right. J. C. Taylor, 1022 Park St.,
Jacksonville.


GRADE GUERNSEY HEIFER CALVES from
day-old to six weeks. These calves sired by
bulls out of high record dams that classify
Very Good and Excellent. Write for prices or
come to the Farm. DONEGAN FARMS,
Largo, Florida.


LEAFY, PROTEIN-RICH ALFALFA HAY,
$50.00 per ton F.O.B. our ranch, or we will
ship to you at small additional cost. SQUARE
G RANCH, Phone 989, Leesburg.










GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



Outstanding Records Made By Florida Guernseys

The following registered Guernsey cows, opened by Florida breeders, have re-
cently completed official Advanced Registry records that were supervised by the Uni-
versity of Florida and reported to the American Guernsey Cattle Club for approval


and publication-
Jenwell Brilliant, owned by BOUTWELL-
MATHESON, INC., Stuart, produced 12,053
lbs. of milk and 554 lbs. of fat on two times
daily milking for 365 days and met calving
requirements. She started her record as a
senior four-year-old. "Brilliant" is the daugh-
ter of the registered Guernsey sire, Sunny
Valley's Combination, that has three tested
daughters in the Performance Register of the
American Guernsey Cattle Club.
Lakemont Midnight Rosa, owned by CAR-
ROLL L. WARD SR., Winter Park, produced
10,106 lbs. of milk and 546 lbs. of fat, as a
junior two-year-old, on a three times daily
milking for 365 days, and met calving re-
quirements. "Rosa" is the daughter of the
famous Guernsey sire, Midnight Hero of The
Glen, that has one son and 25 tested daugh-
ters in the Performance Register of AGCC.
Three registered Guernsey cows, owned by
CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod have com-
pleted the following records:

On three times daily milking for 305 days,
Lay Laine Judy's Peggy, a junior 2-year-old,
produced 8,806 lbs. of milk and 443 lbs. of
fat, and met calving requirements. "Peggy"
is the daughter of the famous Guernsey sire,
Riegeldale Emory's Judicator, that has one son
and 51 tested daughters in the Performance
Register.
Lakemont Victor's Pet, produced 9,506 lbs.
of milk and 516 lbs. of fat, milked three
times daily for 365 days, as a junior 2-year-
old. "Pet" is the daughter of the outstanding
Guernsey sire, Coker Emory's Victor, that has
18 tested daughters in the Performance Reg-
ister.

Vaughandale Verona, as a senior 21year-old,
produced 10,707 lbs. of milk and 666 lbs. of
fat, on three times daily milking for 365 days.
The sire of "Verona" is Burkeville Maxim's
Clark, that has one son and 11 tested daugh-
ters listed in the Performance Register.
Six registered cows owned by DINSMORE
DAIRY Co., Dinsmore, have completed official
Advanced Registry tests:
Dinsmore Maxmost lllista produced 11,718
lbs. of milk and 548 lbs. of fat on three
times daily milking for 365 days, as a senior
two-year-old. "Illista" is the daughter of the
famous Guernsey sire, Quail Roost Maxmost,
that has 142 sons and tested daughters in the
Performance Register.


Dinsmore Conqueror Berline produced 13,-
268 lbs. of milk and 612 lbs. of fat, as a
senior 3-year-old and was milked three times
daily for 365 days. The sire of "Berline" is
Riegeldale Conqueror's Heir, that has 22 test-
ed daughters listed in the Performance Reg-
ister.
Dinsmore Jury Justina produced 13,650
lbs. of milk and 647 lbs. of fat as a senior
3-year-old and was milked three times daily
for 365 days. The sire of "Justina" is Dins-
more Juryman, that has 53 tested daughters
listed in the Performance Register.
Quail Roost Lady Rachel, a junior 4-year-
old, produced 9,483 lbs. of milk and 510 lbs.
of fat, on three times daily milking for 305
days, and met calving requirements. She is
the daughter of the famous Guernsey sire,
Quail Roost Master Max, that has 66 sons
and tested daughters in the Performance Reg-
ister.
Milton Farms Royal Dewdrop, produced
8,247 lbs. of milk and 408 lbs. of fat, milked
three times daily for 305 days, as a junior
2-year-old, and met calving requirements.
Dinsmore Maxmost Faith, produced 11,557
lbs. of milk and 519 lbs. of fat, on three
times daily milking for 365 days, and met
calving requirements. She started her record
as a 6-year-old. "Faith" is the daughter of
the famous Guernsey sire, Quail Roost Max-
most, that has 142 sons and tested daughters
in the Performance Register.

Guernsey Sire Sold
One Florida breeder, DINSMORE DAIRY
CO., Dinsmore, has recently sold the young
Guernsey sire, Dinsmore Majestic Jan, to Bay-
ville Farms, Inc., Norfolk, Va. This richly
bred young sire is out of the well-bred cow,
Dinsmore Mayroyal Janis, that has a produc-
tion record of 11,012 lbs. of milk and 491
lbs. of fat, made on three times daily milking
for 365 days as a junior two year-old and met
calving requirements. He is sired by Dinsmore
Noble Majestic.


AFL-CIO PRESIDENT
RAPS FLORIDA LABOR LAW
In a recent labor address in Miami,
AFL CIO President George Meany
charged that Florida's "right-to-work"
law has made "a mockery of justice" in
the Miami area hotel strike and declared
the union will fight it all the way through
the United States Supreme Court and
Congress if necessary.


Registered Guernsey Sires
Purchased by Florida Breeders

Six registered Guernsey sires have
been purchased and one registered Guern-
sey sire has been sold by Florida breeders
according to recent announcements of the
American Guernsey Cattle Club:
ROBERT MEEKS, West Palm Beach, Flor-
ida, has purchased the Guernsey sire, Land
O'Sun Noble Hero, from Land O'Sun Milk
Co., Inc., Hollywood, Fla. This bull is out
of the cow, Oaksdale Narrator's Nan, and
is sired by Curtiss Candy Noble Curtiss.

ARAEL MEDINA CATA, Miami, has pur-
chased the Guernsey sire, Land O'Sun Dynamo
Leader, from Land O'Sun Milk Co., Holly-
wood. This bull is out of the cow, Maegeo
Dynamo's Carlotta, that has once been clas-
sified Desirable for type, and is sired by Clear
Springs Leader's Chief.

CLAYTON HUNT, Delray Beach, has pur-
chased the Guernsey sire, Torrid Footprint,
from Boutwell-Matheson, Inc., Stuart. This
bull is out of the cow, Beaulea Valor's Do-
reen, and is sired by Foremost Myprince's
Footprint.

DINSMORE DAIRY CO., Dinsmore, have
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Quail
Roost Super Herald, from George Watts Hill,
Rougemont, N. C. This richly bred young
sire, which is sired by Quail Roost Pablo, is
out of the high-producing cow, Quail Roost
Lucy Hilda, that has once been classified
Very Good for type, and has two production
records of 15,801 lbs. of milk and 853 lbs.
of fat, made on three times daily milking for
365 days as a six-year-old, and 13,994 lbs.
of milk and 811 lbs. of fat, made on three
times daily milking for 365 days as a seven-
year-old and met calving requirements.

WILBUR J. & KATHRYN W. CASEY,
Largo, have purchased the young Guernsey
sire, Brookberry Peer's Gambol, from Bow-
man & Gordon Gray, Winston-Salem, N. C.
This richly bred young sire is out of the
high-producing cow, Two Brooks Playful, that
has once been classified Excellent for type,
and has two production records of 13,611
lbs. of milk and 669 lbs. of fat, made on
three times daily milking for 365 days as a
junior four year-old, and 17,409 lbs. of milk
and 903 lbs. of fat, made on three times daily
milking for 365 days as a six year-old. He is
sired by Fairlawn Performer's Peer.

CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod, has
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Bayville
Jolly Olson, from Bayville Farms, Inc., Nor-
folk, Va. This young bull is out of the cow,
Bayville Socute Orleander, and is sired by
Bayville General Jolly.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Why There Is A National Shortage
Of College Students In Dairying A
By: PROF| H. B. HENDERSON,,Chairman
Dairy Iivision, University of Georgia
First of a series of articles condensed from a Special Committee Survey and Report to the
Milk Industry Foundation converning "Why there is a nation-wide shortage of College Grad-
uates in Dairy Science." Professor Henderson, as chairman of the committee, submitted the
report to the 1955 M.I.F. Convention in St. Louis. This series is edited and condensed for
the Dairy News by Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head, Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida.
Relatively little effort has been expended in publicizing the opportunities
afforded by a career in the dairy industry. This is the opinion of leaders of the
dairy industry, dairy department staff members, and college graduates in dairy manu-
facturing. All are agreed that the many phases of the dairy industry do afford
excellent opportunities for a vocation; that the dairy industry offers a challenge to
enterprising young men; that the industry is so broad in scope that there is room for
many different types of talent; that a vocation in this great industry is stable and
profitable in periods of depression as well as in periods of prosperity.


The Milk Industry Foundation in its
study of this topic contacted the dairy
department in each college or university
which offers a four-year program in dairy
manufacturing to determine what was
being done to give accurate and adequate
information to seniors in secondary
schools about the opportunities for a
vocation in the dairy industry.
Some suggestions stand out as partic-
ularly valuable from the standpoint of
influencing secondary school seniors to
choose the dairy industry as a vocation.
One of the most practical of these is the
distribution of various types of promo-
tional literature. Some dairy departments
with limited funds have used to advan-
tage mimeographed material telling of the
dairy industry as a vocational opportunity.
However, unless a person is specifically
interested, it is not likely that he will read
thoroughly a plain mimeographed docu-
ment. Mimeographing, however, can be
dressed up with illustrations that will help
to tell the story and maintain interest.
A much better type of publication is
the amply illustrated printed brochure
issued by interested groups in a few
states. Since this survey was made in the
summer of 1954, several additional at-
tractive publications have been issued.
Interested groups in other states have in-
dicated plans for such publications in
the near future. The brochures issued by
the colleges are designed to tell three
things: (1) something about the institu-
tion and the dairy department, its facili-
ties, staff, and program of study; (2)
something of student life and activities
in the department; and (3) something of
the opportunities afforded the young man
who is willing to accept the challenge
offered by the dairy industry.
A plan used with excellent success in
one state is to have regional dinner meet-
ings, financed by the industry, which the
school counselors, or vocational guidance
directors, and the principals and voca-
tional teachers attend. The head of the
dairy department assumes the responsi-
bility of arranging the meeting and de-
veloping the program. This gives the


head of the dairy department as well as
industry leaders present an opportunity
to tell these key people about the facilities
for instruction in dairying at the univer-
sity and the opportunities this field offers
young men.
Another important means of promo-
tion and recruitment is the provision of
scholarships. The competition of second-
ary school seniors with outstanding lead-
ership and scholarship ability is increas-
ingly keen. In most states 15% to 25%
of the freshmen in the colleges of agri-
culture are recipients of scholarships. In
many instances these scholarships are re-


stricted to a specific subject-matter field.
If the dairy industry expects to receive its
share of outstanding secondary school
seniors, it must compete with other in-
dustries which are offering attractive
scholarships, both freshmen and upper
The Milk Industry Foundation Survey
in 1954-55 showed that the dairy industry
provided only 43 freshmen scholarships
in the entire United States-an average
of less than one per state. Approximately
two-thirds of all such scholarships were
offered in only three states.
As evidence of the potentials of a
scholarship program, such a plan was de-
veloped at one institution during the
spring of 1954. From the dairy industry
of that state, thirteen scholarships of $200
each were secured. Even though gradua-
tion date for the secondary schools was
very near, and in spite of the fact that it
was possible to give very little publicity
to the program, eight scholarships were
awarded. Seven of these went to incom-
ing freshmen and one was awarded to a
transfer student from a Junior college.
Still another major tool needed if the
dairy industry is to have an effective
recruitment program is a modern motion
picture specifically designed for this pur-
pose. Staff members in the dairy depart-
ments have indicated that a film should
be one of the first objectives of the
Committee.
(Continued in Next Issue)


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 15


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Highlights of Annual Field Day Talks
On Dairy Pastures, Feeds and Forage

(PART I of a series covering the Principal Subjects on the Program of the
1955 Annual Florida Dairy Field Day Held at the University of Florida.)
SOME ASPECTS OF GREEN CHOPPED FORAGE PROGRAM
By: PROF. DIX ARNOLD
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
With the development of more efficient forage harvesters, interest has been shown
by many Florida dairymen in a green chopped forage program. The program has
advantages of maximum utilization of forage produced; elimination of fences and
gates; annoyance of tractor operation in small fenced areas; pro-
duction of forage at distances too great for pasturing. Disad-
vantages include large investment in machinery; frequent repairs;
interruption in feed supply due to breakdown; difficulty in
maintaining suitable succession of crops at proper stage through-
H out the year; and excessive expense for small herds.
Crops best adapted to this program must be highly palatable,
highly digestible and low in fiber. These include alfalfa, burr
clover, crimson clover, Dutch and Ladino clover, red clover and
millet and oats. Bermuda and Pangola grasses meet these re-
quirements only when cut at 4 or 5 inches in height. Mixtures
ARNOLD of these and possibly other legumes and grasses may be suitable


if they meet the foregoing requirements.
As yet, there are too many variables
and too few operations in Florida upon
which to base reliable average costs per
ton in the feed trough. Estimated at $10
per ton for suitable crops, the cost per
pound of total digestible nutrients would


vary from 31/2 to 4 cents, depending on
stage of development.
The success or failure of the program
depends entirely on the individual set up.
Careful scrutiny should be given before
a decision is made to replace grazing,
either wholly or in part.


ALFALFA CLOVER OATS
PASTURE FOR DAIRY HEIFERS
By: HERMAN L. SOMERS
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
A pasture mixture of hairy Peruvian
alfalfa, Kenland red clover, California
burr clover, white clover, and oats, seeded
October 6, 1954, was grazed from De-
cember 1 through September 20, 1955.
The pasture was grazed a total of 10 rota-
tions during this period and electric
fences were used to restrict grazing to
narrow bands of forage in each rotation.
Young dairy heifers grazing this pas-
ture without any supplemental feed made
average daily gains of 1.32 pounds, which
was 145 percent of the normal growth
rate for animals of their ages. Gains per
acre of pasture grazed averaged 755
pounds.
The heifers obtained from this pasture
an average of 5,227 pounds of total di-
gestible nutrients per acre, which are
equivalent to that the 5.2 tons of alfalfa
hay. The feed replacement value of the
pasture (calculated at $56.00 per ton for
alfalfa hay) was $291.00 per acre. Total
cost of production was calculated to be
$81.75 per acre, leaving a net return from
this pasture of $209.46 per acre.
This pasture mixture was seeded this
year on September 14 and 15 and grazing
was begun on November 3.


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


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W. H. BOYD RE-ELECTED
BY HOLSTEIN BREEDERS
The Florida Holstein-Friesian Breed-
ers' Club, newest of Florida's dairy breed
organizations, held its second annual
meeting, January 31st, the opening day
of the State Fair in Tampa.
Herman Boyd of the Hall and Boyd
Dairy, Miami, was re-elected for his third
term as president of the group. A. J.
Rusterholtz, Jr., of Orlando, Vice-Presi-
dent, and Kent Price, Assistant County
Agent of Palm Beach County, Secretary,
were also re-elected.
Directors elected for 1956 are: Dr.
Raymond B. Becker, Gainesville; Dr. E.
H. Myers, DeFuniak Springs; Wm. A.
Graham, Hialeah; Henry B. Ebersole,
Eustis; R. Wendell Click, Moore Haven,
and Wm. K. Bixby, Clewiston.
New members elected during the meet-
ing are: Durrance Tropical Dairy, Se-
bring; Velda Dairies, Tallahassee; Mi-
ami Jackson FFA Chapter, Miami, and
Circle F Dairy, Boynton Beach.
Guests at the meeting representing the
National Association were: Bob Cain,
Southeastern Field Representative, and
Bill Prescott, representing the National
magazine, The Holstein-Friesian World.
A prominent Wisconsin Holstein breed-
er, Mr. A. C. Oosterhouse, talked to the
Florida group about Holsteins in Wis-
consin and expressed the belief that there
will be a great future demand for this
breed of dairy cattle in Florida.
C. W. Reaves, Florida Extension
Dairyman of the University of Florida,
was guest at the meeting and discussed
the value of DHIA testing of dairy
herds.
President Boyd and Secretary Kent
Price had an interesting report on a trip
which they took a few weeks ago to Co-
lombia, South America where Boyd
served as one of the official judges in a
National Cattle Show.
Among the official actions taken at
the meeting was a decision to sponsor a
Holstein exhibit at the 1957 State Fair
and to sponsor the first Florida State
Holstein Sale to be held in Orlando, Au-
gust 1st.

HOLSTEIN BREEDERS MEET
IN MILWAUKEE IN JUNE
For the first time since 1940, Wis-
consin will be host to the nation's Hol-
stein breeders when they meet for their
71st annual convention June 5-8 at Mil-
waukee, Wisconsin, according to an an-
nouncement by the headquarters of The
Holstein-Friesian Association of Amer-
ica.
Herman Boyd of Hall and Boyd Dairy,
Miami, is president of the Florida Hol-
stein Breeders Association.


Holsteins at U. of F. Placed
On Official Production Test
The fifteen registered Holstein cows
at the University of Florida's Dairy Sci-
ence Experimental Farm were recently
placed on Advanced Registry with the
Holstein-Friesian Association of Amer-
ica. This puts registered Holsteins on
official production tests in all 49 states
-an unprecedented situation which re-
flects the skyrocketing popularity of the


HOLSTEIN CATTLE CLUB NEWS


"V E, year after year"


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Indiana, referring to his Champion
Brown Swiss, Lady's Gypsy Girl F.,
86633, and Champion Rapid-Flo
Fibre Bonded Filter Disks.
Gypsy is now the highest lifetime
producer of her breed. Day after
day Rapid-Flo Filter Disks are used
by more milk producers than any
other brand. So both qualify as.
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performance.
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A simple daily procedure endorsed
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in the Blue Box. _


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the used filter disk is care-
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FIRST QUARTER, 1956 17


Holstein, long America's leading dairy
breed, in the Deep South.
The Florida herd was founded early
last year as the result of a drive spear-
headed by the Florida Holstein-Friesian
Association, Herman Boyd, president.
Professor Dix Arnold of the Experiment
Station selected the fifteen closely-related
bred heifers in leading Maryland herds
with the assistance of J. Homer Rems-
burg, former president of the Holstein-
Friesian Association of America and Glen
M. Householder, the organization's spe-
cial representative. The transplanted Hol-
steins have acclimated perfectly and are
thriving on the luxuriant legume pas-
tures at the University farm.














Vol. 6, No. 1 FIRST QUARTER 1956



FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
BEGINS 6th YEAR
The Florida Dairy News was five years
old with the publication of its Fourth
Quarter issue of 1955 and is proud to be
beginning the sixth year of service to the
Florida Dairy Association and to the
Florida dairy industry.
The Dairy Association and those who
helped to launch and carry forward this
publication for the past five years fully
realize that the success which the "Dairy
News" has enjoyed has been possible be-
cause of the splendid assistance of the
many contributors to its editorial and
news copy and, more important still, the
excellent support and cooperation of our
advertisers.
To all these, the editor and sponsors
of the Dairy News wish to express our
sincere appreciation.
Dairy News Statistics
While we always like to look to the
future, we found that a little inventory
of what the Florida Dairy News adds up
to in value as a service to the dairy in-
dustry brought out these interesting re-
sults.
Considering first its operation for one
year:
Four quarterly issues of 3300 copies
each, made a total of 14,200 copies.
14,200 copies @ 20 pages of news
copy each, exclusive of advertising, makes
a total of 284,000 pages of printed copy.
It would require 11/2 times this num-
ber of pages to mimeograph this same
material or 426,000 pages.
It would take 40 mimeographed bul-
letins of 3 pages each and 3300 copies of
each to cover this 426,000 pages of copy.
The cost of printing and mailing such
a number of bulletins would be approxi-
mately as follows:
* Cost of 426,000 sheets of
mimeo paper, letter size......$ 2050.00
* Cost of 120 mimeo stencils,
mimeograph ink, 13,200
staples, and 13,200
stamps @ 2 ...................... $ 2765.00:
* Extra help required............$ 900.00
Total of estimated one-year
extra cost of bulletins over
cost of Dairy News, which
is paid for by advertising $ 5715.00
Total estimated 5-year extra
cost of bulletins over
Dairy News ..................$28,575.00


FUTURE FARMER'S WEEK
Future Farmers of America annually
observe the week of Washington's birth-
day as Future Farmer Week. Governor
Collins issued a proclamation for Future
Farmer Week and Future Farmer Chap-
ters throughout Florida sponsored various
projects to call attention to FFA activities
and accomplishments.
The FFA program operates through
the Vocational Agriculture units of the
nation's educational system through the
national association, state associations and
local chapters. Its object is to insure
that tomorrow's farmer receives an op-
portunity to get the necessary training he
needs. Florida's schools provide voca-
tional agriculture courses for our high
school youth. In our schools they learn
the latest farming practices and techniques
and work on their own farms, combin-
ing classroom instruction with actual on-
the-farm experience.
Florida is credited with having a top
ranking FFA program among those of
the country as a whole. Evidence of this
is the fact that three national FFA presi-
dents within the last ten years have been
elected from Florida. The 1954-55 presi-
dent was Future Farmer Bill Gunter, a
dairy farm boy of Live Oak, now serving
as chairman of the Junior Members' Di-
vision of the Florida Dairy Association.

* In addition to the above extra cost to
the Association, such mimeographed
bulletins would carry no pictures and
no advertising, much of which is in-
formational and instructive.
* Much reader appeal would be lost.
Comments of our Readers
"I have just finished reading your pub-
lication, Florida Dairy News, covering
the annual convention of the Florida
Dairy Association. This is one of the
most dramatic and interesting coverages
of a convention that I have seen for a
long time."


"The Florida Dairy News is outstand-
ing as a valuable educational medium for
the Florida dairy industry."


"Just a note to thank you very much
for continuing to send me the Florida
Dairy News. I enjoyed the November-
December issue very much, as I do all
of them."


"I felt very proud to receive the hon-
orary membership at the Florida Dairy
Association meeting and to have this
reported in such a wonderful fashion in
the 'Florida Dairy News' was an added
honor which I had not expected."


TWO FUTURE FARMERS
RECEIVE F. D. A. HONORS
Two outstanding Florida Future Farm-
esr, George Ford of Quincy and Bill
Gunter of Live Oak, who received na-
tional recognition in 1955 by the Future
Farmers of America, were awarded Hon-
or Junior Achievement Trophies by the
Florida Dairy Association during the An-
nual Dairy Field Day meeting in Gaines-
ville in November.
Bill Gunter was awarded the F.F.A.
Trophy in recognition of his achieve-
ments as a junior dairy farmer through
the Future Farmers of America and of
the unusual record he had made- first,
as Florida's F.F.A. Star Dairy Farmer,
and then, as National President of the
Future Farmers of America.
Bill is now a student in dairy science
at the University of Florida and is serv-
ing as chairman of the "Junior Dairy
Membership" of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation. Bill's father, W. D. Gunter, is
a well known dairyman of Live Oak.
George Ford was awarded the Associa-
tion's special Junior Honor Achievement
Award in recognition of his unusual rec-
ord of accomplishments in his Future
Farmer dairy farming projects which led
him to the nation's top 1955 award in
dairy farming, that of "National F.F.A.
Star Dairy Farmer. George was chosen
Florida's F.F.A. State Star Dairy Farmer
in 1954 and Florida F.F.R. State Star
Farmer in 1955.
He is now a member of the Executive
Committee of the "Junior Membership"
of the Florida Dairy Association and,
since graduating from the Quincy High
School, is a full time partner with his
father, W. L. Ford, in the operation of
their dairy farm near Quincy.

Rastus (throwing down four aces): "Dar, I
guess I wins dis ole pot, all right."
Sambo (angrily): "You play dis game
honest, big boy, play it honest! I know what
cards I dealt you!"

"That girl is so dumb she thinks a foot-
ball coach has four wheels."
"Wlell-how many wheels has it?"

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, management, and
circulation required by the Act of Congress of
August 24, 1912, as amended by the Acts of
March 3, 1933, and July 2, 1946 (Title 39, United
States Code 233) of Florida Dairy News published
quarterly at Jacksonville, Florida, for October 1,
1954.
1. The names and addresses of the publisher,
editor, managing editor, and business managers
are: Publisher, Florida Dairy Association, Inc.,
615 Park St., Jacksonville, Fla.; Editor and Busi-
ness Manager, E. T. Lay, 615 Park St., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
2. The owner is: Florida Dairy Association,
Inc., 615 Park Street, Jacksonville, Florida. (Non
Profit Corporation, no capital stock.)
3. The known bondholders, mortgages, and oth-
er security holders owning or holding 1 percent
or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or
other securities are: None.
E. T. LAY, Business Manager
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 28th day
of September, 1955.
L. H. Canova, Notary Public
(My commission expires March 15, 1958)
(Seal)


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







"What About the Price of Milk"
(Guest Editorial continued from page 1)

Now, let's take a look and see what Report No. 98 says. This very interesting
and informative study was made under the direction of Harry C. Trelogan, Director,
Marketing Research Division and Louis F. Herrmann, Head Dairy Section, Marketing
Organization and Costs Branch. They were assisted by five specialists of the Dairy
Section, including Robert E. Olson. Our organization has done work for a number of
years under the direction of Messrs. Herrmann and Olsen. Keener and more factual
minds cannot be found in their field. The Report is 124 pages long and discusses
many things and contains charts and tables galore.
The writer of "the people beg only for mercy" story-to "prove" his main con-
tention-IF THESE 23 CITIES USED ONLY MILK FROM EAU CLAIRE, WIS-
CONSIN, THEIR RAW MILK COST WOULD BE FROM 1% TO 12% LESS
THAN BY SUPPORTING DAIRY FARMING IN THEIR OWN NEIGHBOR-
HOOD-prove that point, he uses a chart on Page 98 that compares the BLEND
price in the great manufacturing area in Wisconsin, plus transportation, with the
BLEND prices in these cities where 95% of all local production is used for fluid
purposes!
IF the dairy farmers of Wisconsin, would sell their Class I milk to go in bottles,
for cheese plant prices, the conclusion our friend reaches might make sense. They
will not sell it in that fashion to distributors in their own home market, so they cer-
tainly will not do it in foreign markets.
To quote actual facts-with no starry-eyed bologna and sob sister stuff-during the
month of October 1955, Memphis, Tennessee, imported milk from Wisconsin (as it
does every Fall), without the slightest restriction or hindrance from the Memphis or
Tennessee Health Departments. The cost of locally produced Class I, 4% milk was
$5.44. The cost of bulk milk hauled by tank truck from Wisconsin was $6.50 for
4% milk. In the face of these facts, the above article in Memphis could get milk 3%
cheaper if it used Wisconsin milk!
The Memphis wire news service representative, who had asked us for information
about the "Changing Times Magazine" article, thanked us for straightening the thing
out-and killed the story which they had received about it.



Editor Prefers Newspaper To Dairy Business
The following editorial carried in over 50 newspapers during January 1956, shows that
many editors are glad to report facts. It should be noted that in Florida the dairy farmer
receives about 56 cents of the consumer dollar for milk as compared to the national average of
47.15 cents reported in this editorial.
"From The Cow To The Cup"
"The perennial precedence problem of the hen and the egg is second only, in its
regular recurrence, to the question of who pockets the difference between what the
farmer gets for his milk and what the consumer pays for it, which is usually twice
as much or more. Right now, for instance, the question is up again in New York,
Michigan and California.
"Because this difference goes into so many pockets, the answer is not easy to come
by. But certainly the most authoritative information available comes from the de-
tailed study-covering the whole U. S.-that has been made every year since 1941
under the sponsorship of the Milk Industry Foundation. The report for 1954, recently
released by Professor G. W. Starr, of Indiana University, shows that an average of
47.15 cents was paid to the farmer for milk that cost the housewife a dollar at her
back-door. The milk dealer's profit on the transaction averaged just over two-and-a-
quarter cents-about half a cent a quart.
"From the cow to the cup, sundry items of expense intervene. Next in cost to the
i-aw milk is labor. In 1954, wages averaged 21.19 cents per dollar's worth of finished
product, and administrative salaries added 97-100 of a cent, for a total of 22.16 cents.
The report goes on to list purchased transportation' (to get the raw milk from the
farm to the milk plant), other material cost, taxes and licenses, insurance, deprecia-
tion, advertising, containers; plant, delivery and office supplies, and a final item of
one and four-tenths cents per dollar for 'other expense'. Adding these up (to four
decimal places) it develops that it cost the dairy 50.57 cents to process and deliver
milk for which it paid the farmer 47.15 cents. In other words, the dairy invested
ninety-seven and 72-100 cents for each dollar on the milk bill.
"As it looks from here, we think we'd rather be in the newspaper business."


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FIRST QUARTER, 1956 19























1956 State 4-H Club Dairy Show

Attracts Wide Interest At Orando
Tvo hundred -IH Club bois ind cZrls from thr,.uthout Florid.i made the State
--H Dajiri sh.. barn a.t the Centr.il F -rid., F.ir in O)rlando a bi-.-hi' ot .itmtv
on Fcbru.ar\ 2i Tv'enti\-three c.tiuntl:s part.,:ip.atd in the lud.i,_ir, L c.ntest anrd I t
icll-hittcd aniniutak icrc exhiblitd in the '.jrisouu ,;sI'es The%\ cr,- the bctr iromn
nine dis trlit H dJair sh.,.: held ,ier the t.itrc in recent m.-.nths Serious th.:'ught
and eli:,rt %xcrc oh',. i.uis rhruighout long da. ..t iir t ot a t u 1 d me ci.ntest. rhe
cattle show, and the final in fittini .. and .h o g- cmnipc'it'n.


. C \'. Rea\cs, Extension Dair) man,
was superintendent of the show; T. W.
Sparks, Assistant Extension Dairyman,
was ringmaster; Walter Welkener and
Earl Johnson, Jacksonville breeders were
the official judges; Dr. M. O. Watkins,
Assistant Director of the Agricultural Ex-
tension Service, and K. S. McMullen,
District Agent, w e r e Showmanship
judges, and W. J. Platt, District Agent,
and Curtis Smallin, Assistant County
Agent from Shelbyville, Tennessee, were
the Fitting Contest judges. W. W. Brown
and Ben Floyd of the State 4-H Club
Department were in charge of the judg-
ing contest.
All awards were made at the 4-H
Dairy Awards Banquet at the Orlando
Chamber of Commerce where the Cen-
tral Florida Fair was host to over 200
4-H members, Extension Agents, state
breed officers, and other representatives
of firms providing special awards. The
accompanying pictures show a number of
winners receiving trophies.
In the judging contest, Palm Beach
and Duval Counties tied on total score,
but Palm Beach won on the basis of
"Reasons" grades. Orange followed Du-
val for third followed in order by teams
from Dade, Nassau, Polk, Jackson, Leon,
Pinellas, and Hardee in the top 10 places
among the 23 counties participating.
High individual judgers were Laura
Cameron (Duval), J. D. Windsor (Palm
Beach), Robert Thornhill (Polk), San-
dra Dennison (Orange), Charles Magill
(Duval), Ricky Dressel (Dade), Ben
Franklin (Dade), John Sellers (Leon),
Ronald Hunt (Volusia), and Tommy
Prator (Nassau).
Placings in the Cattle Fitting Compe-
tition were Martin Schack (Jackson),

20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Nancy Buchholtz (Duval), Charles
Crutchfield (Jackson), Sharon Ellis
(Nassau), and Linda Jacobs (Volusia).
Showmanship winners were Virginia
(Ginger) Stuart (Polk), Nancy Buch-
holtz (Duval), Johnnie Hebb (Polk),
Ernest Fischer (Orange), and Sharon
Ellis (Nassau).
BEST COUNTY GROUP
The Best County Groups (of 3 ani-
mals) was won by Jackson, followed in
order by Polk, Manatee, Orange, Duval,
Volusia, Pinellas, Nassau, Palm Beach,
and Leon.
Trophies and plaques were presented
by the state and national Jersey, Guern-
sey and Holstein breeds, and special
(Continued on page 27)


The Florida Dairy Association Trophy for
the "Best County 4-H Group" being pre-
sented to L. D. Taylor, assistant agent of
Jackson County by T. W. Sparks, assistant
extension dairyman at the 4-H Dairy Banquet
in Orlando, February 20.
























The State 4-H Dairy Show in Pictures
The accompanying pictures tell a large part of the story of the State 4-H Dairy Show at
the Central Florida Fair. Beginning at the left in the vertical panel, (1) View of the
head table and the trophies at the 4-H Dairy Awards Banquet, attended by more than 200
4-H members and County Extension Agents. O. P. Swope and C. T. Bickford had left when
the picture was taken. Left to right are: M. O. Watkins, assistant director of the Agri-
cultural Extension Service and Master of Ceremonies at the Banquet; H. G. Clayton, state
director of the extension service; Gail Williams, Polk County 4-H member who gave the
response to President Swope's address of welcome; and Miss Anna Mae Sikes, State Home
Demonstration Agent.
(2) The Palm Beach County team receiving the Florida Times Union Trophy for
the top team in the Dairy Cattle Judging Contest from Steve Willis, farm editor. Left to
right are: Steve Willis and team members, Virginia Bell, Larry Ashton, 1. D. Neindsor,
and Max Beebe and Palm Beach County Assistant County Agent R. K. Price.
(3) The Duval County Dairy Judging Team, holding the trophy provided by the
Florida Chain Store Council for the second place team. Team members, left to right:
Mildred Braddock, Laura Cameron, Betty June Bowie and Charles Magill.
(4) The Orange County Dairy Judging Team receives a trophy for third place in
the State 4-H Dairy Judging Contest from B. W. Judge, Sr. of Orlando, donor of the
trophy. Left to right are: B. W. Judge, Olin Fischer, Sandra Dennison, Ernest Fischer and
Tommy Edge.
At the top of the left hand page, (1) Jackson County's "Best County Group" of 3
animals at the State 4-H Dairy Show, 1. to. r.: Earl Crutchfield holding Martin Schack's
cow, M. T. Crutchfield, Jr. with his heifer, and Robert Olive, holding cow of Chrales
Crutchfield. (2) Walter Welkener, Jacksonville breeder and Jersey judge at the Show
presents the Welkener Trophy for the second place County Group to Linda Stuart, one of
the Polk County exhibitors. (3) Lamar Parrish presents the Tampa Security Mills Trophy
to Anita Kilcrease, one of the Manatee County exhibitors.
At the top of this page, (1) Martin Schack, Jackson County, receives the Dinsmore
Dairy Trophy for the "best fitted animal" from Earl Johnson of Dinsmore, who was one
of the judges at the Show. (2) Winners in the 1955 4-H Efficient Dairy Production Contest
sponsored by the National Dairy Products Corporation: Fred Hester of Southern Dairies .
in Orlando presents the plaques and checks. Next in line, 1. to r. are: Al Cribbett, assistant
county agent for Orange County, the top county in over-all 4-H dairy program: Martin
Schack, Jackson County, District II winner; Ernest Fischer, Orange County, state winner;
David Clough, Manatee County, District IX winner; Max Beebe, Palm Beach County,
District X winner; and Bob Bowie, Duval County, District V winner. (3) Virginia Stuart,
Polk County, receives the plaque for Champion Showman of cattle in the State 4-H Dairy
Show. F. E. Baetzman, Orange County Agent, presents the trophy for the American Savings
and Loan Association of Orlando.
To the right in the vertical panel, (1) Champion Ayrshires in the State 4-H Dairy
Show; Don Shaw of Dade with the Reserve and Linda Jacobs of Volusia County with the
Grand Champion. (2) Champion Guernseys, 1. to. r., Howard Renner, Pinellas County,
with the grand champion and Leslie Smith, Pasco County, with her junior and reserve
grand champion. (3) Champion Brown Swiss at the Show owned by Ben Franklin of Dade
County. (4) Champion Jersey, 1. to r.: Linda Stuart, Polk County, with the junior champion;
Ernest Sellers, Leon County, with the reserve grand champion; and Ginger Stuart, Polk
County, with the grand champion.

NATIONAL 4-H CLUB WEEK and girls, men and women-millions of
young people have benefitted from 4-H
The 35,000 Florida 4-H Club mem- training. Millions of today's citizens are
hers will join the more than two million better citizens because they had 4-H ex-
others throughout the United States and perience.
their more than 352,000 local voluntary
leaders in celebrating National 4-H Club Business concerns throughout the
Week March 3-11. country like 4-H work so well that they
In the 42 years since the Agricultural put hundreds of thousands of dollars in-
Extension Service was established by to prizes for.members every year. The
Congress to give continuing leadership to country's leaders also like it. President.
corn and tomato clubs, already organized, Dwight D. Eisenhower has issued his
and to make possible a broadening of annual greeting "to the 4-H Club mem-
services rendered rural families boys bers of the United States."
FIRST QUARTER, 1956 0 21









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


I'll'',


Forty Attend Record Directors' Session
For Drafting of 1956 F.D.A. Program

Graham Becomes 4th Producer President
Bill Graham of Miami was officially installed as the fourth producer president
of the Florida Dairy Association at the first 1956 directors' meeting held February 9
at the San Juan Hotel, Orlando.
Just ten years ago, Bill's well-known father, Ernest Graham, one of the State's
leading dairymen and a former State Senator of Miami, served as the first president
of the Florida Dairy Association after it became a joint organization of producers
and distributors.
Officers and Directors Installed
Retiring president C. D. Wayne, who served for the year 1955 as the Association's
fourth distributor president, installed the new officers and directors who, in addition
to President Bill Graham, were: T. G. Lee of Orlando, First Vice-President and
Chairman of the Distributors' Division; John Sargeant of Lakeland, Second Vice-
President and Chairman of the Producers' Division.
Other officers, W. J. Barritt, Treasurer; Walter Burton, Assistant Treasurer, and
E. T. Lay, Executive Director, were re-installed. Producer directors Bob Lunsford of
Milton and C. C. Sellers of Tallahassee were installed for three year terms.


Unusual Attendance
In addition to a full attendance of the
32 active directors including alternates,
there were present Dr. E. L. Fouts, ex-
officio director, and Dr. R. B. Becker,
honorary member, both of the U. of F.
Dairy Dept., and eight members who had
been invited to attend for participation in
the planning of the Association's 1956
program.
Summary of Directors' Actions
Preceded by a meeting of the Executive
Committee held from eight to twelve the
night before, the directors' meeting was
divided into four sections -
From 10:00 to 11:30 A.M., producer
and distributor directors met in joint ses-
sion to receive reports of the past year's
activities and proposed plans for the year
1956.
The producer and distributor directors
then met in separate sessions until 2:30
P.M., when they reconvened for a final
joint session. At this session the recom-
mendations of the producer and distribu-
tor meetings were considered and details
of the Association's 1956 program and
activities were adopted, including the
budget and membership dues rates for the
year.
Resolutions Adopted
(1) Extending the greetings and best
wishes of the members of the Board to
producer director George Johnson, who
was unable to attend the meeting because
of illness.
(2) Expressing the appreciation of the
Board for the services of retiring presi-


dent, C. D. Wayne, and producer vice-
president, George Johnson, for the valu-
able service rendered the Association and
the dairy industry during the year 1955.
(3) Endorsing a program of Federal-
State highway construction as recommend-
ed to Congress by the National Highway
Users Conference.
(4) Reaffirming previous requests and
recommendations to the Florida Milk
Commission.
(5) Paying tribute to Dr. C. V. Noble,
recently retired as dean of the University
of Florida College of Agriculture.
(6) Commending the Association's at-
torneys, Bedell and Bedell, for their capa-
ble representation of the dairy industry
in connection with the Florida Milk Com-
mission Law.
(7) Calling upon the members of the
industry to redouble their efforts to give
the facts of the dairy industry to their
friends and neighbors and to the public
generally at every opportunity and to take
a keen and searching interest in the elec-
tion of the public officials of our State
and Country.
Business Actions Taken
1. Approved reports of the Executive
Director.
2. Approved report of the Treasurer
and Audit Committee.
3. Adopted program of policies and
activities for 1956.
4. Adopted the budget and member-
ship rates for 1956.
(Continued on page 25)


BILL GRAHAM ANDY LAY
President Exec. Director


State Producers' Meeting
Called By F.D.A. Producers
A spring conference of Florida milk
producers has been called by the Pro-
ducers' Division of the Florida Dairy
Association to be held Thursday, March
15, at the T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando.
A joint letter of invitation to all milk
producers of the State to attend the meet-
ing has been issued by the Association's
President Bill Graham, a Miami pro
ducer, and John Sargeant, well-known
Lakeland producer, who is 2nd Vice-
President and Chairman of the Associa
tion's Producer Division.
The purpose of the meeting, accord-
ing to Graham and Sargeant, is to initi-
ate a Spring Conference of Florida Milk
Producers for the discussion and con-
sideration of mutual problems.
A special feature of the conference
will be an address by Dr. Leland Spen-
cer, a specialist in milk marketing of
Cornell University. Dr. Spencer will
discuss the operation of Federal milk
marketing orders after which there will
be an open question and discussion pe-
riod.
Several F.D.A. Committees on milk
producer policies and programs of the
Florida Dairy Association will hold meet-
ings just before the general meeting ses-
sion which starts at 11:00 o'clock. Com-
mittee reports and recommendations will
be made to the general meeting session.
F.D.A. Producer Committees scheduled
to meet are: Annual Field Day, Herds-
men's Short Course, Dairy Disease Con-
trol, Milk Production, Pasture Develop-
ment, and Membership.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


TEAMED UP to carry forward a
constructive and aggressive program
in 1956, are President Bill Graham,
the Florida Dairy Association's 10th
President, and Andy Lay, who is
serving his 14th year as Executive
Secretary.

































FDA 1956 Convention Returns to Clearwater
June 26-28 at Fort Harrison Hotel
We feel sure that all dairies, allied trades and others who look forward to Florida's
annual Dairy Association convention will be pleased to learn that at their February
9th, first quarterly meeting for 1956, the Board of Directors of the Association voted
unanimously to hold the convention again this year at the Fort Harrison Hotel,
Clearwater, where one of the most successful and enjoyable conventions of the Asso-
ciation was held in June, 1955.
In considering the invitations and possible location for the 1956 convention, the
annual meeting committee, consisting of President Bill Graham and Vice Presidents
T. G. Lee and John Sargeant, learned that over half of the annual meeting question
box suggestions made during the 1955 convention had requested the return of the
convention to Clearwater.


Among the other cities considered for the convention were Key
Beach, Jacksonville, Ft. Lauderdale, Orlando and Palm Beach.
The Ft. Harrison Hotel, near the attrac-
tive Clearwater business district, is a love-
ly 12-story, completely air-conditioned
hotel with especially attractive coffee shop,
dining and lounge facilities. An ultra
modern swimming pool and surrounding
tropical garden area with coffee shop faci-
lities are unusually inviting.
The roof garden ball room with star-
light patio all overlooking the beach area
and the Gulf, provide a choice spot for
the convention programs.
For those who enjoy the fine beaches
and swimming in the Gulf, the Ft. Harri-
son's private beach and facilities will be
available. Transportation, which requires
but a few minutes from the hotel, is pro-
vided to and from the beach.
Transportation to Clearwater is by
train, airline or by car. Arrangements
will again be made for official courtesy
transportation to meet convention guests
arriving at both Tampa and St. Petersburg
by air and train.
Recreation features including golf, fish-
ing, boating, swimming, shuffle-board,
and tours should provide a favorite for THE FORT HARRISON
everyone. Convention of the Florida Da


West, Miami


MAKE THE CONVENTION
YOUR SUMMER VACATION
Ladies and children are especially in-
vited. The late date after schools are out
was selected for this reason.
Although the regular room rates at the
Ft. Harrison have increased since last
year, the Dairy Association Convention
rates will be the same low rates as last
year for this fine hotel's all-air-condition-
ed, all-outside rooms. These rates are
only $5.00 single; $8.00 double . a
single occupied room is only $5.00, re-
gardless of the facilities; Suite with twin
bedroom and parlor, $15.00; Suite with
2 twin bedrooms and parlor, $22.00.
Mail your reservation now for Florida's
finest state convention to Ed Hunt, Man-
ager, Ft. Harrison Hotel, Clearwater,
Florida.
Any who prefer a room or kitchenette
apartment on the beach, may also send
your reservation to Mr. Hunt.

TOP PROGRAM PROMISED
Plans are already underway for the
largest and best annual meeting ever held
by the Florida Association. Although the
1955 attendance was the largest, particu-
larly of producers, the attendance goal is
for 100 additional in 1956.
The program will feature both separate
and joint sessions of producers, distribu-
tors, ice cream manufacturers, allied
trades, milk sanitarians and ladies.

ALL ROADS LEAD TO CLEARWA-
TER-JUNE 26- 27- 28-SO MAKE
YOUR PLANS EARLY TO BE THERE.


HOTEL, CLEARWATER where the 1956 Annual Meeting and
iry Association is scheduled for June 26-28.
FIRST QUARTER, 1956 23










DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES __


Policies, Objectives and Activities for 1956

Adopted by Dairy Association's 32 Drectors
Year's Slogan: "Let's Hit Harder Licks in '56."
Among the policies and objectives adopted by the Board of Directors for them
Florida Dairy Association in 1956 are:
To promote a greater interest and action by the dairy industry in a program of
advertising, public information and educational activities regarding milk, milk pro-
ducts and the dairy industry.
The Florida Dairy Association offers its
full cooperation with the press and with Cooperate fully with other agricul-
any person or organization in the furnish- tural and livestock organizations.
ing of factual information about milk, Reaffirm our belief in the soundness
milk prices and the dairy industry and and need for the milk stabilization pro-
urges the press, any individual or public gram and services to the dairy industry
groups to call upon the dairy industry for and the consuming public as provided for
all possible facts and information before by the Florida Milk Commission Law.
publicizing statements or adopting policies
concerning the dairy industry.
To encourage and promote within SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
the industry renewed efforts to produce FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
and furnish to Florida consumers the FOR 1956
highest possible quality dairy products at
the lowest possible prices consistent with REGULAR QUARTERLY DIRECTORS
MEETINGS
sound business practices. (Dates to be announced)
To promote increased efforts and PRODUCERS' DIVISION
participation of dairymen in the programs STATE CONFERENCE
March 15-Lee's Dairy, Orlando
for the control and prevention of disease JUNE DAIRY MONTH
among Florida dairy herds. "Festival of Better Living"
To sponsor and promote participa- Month of June
ANNUAL MEETING & CONVENTION
tion in programs designed to assist dairy- June 26-28-Ft. Harrison Hotel
men in the improvement of dairy herds, Clearwater, Fla.
the production of more feeds and better ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY
pastures, greater efficiency and economy University of Florida
July 19-20
in feeding practices and more adequate DAIRY HERDSMEN'S
control of milk production so that demor- SHORT COURSE
alizing surpluses may be avoided. University of Florida
August 21-23
To encourage active interest and par- DAIRY PLANT SHORT COURSE
ticipation in the affairs of government. University of Florida
To sponsor an active and continuous October 11-13
membership expansion program to secure NATIONAL DAIRY EVENTS
greater interest and participation in local FOR 1956
associations as well as the Florida Dairy
Association. MILK INDUSTRY FOUNDATION


Continue the Association's quarterly
magazine, The Florida Dairy News, and
promote increased support and use of this
outstanding medium of public informa-
tion.
Sponsor an active "June Dairy Month
Program" in cooperation with dairy or-
ganizations throughout the country.
Continue and strive to improve the
cooperation and participation of the dairy
industry in the special annual programs
of the University of Florida Dairy De-
partment, including the Dairy Field Day
2-day program, Dairy Herdsmen 2-day
short course, Dairy Plant Processing Short
Course, Milk Sanitarians Short Course
and Dairy Laboratorians Conference.


A Salute To
10 GRAND
PAST PRESIDENTS
1946 to 1956



FLORIDA

DAIRY

ASS'N.


HERMAN BOYD
1954


THEO DATSON
1951-52


JOHN DU PUIS, JR. COTTON PAUL
1949-50 1948-49


R. S. MC ATEER
1947-48


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


WILMER BASSETT
1952-53


VERNON GRAVES
1950-51


Annual Convention
Atlantic City-October 31-November 2
INTERNATIONAL ICE CREAM
MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
Annual Convention
Atlantic City October 29-31
DAIRY EQUIPMENT EXPOSITION
Atlantic City October 28-November 3
NATIONAL DAIRY COUNCIL
Summer Conference
June 25-27 Chicago
AMERICAN DAIRY SCIENCE ASSN.
Annual Meeting
University of Connecticut
June 18-24
MILK MERCHANDISING COURSES
OF MILK INDUSTRY FOUNDATION
Washington, D. C.
March 26 to March 30
June 25 to June 29
Sept. 24 to Sept. 28


ERNEST GRAHAM
1946-47







F.D.A. Directors' Session
(Continued from page 22)
5. Adopted Standing Committees for
the year to be appointed by the Executive
Committee.
6. Named the Executive Committee for
1956.
7. Approved members and delegates to
various organizations closely associated
with the dairy industry.
8. Voted opposition to requests from
certain equipment manufacturers for re-
laxing of present regulations and laws
pertaining to soft-serve and milk-shake
equipment.
9. Reaffirmed previous approval for
members desiring to do so to form a
Workmens' Compensation Self-Insurance
Group and operate as a unit of the Asso-
ciation.
10. Referred to the Public Relations
Committee a proposal for a state-wide
milk promotion and public relations pro-
gram similar to that of the California
Dairy Advisory Board and the Florida
Citrus Commission.
11. Adopted a proposal for an aggres-
sive Membership Campaign throughout
1956.

1956 DAIRY MONTH PLANS
Lester J. Will, General Manager of
the American Dairy Association which
serves as headquarters for the annual
June Dairy Month campaign, has an-
nounced that advance planning and
preparation for June Dairy Month, 1956,
indicates that the 30 day campaign will
offer more public relations and sales op-
portunities than ever before and that the
dairy industry, retail food stores, res-
taurants and many other groups are go-
ing to be ready to take an active part in
the event.
The Florida Dairy Association heads
up the Dairy Month campaign in Florida
and all local association groups take an
active part with the Jacksonville, Tampa
and Miami Dairy Council units heading
up the program in their respective areas.

Producer George Johnson
Gets Duke Health Check
George Johnson, well-known producer
of West Palm Beach, and Mrs. Johnson
are reported on a combination vacation
and health check up trip, which we are
inclined to take seriously inasmuch as it
is too early in the season for the John-
son's annual combination business and
pleasure trip which happens to come
just at the time of the Kentucky Derby.
George first received a check-up at
Duke Hospital, Durham, N. C., and then
decided to take further examinations in
New York.


Welcome


back to


Clearwater


for your



1956 CONVENTION

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION


THE RED CARPET AWAITS YOU
at the


FORT HARRISON HOTEL

JUNE 26- 28, 1956
For reservations write:
EDWARD HUNT
FORT HARRISON HOTEL
Clearwater, Florida


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 25





































Officers of the Florida Dairy Association for 1956 1st V. Pres. Tom Lee (right)
congratulates President Bill Graham upon his installation as president at the first 1956
directors' meeting in Orlando as 2nd V. Pres. for producers; John Sargeant, 2nd from left,
and Andy Lay, Executive Director & Secretary (left) wait their turn.


F. D. A. COMMITTEES AND CHAIRMEN FOR 1956


The wide scope and importance to the
dairy industry of the work of the Florida
Dairy Association is shown by the follow-
ing list of Standing Committees which
have a total membership of over one
hundred fifty.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, W. A. (Bill)
Graham, President & Chairman, Graham's
Dairy Farms, Hialeah
DISTRIBUTORS' DIVISION, EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE, V.-Pres. T. G. Lee, Chrmn.,
T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando
PRODUCERS' DIVISION N, EXECUTIVE
COMMITEE, V.-Pres. John Sargeant, Sar-
geant's Dairy Farms, Lakeland
ADVISORY MEMBERS' COMMITTEE, Dr.
E. L. Fouts and C. W. Reaves, University
of Fla., Co-Chrmn.
ALLIED TRADES, "Alligator Club", Presi-
dent, Joe Hammons, Robt. A. Johnston Co.,
Milwaukee, Wis.; Dairy "Advisory Mem-
ber," Gordon Nielsen, Alfar Creamery Co.,
West Palm Beach
ANNUAL FIELD DAY, Jack McCullen, Mc-
Mullen Dairy, Clearwater, and Walter
Welkener, Holly Hill Dairy Farm, Jackson-
ville, Co-Chrmn.
ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM & AR-
RANGEMENTS, Pres. Bill Graham, V.-
Pres. T. G. Lee, and V.-Pres. John Sargeant,
Co-Chrmn.
DAIRY HUSBANDRY COMMITTEE, John
G. DuPuis, Jr., Roselawn Farms, Miami
DAIRY LAWS, STANDARDS & REGULA-
TIONS, Claude Kelly, Foremost Dairies,
Inc., Jacksonville, and L. B. (Red) Hull,
L. B. Hull Dairy, Gainesville, Co-Chrmn.
DAIRY PROCESSING, SHORT COURSE,
Richard Wood, Tripsons, Dairy, Vero Beach


FINANCE COMMITTEE, W. J. Barritt, Jr.,
Borden's Dairy, Tampa, and Herman Bur-
nett, Burnett Dairy Farms, Bradenton, Co-
Chrmn.
LADIES' AUXILIARY President, Mrs.
George Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy, Lake
Worth
LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE, Wilmer Bas-
sett, Jr., Bassett's Dairy, Monticello, and
John Adkinson, Adkinson & Mayne Dairy,
Pensacola, Co-Chrmn.
MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE, Cody Skinner,
Skinners' Dairy, Jacksonville, and Herman
Boyd, Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami, Co-
Chrmn.
MILK & ICE CREAM PLANTS COMMIT-
TEE, Henry B. Pownall, Velda Corporation,
Miami
MILK PRODUCTION COMMITTEE, Wil-
bur J. Casey, Bayou Vista Dairy, Clearwater
PAST PRESIDENTS' COMMITTEE, C. D.
Wayne, Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami
PASTURE DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE,
B. W. Judge, Jr., Good Luck Dairy, Or-
lando
PLANT & PRODUCER COST ACCOUNT-
ING, Bill Hale, T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando
PUBLIC HEALTH COMMITTEE, George
Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth,
and J. H. Adams, Adams Dairy, Jackson-
ville
PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE, Cliff
Wayne, Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami,
Chrmn., V.-Pres. T. G. Lee and V.-Pres.
John Sargeant
JUNE DAIRY MONTH PROGRAM, Claude
Kelly, Foremost Dairies, Inc., Jacksonville.
"FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS," T. G. Lee, T. G.
Lee Dairy, Orlando.


OFFICERS & DIRECTORS
Florida Dairy Association
1956

OFFICERS
W. A. (Bill) Graham, President
Thomas G. Lee, 1st Vice President &
Chrmn. Distributors' Division
John Sargeant, 2nd Vice President &
Chrmn. Producers' Division
W. J. Barritt, Jr., Treasurer
E. T. (Andy) Lay, Executive Director
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Pres. Bill Graham, Chrmn.
Producer Members
John Sargeant, Lakeland
Bill Graham, Miami
Jack McMullen, Orlando
Bob Lunsford, Milton
Hugh Adams, Jacksonville
Distributor Members
T. G. Lee, Orlando
W. J. Barritt, Jr., Tampa
Geo. Boutwell, Lake Worth
John Hood, Bradenton
C. D. Wayne, Miami
PRODUCER DIRECTORS
John Sargeant, Lakeland
George Johnson, W. Palm Beach
John D. Fuqua, Altha
Julian T. Stewart, Delray Beach
L. B. Hull, Gainesville
Ira C. Barrow, New Smyrna Beach
Herman Burnett, Bradenton
Julian Lane, Tampa
Bryan W. Judge, Orlando
C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee
John Adkinson, Pensacola
Jack McCullen, Clearwater
J. H. Adams, Jacksonville
R. L. Lunsford, Milton
DISTRIBUTOR DIRECTORS
Thos. G. Lee, Orlando
J. N. McArthur, Miami
John Tripson, Vero Beach
Gordon Nielsen, W. Palm Beach
Earl Lovelace, Tampa
Geo. Boutwell, Lake Worth
Claude Kelly, Jacksonville
J. F. W. Zirkelbach, Pensacola
Cody Skinner, Jacksonville
Walter Burton, Jacksonville
W. J. Barritt, Jr., Tampa
John Hood, Bradenton
D. E. Perret, Jacksonville
Freeman Hales, Miami
EX-OFFICIO DIRECTOR
Pres. Bill Graham, Miami
Past Pres. C. D. Wayne, Miami
Hon. Dir., Alf R. Nielsen, Palm Beach
Pres. "Alligator Club"
Joe Hammons, Milwaukee, Wis.

VETERINARY MEMBERS' COMMITTEE,
Dr. Karl Owens, D. V. M., Gainesville
HONORARY JUNIOR MEMBERS, Bill
Gunter, Chrmn., University of Fla. Dairy
Student. SENIOR ADVISORY CHAIR-
MAN, Wilmer Bassett, Bassett's Dairy,
Monticello


26 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Representatives To Organizations
FLA. FARM BUREAU, J. D. Fuqua, Fuqua's
Dairy, Altha
FLA. COUNTY AGENTS ASSN., C. C. Sell-
ers, Sellers' Dairy, Tallahassee
FLA. AGRICULTURAL COUNCIL, Theo
Datson, Datson Farms, Orlando
FLA. BEEF COUNCIL, Bob Hall, Hall &
Boyd Dairy, Miami, and Theo. Datson,
Datson Farms, Orlando
NAT'L. ASSN. OF ICE CREAM MFRS.,
Fla. Director, C. D. Wayne, Southern
Dairies, Miami
STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, J. N.
McArthur, McArthur Jersey Farms, Inc.,
Miami, and Cotton Paul, Foremost Dairies,
Inc., Jacksonville
STATE JR. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
Chas. Williams, V & W Dairy, Delray
Beach
STATE DEFENSE COUNCIL, Brady Johns-
ton, Dinsmore Dairy Co., Jacksonville
Representatives Of Public Bodies
FLA. LIVESTOCK BOARD, Wilmer Bassett,
Bassett's Dairy, Monticello, and R. L.
(Dick) Dressel, Dressel's Dairy Farm, Mi-
ami
FLA. MILK COMMISSION, Ben S. Waring,
Producer, Hillcrest Dairy Madison, and
Henry Schneider, Distributor, Foremost
Dairies, Inc.
STATE BRUCELLOSIS CONTROL COM-
MITTEE, Bill Graham, Graham's Dairy
Farm, Hialeah, and V. C. Johnson, Dins-
more Dairy Co., Jacksonville


N. D. C. Resolution of Thanks
To Florida Dairy Association
WHEREAS the growth and progress and
effective service of the National Dairy
Council and its affiliated units to the
dairy industry is dependent upon the
interest and cooperation of leaders in
the industry, and
WHEREAS the Executive Director, Offi-
cers and Board of Directors of the
Florida Dairy Association have contrib-
uted a substantial measure of such in-
terest and cooperation through their
leadership, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED that the Board of Di-
rectors of National Dairy Council, at
its meeting on January 30, 1956, rec-
ognizes the value of this contribution,
and hereby extends its deepest appre-
ciation to the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion for this friendly interest and sup-
port.

State 4-H Dairy Show
(Continued from Page 20)
awards were provided by the Ayrshire
Breeders Association for winners in their
respective breed shows. The Florida Dairy
Association sponsors a revolving trophy
for the "Best County Group" participat-
ing in the show. This was won by the
Jackson County 4-H group.


U. of F. President Inaugurated
A colorful ceremony in Gainesville,
Florida, on February 17 marked the for-
mal inauguration of Dr. J. Wayne Reitz
as president of the University of Florida.
Formerly provost of agriculture at the
University, Dr. Reitz has attended several
annual meetings and Field Day programs
of the F.D.A. both as a speaker and as a
friend of the industry. Dairymen were
especially grateful upon his elevation to
the presidency of the University last April.
Dr. Reitz addressed the full convoca-
tion of colorfully capped and gowned
teaching staff, together with scores of
similarly costumed visiting educators and
several thousand friends and well-wishers
on the theme, "A State University Re-
sponds to the Needs of Society."
Dr. Reitz stated his conviction that
"our civilization in the final analysis will
be measured not alone by its material,
but more particularly by its intellectual,
moral and spiritual achievements." He
also believes "that as it has contributed
so nobly in the past, higher education
faces a greater opportunity for service in
the future."

The CIO-AFL organization now claims
15 million members and say the total po-
tential membership would be about 42
million.


OPERATION 00

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FIRST QUARTER, 1956 0 27







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station


Dairy Industry Pays Tribute to Dr. C. V. Noble

Former Dean, U. of F. College of Agriculture
The Board of Directors of the Florida Dairy Association, acting on behalf of the
Florida Dairy Industry, adopted the following resolution at their first quarterly meet-
ing of 1956 in recognition of and as a tribute to the services and accomplishments of
Dr. C. V. Noble, as a member of the faculty and as dean of the University of Florida


College of Agriculture.

F. D. A. Resolution
WHEREAS, on August 30, 1955 Dr.
C. V. Noble retired from active duty as
dean of the College of Agriculture of the
University of Florida after serving 30
years as member of the faculty, as organ-
izer and head of the Department of Agri-
cultural Economics, and as dean of the
College of Agriculture, and
WHEREAS, during his long service in
his chosen field of Agricultural Econo-
mics and Agricultural Education, Dr.
Noble has not only contributed much to-
ward Florida's rapid growth and develop-
ment in Agriculture and the Dairy Indus-
try but has endeared himself to the thou-
sands of students and dairymen with
whom he has been associated.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RE-
SOLVED, by the Board of Directors of
the Florida Dairy Association that on be-
half of ourselves and the Florida Dairy
Industry as a whole, we express to Dr.
Noble our sincere appreciation and grati-
tude for his long and distinguished serv-
ices to the Dairy Industry and to the State
of Florida, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that
we extend to Dr. Noble our sincere best
wishes for many years of happiness and
enjoyment of his many friends, his pro-
fession and his hobbies, and
BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that a
copy of this resolution be spread upon
the minutes of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation and that copies 'be sent to Dr.
Noble, the College of Agriculture and
the President of the University of Florida.
The Board of Directors
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION, INC.
W. A. Graham, President
Dr. Noble was born and reared on a
general farm near Federalsburg, Mary-
land. In 1912 he entered Cornell Uni-
versity and in 1916 he was awarded the
Bachelor of Science degree. After gradu-


DR. NOBLE
ation he was appointed to a teaching posi-
tion at Cornell in farm management. He
continued his studies and in 1920 he was
awarded a Ph.D. degree. He continued
his teaching duties there until he came to
Florida.
Dr. Noble is an elder in the Presby-
terian Church and holds membership in
the Gainesville Kiwanis Club. In 1934 he
was a delegate to the International Con-
ference of Agricultural Economics in Bad
Eilson, Germany. He is a member of Pi
Gamma Mu, national honor society of the
social sciences; Phi Kappa Phi, honorary
scholastic fraternity; Gamma Sigma Del-
ta, honorary agricultural fraternity; Amer-
ican Men of Science; American Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Science; Na-
tional Association of Marketing Officials;
Association of Southern Agricultural
Workers; Florida State Horticultural So-
ciety; American Economic Association;
and the American Farm Economic Asso-
ciation.
Dr. Noble's main job as Dean of Agri-
culture has been to coordinate the work of


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1956 Special Events
for
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY

March 20-23
7th Annual
LABORATORIAN'S SHORT COURSE
For laboratory personnel from state, county,
city and commercial laboratories, who test
dairy and food products, and for milk sani-
tarians.
March 21-23
12th Annual
MILK AND FOOD SANITARIAN'S
CONFERENCE
For milk and food sanitarians, laboratorians,
technicians, public health workers, veterina-
rians, dairy plant operators, producers, dis-
tributors, quality control personnel, and
equipment and supply dealers.
July 19-20
21st Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY AND
CONFERENCE
For milk producer-distributors, milk pro-
ducers, dairy processors, herdsmen, county
agents, vocational agriculture teachers, vet-
erinarians, DHIA workers and equipment
and supply dealers.
August 21-23
25th Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.
October 11-13
19th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATOR'S
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant employ-
ees, producer-distributors, equipment and
supply dealers.


the teaching division. He has kept the
heads of departments in harmony with
each other and also has been responsible
for cooperation within the departments.
He served the University many years
through a period when the lack of facili-
ties, buildings and equipment hampered
progress. Seeing this problem he has
worked hard to help secure the wonderful
new Agriculture building now under con-
struction, realizing that retirement would
prevent him from ever using the new
building himself. A number of other
buildings in various agricultural fields
have been erected during his tenure of of-
fice as dean, including Poultry Science,
Nutrition, and Agricultural Engineering.
Dr. Noble says that in addition to en-
joying association with his friends and
former associates at the University, he
plans to spend much time at his Santa Fe
Lake place, called "Nohideout," working
in his orange grove and fishing.

The happiest miser of all is he who keeps
his friends.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Pasture Contest Reports Due
County Agents by April 15

By: C. W. REAVES,
Extension Dairyman

The 1955-56 Dairy Pasture Contest
ends April 1, 1956. Reports are due in
the county agent's office by April 15.
Reports of County Winners are due from
county agents at the Dairy Extension Of-
fice at the University by May 1.
Every dairyman is eligible to enter the
state competition except the State Win-
ners in the two previous years' contests.
Previous County Winners are eligible to
win State Awards. Fill out a report if
you had just reasonably good pasture and
forage the past year. Others will be in
the same position and the setting down
of your pasture records will help you.
When you write down the acres and
kinds of pasture, number animals grazed,
tons hay or silage produced and the ex-
penditures for fertilizer and lime, you
get a picture of your operation. It helps
determine the costs and returns from
pasture. A study of your records will en-
able you to decide whether you need ad-
ditional pasture and forage for your herd
and whether it would be profitable to put
out more.
Fill out as complete information as
possible, but do not fail to turn the re-
port in, even if not complete. The pre-
vious year's figures are not necessary ex-
cept for competition for "most improve-
ment over previous year". Those who
submitted reports last year and want the
information to use this year can write
the State Extension Dairyman, Gaines-
ville, for it.
The committee composed of Agricul-
tural Extension specialists and represen-
tatives of the Florida Dairy Association
are hopeful of receiving a good number
of pasture reports. The Florida Dairy
Association is providing nice trophies to
the State Winner in each division, Spe-
cial Certificates of Reward to County
Winners and Certificates of Merit to all
whose pasture reports score as much as
75 per cent. Participation by filling out a
pasture report indicates an effort at ef-
ficient dairy production.
County and State Winners are selected
in two divisions:
1. Best pasture and forage program
2. Most improvement over the previ-
ous year.



A man finally bought a parrot at an auction
after some spirited bidding.
"I suppose the bird talks," he said to the
auctioneer.
"Talks?" was the reply, "He's been bidding
against you for the past quarter hour."


MILK SANITARIANS
MEET IN MARCH
The Florida Association of Milk and
Food Sanitarians will meet at the Uni-
versity of Florida on March 21 to 23.
Sponsors of this meeting will be at the
Department of Dairy Science. Dr. H. H.
Wilkowske, Secretary of the Association,
is in charge of local arrangements.
An outstanding program of interest to
milk, food and general sanitarians is
planned. This program also will be of
special interest to dairymen. Topics to
be discussed by authoritative speakers in-
clude the following: Registration of San-
itarians and Legislative Techniques; How
the Laboratorian Can Help the Sanitarian
and Plant Operators; Epidemiology, In-
terstate Milk Shipments; Corrosion of
Stainless Steel; 3-A Dairy Equipment
Standards; Florida's Mobile Milk Labora-
tory; Entomology; Milk Fieldmen; Sani-
tarian Training; and Calibration of Farm
Tanks.
In conjunction with the meeting, the
Association holds its annual business
meeting and election of officers. Also the
annual banquet is held at which time Ten-
year Sanitarian Awards are made and an
evening of excellent entertainment pro-
vided by the Florida Dairy Association.
The meeting is open to anyone who
wishes to attend.



MILK LABORATORIANS
MEET IN GAINESVILLE
The Milk Laboratorians section of the
Florida Association of Milk and Food
Sanitarians will meet at the University of
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
in Gainesville March 20 to 23. As in
the past the hosts will be the Department
of Dairy Science. Hugh Butner, bacteri-
ologist with the State Board of Health
and Mary Schmoker, laboratory technician
with Bordens Dairy at Orlando are in
charge of the program along with Dr.
H. H. Wilkowske who is in charge of
local arrangements.
The special feature this year will be
the study of all aspects of standard bac-
terial plate count practices and procedures
as well as information on the direct mi-
croscopic counts. Anyone interested in
learning or improving his plating tech-
niques or anyone interested in knowing
how to correctly interpret plate count re-
sults will be interested in attending this
short course.
Dr. Robert Myers, Cincinnati Health
Center, will return again by popular de-
mand to conduct the main portions of the
program. He is an outstanding authority
in this field and a good attendance is ex-
pected.


Carlos Gieseke-Cevallos is seen receiving the
Borden Agricultural Scholarship Award for
1955 from M. A. Brooker, assistant dean of
the College of Agriculture, University of Flor-
ida. Dr. E. L. Fouts, head of the department
of dairy science, left, and R. H. Shortlidge,
manager of the Borden Southern Company of
Jacksonville, look on.

Agricultural Scholarship
Award Presented by Borden
The 11th annual Borden Agricultural
Scholarship Award was presented recently
at the Dairy Products Laboratory by R. H.
(Bob) Shortlidge, manager, Borden
Southern Company, Jacksonville. Each
year this award is given to the senior
student in Agriculture who has the high-
est average grade in all college work
prior to his senior year and who has com-
pleted at least two dairy courses. The
award consists of a certificate of achieve-
ment, a check for $300.00, and the in-
scribing of the student's name on a
plaque which is prominently displayed in
the Dairy Science Building. The award
this year was given to Carlos Gieseke-
Cevallos, who had a grade point average
of 3,382. (4.0 represents a straight A
grade).
Mr. Gieseke-Cevallos was born in El
Salvador and was reared in Hamburg,
Germany. In 1949 he returned to El Sal-
vador. He attended Pan American Agri-
cultural School, Tegucigalpa, Honduras,
where he graduated with a 3-year diploma
in Agriculture. He came a to the Univer-
sity of Florida in September, 1954 and
will receive his B.S. Degree in Animal
Husbandry in June, 1956. He hopes to
go to veterinary school or do graduate
work in animal nutrition, after which he
will go back to El Salvador.

Notice To Lazy Salesmen
The following "help wanted" ad ap-
peared recently in the Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, morning paper:
"Wanted: Lazy Salesman-Earn $200
week and up. To qualify, you must be
allergic to work. You must insist that
you work not more than 5 hours per day.
You will not knock on doors. To really
qualify, you must be too lazy to walk, so
you must own a car.
"Please do not come before 11:00
A.M. because we also are allergic to
work."


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 29







ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:
DIRECTORY OF

Florida's Dairy Councils FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the 16 East Church Street
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the Mrs. Maxine Carter, Exec. Director
three Council directors in turn.

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Children Experiment on Taking Milk Apart DTeSMbr Tampa
SM rs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
"Milk is Nature's most nearly perfect food." Today's youngsters want to know Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director
why. Provide them with the scientific equipment, chemical solutions, non-perishable
food materials and a set of simple food experiments and these junior scientists will DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
find the answer for themselves, ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
"Taking Milk Apart" is the title of a series of food experiments, designed for 769 N. W 18th Terrace Miami
use in classrooms of upper elementary grades. Its purpose is: Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director
1. To use experimentation to help show boys and girls why certain food prac- Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director
tices, such as drinking a quart of milk a day, are important for them.
2. To help children understand that every part of milk is valuable food. Teachers desire to introduce new and
Boys and girls in the sixth and seventh grades display keen interest in carrying out varied approaches in food studies as chil-
experiments. Experimentation develops and gratifies the "let's find out" desire. It dren grow older and their interests
encourages children to work accurately, to observe carefully, and to draw conclusions change. These experiments are designed
on the basis of observation, to challenge older children. The ultimate
aim is the intelligent use of foods and
Improvement in food habits. Boys and
girls entering the period of rapid adole-
scent growth need to build reserves for
that growth. Milk and its products are
essential in building that growth reserve.

Children know milk chiefly as a fluid.
In discovering through experimentation
the different parts and the solids of milk,
children tend to change their attitudes to-
ward it. They begin to think of it as a
substantial food for an adult as well as
for a child. They also begin to see how
industries apply science to provide a
variety of dairy foods. Plant trips, read-
ing, and motion pictures mean more to
the boy or girl who has seen or has car-
ried out experiments on taking milk apart.

Equipment for these experiments and
the National Dairy Council filmstrip
"What Shall We Have to Eat" are packed
in a colorful metal bread box and loaned
to schools for a two-week period.
(Continued on next page)

1. At the Hogan-Spring Glen School,
Mrs. Maxine Hellinger, seventh grade health
-- 0 teacher, conducts one of the 5 health classes
which learned about milk in a series of ex-
- periments designed to show why "Milk is
Nature's most nearly perfect food."
2. The art committee of the sixth grade,
South Jacksonville Elementary School, Mrs.
Ann McNeill, teacher, displays posters made
by the class to show the importance of drink-
ing milk. On the table is the Dairy Class
Workit showing the production and distribu-
tion of the nation's milk supply. The girl,
front left, is learning about dairying in
Alaska. Her committee will arrange for the
class trip to a local dairy. The kit box hold-
ing the complete experiment is shown at the
3F R Dleft.
30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Taking Milk Apart
(Continued from page 30)
Popularity of this classroom project
during the past year led the Dairy Coun-
cil of Jacksonville to outfit four kits for
use for this year. Fifty-seven teachers in
Duval County have already requested the
kits for use in 62 classes. Over 2,500
boys and girls will spend two weeks in
learning a little about how scientists can
take food apart, and how they find out
what is in them that we need to build
strong bodies. I. B. Cody, sixth grade
teacher, featured the experiments at Par-
ent's Night in his school.
Miss Bessie Bankhead, Grand Park
School-"Children were willing to try
new foods. One pupil has learned to like
buttermilk."
Mrs. Josie Messer, Arlington School-
"Excellent for sixth grade . results
were satisfying .. led to improved food
habits."
Best of all are the letters from boys and
girls like Jimmy Fortune who wrote to
Mrs. Carter as follows:
"Thank you for the wonderful ma-
terials that you sent to us. Our class is
very grateful to you and your council for
sending it to us.
The class under the guidance of Mrs.
Messer our school teacher has conduct-
ed a series of experiments on how milk
is built. We found out many interest-
ing things about milk; butter, whey,
curds. To wind all this up we took a
very interesting and educational trip to
the Sealtest Dairy. We saw many in-
teresting things that we had been study-
ing. I thank you from the bottom of
my heart."

DAIRY COUNCIL UNITS OF
FLORIDA IN ACTION
) Mrs. Maxine Carter, director of the
Dairy Council of Jacksonville, is the sec-
retary of the Florida Dietetic Association
for 1956 having been elected at the state
meeting in Miami Beach late in 1955.
) All the Florida directors of local Dairy
Council units and their assistants attended
the 41st Annual Meeting and Winter
Conference of the National Dairy Council
in New York City from January 30 to
February 1. They also participated in a
special TV clinic and workshop follow-
ing the conference.
g The theme of the Winter Conference
was "Education: the Key to Greater
Sales." Throughout the conference it was
emphasized that the local affiliated units
of the National Dairy Council "comprise
the nutrition research and the educational
arm of the dairy industry" and "make up
the market-level attack by the National
Dairy Council to get depth of market
penetration in the most economical man-
ner." There are 71 local units now affili-
ated with the National organization.
) A new film for free use in schools and


by community leader groups was shown
for the first time at the conference in
New York City. It is a 13-minute film
entitled "Admirals in the Making" de-
picting the life and traditions at the U. S.
N a v a Academy, emphasizing sound
health and eating practices and promin-
ently featuring dairy foods.
) Paul E. Reinhold of Foremost Dairies,
Inc., Jacksonville, was re-elected to the
Board of Directors of the National Dairy
Council during the Annual Meeting and
Winter Conference.
) The 4th Annual Meeting of the Dairy
Council of Dade, Broward and Monroe


Counties will be held 'April 19. An-
nouncement of final plans will be made
later.
) Milk Dealers sold an additional 96 mil-
lion half pints of milk, and dairy farmers
received an extra $780,000 through
stronger Special School Milk Program ac-
tivities in the 32 states where there are
local Dairy Council offices. The propor-
tion of schools participating and the aver-
age consumption per child were greater
in Dairy Council states according to an
analysis made by the National Dairy
Council and issued by the Department of
Agriculture.


Mrs. America Escuder, left, director of the Dairy Council of Hillsborough and Pinellas
Counties, talking about nutrition on the TV program "Lookin at Cookin" conducted by
Olga Hanscome, right, in Tampa.


The weight reduction booth at the North Dade Home Progress Exposition in Opa Locka is
pictured showing Miss Marian Cudworth, executive director, and her assistant director, Miss
Nance Hinckley, talking with women interested in weight control information. The Dairy
Council of Dade, Broward and Monroe Counties sponsored this booth and distributed recipes
using milk, later mailing booklets to visitors who desired material on weight control.
FIRST QUARTER, 1956 31






















ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY REVIEW
Experts Discuss Pastures, Feeding and Farm Problems
The fact that Florida dairymen like Field Day programs undoubtedly has much to
do with the popularity and continuous growth of the Annual Dairy Field Day meet-
ing at the University of Florida. Old timers tell us this event had its beginnings
before the days of roads and automobiles as "State Farmer's Day."
In those days, those attending travelled to Gainesville by train and stayed over
night in the men's dormitory. The 1955 Dairy Field Day was the 20th since the
program became identified under this name.
In recent years the University Dairy
Science Department has made the Florida
Dairy Association a co-sponsor of the An- in his work at the University of Florida.
nual Field Day as well as for the Annual Special trophies were also presented by
Herdsmen's Short Course and Annual the Association to two Florida Future
Dairy Plant Processing Short Course. Farmers, both sons of Florida dairy fam-
PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS ilies, in tribute to their outstanding ac-
In addition to the dairy farm problems complishments and national recognition
sessions which were held during the after- in the Future Farmers of America pro-
noon of the first day and in morning ses- gram. Stories of these two young men,
sion through lunch hour on the second Bill Gunter and George Ford, are carried
day, a number of special features spon- in a separate article.
scored by the Dairy Association add to the rSeveral leaders and top officers of the
interest and benefits of the two-day Florida Future Farmer organization, in-
sess.on. cluding Miss Joan Van Arsdall (1955
These features include registration, State FFA "Sweetheart"), were present to
welcome committees and an early bird participate in honoring these two young
luncheon at the Hotel Thomas, a special men.
conference of the Directors of the Florida MANY SUBJECTS CONSIDERED
Dairy Association with the President of
the University and principal agriculture The principal visiting speaker on the
and dairy department heads, a Reception program was Dr. G. H. Hopson of New
York who is Milk Sanitarian Consultant
and Social Hour during the evening spon-
sored by F.D.A. Allied Trades Members, of the De Laval Sarator Company. Dr.
an Annual Dinner Program at the Uni- Hopson spoke on "Pipeline Milkers."
versity Student Service Center, and a clos-
ing Barbecue Lunch at the University
Dairy Research Farm.
PRODUCER AWARDS MADE
The annual dinner portion of the Field
Day has in recent years become the oc-
casion for the awarding of annual milk
producer awards of the Florida DHIA
program and the presenting of various
Dairy Association honors and awards in-
cluding the winners in the Annual State
Dairy Pasture Development Program.
HONORARY TRIBUTES MADE
The 1955 Field Day Dinner was made WINNERS IN THE 1954- 55 DHIA
the occasion for the presenting of "special EFFICIENT DAIRY PRODUCTION CON-
TEST, left to right, E. W. Brannon, state
tributes" 'by the Florida Dairy Association w.unner in DHIA Supervisors' Division; B.
to Dr. R. B. Becker, who was made an W. Judge, Jr. and B. W. Judge, Sr., state
Honorary Life Member of the Asocia- winners in Dairymen's Division; A. T. Al-
tion in recognition of his long and Vilu- varez, North Florida district winner, R. W.
Click, Moore Haven, district winner and 2nd
able service to the Florida dairy industry place state winner.
32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


.-- 1Y
























Annual Field Day Pictures: Top panel, left to right, (1) E. T. Lay, Sec'y., Florida Dairy Association, and Dr. S. P. Marshall, Univ.
of Fla., assisting in registering for the Field Day; (2) Dr. L. E. Mull, Univ. of Fla., and assistant registering for the Field Day; (3)
Group assembling for bus tour of the University Dairy Research Farm; (4) Field Day group, lined up for barbecue lunch at University
Dairy Farm; (5) Group inspect new State Dept. of Agriculture portable dairy laboratory; (6) Dr. R. B. Becker receiving "citation" and
tribute of the Florida Dairy Association from T. G. Lee, Vice-President and other directors.
PANEL AT LEFT: (1) Group viewing a hay bailing demonstration of a "New Holland" baler pulled by a Ferguson tractor; (2) Truck
used to demonstrate applying of liquid fertilizer to pasture; (3) Demonstration of "New Holland" forage harvester and wagon pulled by
Ferguson tractor; (4) Hay baler and other machinery shown at University Farm equipment demonstration.
PANEL BELOW Top picture: 1954-55 Dairy Pasture Contest Winners. B. W. Judge, Jr. and Sr. Orlando, 4th and 6th from left,
won first in the state-wide "Best Pasture and Forage Program." W. I. Casey of Largo, 1st from left, won 3rd in this division. C. E.
Donegan, Largo 7th from left won third in "Most Improvement in Pasture and Forage" division. C. L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod, and W. ].
Simmons, Jacksonville, 2nd and 3rd from left are Pasture Contest Certificate winners; M. A. Schack, Greenwood, 5th from left, was
Jackson County winner; Hanson Collins, Orlando and A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville, 4th and 3rd from right "Most Pasture Improvement"
winners in Orange and Duval respectively; R. A. Shearin, Trenton and Edward Froehlick, West Palm Beach, 2nd and 1st from right,
were County Winners in Gilchrist and Palm Beach counties respectively. The silver pitchers to the State Winner in each division and the
Certificates to County Winners were provided by the Florida Dairy Association, sponsor of the Pasture Contest. BOTTOM PICTURE:
Winners of "Honor Roll Diploma" in DHIA program awarded at Dairy Field Day Banquet, left to right, Elbert Cammack, Geneva; B. W.
Judge, Jr., Orlando; C. C. Sellers, Tallahassee; B. W. Judge, Sr., Orlando; W. J. Simmons, Jacksonville; C. L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod; Jack
Dodd, Maitland; A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville; F. E. Willis, Tallahassee; M. A. Schack, Greenwood; C. L. Ward, Sr., Winter Park; and
Hanson Collins, Orlando. B. W. Judge holds the silver pitcher trophy awarded him as 1st place winner in the State Dairy Pasture Contest.


Others subjects on the official program
were: Bulk Handling of Milk, Dairy
Barn Design, Pastures and Forage in Ef-
ficient Milk Production, Silage and Hay
in Milk Production, Cost of Producing
Dairy Feed Nutrients in Florida, Value of
Temporary and Permanent Pastures, Al-
falfa-Clover and Oat Pastures for Dairy
Heifers, Chopped Green Foliage Feeding,
Rates of Consumption of Silages, Digesti-
ble Nutrients of Silage Crops and Preserv-
ing Forages as Silage. I
UNIVERSITY FARM TOUR
The closing section of the program in-
cluded a tour of the University Dairy Re-
search Farm. This included an inspection
of the herds and various experimental i
pastures, a dairy farm machinery exhibit
and demonstration, and the closing bar-
becue lunch, which was served by mem-
bers of the Dairy Department staff.
SUMMARY OF TALKS
TO BE PUBLISHED
Beginning in this issue, the Florida
Dairy News will publish a series of sum-
maries of the talks of various Field Day
speakers.
A limited number of sets of these sub-
ject digests are available from the Florida
Dairy Association upon request.
L. B. Hull, Gainesville producer,
served as Chairman of the Florida Dairy
Association's 1955 Field Day Committee
which co-operated with the University
Dairy Department in planning, promoting
and conducting the Field Day program.
FIRST QUARTER, 1956 33









Why Milk Price Control to the Producer Only 1956-A Year of Decision
Will Not Ade uatel Protect the Producer For Florida Dairy Industry


T v III I II ^ 7 I I I I I I l l = I =
A summary of statements made to the Florida Legislature on the subject
by the Florida Dairy Association.
Control of the farm price of milk alone would apply only to milk purchased by a
processor-distributor" and would not apply to milk produced by Florida's numerous
"producer-distributors" who produce and retail all their own milk.
This would force milk under a "controlled price" to compete with milk "under no
minimum price."
If the regulation of the minimum price of milk when sold by a distributor, is
abandoned, there would then be controlled only the price to the dairy farmer who
sells his milk to a distributor.


Should cut-price competition, from
either the uncontrolled producer-distribu-
tor or by stores or other distributors using
price-cutting methods to gain business,
threaten the loss of the sale of this pro-
ducer's milk by his distributor, either the
business would be lost to the cut-price
milk or the producer and distributor
would have to agree on lower prices.
With the milk supply on hand requir-
ing disposal daily and the daily expense
of feeding his dairy herd, the producer
would be compelled to make an arrange-
ment with his distributor for disposal of
the milk, regardless of the price he might
receive for it.
Otherwise, the distributor, having lost
the market for his producer's milk for
Class I, or fluid use, would be able to pay
the producer only at a lower price based
on the use the distributor is able to make
of the milk.
As pointed out above, a law regulating
only the price paid by a distributor to his
milk producer would leave the producer-
distributor, who both produces and dis-
tributes his milk, free from any price reg-
ulation.
Such producer-distributor, if financially
strong, could expand his own milk pro-
duction, which would not be under price
control, to such volume that he could
make temporary price reductions in order
to take business away from distributors
whose producer prices are regulated.
This procedure would discriminate
against producers selling their milk to dis-
tributors under minimum farm prices ..
to the point that his distributor would be
forced to pay less for the milk in order
to hold his established customers or dis-
continue buying from his regular pro-
ducers and find a cheaper supply of milk.
Large milk distributors with strong fi-
nancial backing could, by taking delib-
erate losses on milk sales, squeeze out of
a market their weaker competitors among
the small independent, home-owned dair-
ies and be free to increase prices to re-
cover their losses after competition had
been removed.
By this same "selling at a loss" proce-
dure, large super markets and chain stores,
without retail milk price control, could
return to the practice of using milk as a
"loss leader" (now prevented by the Milk
Commission) to bring customers to their


store and could use their large-volume
buying power to force low prices from
milk distributors, who in turn would be
forced to pay less to their milk producers.
The milk distributor's only alternative
to paying lower prices to producers in
such a situation would be the importing
of cheaper surplus milk from out of state
milk surplus supplies.
Under Federal and State regulations,
municipal regulations and county regula-
tions which require top "Grade A" qual-
ity, Florida milk must be produced under
expensive conditions. Milk is highly per-
ishable and must be processed, or dis-
posed of, within hours after it is pro-
duced. Experience in Florida for more
than twenty-three years has convinced us
that if the dairy industry of Florida is to
be expected to guarantee to the housewife
of Florida wholesome milk of high qual-
ity and in adequate amounts, the industry
must have the stabilization provided by a
reasonable control of prices.
Evidence that the Florida milk price
stabilization program has benefitted both
the milk consumer and those who produce
and distribute milk is found in the fact
that:
(1) Stabilization of Florida milk prices
has enabled the milk producers to double
their milk production and at the same
time greatly improve the quality to the
point that Florida's entire fluid milk sup-
ply is now Florida-produced and is of the
highest Grade A quality, whereas, where
this price stabilization program started in
1933, only half of Florida's fluid milk
supply was produced in Florida and much
of this was of considerably lower quality
than that now produced.
(2) Milk prices in Florida under this
stabilizing program have increased only
about 60% since 1939 as compared to a
nationwide milk price increase of about
90% during this period.
We believe these facts and others which
have been furnished, point to the need
and importance of continuing State price
regulations at both farm and retail price
levels.

"Government has no place in alleviating the
economic affairs of its citizens until they have
reached the extremities of their own endeav-
or."-Father George Nell, speaking before the
Chicago Agricultural Club.


Decisions which must be made in 1956
concerning the Florida Dairy industry
may have a more far-reaching effect on
the industry's future in this State than at
any time since the passage of the Florida
Milk Commission Law in 1933.
Various happenings during the past
year threatening the future operation and
effectiveness of the Milk Commission in
its supervision and stabilizing of the in-
dustry have given Florida's 1200 milk
producers and the dairy plants which
process and distribute milk to the con-
sumer, a first class case of the jitters.
This situation exists because of the
Milk Commission's moratorium on en-
forcement of minimum milk prices for a
period of a year from last October. The
Commission took the action after receiv-
ing a suggestion from Governor Collins
that it abandon the enforcement of resale
milk prices.
While the industry awaits a long de-
layed decision of the State Supreme Court
on the legality of the Commission's milk
price enforcement moratorium, members
of the industry, particularly producers,
are reluctantly considering the possibili-
ties of turning from State supervision to
Federal milk price control.
The milk producers of the Miami area,
fearful that without price supervision in
that area that the Spring season may
bring about chaotic farm price conditions,
have decided to ask for Federal control
by the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
A thorough survey of milk production
costs and marketing conditions in the
area is now underway under the direction
of Dr. Leland Spencer of Cornell Uni-
versity, who is recognized as one of the
nation's authorities on milk marketing
and agricultural economics. Dr. Spencer
has been retained by the Miami area pro-
ducers association.
Decisions to be made during the next
few months by the Supreme Court, by
the Milk Commission, and by the dairy
industry may have much influence on the
future welfare of Florida's over 100-mil-
lion-dollar milk industry.

Given Milk Price Powers
The 1955 South Carolina Legislature
passed a milk bill which gives the five
members of that state's Milk Commission
the power to establish prices paid to the
producers and the retail or wholesale
prices of milk. The five members of the
commission are: The Commissioner of
Agriculture, one producer member, one
distributor member, and two consumer
members.

Teacher: "If I lay three eggs here and five
eggs there, how many eggs will I hare?"
Skeptical Pupil: "I don't think that you
can do it."


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







4-H Dairy Show at Orlando
Competitive Grooming and Showmanship
was keenest at the 1955 Area VI Orlando
Sentinel Dairy Show held at Orlando on No-
vember 12th which involved six county
groups from Polk, Brevard, Volusia, Osceola,
Lake and Orange Counties.
The Orange County Group composed of
Ernest Fischer of Windermere, Alfred Ham-
mond, Jr., of Conway, Jeanette Foote of
Lockhart, Brenda Dennison of Orlando, Jo-
seph Brady of Maitland and Ruth Black of
Orlando, massed a total of 548.9 points to top
the Show and win the Area Show Trophy.
Gail Williams, Polk County 4-H Dairy girl
from Winter Haven, took individual honors
for the day with a total score of 92.7 points.
The 1955 Area Show was sponsored for
the first time by the Orlando Sentinel-Star
with $500.00 prize money being distributed
to the thirty-five 4-H Dairy members entered.
The Show, judged on the Modified Danish
System, was judged by C. W. Reaves, Exten-
sion Dairyman, as Animal Judge; K. S. Mc-
Mullen, District Agent, as Showmanship
Judge and W. W. Brown, State Boys' 4-H
Club Agent, as Grooming Judge. Each 4-H'er
was judged on the score card of 40 points on
animal, 20 points on Record Book, 20 points
on Showmanship and 20 points on Grooming.
All five major dairy breeds were represent-
ed at the Show with the Gail Williams entry,
Senior Jersey Heifer Calf, topping the Show
with an 89 animal score.
The Polk County group composed of Gail
Williams, Linda Stuart, Melissa Jo Williams,
John Hebb, Donald Addison, and Paul Shef-
field finished close behind Orange County
with a total of 542.1 points, followed by
Brevard County with 528.5, Volusia County
with 526.4, Osceola County with 520.9 and
Lake County with 427.9 points.
Award winners were as follows: Blue
Award-Gail Williams, Polk; Ernest Fischer,
Orange; Jeanette Foot, Orange; Ruth Black,
Orange; Joseph Brady, Orange; Melissa Jo
Williams, Polk; John Hebb, Polk; Andy
Tucker, Brevard; Tommy Griner, Brevard;
Paul Sheffield, Polk; Alfred Hammond,
Orange; Brenda Dennison, Orange; Linda
Stuart, Polk; Polly Watkins, Osceola; Donald
Addison, Polk; Johnny Wilson, Volusia;
Sandra Stoudenmire, Volusia; Dixie Alford,
Osceola; Braxton Powell, Brevard; Jackie Wil-
son, Volusia; Lewis Hughes, Lake.
Red Award-Sharon Stoudenmire, Volusia;
Sam Ebersole, Lake; Warren Watkins, Osce-
ola; Jim Dowdy, Brevard; Linda Jacobs, Vo-
lusia; Roger Quist, Brevard; Dickey Johns,
Osceola; Frank Powell, Brevard; Kenneth
Ebersole, Lake; Martin Bartoszek, Volusia;
Bobby Blair, Lake; Mike Partin, Osceola.
White Award-John Roebuck, Osceola;
Bert McDonald, Lake.
It is estimated that 16 million school
children are drinking milk under the
special school milk program. This meant
the consumption of 350 million half pints
of milk during October, the latest month
for which figures are available.


and IT IS GOOD!
-

Unmatched in its field!

Get your hands into a bag of Spartan Quality Dairy, and
you'll agree "MAN, WHAT FEED!" You'll see those big,
Crimped Oats...those Crunchy Pellets (contain fine
materials)...that tasty Beet Pulp and Wheat Bran...
all "cow-flavored" with fine-spray Molasses. Cows love
it! And dairymen quickly get sold on its milk-making
and money-making power. This feed is built to produce!

If you're really serious about this dairy business...
most milk for least cost, long cow life, and sturdy
calves . then YOU SHOULD BE AN "SQ" USER!

NOW IN SPARTAN'S ................
# V50 Ius an


BACK-SAVER BAGS

* "SQ" CALF STARTER PELLETS DAIRY

* "SQ" CALF FEED (Grower)

* "SQ" 16% DAIRY

* "SQ" 20% DAIRY

* "SQ" LIVESTOCK MINERALS



S SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
t tetSPhunri Ja0 .u.lice. -12 77


FIRST QUARTER, 1956 35

















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division


Auburndale, Fla.


Phone 8-4301


= INC. Darich
Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Come Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902


DAIRY & FOOD EQUIPMENT, INC.
General Office: 1034 N.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Fla. Telephone 9-3679


Branches
Tampn Jacksonville


Orlando


DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
O. S. NEWSOM, JR.
Phone: EV 7-7383
1625 S. McDuff Jacksonville, Fla.


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.

VETERINARY MEDICINES


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
K R I M K O Florida Representative
Chocolate Flavorings
Orange Drink Concentrate
616 Jessamine Ave., Daytona Beach, Fla.
Phone 2-0148


YOU NEVER

OUTGROW YOUR

NEED FOR

MILK


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone: ELgin 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land O' Lakes Non-fat Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
0ow a COCOA DIVISION

Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
TOM POWERS
5616 Auburn Road Jacksonville 7, Fla.
Phone EXbrook 8-5871

KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricold and Sherbelizer
JOE E. ANDERSON

2577 Decatur Rd., Decatur, Ga.
Phone ME 4-8781


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone ELgin 6-1334
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.


S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Van-Sal Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative

2840 West 47th Place Chicago 32, Ill.


KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


Howell House Suite 202


Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head
Phone Norfolk, Va., LOwell 3-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksonville, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami, Fla., Phone: MUrray 8-8431


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee W. H. Adams
R. G. Shackelford
1601 Prudential Bldg. Jacksonville 7, Fla.
Phone-FL 9-0545 & 6


PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Rennet for Cottage Cheese
Cottage Cheese Coagulator-Ice Cream Color
Cottage Cheese Literature Available
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC.-Miami, Florida


PENN SALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbllt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
Tampa
2209 E. Broadway, Phone 4-3362
Jacksonville
2320 Edwards Ave., EV 7-7011
Orlando
1215 W. Central Ave., 5-5179
MAIN OFFICE:
Miami-1034 N.W. 22nd St., Ph. 82-1671
Distributor
DUDLEY CAWTHON, INC.
Representative
E. G. "Don" Graham


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N.C.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINES
Division of National Cooperatives
World's Most Complete Line of Milking
Equipment
L. H. HALL-DEALER
5240 N. W. 7th Avenue Miami, Florida


36 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory







AGAIN DINSMORE FARMS WIN TOP AWARDS
At the South's Largest Winter Show
FLORIDA STATE FAIR, TAMPA, FLORIDA

PREMIER EXHIBITOR AWARD
(All breeds competing) presented by Florida Dairy Association

PREMIER BREEDER AWARD
(All breeds competing) presented by Florida Grower and Rancher Magazine
For the Third Consecutive Time Every Animal in Our Show String
was Bred and Raised At Dinsmore


THE GRAND CHAMPION


GREAT GRANDMOTHER
CHAMPION


OF JUNIOR


Dinsmore Jury Linnie
9959-453-Jr4-305C (Pending)
On retest milking over 50# per day
Sire: Dinsmore Juryman


Dinsmore Royal May
15261-643-5yr-305C
EXCELLENT-$10,000
Maternal sister to sire of Linnie (at left)


The Junior Champion, Dinsmore Nobly Georgella, as well as 'Linnie",
is from the 'Royal May' family.

Mr. Ralph Coarsey has just selected 5 young springers, all due with their first
calves in July and August to go to the Alabama State Sale on April 30 at Birming-
ham, Alabama fair grounds.


Write us for catalogs then select


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
S BRADY S. JOHNSTON








You Can Milk FASTER

with a Better Pump




as little uas

DOWN

Puts a New Surge Pump
in your hrn
Thousands of very busy dairy far-
mers are getting slow milking
because-while the vacuum pump is
still clunking along after a fashion
-it is just not big enough or moving
Maybe you'd like to add another
Surge milker unit and milk a few
... more cows or milk your present
herd faster.
The right pump will help you do
it and pay for itself in man-hours
saved. The Surge Plan makes it
easy to buy a new pump.


Surge Vacuum Pumping Outfit for 2 Units $------ $ 7.50 DOWN
Surge Vacuum Pumping Outfit for 3 to 4 Units-- 10.00 DOWN
Surge Vacuum Pumping Outfit for 6 to 8 Units-- 20.00 DOWN
Surge Vacuum Pumping Outfit for 8 to 12 Units- 22.50 DOWN
UP TO 24 MONTHS TO PAY
Right is reserved to withdraw this proposition at any time.

BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 W. 19TH STREET CHICAGO 23, ILLINOIS
ATLANTA CHICAGO HOUSTON KANSAS CITY
MINNEAPOLIS SACRAMENTO SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO
Copyright 1955 Babson Bros. Co.




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