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Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00029
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 3d quarter 1955
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00029
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Back Cover
        Page 43
        Page 44
Full Text





































































'-A

JACKSONVILLE BOY WINS BICYCLE WITH 3,800 MILK BOTTLE CAPS AND CARTONS
(See page 12)


:` :i.l
~J~i%
I:-~S. ~ Eru?~i*i~
~4t~ji. '"*







TELCTRORAIA
Patent Pending


The


SURGE

Automatic

High-Velocity

Push Button

Pipeline Washer


"The right routine
locked up in a box
that has no key"


ELECTROBRAIN is a fully automatic timing de-
vice designed specifically to handle the cycles of
C. I. P. (Cleaned In Place) washing of milk lines
and milking equipment.
Electrobrain is never hurried- never forgets
- is never careless. The right and accepted rou-
tine is the only one that it knows.


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 W. 19th St., Chicago 23, 111.


ATLANTA HOUSTON KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS SACRAMENTO *
I Babson Bros. Co., 2843 W. 19th St., Chicago 23, Ill., Dept. FDN
SPlease send me further details on ELECTROBRAIN.
I have cows.
1 I am interested in a pipeline system.
O I have a pipeline now installed.
NAME_
AD ES (Please Print)
ADDRESS,
NNNN am mmmmMMmmmmmmm


SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO

for further information on
TLECTROBRAIM'
Send this blank for a
brief booklet on the new
Surge system of pipeline
"Cleaning in Place."


Co i ht 1954









UNDERFEEDING LOWERS MILK PRODUCTION


UP TO 20% IN 2 OUT OF 3 COWS!


Yet, Larro SUREMILK,
properly fed, makes
most undermilkers give
up to 20% more milk!
After checking production records
of over 100,000 cows from large and
small herds, General Mills proved
that 2 out of 3 cows actually under-
milk by 20%, or 2,000 lbs. per cow
per lactation! However, when under-
fed cows were put on Larro SURE-
MILK (or SUREMILK 32 and grain)
milk production increased up to
20%, proving SUREMILK contains
all the nutrients a dairy cow needs
to milk most efficiently.
What Is SUREMILK?
SUREMILK is General Mills' bal-
anced dairy ration supplying pro-
teins, energy sources, minerals and
trace minerals needed for high profit
dairying. Both SUREMILK and SURE-
MILK 32 aid rumen bacteria in
doing a more complete job of digest-
ing roughage.
Mineral Feeding Eliminated!
Because SUREMILK and SUREMILK
32 contain Larromin, General Mills'
own trace mineral formula, no extra
mineral supplement is ever needed
when either is fed correctly.


\


I


Would you keep a cow that couldn't use all of her udder to produce milk? Would you allow 20%
of the milk to remain in the udder? You certainly wouldn't. Then why let underfeeding hold back
your cow's milk. You know, 2 out of 3 cows can really milk heavier and, when switched to Sure-
Milk, actually increased production up to 20% and morel


SUREMILK Satisfies... Or Else!
If you are not completely satisfied
with Larro SUREMILK or SUREMILK
32, notify your Larro Dealer or
salesman. He'll arrange to pick up
the unused feed and refund its pur-
chase price.


Figure the Plusses...Feed for
Plus Production
Your Larro SURE FEED Dealer has
full information on profitable dairy-
ing with SUREMILK or SUREMILK
32. To get all the milk your cows
can profitably produce, see him soon.


SUREMILK 32 Makes Ohioan
171/2c More Profit Per Cwt.
C. D. Richey, registered Ayrshire
breeder from Fincastle, Ohio, knows
he makes more profit with SURE-
MILK 32. He writes:
"I put my herd on SUREMILK 32
and grain for a full DHIA test year.
The next year, I went back to my
previous brand (a prominent na-
tional brand). The feeding method
remained the same," . but what
a difference in profit over feed cost!
ON SUREMILK 32
Price of milk per cwt. ... $4.60
Cost to produce per cwt. 1.41%
Profit over feed cost
with Larro . .......... 3.18% /cwt.
ON OTHER BRAND
Price of milk per cwt.... $4.98
Cost to produce per cwt.. 1.97
Profit over feed cost with
other brand ............ 3.01/cwt.
Extra profit from
SUREMILK despite lower
milk price.............. .17% /cwt.
Mr. Richey adds, "Needless to say,
I am back on Larro and I surely can
recommend it!"
Another testimonial which adds to
the evidence that "You're Money
Ahead When They're Larro-fed!"


ROAMIN' IN
THE RUMEN
4I" by Steve Carter
of General Mills

The rumen of cattle
S holds billions of tiny
animals called bac-
teria. These bacteria tear down and
digest roughages. To do this com-
pletely and economically, they must
be properly fed. Just like other ani-
mals, they need a blend of proteins,
minerals, trace minerals and energy
all balanced properly.
The better the bacteria's ration is
balanced, the more complete is
roughage digestion. And since rough-
age is the basis of dairy nutrition,
an efficient job of digestion by the
rumen bacteria means more profit
over feed cost.
Larro Research Farm and other
dairy scientists are developing bet-
ter rations for the dairy cow and her
rumen bacteria. In the future, dairy
feeding may be largely a matter of
feeding her rumen bacteria.


SM-2-54
General Mills
Minneapolis 1, Minnesota


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 0 1


T~-~ds








Florida dairymen are talking about...


PURINA BULKY-LAS...A GOOD


CITRUS PULP SUPPLEMENT!


Good roughage is often the key to
dairy profits. That's one reason why
Purina developed Bulky-Las-to help
turn lower-quality roughage into good.
Hundreds of dairymen mix Bulky-Las
with poor roughage. The reasons are
not hard to find.
BULKY-LAS is a BIG bag of highly
palatable, nutritious dairy feed. It has
proteins, minerals, and vitamins that
are usually lacking in citrus pulp and
other poor or average roughages. For
building condition and whetting the
appetite, Bulky-Las has plenty of mo-
lasses mixed into it. And finally, it's
high in carbohydrates, making it a
good, substantial feed that cows really
go for and clean up.
That's why so many Florida dairymen
are using Purina Bulky-Las to supple-
ment citrus pulp. They've found the
roughage mixture of one-third Bulky
Las and two-thirds citrus pulp is a real
milk booster. Bulky-Las is a cow condi-
tioner, too, and extra cow condition
always means extra milk.


Ask your Purina Dealer about Bulky-Las
today. It comes in big 5-bushel bags that
cost a lot less than you might think.

RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
Tampa Miami


Look How PURINA

BULKY-LAS Balances

Out Citrus Pulp

* 03 0 3 0


FEEDING VALUES


BULKY-LAS


CITRUS
PULP


Digestible Nutrients High Low
Palatability
and Relish Very High Low
Lime and Phosphorus High Low
* Variety High None
Bulk High High
Protein Medium Low
* Conditioning Value Very High Good
Laxative Value Very High High
Cud-Making
* Character Excellent Good
Heating Qualities Low Low
00
* -




* *PURINA .

BULKY-LAS
NHOW


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS









EDITORIALS


Freedom Of The Press To Mislead The Public
Newspapers talk loud and long about the freedom of the press but some of them
come up short in printing facts and particularly when the facts pertain to milk prices
and the Florida Milk Commission.
A Miami paper on July 31 carried great headlines saying "Miami Milk Prices
May Drop By 2 Cents Within 90 Days." The article goes on to say "lower milk
prices for greater Miami families within the next 90 days appeared almost certain
Saturday." To back up this statement the article points to a recent University of
Florida survey of milk production costs. The survey is quoted as finding that the cost
of producing milk in the Miami area has declined more than 6 cents a gallon in the
last two years.
After playing up the above in the heading and sub-headings of the article, the
writer mentions near the bottom of his misleading article that "The study noted that
the cost estimates do not include interest charges on investment and depreciation on
buildings and equipment." Nor did it include an allowance for unpaid labor and
managerial services.
The University's report states that the combined cost items not included in the
production cost estimates of the survey comprise one-fifth to one-tenth of the total
costs.
The same article states that the Miami milk price of 26c a quart is the "highest
in the nation." The fact that this statement is untrue can be verified by the official
monthly Fluid Milk Price Report of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. This
report for July 1955 lists nine cities with a milk price equal to or greater than in
Miami and in most of these the butterfat content of the milk is considerably less than
in the Miami area.



Uninformed Criticism Called Lamentable
Published in The Congressional Record, May 5, 1955, at the request of U. S.
Senator Aiken of Vermont was a statement of the Commissioner of Agriculture of
Vermont under the heading "Criticisms of the Dairy Industry."
The following quotations from this article are of interest: "The dairy industry
is now going through a period of criticism from the staff writers and editors of many
of our newspapers and magazines that have very wide national circulation. The
industry has constant, extensive criticisms in newspapers. This is the way abuses
are brought to light, and corrected, and in general is one of the factors which has
made this country great and keeps it that way. It is lamentable, however, that dairy
articles read by so many people are so often written by persons who have only the
most superficial knowledge of the subject and are slanted to make headlines and stir
up popular prejudice rather than to offer constructive criticism and factually inform
the public of the good as well as the bad. Articles which by inference condemn the
entire industry as being dominated by dealer monopolies, and profiteering farmers,
all operating under a complicated maze of governmental sanitary and price-fixing
regulations, detrimental to the public interest. While true some of the time in some
place, these conditions are not typical.
"Dairy products have increased much less in price during the period of inflation
than the average of all other foods. The cost of distributing milk is increasing,
principally due to increased service, labor costs, and in some measure to increased
dealer profits. Percentagewise, this increased cost of distribution is less than the
average for other foods. One hour of average industrial wages will now buy 9 quarts
of milk. In 1940 1 hour's wages bought 4 quarts of milk. Not everyone has the
money to buy all the milk they need. This same group cannot afford medical care or
good education for their children. The problems of the lowest income groups cannot
be solved by the dairy industry, but must be handled by society as a whole. If milk
costs as much for the value furnished as other foods and services, these low-income
people would be much worse off. Retail prices which occur at the low point in price
are not a sound basis for comparisons or conclusions.
"The dairy industry is serving the public by furnishing the world's best, high-
quality food at a very low price. Quality and efficiency is improving very rapidly.
In some places some very obvious faults need correcting. Public health, good
nutrition, and the general economy can best be served by giving due recognition to
the excellence of the product furnished at a reasonable price and not by inferring that
isolated abuses are typical of this vital, rapidly advancing industry."


THIRD QUARTER 1955


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Elitor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
C. D. WAYNE, President
Miami

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
W. A. BOUTWELL, SR., President
Lake Worth

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
A. T. ALVAREZ, SR., President
Jacksonville

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, SR., President
Miami

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
DR. H. H. ROTHE, President
Gainesville

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Committee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
C. D. WAYNE, President
Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami
GEO. F. JOHNSON, 1st V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Producers' Division, West Palm Beach
T. G. LEE, 2nd V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Distributors' Division, Orlando

Additional Producers
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Gainesville

Additional Distributors
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jacksonville,
Florida. Subscription price is $1.00 a year.
Entered as second class mail at the Post
Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under Act of
March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.

NATIONAL EDITORIAL


Member Florida Press Association
Member Florida Press Association


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 3


. 5


SVOL


NO. 3












































Both breeding and feeding go into the make-up of good cattle.
The breeding of Florida cattle is being improved rapidly with
the use of good bulls but hand-in-hand with this MUST go a con-
tinuous supply of good pasture.
This calls for a carefully thought-out plan or program of good
pasture management-good pastures such as these shown side by
side with grass on the left and White Dutch Clover on the right.
Wilson & Toomer has been active for nearly seven decades in
the development of citrus, vegetable and other production programs.
Now we are working with our many pasture customers to help
further their pasture improvement planning.
September is the month to set up pasture management plans for
wintering cattle and providing quality pasture for the '56 calf crop.
Contact your Wilson & Toomer representative and he will help
you plan maximum care of your cattle at minimum cost.


4


a@


WILSON r TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
QEN.ERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


MILK COMMISSION NEWS

AREA MILK COST HEARINGS
ON AUGUST 30-31
The Florida Milk Commission will
meet in Lakeland for the second of a
series of area milk cost hearings which
are to cover, as soon as possible, all milk
market areas of the State.
The first area hearing was held in
Miami, July 18-20; this is being followed
up by special auditors employed by the
Commission to assemble and analyze the
production and operating costs of both
milk producers and distributors of the
area.
The Florida Dairy Association had of-
ficially recommended to the Commission
back in February this year that such cost
surveys be made throughout the State.
COMMISSION MEMBERS RESIGN
Both the chairman of the Commission,
Raymond Lee of Clearwater, and the
producer member, Ben S. Waring, Madi-
son, recently submitted resignations to
Governor Collins.
The resignations have not been ac-
cepted and there has been some hope
that the Governor may request both these
members to continue on the Commission.
ATTORNEY GENERAL RULES
COMMISSION SETS FINES
For many years the Milk Commission
has followed a policy of allowing a per-
son who elects to pay a fine in lieu of
losing his license as a penalty for a viola-
tion to propose the amount of the fine to
be paid.
The Commission recently asked the
Attorney General for an official inter-
pretation of the law on this question and
was advised that the Commission should
set the amount of any fine to be paid
to the Commission.
TWO COUNTIES INCLUDED
UNDER COMMISSION CONTROL
Sumter and Union Counties have re-
cently been approved for Milk Commis-
sion supervision. Sumter County was
added to the Central Florida area which
includes Orange, Seminole, Osceola, Lake,
and Sumter Counties. Union County was
added to the Alachua County area.
No changes were made in either the
farm or retail prices of milk in the
counties added to the jurisdiction of the
Commission
Indications are that dairymen of Marion
County will soon file a petition with the
Commission to be included under the
supervision of the Commission.


Boss: "It gives me great pleasure to
give you this $10 raise."
Employee: "Why not make it 20 and
really have fun?"









NEWS AND VIEWS

Dairies Urge Milk Prices Based Only On Facts
During recent months the Florida Dairy Association has advocated thorough sur-
veys and cost studies by the Florida Milk Commission to determine in all areas of
the State complete up to date facts on the costs of milk production, and of milk
processing and distribution.
It was argued that fact finding on milk
costs is urgently needed in order that
widespread claims and representations Florida Milk Price Facts
about Florida Milk Prices can be properly
appraised, but that more important still
was the need for the public to know the The Florida Dairy Association sub-
facts. mitted the following milk price data to
The Milk Commission eventually the Florida Milk Commission at the Com-
adopted a program to survey Milk Costs mission's public hearing in Miami, July
in all areas of the State and in the course 18th:
of these surveys to hold one or more pub- (1) A price increase comparison of 22
lic hearings on the subject in each of the food and other home necessity items
Commission's 17 Milk Marketing Areas. with the price increase of milk ..
The first step of these hearings was in the Miami area . made just
held in Miami, July 18-19-20. The first prior to the hearing . disclosed
information submitted by the dairies and the following facts:
dairymen of the area to the Milk Com-
mission was a joint resolution by the milk The 22 items other than milk
producers and distributors of the area increased from 70% to 275% with
urging the Commission to secure all the an average increase of 146%, as
facts of milk costs in the area and deter- compared to an increase of only
mine reasonable minimum milk prices 58.8% for homogenized milk.
accordingly. Note: Prices used were taken from
This resolution which was made a part ads in the Miami Herald, July 1940
of the official record of the hearing is and July 1955.
quoted, in part, as follows: (2) The average price increase of the
"The undersigned milk producers and three lower price automobiles-
distributors representing a large majority Ford, Plymouth and Chevrolet-
of the milk produced, processed and sold (using the factory price) was 126%
in the Miami Area, hereby request that as compared to the milk increase
consideration be given to all segments of of only 58.8%.
the milk and milk products handling
business which includes the producers of (3) The farm price by Miami milk dis-
milk, the distributors of milk, and the tributors in 27 representative cities
retailers of milk; and that average cost of of the country . .
handling milk and milk products be de- While the Miami distributors pro-
termined accurately and fairly for all cessing and distribution cost mark
three above mentioned groups producing up above the farm buying price was
and handling milk and milk products, two cents per gallon less than the
and that the price set shall cover ade- average of these 27 cities.
quately these average costs of the above
groups which will enable them to make a
fair return on their investment as out- STATE CONTROL PREFERRED
lined in the Florida Milk Control Act.
Indications are that efforts are being
Three Courses of Action directed toward promotion of legislation
For The Dairy Industry in the United States Congress which
Speaking at the Annual Meeting of the would restrict the powers and activities of
Florida Dairy Association in June, Dr. state and local governments with respect
Tom Douglas, official of the Milk Indus- to standards and inspection of milk and
try Foundation, Washington, D. C., said t a
the Florida Dairy Industry had a choice other dairy products.
of three courses of action concerning One state dairy organization has al-
the problems of the industry. These ready declared war on any such legislation
choices, he said, are like those of a boy
who had fallen into the current of a deep and we predict that state and local organi-
stream, zations of the dairy industry as well as
He could: 1. Do nothing and sink. most health authorities will stand solidly
2. Float and go down stream. 3. Swim against the passage of any such Federal
and get out. Control Legislation.


Dairy Industry "Jaycees,"
Your Attention, Please!
Members of the Florida Dairy Industry
who are members of the Junior Chamber
of Commerce should know and do some-
thing about a Resolution adopted at the
1.955 Miami Beach State Convention of
the Florida Junior Chamber of Commerce
which strikes at your industry.
This resolution adopted May 1st "urges
the legislature to abolish the price fixing
power of the Florida Milk Commission."
Such action by these young business
men of Florida indicates, in our opinion,
that they are either misinformed or unin-
formed about the dairy industry and the
benefits to the people and the economy of
the State of Florida of the moderate price
stabilizing functions of the Florida Milk
Commission.
Not only the Jaycees who are a part of
the dairy industry but all responsible
members of the industry should make use
of every opportunity to furnish informa-
tion on this subject to the members and
local organizations of the State Junior
Chamber of Commerce.
Text of Resolution
"WHEREAS, The Florida J u n i o r
Chamber of Commerce is vitally interest-
ed in the basic and cherished principals
of Americanism, free enterprise and com-
petition, and
"WHEREAS, our great Nation has de-
veloped to its position of leadership in
the world today through the practice and
application of these principals and
"WHEREAS, the price fixing powers
of the Florida Milk Commission are in-
consistent with these principles;
"NOW BE IT THEREFORE RE-
SOLVED: that The Florida Junior Cham-
ber of Commerce duly assembled in State
Convention this 1st day of May, 1955, in
Miami, does urge the Legislature of the
State of Florida to abolish the price fixing
power of the Florida Milk Commission,
and
"BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that
copies of this resolution be forwarded to
each member of the Florida Legislature."

IT'S NOT NEWS,
BUT HAVE YOU HEARD?
Dairy plant and farm improvements
and new equipment are sound invest-
ments.
This year, and every year, some of your
profits should be plowed back into im-
provements and equipment.
Good equipment and well organized
methods will result in: A better product;
Reduced costs; Greater demand and more
profit for your products; Less labor and
better working conditions.
"The Dairy Record."


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 5








$50.00 In Cash Prizes Awarded

In Teen-Age Milk Essay Contest
Boy Age 12 Wins 1st Prize
While Girls Win 2nd and 3rd
Twelve year old George Collins III of Perry, Florida is the proud winner of the
$25.00 first place award offered by the Florida Dairy Association in a teen-age contest
on "Why I Drink Milk."
The contest which ended June 30th was sponsored by the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation through the readers of "The Florida Dairy News Home Edition" of which
95,000 were delivered to homes during May and June by milk drivers.
Rules of the contest limited the participants to under 16 years of age and the
composition to not over 200 words.
Winner of the 2nd place $15.00 award in the contest was 15 year old Patty
Judge, a 10th grade student of Mainland
High School, Daytona Beach, while 11 issues of the Dairy News: Lou Russell-
year old Beverly Battle, 7th grade student age 11 Perry, Sue Collie age 13 -
of Manatee Junior High School of Bra- West Palm Beach, Jeffrey Biegler age
denton, won the $10.00 3rd place award. 13 Boca Raton, David Anderson age
Judges of the 10 compositions entered 9-Dinsmore, Landis Patrick-Ft. Wal-
in the contest were: Dr. E. L. Fouts, ton Beach, Bette Levy age 11 -Jack-
Head of the Dept. of Dairy Science, Uni- sonville, and Elaine Campbell -age 13
versity of Florida and Dr. H. H. Wil- Jacksonville.
kowske, Dr. L. E. Mull and Prof. Walter These contestants received a $1.00
Krienke, all associated with the Univer- Consolation prize and an invitation to
sity Dept. of Dairy Science. visit their favorite local dairy farm and
The following contestants received ice cream plant to learn more about
"honorable mention" for their composi- milk and how milk and ice cream are
tions which will be carried in succeeding produced.


ibew .


DAIRY MONTH PROGRAM SEES NATIONAL GAIN
special dairy speakers at civic club meet-
hile the 1955 June Dairy Month ings and various others. One local corn-
am experienced a considerable na- mittee sponsored a successful milk sales
increase in activities, Florida increase contest during June, awarding a
ped behind its record years in this U.S. Government Bond to each driver
rtant program. who achieved a certain percentage of in-
reased sponsorship of television, creased sales.
and advertising programs, together The Jacksonville Dairy Council's milk
well-planned special individual dairy bottle and cap contest on the radio was
dairy organization sponsored pro- probably the outstanding stunt program.
s developed largely by the American A story about this feature is carried
Association accounted for the sharp separately in this issue and it is shown
ise in the over-all 1955 participation on the "cover picture". Jacksonville 4-H
June Dairy Month program. clubs did a fine job in sponsoring a dairy
e new activity in Florida was the milk display in a downtown store win-
orshiD by the Florida Dairy Asso- dow.


citation of special Dairy Month posters
which were furnished Florida postmasters
for use during the last half of June on
post office trucks. 750 posters were furn-
ished for this purpose.
Local Dairy Month committees in prin-
cipal Florida cities carried on various
special activities including dairy displays
in downtown areas, exhibits of dairy
cows and calves in city playgrounds,


With the Florida Legislature in session
through the first week in June this year,
the Florida Dairy Association was unable
to plan and sponsor an active State-wide
Dairy Month program which Florida
should have. However, the Annual Con-
vention of the Dairy Association held
late in June attracted considerable atten-
tion and served as a fitting climax to
Dairy Month.


1st PRIZE ESSAY


WHY I DRINK MILK
By George Collins
I drink milk because I like the taste
of it. To me, nothing tastes better than
cold milk in summer and warm cocoa in
winter.
Milk is served with our lunch in the
school cafeteria. I always drink mine be-
cause I want to gain in
height and weight as
'.,I should.
I have learned that
milk is the most near-
ly perfect food in our
diet and is good for
everybody.
It is the best food
to make children grow
strong and healthy for
COLLINS it contains the food
materials necessary for good health. It is
needed to grow strong muscles, bones,
and teeth.
The best athletic champions have been
milk-drinkers and always looked well and
happy. So I will continue to drink milk
and hope to develop into a good athlete
as I grow older.
Milk is one of the cheapest foods on
the market and one of the most nourish-
ing.
I can be healthier, happier, and serve
others better if I keep well and strong
by drinking milk.
I am grateful to you for pointing out
the "Fountain of Youth" for me before
I felt the need of it. I will encourage
other children to drink milk.


6 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


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GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Florida Guernsey Cattle Club

Announces 17th Annual Sale
The sales committee of the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club has announced that the
17th annual State Guernsey Sale will be held on September 16 at 1:00 P.M. at the
4-H Building in Largo, Florida. The sales headquarters will be the Sea Shell Hotel
in Clearwater. On Thursday evening, the Florida Guernsey Cattle Club will be hosts
to consignors, buyers and friends at a buffet supper at Donegan Farms, Largo.
Sixteen herds in Florida and fifty-six T c
out-of-State herds were inspected by the The cattle will be in the barns atthe
sales committee in making selections for 4-H Building in Largo two days before
this Sale. Many good previous consignors sale time and can be inspected at any
were ruled out because vaccination was time.
required and stress was put on good type Florida Breeders Purchase
with good production background. Since
the base-making period in most of Florida Registered Guernsey Sires
is November through January, every The following Florida purchases of
animal selected will be at her peak dur- The gi fol g Florida purchases of
ing that period. There will be about registered Guernsebysires have been an-
twelve fresh by or before sale time and bounced recently by the American Guern-
the balance will be due by November 15. sey Cattle Club:
There are some outstanding Show pros- VELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC., Tal-
pects in the offering, lahassee, have purchased two: Wyno
With the increasing popularity of the Stately Peer, from Alvin R. Bush, Muncy,
Guernsey cow and the increased demand Pennsylvania. This young bull is out of
for Golden Guernsey milk in Florida this Charmel's Hi Peer's Minerva, that has
sale should provide a fine opportunity once been classified Very Good for type,
for the Florida dairyman to add some and is sired McDonald Farms Pre States-
Golden Guernsey milk and some out- man. Also, McDonald Farms High Laird,
standing individual cows to his herd. from George W. Snyder, St. Johns, Penn-
This year's Sale Committee was made sylvania. This bull is out of the high-pro-
up of J. T. Christian, Donegan Farms, during McDonald Farms Honoria, and is
Largo, ChaTrman; Earl Jensen, Boutwell's sired by McDonald Farms Hightime.
Dairy, Lake Worth; and Carroll Ward, CHARLES M. WATTS, Haines City,
Jr., Lay Laine Guernsey Dairy, Golden- has just purchased Bayou Vista Robert's
rod. Leon H. Sellers, Sr., Sellers Gurnsey Sydney, from Arlen R. Wetherington,
Farm, St. Petersburg, accompanied the Sydney, Florida. This young bull is out
committee on the out-of-State selections. (Continued on Page 25)


20 Tons Corn Per Acre On Dinsmore Dairy Farm
The Dinsmore Guernsey Dairy farm near Jacksonville put up silage in a hurry
while cutting from a 12 acre field of corn that produced 20 tons per acre.
The pictures above show Earl Johnson, one of the Dinsmore Dairy partners,
standing in the edge of the 10 to 11 feet high corn of the prize 12 acre tract. Mr.
Johnson emphasized the fact that while he is proud of the production on this small
acreage, the other 58 acres of the dairy's 1955 corn crop produced less average per
acre tonnage. In the other picture, Mr. Johnson is seen operating their new PAPEC
FORAGE HARVESTER, which was used in harvesting a total of more than 600
tons of corn silage this season.


Outstanding Records Made
By Florida Guernseys
Two registered Guernsey bulls, owned
by Florida breeders, have recently become
nationally recognized sires, according to
an announcement by the American Guern-
sey Cattle Club. Complete official in-
formation is now available so that a
thorough study of the transmitting ability
of these sires can be made.
Brays Island Bon-Ton's Supreme, owned
by W. E. GOODYEAR, Ocala-This regis-
tered Guernsey sire's first six tested daughters
have six actual official records that average
11,392 pounds of milk and 570 pounds of fat.
His top daughter, Bonnie's Supreme Belle, has
a record of 12,123 pounds of milk and 658
pounds of fat.
Lakemont Anthony's Steadfast, owned by
CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod. This
registered Guernsey sire's first six tested
daughters have records that average 8,483
pounds of milk and 442 pounds of fat. His
top daughter, Lakemont Steadfast Belle, has
a record of 13,650 pounds of milk and 681
pounds of fat on regular testing schedule.
Registered Guernsey cows which have
made records in recent reports include:
Dinsmore Actor lowanite, owned by Dins-
more Dairy Co., Dinsmore-This cow has just
completed a state champion production record
by producing 12,833 pounds of milk and 629
pounds of fat, which is the highest Advance
Registry record in Florida, made by a junior
four-year-old on three time daily milking for
305 days and met calving requirements.
Dinsmore Maxmost Bloom, owned by
Donegan Farms, Largo-In official Herd Im-
provement Registry test this cow produced
12,063 pounds of milk and 555 pounds of fat.
"Bloom" was an eight-year-old and was milked
two times daily on this test. She is a daughter
of Quail Roost Maxmost.
Cone's Roscoe Lady, owned by J. H. Cone,
Plant City-This cow, as a junior two-year-
old, produced 8,066 pounds of milk and 438
pounds of fat while on test. She is a daughter
of Cone's Cavalier Roscoe that has four tested
daughters in the performance register of the
AGCC.
Six registered cows owned by Carroll
L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod, have completed
official Advanced Registry tests:
Lakemont Judy's Esther on 365 days test
produced 11,195 pounds of milk and 567
pounds of fat as a junior two-year-old. She is
the daughter of Riegeldale Emory's Judicator.
Lakemont Independent Judy, daughter of
Elm Farm Independent, in 305 days produced
8,063 pounds of milk and 437 pounds of fat
as a junior two-year-old.
Lakemont Steadfast Gerty, daughter of
Lakemont Anthony's Steadfast, in 305-day
test, produced 8,867 pounds of milk and 450
pounds of fat as a junior two-year-old.
Lakemont Midnight's Pride, daughter of
Midnight Hero of The Glen, produced 8,945
pounds of milk and 447 pounds of fat in 305-
day test, also as a junior two-year-old.
Lakemont Noble's Goldie, daughter of
Riegeldale Emory's Noble, produced, 8,420
pounds of milk and 497 pounds of fat as a
junior two-year-old in the regular 305-day
test.
Kitty's Knight's Cupid, daughter of Rai-
ford's Noblest Knight, starting her record as
an eight-year-old on 305-day test, produced
13,143 pounds of milk and 629 pounds of fat.
HOSPITALITY: The art of making a
guest feel at home when you really wish
he were.-Tom Douglas, M.I.F.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







17th ANNUAL STATE GUERNSEY SALE
4-H Building, Largo, Florida Friday, September 16, 1:00 P.M.

45 Head Top, Heavy-Springers and Fresh Cows and Heifers
All Calfhood Vaccinated, Strain 19, for Bangs
CONSIGNMENTS INCLUDE ANIMALS FROM 8 STATES, as follows: FLORIDA, Dinsmore
Farm, Boutwell and Matheson, Inc., Waldrep's Dairy, Lakemont Dairy, Lay Laine Dairy, Bayou
Vista Dairy, Donegan Farm, Hiatt's Dairy, Sellers' Dairy, Velda Farm; ALABAMA, Sargents
Farm; SOUTH CAROLINA, Hilltop Dairy, MarMac Farm, Edisto Farm; NORTH CARO-
LINA, Maegoe Dairy; VIRGINIA, Bayville Dairy, Pine Grove Farm, Holliknoll Dairy, James
Vaughn Dairy, Bosnells Dairy, Jesse Rawls Dairy, Agnews Farm; MARYLAND, Mt. Ararat
Dairy, Cool Branch Farm, Brooks Cross Dairy, Manor Farm; PENNSYLVANIA, Alva Long
Dairy; NEW JERSEY, Wilgorlan Dairy, Locust Grove Farm.
SALE MANAGED BY FLORIDA GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB
For Catalogues, write John Henry Logan, Secretary, Largo, Florida.
SALES COMMITTEE: J. T. Christian, Largo; Carroll Ward, Jr., Goldenrod; Earl Jensen, Lake Worth.
SALES HEADQUARTERS: Sea Shell Hotel, Clearwater; Fort Harrison Hotel, West Coast Hotel and Motels, available.



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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 9










DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Dairy Club To Meet
The North Florida Dairy Technology
Club will hold its next meeting, Septem-
ber 26th for dinner at 6:30 p.m. at the
Town House Restaurant on U. S. #1,
South.
Membership of the Club includes
Dairy Plant Managers, Superintendents
and employees, as well as representatives
of Allied Trades.
Corwith Davis of Foremost Dairies is
the principal speaker for the meeting.

WEST FLORIDA DAIRY SHOW
The West Florida Dairy Show to be
held November 5 at Chipley is expected
to attract participation from additional
counties and include more dairy cattle ex-
hibits than at any previous show accord-
ing to an announcement of the show's
general chairman, Washington County
Farm Agent Red Davis. The Show will
have 4-H, FFA and Open Classes.

Public Relations Director
For Milk Foundation
The Milk Industry Foundation office
in Washington announced August 29th,
the appointment of J. Carroll Bateman
to the position of Public Relations Direc-
tor.
Bateman, age 38, is a former Eastern
Railroad Public Relations Executive and
instructor of Public Relations at Johns
Hopkins University.

State Unemployment Laws
Increase Weekly Benefits
35 States including Florida amended
their Unemployment Compensation Laws
this year to increase weekly benefits to
eligible unemployed by amounts from
$1.00 to $13.00 a week.
36 State Laws now provide maximum
unemployment benefits as high as $30.00
a week while 11 States provide weekly
benefit amounts which may go higher
than $30.00. These provisions vary in
different states from maximums ranging
from $35.00 to $54.00. The Alaska
maximum is $70.00 and Massachusetts
now allows the full wage under certain
circumstances. Florida increased the
maximum weekly amount from $20.00 to
$26.00. Benefits may be drawn up to 16
weeks.


Fall Schedule Given
For M.I.F. Sales Courses
The Milk Industry Foundation an-
nounces that applications for the Fall
sessions of the Sales Training Institute
are now being accepted.
These intensive two-week sessions,
which are held in Washington, D. C.,
are scheduled as follows: October 3 to
October 14; November 7 to November
18; and November 28 to December 9.
Each session is limited to 20 represen-
tatives of MIF member companies. If in-
terested, write for application blank and
further information to Milk Industry
Foundation at 1145 Nineteenth Street
N.W., Washington 6, D. C.

1955 National Conventions
October 23-28 In St. Louis
The 1955 Annual Conventions of the
National milk and ice cream associations
will be held in St. Louis the week of
October 23-28. The Ice Cream Manu-
facturers meetings are first with business
sessions Monday to Wednesday, October
24-26.
A joint general session of the Ice
Cream group and the Milk Industry
Foundation will be held Wednesday the
26th, followed by the two days schedule
of business sessions by the Milk Founda-
tion on Thursday and Friday.
Hotel reservations should be made on
official forms which have been mailed
to all members of both associations. Mem-
bers can secure extra copies of the reser-
vation forms upon request to "The Milk
Industry Foundation, 1145 Nineteenth
Street, N.W., Washington 6, D. C." or
to "The International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers, Barr Building,
Washington, D. C.


Reagan Dairy Farm
Started At Bradenton
Cecil L. Reagan who formerly operated
a dairy farm in Pinellas County has pur-
chased a 400 acre tract of land East of
Bradenton where he plans to establish a
new dairy farm operation. Two-hundred
acres of the tract is pasture land. The
purchase price of the land, according to
the Bradenton Herald, was $44,000.


Dinsmore Dairy Officials are presented
the Florida Dairy Association Trophy as
"Premiere Exhibitor" in the 1955 State Fair
Dairy Show.
Left to Right are: Charles Johnson, Earl
Johnson, E. T. Lay, Fla. Dairy Assn., V. C.
Johnson.

Dairy Show Dates Announced
For 1956 Florida State Fair
J. C. Huskisson, manager of the
Florida State Fair, has announced January
31 through February 11 as the dates for
the 1956 Fair.
The Dairy Cattle Show is scheduled to
run the first week of the Fair beginning
Tuesday, January 31. The dairy cattle
judging schedule is as follows:
Ayrshire-Jan. 31, 9 A.M.
Holstein-Jan. 31, 10 A.M.
Jersey-Feb. 1, 9 A.M.
Guernsey-Feb. 2, 9 A.M.
Dairy animal judging will be done by
L. O. Colebank. Information concern-
ing the Dairy Show may be secured by
writing J. C. Huskisson, Manager
Florida State Fair, P. O. Box 1231,
Tampa, Florida.

White Belt Dairy, Inc.
Purchases 10,500 Acres
Dr. John DuPuis and his son John
DuPuis, Jr., operators of the White Belt
Dairy of Miami for more than 50 years
have recently announced the sale of most
of the land on which the dairy was oper-
ated inside the city limits of the City of
Miami. They have purchased a large
tract of ranch land in Palm Beach and
Martin Counties. The purchase price of
the tract of over 10,500 acres is reported
at $1,355,000.00.
While the definite plans of the White
Belt dairy for its new holdings are not
known, it is believed that a large milk
production operation as well as beef pro-
duction is planned.
The White Belt Dairy sold its milk and
ice cream processing and distribution
business in Miami to Foremost Dairies
several years ago. John DuPuis, Jr.,
manager of the White Belt Dairy and
farm operations is a past president of the
Florida Dairy Association and a former
chairman of the Florida Livestock Board.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Summary of Dairy Cattle
Show At 1955 Fla. State Fair
The show barn at the Florida State Fair
grounds was comfortably filled for the
first time in its history with the biggest
dairy show ever held in Florida. Approxi-
mately 300 head of Guernsey, Jersey, Ayr-
shire, and Holstein cattle were exhibited.
The Guernsey breed predominated, mak-
ing up more than one-half the entire
show. Entries come from all parts of
Florida, from Alabama, South Carolina,
North Carolina, Illinois, New York and
Connecticut.
Professor Fordyce Ely of Ohio State
University judged the show, and T. W.
Sparks, Assistant Extension Dairyman U.
of F., served as Superintendent.
The cherished "Premier Breeder" Dairy
Trophy and the "Premier Exhibitor"
Trophy were won by Dinsmore Dairy
Farm, Dinsmore, Florida. These trophies
are presented by the Florida Grower and
Rancher and the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion, respectively.
When the champions were selected
from the large exhibit of Guernsey cattle,
Florida Guernseys were definitely in the
spotlight. Boutwell's Dairy, Lake Worth,
had the Grand Champion Female in Ar-
row Farms Queenette, and E. E. Landley,
Union, S. C., showed the Reserve Cham-
pion Female. Coastal Dairy, Stuart, Fla.,
showed Oakhurst Eastern Duke to the
Grand Championship in the Bull Divi-
sion, and Edisto Farms, Denmark, S. C.,
exhibited the Reserve Champion Bull.
Edisto Farms won the Get-of-Sire, and
Waldrep Dairy, Hollywood, Fla., won
the Produce of Dam.
In the Jersey show, Sanitary Dairy,
Dothan, Ala., walked away with a big
portion of the major laurels, winning the
Grand Championship and the Reserve
Grand Championship in both the Bull
and Cow Division. J. K. Stuart, of
Bartow, won the coveted Get-of-Sire
award on the Get of Dandy Noble Sir,
and Sanitary Dairy won the Produce-of-
Dam.
The Grand Champion and the Reserve
Grand Champion Aryshire Bulls were
owned by George Patrick, Chrysman, Ill.
Patrick also owned the Reserve Champion
Cow. The Grand Champion Cow was
owned by Strathglass Farm, Port Chester,
N. Y. On the last day of the dairy show,
the annual Aryshire Sale was held with
about 35 head being sold.
The 1955 show was the first in recent
years that Holstein cattle have been
shown. Although the number of cattle
was small, the quality was excellent. The
Grand Champion Female was won by
Land O'Sun Dairy, Miami, and the Re-
serve went to Lucky Eleven Dairy, Miami.
Best three females was won by Herman
Boyd, President Florida Holstein Cattle
Club and partner in the Hall and Boyd
Dairy, Miami.


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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 11









DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


Bill Graham Is F.D.A. President-Elect
Lee and Sargeant Vice-Presidents For 1956
Miami Producer Given Top Association Post When
Vice-President George Johnson Declines Election
Members of the Florida Dairy Association can look forward to another year of
well qualified and hard working leadership when they consider the men named at
the Clearwater Annual Meeting to serve as the Association's officers and directors
beginning next January for the year 1956.
Bill Graham, who was elected President following the request of 1st Vice-Pres-
ident George Johnson that he not be elected, will assume the leadership of the Asso-
ciation just ten years after his father, Ernest Graham, served as President.
As a University of Florida graduate and with years of dairy farm management
in partnership with his able father, Bill has been looked upon as a future leader of
the industry since he first became active as a director of the Assoication.
Tom Lee, who as First Vice-President Alligator Club President Joe Hammons.
for Distributors has been recognized as an Alf Nielsen is an Honorary Director.
able dairyman and leader in the industry
for many years, will continue for the sec- Tallahassee Producer
ond year as Chairman of the Distributors'
Division, while John Sargeant, who be- Is New F.D.A. Director
comes Second Vice-President and Chair- C. C. SELLERS, well known dairyman
man of the Producers' Division, also is of Leon County since 1942, was named a
well qualified by excellent experience in producer director of the Florida Dairy
dairying as well as through other posi- Association at the Annual Convention of
tions of leadership, including the presi- the Association in Clearwater, June 24.
dency of the Guernsey Cattle Club for Mr. Sellers was
two terms. elected to fill the va-
W. J. Barritt as Treasurer and Walter cancy left among the
Burton as Assistant Treasurer have made producer directors of
such a good team that they were prevailed the Association when
upon to continue in these important posts. A. T. Alvarez of
To rlrnnvril Ip whn


Ten Directors Elected
At last year's convention director's
terms were changed from one ot three
years and to get the new system working,
the thirty directors who began their terms
January 1954, cast lots for one, two or
three terms. Those who drew the one year
terms were subject to reelection at this
years Annual Meeting. Producers of this
group were: John Adkinson, Pensacola;
John Hentz, Panama City; John McMul-
len, Clearwater; J. H. Adams, Jackson-
ville; and there was one vacancy. These
were reelected with the exception of John
Hentz. This directorship went to R. L.
Lunsford of Milton and C. C. Sellers,
Tallahassee, was elected to fill the va-
cancy.
Distributors who had a one-year term
were: T. G. Lee, Orlando; W. J. Barritt,
Jr., Tampa; John Hood, Bradenton; Don-
ald Perret, Jacksonville; and Freeman
Hales, Miami. All these were reelected.
Ten other directors will serve through the
year 1956 and ten others continue
through 1957.
Ex-Officio Directors for 19.56 will be
the President, Bill Graham; the immedi-
ate past-president, C. D. Wayne; and


was elected for 1955,
declined to s e r v e.
Sellers was elected S RS
for the half-year un- SELLERS
expired term and for a full three-year
term which will begin January 1956.
Seller's election gives West Florida its
fourth producer director in the area from
Tallahassee to Pensacola which has a
heavy concentration of the State's milk
producers.
He is well qualified for a position of
leadership in the dairy industry through
both education and experience. After
graduating from the University of Flor-
ida in 1937, he taught vocational agri-
culture until he started his Leon County
dairy in 1942. The Sellers Dairy Farm
operated on 251 acres has a herd of 200
dairy cattle, many of which are registered
Jerseys.
C. C. and Mrs. Sellers, formerly Mary
Richard, whom he married in Tallahassee
in 1936, have four sons now 18, 16, 14
and 7 years old. Seller's ability as a
dairyman is evidenced by the fact that his
son Erny was a member of the Florida
State 4-H Dairy Judging team for 1954,
competing in the National 4-H judging at


Radio Milk Carton Contest
Tops Dairy Month Projects
(See Cover Picture, Also)
The picture above and the cover pic-
ture tell this story convincingly but some
further details will be of interest concern-
ing this unusual Dairy Month project.
Jacksonville's live-wire radio program
specialist Jack Wheeler conducts a regu-
lar program for a Jacksonville dairy and
he suggested the idea of a milk carton
contest to his dairy sponsor who hap-
pened to be Jacksonville's June Dairy
Month Chairman. The Jacksonville Dairy
Month Committee furnished the bicycle
and the contest was on.
Jack Wheeler talked about it on his
radio program every day during the
Month of June, suggesting to teen-agers
that they get into the contest to win a
fine bicycle and asked for the milk car-
tons and the bottle caps to be brought to
his studio. The picture shows how the
studio was filled up with almost 15,000
cartons and bottle caps. The winner
brought in 3,800 and many others from
2,000 down.
Present and speaking when the prize
was awarded on the radio program, in
addition to Jack Wheeler, were Cody
Skinner, Jacksonville Dairy Month chair-
man; Carl Caudill, member of the Jack-
sonville Committee and chairman of the
radio carton contest; Brady Johnston,
State Dairy Month Chairman; and Andy
Lay, Executive Director Florida Dairy As-
sociation.
Waterloo, Iowa, and winning the judging
at the International Livestock Show in
Chicago. Erny and another member of
the team later represented the United
States in a Caribbean International Show
and Judging Contest in Jamaica in Jan-
uary, which they won.
The second oldest son, C. C., Jr., re-
cently won membership on the 1955
Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team.


12 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


111111








F.D.A. Directors Adopt

Program and Policies

The Board of Directors of the Florida Dairy Association
met in Tallahassee, May 18th, and in Clearwater, June 21,
the day before the Annual Meeting.
Questions of Association policy and program adopted at
these meetings were:
Promote understanding, goodwill and fair dealing be-
tween producers and distributors.
Support wholeheartedly the objectives and purposes of
the Florida Milk Commission Law to insure a wholesome and
adequate home milk supply by stabilizing the business of pro-
ducing milk establishing and enforcing minimum farm and
retail milk prices.
Favor and urge strict enforcement by the Milk Commis-
sion of its milk price and fair trade practice orders.
Opposed to any amendments or changes in the Florida
Milk Commission Law and/or other Florida dairy laws, by
the 1955 State Legislature.
Favor the consolidation of any of the present milk
market areas established by the Milk Commission which, after
careful consideration by the Commission, are deemed advisable
and practical. Also a systematic study by the Milk Commis-
sion within the year and the holding of necessary public hear-
ings for the purpose of determining current milk production,
processing and distribution costs and whether or not any
change in present minimum Florida milk price orders of the
Commission, either at the producer or retail level, are in-
dicated.
Encourage active individual interest and participation of
all those interested in the future welfare of the dairy industry
in the affairs of government.
Continue our belief in and support of the operation of
one Statewide Dairy Association including all phases of the
industry.
Maintain friendly relations and cooperate to the fullest
extent possible with other Florida agricultural organizations.
Urge the State Department of Agriculture, State and
County Health Departments and the Florida Milk Commis-
sion to rigidly enforce all laws and regulations pertaining
to the quality requirements of milk shipped into Florida from
out of state areas.
Adopt the use of a miniature 4-page folder of The Flor-
ida Dairy News to be called the "Home Edition" for distri-
bution as an information piece to consumers.
Continue the consideration of revisions in the Dairy
Industry Code of Ethics for recommendation to the Florida
Milk Commission.
Continue the consideration and development of a Stand-
ard of Fair Practices between milk producers and distributors.
The Florida Dairy Association deplores the adoption of
policies regarding matters affecting the dairy industry by such
civic groups as the State Junior Chamber of Commerce and
the American Legion sponsored "Girls State," without first
seeking full information from the Dairy Industry about such
matters.
Promote increased effort to control and prevent disease
among Florida dairy herds and secure all possible aid to dairy-
men toward this end, including the establishing of a state
animal diagnostic laboratory.


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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 13










RUMELK










THE NEW DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENTIFIC
AND PRACTICAL CALF FEEDING
RUMELK, a new and different milk re-
placement feed that features rumen cul-
tures in a viable state and enzymes has
been found to grow healthier and larger
calves than those fed on whole milk.
RUMELK was developed by George A.
Jeffreys, one of the country's outstanding
enzymologists, and president of the
George A. Jeffreys Research & Develop-
ment Co.
RUMELK is a natural feed that makes calf
feeding easy, safe and economical. This
amazing product is the long sought after
ideal calf replacement feed. After years
of research it has finally been produced
and is now available to herdsmen and
dairymen. No longer do calves have to
die from nutritional scours or food de-
ficiencies. No longer need the farmer
waste hundreds of pounds of milk to
raise a calf. RUMELK guarantees that
a calf can be raised on 20-80 pounds of
milk, depending on size and breed. Ex-
haustive field tests have proven that
calves raised on RUMELK will do bet-
ter than those fed whole milk.
The principle of RUMELK is this: The
micro-organisms and enzymes of the ma-
ture cow is transferred through a special
patented culture contained in RUMELK.
This seeds the stomach and intestines
with beneficial organisms that promote
a healthy tone. The rumen of the calf
developed earlier, making it possible for
hay and grains to be utilized more effici-
ently.
RUMELK contains all the proteins of milk.
It is high in vitamin content. It con-
tains vitamin B12, terramycin and un-
identified growth factors. In addition
RUMELK contains a special bulking
enzyme that reduces nutritional scours
to an absolute minimum. This amazing
new product will do a great service to
the dairy industry, for it has definitely
been proven to save milk for market and
grow healthier and larger calves and
replacement stock.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FEED DEAL-
ER OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DE-
TAILS AND INTERESTING LEAFLET

Manufactured by:

W. A. DAVIS MILLING CO.
P. O. Box 1552, High Point, N. C.
or
P. 0. Box 787, DeLand, Fla.


Members Florida 1955 4-H Dairy Judging Team
Left to Right: Nancy Buchholtz, Dinsmore, Fla.; Pleas Strickland, Tallahassee; Clifford
Flood, Yulee; C. C. Sellers, Jr., Tallahassee. T. W. Sparks, State Advisor, extreme left.


Florida 4-H Dairy Judging Team

Selected For National Competition

Four Florida 4-H club members were selected in a closely contested contest, June
15, to represent Florida in the National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Contest in Water-
loo, Iowa. The top four contestants in order were: C. C. Sellers, Jr., Tallahassee;
Clifford Flood, Yulee; Pleas Strickland, Tallahassee; and Nancy Buchholtz, Dinsmore,
Fla. C. C. Sellers, Jr. is the younger brother of Erny Sellers, who placed first in a like


contest one year ago.
The contest was held at Alpine Dairy
and Dinsmore Dairy in Duval County.
Eighteen members participated. They were
from the top 20 members in the State
Contest held in February at the State 4-H
Dairy Show in Orlando. Other contestants
were: Robert Thornhill, Polk County;
Nell Whittengton, Marion County; Susan
Wing, Citrus County; Michael William-
son, Pinellas County; Milton Pittman,
Jackson County; Mickey McGee, Marion
County; Mildred Frierson, Hardee Coun-
ty; Billy Boyd, Dade County; Lucy
Parker, Hillsborough County; Russell
Lloyd, Duval County; Earl Crutchfield,
Jackson County; Jay Pelot, Marion Coun-
ty; Sharon Ellis, Nassau County; and
Franklin A. Davis, Madison County.
Thornhill, Miss Wing, Williamson and
Lloyd finished fifth through eighth, con-
secutively, with only 5 points dividing
fourth place from eighth place.

The team's sponsors are: The Florida
Dairy Association, the Florida Times-
Union, The Florida Jersey and Guernsey
Cattle Clubs, and the State Department
of Agriculture.


Florida's Milk Imports
One Fifth Of One Percent
The Office of the Chief Dairy Super-
visor, Florida State Department of Agri-
culture reports fluid milk shipped into
Florida during the year 1954 "for civilian
use" was 312,000 gallons.
This amount is one fifth of one per
cent of the total milk produced in Florida
in 1954.
The Chief Dairy Supervisor reports
also that approximately the same amount
of milk which came in to Florida from
outside the State was sent out of the
State by Florida dairies who sell milk in
States bordering Florida.
The report shows that out of State
milk brought into Florida by Florida
dairies for sale to military establishments
in the year 1954 amounted to 480,000
gallons. Some additional out of State
milk was purchased by Military estab-
lishments in Florida from dairies outside
of Florida, but Florida has no control
over such milk and receives no reports
concerning amounts purchased.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








4-H DAIRY SHOWS


FALL SCHEDULE
September 10
Leon County, Tallahassee
October 1
Columbia County, Lake City
October 1
Hamilton County, Jasper
October 1
Madison County, Madison
October 1
Gadsden County, Quincy
October 8
Union County, Lake Butler
October 8
Jefferson County, Monticello
October 8
Taylor County, Perry
October 13
DISTRICT III Show, Quincy
October 15
Dixie County, Cross City
October 15
Lafayette County, Mayo
October 17-22
DISTRICT I, Pensacola
October 20
Suwannee County, Live Oak
October 21
DISTRICT IV, Live Oak
October 29
NORTH FLORIDA FAIR, Tallahassee
October 29
Orange County, Orlando
November 5
Volusia County, DeLand
November 5
Osceola County, Kissimmee
November 12
Polk County, Bartow
November 12
Lake County, Tavares
November 12
Brevard County, Cocoa
November 19
DISTRICT VII, Orlando

Other Important Dates
For 4-H Dairy People
October 3
National 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging
Contest, Waterloo, Iowa
October 15
Gadsden County Fair and Dairy Show,
Quincy
October 17-18
Southeastern Youth Livestock Show,
Ocala
October 18
Dairy Show at Jackson County Fair
November 5
West Florida Dairy Show, Chipley


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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 0 15


I


- --- - -- - -


I








George Ford, Quincy Dairy Youth

Wins F.F.A. Dairy Farmer Award
George Ford, age 19, in the 12th grade and a member of the Quincy FFA
Chapter of the Quincy High School was acclaimed the Star State Dairy Farmer
Award winner for 1955 at the State FFA Convention, June 14, and received $100
from the Future Farmers of America Foundation. He was the Star State Farmer
in 1954.
George's farming program is very outstanding and includes hogs, poultry and
many acres of feed crops in addition to his dairy program.
He is a member of the Florida Farm Bureau, Florida Dairy Assoication, and
the North Florida Breeders Assoication. He has been president of the Junior Con-
servation Club, Vice-President of the Quincy FFA Chapter, member of the football
team and of the Batpist Church and Honorary member of the Lions Club.


SILAGE STAYS FRESH, SWEET
HIGH IN FOOD VALUE



WITH BISULFITE

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brings you another great new farm aid. This time it's STA-FRESH -
the handy, low-cost sodium bisulfite powder that keeps silage fresh,
green and sweet-smelling.
STA-FRESH insures a superior feed with less work at lower cost.
It is already highly recommended by many county agents and agri-
cultural leaders. STA-FRESH has been used with success on alfalfa,
orchard grass, brome grass, ladino, sweet clover, timothy, vetch,
oats, and other forage crops.
Cows prefer STA-FRESH treated silage. In a typical free-choice test,
cattle ate an average of 63 pounds of bisulfite-treated silage to 18
pounds of untreated silage.
STA-FRESH keeps silage sweet-smelling, too; rids it of that "silage
stink" that fouls your clothes, smells up the barn and may taint milk.
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GEORGE FORD


George has developed a great respect
for and a belief in the future of farming.
His interest has ben centered in dairying
for the past seven years. With encourage-
ment from his father, a former Future
Farmer member, he has built up a herd of
fifty-three head of dairy animals of which
32 are cows of producing ages. He also
has 24 cows in partnership. He has sold
$1,675.00 worth of animals and
$32,857.82 worth of dairy products in his
five years of vocational agriculture in-
struction. His average animal milk pro-
duction per cow is 775 gallons with an
average butterfat of 4.8%.

DISTRICT DAIRY FARMERS
Other 1955 FFA District Dairy Farmer
Award Winners are: District I, Darrel
Hobbs, Paxton; District II, Bobby Dur-
den, Havana; District III, Ronald Hunt,
DeLand; District IV, Harold McGee,
Ocala; District V, Harry Griffin, Bartow;
and District VI, Terry McDavid, Pom-
pano. Bobby Durden of District II was
selected "top district winner." Southern
Dairies presented Dairy Efficiency Plaques
to the State and Top District Winners
and $25 to each District winner.

EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
You can buy and pay for the presence
and labor of an employee-but you can-
not pay for enthusiasm, loyalty and de-
votion.

Does your employee feel that he is a
member of your team? That he and his
job are important to the success of the
business?


16 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Highlights Of Annual Field Day Talks

On Dairy Pastures, Feed And Forage
PART III
DAIRY PASTURE COSTS AND RETURNS
C. W. REAVES, State Extension Dairyman
The total annual costs were secured on the pasture as a whole of four dairy
farms. By the method of inverse calculation, the nutrients provided by the pastures
were determined. Dairy Herd Improvement Association records were available for
milk production, per cent Test, and for the kinds and amounts of feeds fed.
The TDN (total digestible nutrients) required was figured by use of Morrison's
tables for maintenance and milk production. The TDN was figured for all feeds fed
in the barn or feed racks. The difference in the nutrients required and fed can be
attributed to the pasture. All records cover a complete year's operation for each farm.


The per cents of the total in take of
nutrients supplied the herds by pasture
were 33, 27, 14 and 48 respectively for
the four farms, or an average of only 29
per cent.
The value of the pasture was calculated
at 4( per pound TDN supplied. (One
pound TDN in dairy feed costing $3.75
per 100 pounds costs 54 per pound
TDN). The feed replacement value of
an acre of pasture on the four farms
amounted to $62.24. The total annual
pasture costs amounted to $28.94 per
acre. This meant a feed replacement
value of $2.15 for each $1.00 represented
in the total annual pasture costs for the
four farms taken together. The average
cost per pound TDN from pasture was
1.85 cents.
The study is being extended to secure
similar records on other farms.
EFFECT OF OROTIC ACID AND
METHIONINE ON FEED CONSUMPTION
AND GROWTH OF CALVES
DR. JAMES M. WING, University of
Florida, Dairy Science Dept.
Young Jersey calves which were sup-
plemented with orotic acid and methion-
ine gained 37 percent more in body
weight than did comparable controls. A
39 percent superiority in efficiency of feed
utilization also was observed in the
treated group. Both observations are sta-
tistically significant at p.01.

KEEP THEM BREEDING!
P. T. DIX ARNOLD, University of
Florida, Dairy Science Dept.
Regular reproduction is the keynote to
profitable milk production. To attain
good breeding efficiency, complete records
need to be kept and referred to daily. A
calving interval of 365 days is considered
100% breeding efficiency, and cows in
that category averaged 22.75 pounds of
milk daily from calf to calf, including dry
period. Average daily production during
1 year, 3 months calving intervals was 19
pounds and 1 year, 6 months was 16
pounds.
Well grown heifers in milk at 23-24
months of age will produce, on the aver-
age, 10% more milk during their produc-
tive lifetime than heifers freshening at
29 30 months of age.


SOUTHERN ICE CREAM GROUP
TO MEET AGAIN IN FLORIDA
The Southern Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers has announced plans for
holding the 1955 Annual Convention at
Boca Raton, Florida, November 21 and
22. Florida ice cream manufacturers de-
siring room reservations should write to
Ed Koontz, Secretary, S.A.I.C.M., P. O.
Box 5107, Biltmore, N. C.
Jack Tierney, Foremost Dairies mana-
ger at Orlando, is president of the South-
ern Association this year and Cliff Wayne,
Southern Dairies Florida State Manager,
is Florida's other director on the board
with Tierney.


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with Se'4 T-20 Milk Tank


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with Zero's Super Strainer under Vacuum . .
"just like sucking milk through a straw." With
this method, a pail of milk is easily drawn into
the tank in about 30 seconds, then quickly
vacuum refrigerated. The short milk line used
includes our in-line strainer and valve. This lets
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Write TODAY for the Name of Your Nearest Zero
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667-G DUNCAN AVE.
WASHINGTON, MISSOURI


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 0 17







Dairy Association And University

Continue State Pasture Contest
The University of Florida Extension Department and the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion have decided to adopt the State Dairy Pasture Improvement Contest on a con-
tinuing basis. This very worthwhile project will now enter the third annual contest
under the direction of C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman of the University
of Florida.
Plan of the 1955-56 Contest
The general objective of the contest will continue to be for more dairymen to
secure the results of good pasture and forage production, utilizing these valuable green
feeds for more efficient and profitable dairying. County committees will score all
farms entering the contest and submitting reports. Certificates of Recognition will be
presented all those scoring 75 per cent or
above. County and State winners will be tion and inter-regional competition. Good
named in two divisions as follows: pastures are the cheapest source of nutri-
1. The one with the best overall dairy ents for cattle. Hay and silage provide for
pasture and forage programll dairy higher production at lower costs during

2. The one making the most progress periods when pastures are inadequate for
over his previous year's pasture and any cause.
f pThe production of 35 to 50 per cent
forage program, of the feed supplies for dairy herds on
Certificates and plaques will be award- the farms has been adopted by the State
ed at the Annual Dairy Field Day held at Pasture Committee of the Florida Dairy
the University. Association as a goal for more efficient
The ending date of the 1955-56 contest milk production through provision of
will be April 1, 1956, to permit Fall-sown more pastures and forage and their util-
winter pastures to be grazed within the ization for maximum production of low
same contest year as planted. This will cost milk. Participation in the State Dairy
allow judging the success of the Winter Pasture and Forage Contest helps to direct
pasture and the Spring pasture. A rule each dairyman's attention to his own
of the contest is that the winners one year needs.
will not be considered in competition Join the contest and help make a
again for three years. greater Florida dairy industry and a more


The County Committees
The County Agent will be chairman of
each county committee. The Florida
Dairy Association will appoint two dairy-
men in each county to work with the
County Agent as the County Dairy Pas-
ture Committee to promote the program
and judge the entrants. It is recommend-
ed that the County Committee visit the
farm of each entrant at least twice to see
the pastures and forage crops and to get
information to help score the pasture rec-
ord. One visit should be in the Summer
of 1955 to see the Summer pasture and
forage crops and the other about March,
1956 to see the winter annual pasture,
white clover, etc. Reports of the county
winners should be sent to the State Judg-
ing Committee by May 1, 1956.
Value of Pasture Contest
Cards are being supplied all dairymen
who are urged to enter the contest be-
cause you will benefit by the thought and
consideration given your pastures and by
steps taken for their improvement. If
your report is turned by April 1 on a
reasonable good pasture and forage pro-
gram, you will receive a certificate of rec-
ognition. You may win additional county
or State honors.
Pastures are a cash crop. Plan for
ample pasture for as many months as
possible and store silage or hay for other
months. More and better pastures and
forage can help meet high costs of produc-


profitable business for yourself. Entry
blanks and copies of record and report
forms will be available from County
Farm Agents, State Extension Dairyman
C. W. Reaves, University of Florida,
Gainesville, or the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation.
F. D. A. PASTURE COMMITTEE
The Florida Dairy Association Com-
mittee on "Pasture Development" for
1955 who conduct the organization's ac-
tivities relating to pasture, including the
State Pasture and Forage Contest, is head-
ed by veteran dairyman Herman Boyd, of
the Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami, who won
the "Best Pasture Award" for the State in
the Contest for 1953-54.
Other Members of the Committee
Glenn S. Datson, Pinecastle; Walter
Welkener and Al Wells, Jacksonville;
Ben S. Waring, Madison; W. A. Bout-
well, Sr., Lake Worth; Carroll Ward,
Sr., Winter Park; T. Stin Haselton, Eus-
tis; Julian Lane, Tampa; M. T. Crutch-
field and J. D. Fuqua, Altha; John Sar-
geant, Lakeland; Herman Burnett, Bra-
denton; M. A. Schack, Greenwood; Floyd
Crawford, Lake City; Bryan Judge, Or-
lando; R. G. Goolsby, Ft. Lauderdale;
Charles Johnson, Dinsmore; Bill Graham,
Miami; W. J. Casey, Clearwater; Kent
Price, Asst. Farm Agent, West Palm
Beach; John Logan, County Agent, Lar-
go; and W. W. Glenn, County Agent,
Marianna.


FLORIDA MILK PRICES
NOT NATION'S HIGHEST
The Florida Dairy Association fur-
nished data at the recent Milk Commis-
sion hearings in Miami taken from current
milk price reports of the United States
Department of Agriculture, which spokes-
men of the Association say proves con-
clusively that milk prices in Florida are
not the highest in the Nation.
Repeated statements in the press (the
latest being July 31 by the Miami Herald)
and other uninformed sources, that the
price of milk is the highest in the Nation
is not true according to the Florida Dairy
Association which quotes the following
milk prices from a July, 1955 Fluid Milk
and Cream Report of the U. S. Dept. of
Agriculture to prove the statement.
Florida milk prices quoted for pasteur-
ized milk in Miami with 4% to 4.4%
butterfat @ 26 cents a quart. The Jack-
sonville price is 27 cents a quart for milk
with 4% to 4.5% butterfat.
Prices quoted in other states having
prices as high (and some higher) as these
Florida prices are: Atlantic City-26c for
3.5% bf. milk; Gary, Indiana-26c for
3.5% bf. milk; Chicago, Illinois-261/2c
for 3.6% bf. milk; Durham, N. C.-26c
for 4% bf. milk; Macon, Georgia-26c
for 4% bf. milk; Savannah, Georgia-
28c for 4.3% bf. milk; New Orleans,
La.-271/2% for 3.9% bf. milk; Okla-
homa City-26c for 4% bf. milk; Tulsa,
Oklahoma-26c for 3.6% bf. milk; Gal-
veston, Texas-26c for 4% bf. milk.
There are other cities with prices simi-
lar to the above not carried in the U. S.
reports such as reported in a New York
State Dept .of Agriculture Milk Price Re-
port for May 1955. This report lists:
New York City-26c for 3.5% bf.
milk; Poughkeepsie-26c for 3.5% bf.
milk; White Plains-261/2c for 3.5% bf.
milk; Yonkers-261/2c for 3.5% bf.
milk.
The Florida Dairy Association points
out that most of the above prices, if
adjusted to the same butterfat content as
Florida milk, would be higher priced than
Florida milk.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Milk Driver Wrecks Truck
To Protect Racing Cars
522 cases of milk were dumped in the
ditch near Crestview, Florida, August
10th, when the driver of a dairy trailer
truck belonging to the Polar Ice Cream
Company of Pensacola swerved to avoid
a head-on collision with two racing cars.
The driver, Baynard Chaster Smith of
Pensacola, said he met the two cars at
the top of a hill while near Crestview
enroute with his load of milk to Fort
Benning, Georgia.


Insurance Rates Increase
On Workmen's Compensation
Dairy industry rates for workmen's
compensation insurance were changed on
August 1, along with a general revision
of Florida rates made by the State Insur-
ance Commissioner. The average of all
rate increases allowed was 2.7%, while
the National Insurance Rating Bureau had
requested a 4.7% increase.
Although the milk plant rates increased
from $2.08 to $2.25, the ice cream plant
rate was reduced from $1.32 to $1.28.
Plants having both milk and ice cream
operations are insured under both these
rates if the employees of the two opera-
tions are separated.
These rates apply to all employees ex-
cept office employees and farm workers,
where a farm is operated. Farm opera-
tions, alone, are not required to carry
this insurance but many elect to do so.
The office insurance rate was increased
from 11 to 13 and the farm rates from
$2.17 to $2.71. The rates given apply
to each $100.00 of payroll.
The adjustment of the insurance rates
on August 1 was made necessary by
changes in the accident loss experience
and changes in the Florida Law made by
the 1955 legislature which provided for
substantial increases in compensation ac-
cident benefits.
Dairy service businesses such as hay,
grain and feed dealers had a rate increase
from $2.22 to $2.68, while wholesale
machinery and equipment dealers re-
ceived increase in their rate from $1.65
to $1.83.
A committee of the Florida Dairy As-
sociation is now making a special study
of the accident experience of all Florida
dairies and Allied Trades members in-
sured under the Workmen's Compensa-
tion Law. The committee hopes to deter-
mine if the present insurance rates are
proper and whether or not some Associa-
tion program might be conducted which
would decrease accidents within the in-
dustry and bring about lower insurance
costs.
The total cost of Workmen's Compen-
sation Insurance in Florida to all em-
ployers is about 24 million dollars.


7t' 3itoat preetw


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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 19









He itis!

A big new supplement to

Canco's basic merchandising kit...


/
I,


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sell more dairy products--
not just during Dairy Month -


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20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
















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THIRD QUARTER, 1955 0 21







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

State University Announces Programs
For Three Fall Dairy Events
By DR. E. L. FOUTS, Head, Department of Dairy Science
Agricultural Experiment Station, University of Florida
We of the Department of Dairy Science staff at the University of Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station are pleased to be able to announce to the members of the
Dairy Industry the following detailed programs for our three main annual events
here at the University for the benefit of Florida dairymen.
The programs have been planned along with special Committees of the Florida
Dairy Assoication so as to provide for discussion and information on those problems
of the industry which in the opinion of the Committees would be of the most benefit
in dealing with current conditions.
We want to emphasize that these three
Short-Course and Conference sessions
deal with and should attract the attend- 10:00 P. T. Dix Arnold Feeding
ance and participation of (a) Dairy Cows on Pasture
Farmers and Herdsmen at the "Dairy 11:00 Dr. J. M. Wing--Why Raise
Herdsmen Program" Sept. 6-8, (b) Replacements?
Plant Superintendents and Processing Su- 1:30 Johnny Boggs Use and Care
pervisors at the "Plant Short Course" of Milking Machines
Oct. 13-15, and (c) Both dairy farm and 3:30 Calf Records- Identification,
plant owners and managers at the "An- Dehorning and Feeding
nual Dairy Field Day" -Nov. 2-3. Wednesday, September 7
We are proud of the interest and the 8:00 C. W. Reaves- Contribution of
prominent part which the Florida Dairy Farm Feeds to Milk Production
Association has taken in these various 9:00 S. P. Marshall Permanent Pas-
dairy industry programs in recent years tures for Dairy Cows; Pasture
and are sure that considerable of the cred- Irrigation
it for the splendid growth in attendance 10:00 Recess
and participation in all these programs 10:15 R. B. Becker Low Fat Milk
is due to the interest and promotion of 11:00 Dr. B. C. Swindle, U. S. D. A.
the Dairy Association. The New Brucellosis Program
We at the Department of Dairy Science 1:15 H. L. Somers Sterility of Non-
look forward to welcoming you to these Infectious Origin in Cattle
special dairy events. 3:00 S. P. Marshall -Tour of Dairy


PROGRAM
HERDSMEN SHORT COURSE
September 6-8

This course is designed to be of value
to dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, pro-
ducer-distributors and milk producers.
Dr. R. B. Becker is in charge of the
course and the following well balanced
program should be very useful and in-
structive to all who can attend.
The subject matter on the program
follows:
Tuesday, September 6
8:30 Registration
Dr. E. L. Fouts-Program of
Dairy Science Department
9:00 Dr. S. P. Marshall -Temporary
Pastures for Dairy Cattle
9:45 Recess


Research Unit Pastures
7:00 T. W. Sparks-Parasite Con-
trol, Including Motion Picture
Thursday, September 8
8:30 P. T. Dix Arnold-Care and
Feeding of Heifers
9:30 R. B. Becker Silos and Silages
(possibly moving picture)
Recess
11:00 Dr. H. H. Rothe The Pipeline
Milker; Meeting Sanitary Regu-
lations


18th Annual Dairy Plant
Superintendent's Conference
Dates for the 18th Annual Dairy Plant
Superintendents' Conference are October
13, 14 and 15, 1955.
A number of outstanding speakers will
be on hand to review some of the latest
developments in the dairy industry. To
mention a few of the program speakers,


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1955 Special Events
for
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
September 6-8 24th Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, pro-
ducer-distributors and milk producers.
October 13-15 18th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
and supply dealers.

November 2-3 20th Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY AND
CONFERENCE
For Milk Producer-distributors, Milk Pro-
ducers, dairy processors, herdsmen, county
agents, vocational agriculture teachers,
veterinarians, DHIA workers and equip-
ment and supply dealers.


there will be Art Lund, Division Engi-
neer of the Cherry-Burrell Corpo-
ration, Chicago; Dr. T. R. Free-
man, Professor of Dairying, from the
University of Kentucky at Lexington,
former professor at the University of
Florida, and co-author of a book entitled
"Dairy Manufacturing Processes"; Dr.
Maxey, Director of Research for Diversey
Corporation, Chicago, who is author of
several research papers on problems in the
dairy and food industries; Hugh F. But-
ner, Bacteriologist in Charge for the Flor-
ida State Board of Health, Jacksonville,
and E. T. "Andy" Lay, Executive Direc-
tor and Secretary of the Florida Dairy
Association, Jacksonville. These and
other authorities in the field of Dairy
Processing will be available to discuss
your problems with you and members of
the staff of the Department of Dairy
Science will assist in making your visit
an enjoyable one.
The annual Dairy Products Clinic will
be on VANILLA ice cream with Dr. T.
R. Freeman in charge, assisted by Dr. E.
L. Fouts and his staff.
The short course program will be con-
cluded at noon on Saturday, October 15,
but for those who wish to stay over there
will be an excellent football game be-
tween the University of Florida and Loui-
siana State University at 2:00 P. M. Sa-
turday afternoon on the University cam-
pus.
The details of the program are expect-
ed to be complete and announcements
will be in the mail early in September.
Mark the dates on your calendar, October
13, 14, 15, 1955, and make your plans
now to attend the 18th Annual Dairy
Plant Superintendents' Conference at
Gainesville.


22 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Dr. Reitz A Friend Of Florida Agriculture

Dr. J. Wayne Reitz, newly appointed president of the University of Florida, is
an agricultural man who has a broad understanding of Florida and most of its prob-
lems. Dr. Reitz assumed the presidency April 1, and succeeds the late J. Hillis Miller.
He is widely known throughout Florida, is highly respected in national agricul-
tural circles.
The promotion of Dr. Reitz from his position as Provost for
Agriculture to become president of the University met the genuine
approval of Florida Agricultural interests and particularly that of
the dairy industry.
For a number of years Dr. Reitz had been a favorite Master
itof Ceremonies or featured speaker at the Annual Field Day Meet-
ings of the Dairy Industry always held on the University Campus.
One of the likable things about Dr. Reitz in his dealings
with dairymen was that he had a way of making himself one
of the crowd. He didn't wait for invitations and usually made
DR. REITZ his appearance at Dairy Field Days and Annual Convention Ses-
sions without waiting for an invitation.


Dr. Reitz was born on a farm near
Olathe, Kansas, December 31, 1908. As
an undergraduate at Colorado A. and M.
College he was active in the life of the
campus. He did undergraduate work at
the University of Illinois where he re-
ceived his master degree and at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin where he received
his doctor of philosophy degree.
An authority in the field of agricultu-
ral economics his keen judgment of char-
acter and his ability to make sound ad-
ministrative decisions have sparked a
rapid rise to prominence in the whole
broad field of education.
With the exception of five years when
he was serving as an agricultural
economic counsel to the United Growers
and Shippers Association of Orlando, and
later as chief of the citrus fruit division
of the production and marketing division
of the United States Department of Agri-
culture, Dr. Reitz has worked in the field
of education. He has been on the staff
of the University, with the exception of
those five years, since 1934.

Dairy Science Association
Honors U of F Dairy Leaders
Dr. E. L. Fouts, Head of the Depart-
ment of Dairy Science was elected a di-
rector of the American Dairy Science As-
sociation for a three year term at the June
Annual Meeting of the Association held
at Michigan State University.
Dr. S. P. Marshall, Dairy Husbandman
of the University of Florida Dairy Science
Department was honored by his selection
to serve as Chairman of the "Production
Section" of the National Organization
for 1956.
Other members of the University of
Florida Dairy Science Dept. staff who at-
tended and presented papers at the Amer-
ican Dairy Science Association Annual
Meeting were: Dr. R. B. Becker, a past
president of the Association; Dr. J. M.
Wing and Prof. W. A. Krienke.


Dr. Wayne Reitz, center, is seen conferring
with dairymen Herman Burnett, producer of
Bradenton, left, and Alf Nielsen of the Alfar
Creamery, West Palm Beach, at the F.D.A.
1954 Annual Convention.


PROGRAM
ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY
November 2-3

This meeting is designed to be of inter-
est to people in all phases of dairying, in-
cluding producer-distributors, producers,
processors, herdsmen, county agents, vo-
cational agricultural teachers, veterinar-
ians, DHIA workers, equipment and sup-
ply dealers. The meeting will feature
talks by outstanding leaders in matters of
extreme interest to people in all phases
of dairying. The detailed program is as
follows:
Theme- "Feeds and Facilities for
Efficient Production"
"OPEN HOUSE" at Dairy Research Unit
and Dairy Products Laboratory-
All Day Wednesday and Thurs-
day, November 2 and 3
NOVEMBER 2:
10:00 OPENING REGISTRATION-
Hotel Thomas and Dairy Pro-
ducts Laboratory
12:00 "Early Bird" Lunch Hotel
Thomas


DR. ALLEN


A JOB WELL DONE
(Reprinted from Florida Alligator on which
the F.D.A. heartily concurs.)
Dr. John S. Allen, who served as acting
president of the University of Florida for
16 months, has been named the Florida
Alligator's Man of the Year for 1955.
Dr. Alien named by the newspaper
editors, received the award for "long and
meritorious service to the University and
the state at a time when stern and capable
leadership was direly needed."
The 48-year-old Vice President took
over the reins of the University after the
death of Dr. J. Hillis Miller in 1953 and
served until the appointment of Dr.
Wayne Reitz to the post in April. He has
been at the University since 1948.
The Florida Dairy Association paid its
highest tribute to Dr. Allen a few months
before his retirement as Acting President
of the University by electing him an
"Honorary Member."
1:00, Continuation of Registration--
Student Service Center
1:30 FIRST PROGRAM SESSION -
Student Service Center
WELCOME Dr. E. L. Fouts,
Head, Department of Dairying
RESPONSE- C. D. Wayne,
President, Florida Dairy Associa-
tion
Pipeline Milkers-Dr. G. H.
Hopson, Milk Sanitarian, The
De Laval Separator Company
The following topics will be dis-
cussed by outstanding men in
each field.
Trends in Dairy Barn Design
Bulk Handling of Milk
Preservation and Feeding of
Silages
Temporary Pastures for Efficient
Milk Production
A Permanent Pasture Program
for the Dairy Herd
7:30 ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD
DAY DINNER and PRO-
GRAM Student Service Center
AWARDING OF NATIONAL
HERD HONOR ROLL DIP-
LOMAS

(Continued on Page 27)


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 23









DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES ON IN 1955


By: DR. R. B. BECKER
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

American Dairy Science Association held the 50th annual meeting at East Lans-
ing, Michigan on June 22-24, 1955, with attendance registered from every state,
Alaska, Porto Rico, Canada and 8 other countries. Over 1,300 members, wives and
children were present. Besides the general opening program, 175
technical papers in dairy production, manufactures and extension &
subjects were given. Affiliated agricultural student chapters had
exhibits of their activities. There were symposia on dairy prod-
ucts in human nutrition, ratios of forages to grains in the milking e
ration, 4-H Club leadership, frozen semen, reports of 4 regional
dairy cattle breeding projects, dairy cattle health, breeding, type,
and breed relations (national regulations for production testing,
artificial breeding and type classification).
The Association cooperates with the Purebred Dairy Cattle
Association and other organizations in national programs relating BECKER
to dairying. Selected technical reports will be chosen for this review.
Cornell University has dealt with pro-
duction of a soft Italian type cheese-
Ricotta- from whole milk by acidifica- Athens, Georgia, Tift Sudan grass slightly
tion and heat. The finished product must exceeded Starr millet in value as a grazing
be refrigerated to maintain quality. A new crop for milking cows. At night, Jerseys,
acid coagulation test was developed in Brown Swiss and Swiss x Sindhi cross-
Wisconsin to determine the correct time bred cows at Baton Rouge, Louisiana,
for cutting the curd for cottage cheese, grazed in the order named, while the
Representative samples of milk from Sindhi crossbreds grazed more during sun-
farm bulk tanks were obtained in Ver- light. Average milk yields were: Brown
mont with the agitator operating one min- Swiss, 15.9 pounds; Jerseys, 15.0 pounds,
ute at 29 revolutions per minute. Less and crossbreds 14.1 pounds of 4 per cent
flavor defect was observed than previously fat corrected milk daily.
under can cooling. Homogenized milk A 4-year study of rate of milking at
(Pennsylvania) exposed to sunlight de- Cornell (286 cows of 4 breeds) showed
veloped oxidized flavor due to the water- an extreme range between 1 minute, 15
soluble vitamin riboflavin. Cornell work- seconds to 11 minutes, 40 seconds to milk
ers were unable to prevent oxidized flavor out a cow by machine. Fresh cows re-
in milk by feeding 100 mgm. of mena- quired more time than in mid lactation.
dione per cow daily. They also studied Machine stripping averaged 37 seconds
the increased occurrence of rancidity in and yielded an average of 1.5 pounds of
milk from pipeline milkers, milk. Most cows in mid lactation milked
Several stations have developed meth- out in 3 to 4 minutes, with 9 per cent
ods of detecting adulteration of fats in of them needing longer than 5 minutes.
milk. "Subnormal milk" due to feeding prac-


Several reports dealt with technical
methods in artificial breeding or in freez-
ing and storing semen for artificial use.
Various phases of rumen digestion in
calves and older animals entailed 17 re-
ports concerned with production of fatty
acids, bloat, cud inocculation and micro-
organism development. Udder develop-
ment and the relation of various hormone-
like substances numbered 7 reports.
Cows at the Kentucky station on blue-
grass pasture consumed 11 per cent more
dry matter but grazed pasture somewhat
less when given access also to alfalfa hay,
than did those on pasture as the only
roughage. Young oat forage (6-12 inches
high) was practically equal to alfalfa hay
for milk cows at the Alabama station.
Growth of dairy heifers at Beltsville was
increased slightly when a limited amount
of hay was fed along with plain wilted
alfalfa silage. The hay appeared to en-
courage higher total feed intake. At


tice was reported by Florida workers. Fat
percentages of milk from 10 cows drop-
ped 0.5- 2.2 per cent in 10 to 14 days
after all leafy roughage was replaced by
a bulky concentrate mixture. When given
Pangola grass hay, or corn silage, or pas-
ture, milk from these cows returned grad-
ually toward normal fat tests. Extremely
young white clover and young winter oats
pasture likewise resulted in subnormal
tests until the forage changed in charac-
ter. The solids-not-fat values were lower-
ed only slightly. The cutting strength of
the milk curd paralleled the changes in
fat percentage.
Fat and solids-not-fat (SNF) in milk
from cows at the Virginia station analysed
as follows:


Breed
Guernsey
Holstein
Jersey


Average Composition
Samples Fat SNF


279 5.28%
505 3.78%
234 5.86%


9.18%
8.46%
9.49%


Use of frozen semen with 900 cows in
8 Kansas counties resulted in 67 per cent
nonreturn rate as compared with a 64 per
cent nonreturn rate from fresh semen
with over 3,900 cows. Long storage of
frozen semen appeared to reduce its effici-
ency slightly. The Maine station also
noted that the differences are slight in sur-
vival of spermatozoa in properly proc-
essed frozen semen.
Several states are equipped to use tele-
vision in dairy Extension activities with
about 125 TV stations equipped to carry
color. Effectiveness in extension teaching
involves attention by helping the listener
to visualize facts, participation, visual
aids, helping the listener to remember,
group discussion, and planned follow-up
of the subject.
Four-H Club volunteer work is a chal-
lenge for leadership. It calls for recogni-
tion of the volunteer's efforts; encourage-
ment of local decisions, and recognition
of a vital need in the community. More
than 20 states participated in exhibits of
subject matter materials in all phases of
extension dairy work.


Farm Safety Pays
National Farm Safety Week, July 24-
30, emphasized the theme "Your Safety
is in Your Hands."
The fact that one million persons were
injured and fourteen thousand died last
year as a result of farm accidents is argu-
ment enough of the importance of giving
some thought to safety on the farm.
The Florida Agricultural Extension
Service, University of Florida, urges em-
phasis in Florida on the following farm
safety suggestions: (1) Avoidance of an
overcrowded schedule; (2) Home Safety;
(3) Safety with livestock; (4) Preven-
tion of falls; (5) Highway safety; and
(6) Safety with Farm Machinery.
Among the recommendations of the
National Safety Council regarding farm
safety are the following:
MACHINERY: Don't repair or adjust
machinery while it is in operation. Don't
hop off moving equipment, or give
"'joy" rides to youngsters. Use all the
safety shields, guards, devices and in-
structions provided by the manufacturer.
FARM ANIMALS: Never trust a bull;
use safety pens for handling dangerous
or potentially dangerous stock. Leave
avenues of quick exit when working in
close quarters; carry defense equipment
such as hand hurdles.
Safety directors point out one salient
fact: Simple precautions easily taken
and non-time-consuming, generally will
prevent the most serious of accidents.

"Have you forgotten that you owe me
five dollars?"
"No, not yet. Give me more time and
I will."


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








GUERNSEYS PURCHASED
(Continued from Page 8)

of L. Royal Select's Beauty and is sired
by Sky Brook Rose Maxim's Robert.
W. J. CASEY. Clearwater, has just
purchased Pleasant Vieu Ray Mack from
W. W. Alman, Jonesville, S. C. This
richly bred young bull is out of the high
producing Pleasant View Ace's Evelyn
and is sired by Quail Roost Ray Maxim.
M. S. HANCOCK, Palatka, has bought
Dinsmore Jury King from W. E. Bryan
of Palatka. This young bull is out of
Dinsmore Maxmost Karla that has once
been classified Very Good for type, and
is sired by Dinsmore Juryman.
F. M. DOUGLAS, Panama City, has
bought Dinsmore Tom Boy from Dins-
more Dairy Co., Jacksonville. He is out
of Dinsmore Toma and is sired by Riegel-
dale Conqueror's Heir.
ELMER & DONALD STEBBINS,
Lakeland, have purchased Shad Blow K.
Baron from J. P. Kinsey, Torrington,
Conn. This young bull is out of the
record making cow, Fairlawn Actor's
Ermine, and is sired by Farilawn K.
Eastern King.
D. M. SNOWBERGER, Leesburg, has
bought Lay Laine Foresquire's Esquirt
from Carroll L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod,
Florida. He is out of Lakemont Judy's
Angel and is sired by Sun-Blest Farms
Foresquire.

GUERNSEYS CLASSIFIED
Five registered Guernsey herds in
Florida have recently been classified for
type by L. O. Colebank, Knoxville, Tenn.,
official classifier for the American Guern-
sey Cattle Club. Results of this work
tell the breeder the strong and weak
points in the conformation of his herd.
By selecting the better cows and breeding
them to sires that transmit good confor-
mation, herd type can be improved.
C. E. DONEGAN and J. T. CHRIS-
TIAN, Largo-53 cows classified: One
was rated Excellent, 14 Very Good, 23
Desirable and 14 Acceptable. Four
daughters of Butler Island Old Gold were
classified: Two rated Very Good and one
Desirable. Three daughters of Curtiss
Candy Naviagator were classified: One
rated Very Good and two Desirable.
BOUTWELL'S DAIRY, INC., LAKE
WORTH-Their 210 cows were classi-
fied: 32 were rated Very Good, 106 De-
sirable and 57 Acceptable. 25 daughters
of Klondike Raider's Merry Boy were
classified: Six rated Very Good, 15 De-
sirable and three Acceptable. 17 daughters
of Thirlstane King Eugene were classi-
fied: Seven rated Desirable and six Ac-
ceptable. 13 daughters of McDonald
Farms Steadfast Otho were classified:
Two rated Very Good, five Desirable and
six Acceptable.


CARROLL L. WARD, JR., LAY
LAINE GUERNSEY FARM, GOLDEN-
ROD-114 cows were classified: 23 were
rated Very Good, 52 Desirable and 31
Acceptable. 21 daughters of Riegeldale
Emory's Judicator were classified: Four
rated Very Good, nine Desirable and
seven Acceptable. Eight daughters of
Gippy's Foremost Maxim were classified:
Four rated Very Good and four Desirable.
E!gh: daughters of Lakemont Anthony's
Steadfast were classified: Five rated De-
sirable and two Acceptable.
J. H. CONE, CONE'S DAIRY PRO-
DUCTS, PLANT CITY-59 cows were
classified: 10 were rated Very Good, 28
Desirable and 15 Acceptable. 18 daugh-
ters of Riegeldale Emory's Cavalier were
classified: three rated Very Good, five
Desirable, and six Acceptable. 15 daugh-


IMPROVE MILK QUALITY-
CUT COSTS WITH THE RAPID-
FLO CHECK-UP FOR MASTITIS
AND SEDIMENT
A simple daily procedure en-
dorsed by sanitarians and
health authorities that can help
prevent loss of milk and cows.


ters of Riegeldale Ben's Clair Voyant
were classified: three rated Very Good,
seven Desirable, and three Acceptable.
Eight daughters of Nyala Honor's Royal
were classified: two rated Very Good,
four Desirable and two Acceptable.
CARROL L. WARD, SR, LAKE-
MONT DAIRY, Winter Park-80 cows
were classified: One was rated Excellent,
21 Very Good, 29 Desirable and 23 Ac-
ceptable. 25 daughters of McDonald
Farms King Ken were classified: four
rated Very Good, 11 Desirable, and
eight Acceptable. 10 daughters of Coker
Emory's Victor were rated: One Very
Good, five Desirable and three Accept-
able. Seven daughters of Coker King's
Peerless were classified: One rated Very
Good, two Desirable and three Accept-
table.


1. After filtering each can
of milk (10 gallons or
less) the used filter
disk is carefully re-
moved from the
strainer and placed on
a cardboard to dry.
2. Examination of the
used filter will indicate
precautionary steps
necessary to secure
clean milk.


Filter Products Division


4949 West 65th Street Chicago 38, Illinois


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 25


SErindale Dunloggin Anna
b (Ex.)-Highest record living
cow (fat) in the world on official type
S- test. (11-5, 365d, 3X, 33198, 4.5%,
1479.) This outstanding Holstein is
owned by Jack R. Budd of Belleville,
Michigan who uses Rapid-Flo Fibre-
Bonded Filter Disks, like a big ma-
jority of dairy farmers from coast
to coast.




more
dairy farmers
use

RAPID-FLOo

FILTER DISKS
than any other
brand
It's performance that makes a champion-it's the proved relia-
bility and safe filtration engineered into Rapid-Flo Fibre-Bonded
Filter Disks that cause more and more dairy farmers to use this
trusted brand to protect milk quality, day in, day out. You'll find
it pays off in better quality milk or cream to follow the judgment
of the majority-and insist on Champion Rapid-Flo Fibre-Bonded
Filter Disks in the Blue Box.























Harvesting Pasture at Hall and Boyd Dairy, Miami
Harvesting Pasture at Hall and Boyd Dairy, Miami


Florida Dairy Pasture Contest Winners
Announced For Year Ended April 1955
By C. W. REAVES, State Extension Dairyman
Director of the State Pasture Contest
State Winners in Division A, "Best Pasture and Forage Porgram," are B. W.
Judge & Son Dairy, Orlando, first; Walter Welkener Dairy, Jacksonville, second;
and Bayou Vista Dairy Farm, Clearwater, third.
In Division B, "Most Improvement Over Previous Year," the winners are: R. W.
Edwards, Bradenton, first; Velda Dairy Farm, St. Augustine, second; and Donegan
Dairy Farm, Largo, third.
In announcing the county winners, the judges and directors of the pasture con-
test call attention to the fact that the pasture programs which won may or may not
actually be the best pastures in the county, for the reason that all pastures were not
entered in the contest.
GROUP I. "Best Pasture Program"; WASHINGTON COUNTY, Stanton
Dairy; JACKSON COUNTY, Schack's Dairy; COLUMBIA COUNTY, Columbia
Dairy Farm GILCHRIST COUNTY, Hill Top Dairy; DUVAL COUNTY, Walter
Welkener; ST. JOHNS COUNTY, Velda Corp. Dairy Farm; VOLUSIA COUNTY,
Barrow Dairy Farm; ORANGE COUNTY, B. W. Judge & Son Dairy; PINELLAS
COUNTY, Bayou Vista Farm Dairy; MANATEE COUNTY, R. W. Edwards;
POLK COUNTY, Edgar Melvin Dairy; HIGHLANDS COUNTY, Ramer's Dairy;
PALM BEACH COUNTY, Froehlich's Dairy.
GROUP II. "Best Improvement Over Previous Year"; WASHINGTON
COUNTY, Stanton Dairy; JACKSON COUNTY, Schack's Dairy; COLUMBIA
COUNTY, Columbia Dairy Farm; GILCHRIST COUNTY, Hill Top Dairy; DU-
VAL COUNTY, A. T. Alvarez; ST. JOHNS COUNTY, Velda Corp. Dairy Farm;
VOLUSIA COUNTY, Barrow Dairy Farm; ORANGE COUNTY, Hanson Collins,
PINELLAS COUNTY, Donegan Farm Dairy; MANATEE COUNTY, R. W. Ed-
wards; POLK COUNTY, Edgar Melvin Dairy; HIGHLANDS COUNTY, Ramer's
Dairy; and PALM BEACH COUNTY, Froehlich's Dairy.
OTHER DAIRIES WITH HIGH SCORES
DESERVING OF HONORABLE MENTION
Lay Laine Guernsey Farm and Fairglade Jersey Farm or Orange County;
Brightman Skinner, W. J. Simmons and Fred B. Miller, all of Duval County, scored
well in the contest with creditable pasture programs.
Certificates will be presented to all those listed above at the Dairy Field Day at
the University of Florida November 2 & 3. The awards will be made to the two state
winners at that time, also. A number of excellent reports were submitted, showing
improved practices in the pasture and forage programs of these farms.
SCORE CARD USED IN PASTURE CONTEST
1. Amount and Quality of Pasture and Forage.............. 60 points
2. Efficient Pasture Production Methods...................... 15 points
3. U tilization of Pastures......................................... 10 points
4. Efficient Handling of Cows on Pasture.................... 5 points
.5. Efficiency of Feeding............................ ................. 10 points
TOTAL 100 points


FLORIDA'S TOP DAIRY
PASTURE PROGRAM 1953-54
The Hall & Boyd Dairy of Miami,
owned and operated by Herman Boyd
and Bob Hall, won the 1953-54 State
Dairy Pasture Contest Award for the Best
Dairy Pasture and Forage Program.
This dairy has demonstrated for several
years the practicability of growing mix-
tures of various grasses and clovers includ-
ing some varieties which have not com-
monly been grown in the area. By proper
fertilization and harvesting methods they
have secured very heavy yields of forage
which have been field chopped and self
fed to the herd from trailer wagons in
small pasture lots. The following grasses
and clovers were used: Pangola, carib,
Saint Lucie, Coastal Bermuda, Dalas, com-
mon and Pensacola bahia, orchard grass,
Kentucky fescue, white clover, alfalfa,
kenland red clover, California burr and
hubam.
In addition to daily chopping and feed-
ing of green forage, silage has been made
from surplus forage for use in periods in
which fresh cut forage is unavailable due
to frosts, droughts, or floods. The herd
has had excellent production with an
average for all cows of 22.8 pounds per
head daily with relatively light grain
feeding.

Clock Radio Awarded
Brightman Skinner of Meadowbrook
Farms Dairy, Jacksonville, won the draw-
ing for a handsome clock radio which was
awarded by the Florida Dairy Association
f.r those who participated in the contest
and completed the pasture reports. The
drawingg was held at the Annual Meeting
"f the Association in Clearwater.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








J. O. Bowen Promoted
By Southern Dairies
Southern Dairies, Inc., recently an-
nounced from the company's headquarters
in Charlotte, N.C., the elevation of J. O.
Bowen from vice president to executive
vice-president.
A native of Tallahassee, Florida,
Bowen has been with Southern Dairies
33 years. He was manager of the West
Palm Beach plant for a number of years
and served as president of the former
Florida Dairy Products Association in
1941 and 1942.
In 1945 he was named zone manager
for Miami. In 1948 he was made Florida
divisional manager and in 1950 was
moved up to the Southern Dairies head-
quarters offices in Washington, D. C. as
vice-president.

MILK FARM PRICE UP
Florida prices remained the same un-
der supervision of the Florida Milk Com-
mission for the month of July while the
average price of milk paid to dairy farm-
ers for the month of July was up 18
cents per hundred pounds, according to
a report of the U. S. Department of Agri-
culture.
The report indicated the number of
dairy cows in the United States during
June as being down 11/2 % from June
1954 and 14% below the record high of
1944. The present number is 22.1 mil-
lion cows.

FIELD DAY PROGRAM
(Continued from Page 23)

PRESENTATION OF DAIRY
PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY
AWARDS
PRESENTATION OF 1 9 54
"PASTURE CONTEST
AWARDS"
ANNOUNCEMENT OF 4-H &
FFA DAIRY EVENTS WIN-
NERS
NOVEMBER 3:
8:30 CONTINUATION OF REGI-
STRATION Student Service
Center
9:00 SECOND PROGRAM SESSION
Student Service Center
Reports of Dairy Research De-
velopments by Dairy Staff
10:15 TOUR OF DAIRY RESEARCH
UNIT
11:30 FARM MACHINERY EXHIB-
IT and DEMONSTATION-
Dairy Research Unit
12:30 BARBEQUE LUNCHEON-
Dairy Research Unit
Further information on any of the
courses may be obtained by writing to the
Department of Dairy Science, University
of Florida, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion, Gainesville, Florida.


DIRECT DELIVERY SERVICE to the
field, grove or pasture. Complete field
service, coordinated with spreading re-
quirements is rendered by a fleet of 15
trailer truck units. Fertilizer mixtures
are formulated according to actual re-
quirements. Here's a service that really
saves you time and money. Write or


* CITRUS GROVES
* FIELD CROPS
* PASTURE GRASS
* TRUCK FARMS


c florida

favorite fertilizer
I NCO RP O RATED
PH. MUTUAL 2-1291- P.O.BOX 912. LAELAND


BUCKET or PIPELINE MILKING


STANDARD
LOW DESIGN
BULK COOLER
For use with conven-
tional milking equip-
ment. Has rounded
bottom for fast drain-
ing, easy cleaning.
Designed with low
pour-in height . 200
gallon tank only 32'4"
high. Twelve sizes-
60 to 1500 gallons.
Ask for Bulletin 290.

VACUUM BULK
COOLER
For direct tie-in with
pipeline milker. No re-
leaser or riser neces-
sary. Fewer parts to
-lean. Can be fur-
nished with adapter
for bucket pour-in.
Available in 200, 300.
400, 500, 600, 800 and
1000 gallon capacities.
Ask for Bulletin
330-22.


Mojonnier Bros. Co. has pioneered in developing improved
bulk milk methods. Decide now to enjoy these advantages
which Mojonnier continuous research and extensive experi-
ence has made available to the dairy farm.
MOJONNIER BROS. CO.
4801 W. OHIO ST., CHICAGO 44. ILLINOI0


.. you're way

ahead with



B JL K


Mojonnier Bulk Coolers have all these
features:
FAST COOLING. Milk is cooled rap-
idly to 34'-36' F. from 15 to 45 minutes
after the milking period.
LESS POWER. Milk is cooled at the
lowest possible power cost... as much
as one-half less.
LESS MAINTENANCE. No moving
parts in the full flooded Freon refrig-
eration system.
ALL STAINLESS STEEL. Coolers are
constructed of 18-8 stainless steel,
including even internal bracing mem-
bers. No sagging or corrosion..

Florida Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 27


ON THE J1 DELIVERY!



















Pictures Reveal Growing Interest and Worth

Of Florida's Annual Dairy Industry Reunions


Producers and Ladies Boost Attendance,
Work and Fun at Clearwater Convention
Whether or not you were one of the over 300 who attended the 1955 Florida
Dairy Convention late in June in Clearwater, you will enjoy browsing through this
picture review of who was there and what they did. If you were there, you will
probably find yourself in one of these action scenes. If you were not there, you cer-
tainly want to see what you missed.
We think that this particular meeting might more appropriately be called Florida's
Annual Dairy Reunion or Home-Coming rather than a Convention. But, be that as
it may, as you let this series of pictures carry you through three days of the doings
of 300 grand people, all with common interests and aspirations, you will better under-
stand why this meeting and program is a good and worthwhile event for Florida
dairy folks.


A Bird's Eye View
While the meeting schedule was only
from Wednesday morning to Friday after-
noon, a bird's eye view would show that
activities actually began on Monday and
ended Saturday. The many details of ar-
rangements kept the Association Staff and
Arrangements Committee busy all week.
A running summary of activities begins
with the President's Early Bird party and
the Directors' dinner and meeting Tues-
day evening. Wednesday morning saw the
Fort Harrison Hotel alive with activity
from top to bottom, including incoming
delegates, assigning of rooms, registering
of dairymen, ladies and men of the allied
trades and with the early birds already
busy with golf, swimming and visiting.
Wednesday afternoon brought the
opening business session in the beautiful
Roof Garden Ballroom and it was packed
with dairymen as well as with interest.
Ladies left the business session after the
opening ceremonies and introductions for
a Get-Acquainted Bridge and Refresh-
ments Party around the Pool and Garden
Terrace. Ladies Auxiliary President Eve-
lyn Sellers and her local arrangements
committee for the ladies program were the
hostesses while refreshments and prizes
were provided by the Alligator Club.
,Wednesday evening brought the "West-
ern Party" and Social Hour, sponsored
by the Alligator Club, in the pool and
garden area which was packed with fun
and fellowship. The Western Costume
contest brought out big surprises and you
had to look twice to be sure the famed
Davy Crockett, Will Rogers or Buffalo
Bill had not come back for a Florida Con-
vention. The Alligator Party continued
after a buffet dinner with dance and floor
show on the roof garden. Western Cos-
tume prizes were awarded to Mrs. A. O.
Patrick for the best ladies Western cos-
tume; Donald Perret, Davy Crockett char-
acterization; Brady Johnston, Western
shirt; Nancy Mathis, Western ladies hat;
Bill Graham, Western men's hat, and
H. B. Thomas, men's Western Costume,

(Continued
Next Page)


















F.D.A. ANNUAL CONVENTION PICTURES. TOP PANEL, across both pages (1) President Cliff Wayne opening the
Convention (2) Jack Dew leads in singing of "God Bless America"; (3) Jack McMullen, Chairman Convention Arrangements
and, Reception Committee, introducing welcoming speakers; (4) Chamber of Commerce Manager Paul Ficht and (5) His Honor,
Mayor Herbert Brown, welcoming the Convention; (6) Jim Stewart, Alligator Club President, outlines convention plans of the
club, (7) Ed Hunt, Manager of the Fort Harrison, pledges assistance of the Hotel Staff, and (8) F.D.A. Secretary Andy Lay out-
lines highlights of the convention program.
LEFT PANEL: Birdseye views of the Annual Banquet. Many are not seen because of balcony.
RIGHT PANEL: (1) One of the distributors' meetings, Vice-President Tom Lee, presiding; (2) A well-attended pro-
ducer program session; Producer Vice-President George Johnson, front row center; (3) The Convention registration desk was
a busy place.



CONVENTION REPORT
(Continued)
Producers Interest High I
Thursday's activities started with break-
fast meetings of the State Dairy Pasture
Contest Judges, Nominating Committee,
and Public Relations Committee.
The morning business sessions were
separate for producers and distributors.
Producers had the largest group ever seen
at a State meeting and interest was so high ,
the session was extended through most of
the afternoon in preference to taking part
in the recreation program.
Distributors also had splendid attend-
ance and interest throughout the morning. I
Noon and Afternoon
The men were all back together for a
luncheon program on Public Relations
while the ladies lunched 40 miles away at
Weeki Wachee Springs.
The golf tournament, a boat trip and
swimming made outdoors fun for many '
on Thursday afternoon, while the hard
working producers chose to continue their .4
conference session. A.
Thursday Night is Enjoyed
Thursday evening began with a recep-
tion party by the Board of Directors
which was followed by the delightful An-
nual Dinner program. Following the
singing of lovely 11-year old Beverly Col-
lins and the address of Bill Gunter, Na-
tional President of the Future Farmers of
America, keen interest centered on the
awarding of golf prizes, State Pasture ~ 1
Contest Prizes and Emblems to Honorary
Junior Members.
The presentation of surprise gifts to
the Association staff, Mr. and Mrs. Andy
Lay and Mrs. Elsie Remsen, brought a
thrill which will long be remembered by
these three. Dancing and good fellow- "'
ship finished out a pleasant evening's
program.
(Continued
Next Page)





















F.D.A. Convention Groups: TOP PANEL, (1) President C. D. Wayne presenting F.D.A. Honorary Junior Membership
Emblem to Bill Gunter, president of Future Farmers of America and son of F.D.A. producer member W. D. Gunter, Live Oak;
(2) President Wayne presenting Honorary Junior Membership to an outstanding 4-H Club member, Howard Renner, St. Peters-
burg, son of F.D.A. producer member, Paul Renner; (3) President Wayne presenting a gift to Secretary and Mrs. Andy Lay;
(4) Mrs. Elsie Remsen, F.D.A. Office Secretary, is presented with a watch by Bill Decklar on behalf of the Alligator Club.


LEFT PANEL, (1) Convention guest
speakers, L to R, Rex Paxton, Sutherland
Paper Co., Kalamazoo, Michigan; Bob
North, International Association of Ice
Cream Manufacturers; Tom Douglas,
Milk Industry Foundation; and Del Cook,
Ice Cream Merchandising Institute, all of
Washington, D. C. (2) F.D.A. group,
L to R seated, Secretary Andy Lay, Presi-
dent Cliff Wayne, Immediate Past-Presi-
dent Herman Boyd; ...,..'.':. President-
Elect Bill Graham, Producer Director
Jack McMullen, Bob Hall and a former
president, Cotton Paul; (3) F.D.A. Di-
rectors in special meeting, L to R seated:
Walter Burton, George Johnson, Hugh
Adams, Tom Lee, Cody Skinner, Presi-
dent Cliff Wavne, IW. J. Barritt. Tohn Ad-
kinson, Claude Kelly, J. F. W. Zirkel-
bach and Donnld Perret; standing: Sec-
retary Andy Lay, John Fuqua, Bob Luns-
ford and President-Elect Bill Graham.



CONVENTION REPORT
(Continued)

Public Relations Session
Friday morning saw a record third day
attendance and participation in a serious
discussion and consideration of the public
relations problems of the Florida dairy
industry, which stimulated the later adop-
tion of a convention resolution for a more
active Association program of public in-
formation and public relations.
The Friday luncheon program was the
Association's best attended final Conven-
tion session. Dr. Tom Douglas of the
Milk Industry Foundation and Alf Niel-
sen appropriately closed the Convention
with challenging suggestions for individ-
ual and industry improvement.


30 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





















Ladies Auxiliary Group: TOP PANEL, Ladies visiting in the Fort Harrison's attractive lounges, (1) L to R, foreground, Miss
Marjorie Hugo, Memphis: Mrs. D. E. Perret, Mrs. Maxine Carter, Mrs. Hugh Adams and Mrs. Elsie Remsen, all of Jackson-
ville; (2) L to R, Mrs. John Lowry, Mrs. H. B. Thomas, an unidentified guest of Mrs. Morgan, Mrs. George Johnson, Mrs.
Charley Morgan and Mrs. WI. Barrit, Jr. BOTTOM PANEL, (1) Ladies Garden Party, (2) Ladies Auxiliary Annual Break-
fast; standing at end of table, left, Mrs. Marjorie Lay as she introduced the guest speaker, Dr. Ouida Abbott, right, Head of the
Department of Home Economics, University of Florida.





CONVENTION REPORT
(Continued)

Alf Nielsen installed all new officers
and directors, impressing some with the .
satisfactions of a duty and a job well-
done, others with a challenge to serve as
new leaders of a great and essential in-
dustry to new heights of accomplishment
and greater public understanding and ap- r
preciation of the industry and its products. i
Convention Speakers
President Cliff Wayne who acted as L, .
chairman of the Annual Meeting Program
Speakers and Arrangements and did a
masterful job of presiding and conducting
the convention sessions . would be
justified in feeling very proud of the fine
acceptance and appreciation shown the
many guest speakers.
The well diversified program included
top-ranking speakers from the principal
national dairy industry associations, in- .9
cluding: Tom Douglas of Milk Industry
Foundation, Neal Kelley of National
Dairy Council, Bob North of the Inter-
national Association of Ice Cream Manu-
facturers and Del Cook of the Ice Cream
Merchandising Institute.
Rex Paxton of Sutherland Paper Com-
pany, Kalamazoo, Michigan, was selected
outside the industry's association leaders
for his wide experience and reputation as
an authority on dairy public relations.
Well chosen from among our Univer-
sity of Florida's authorities were Dr.
Ouida Abbott, Head of the Department
of Home Economics; Prof. Dix Arnold, ,
(Continued
Next Page)

THIRD QUARTER, 1955 31






















Convention Groups. TOP PANEL, (1) Alf Nielsen and Gordon Nielsen, Alfar Creamery, West Palm Beach; (2) Bill Bridges,
manager Miami Home Milk and Tom Plant, manager McArthur Jersey Farm Dairy, both of Miami, (3) Brady Johnston of
Dinsmore Dairy, Jacksonville, receives the Alligator Golf Trophy for keeps from golf chairman, Henry McClanahan, after win-
ning it three times in succession; (4) Jack Dew and Mrs. Donald Perret, scouting for costume winners in the Western Party.
BOTTOM PANEL, Groups taken during the Alligator Club reunion party.




CONVENTION REPORT
(Continued)

Associate Dairy Husbandman; Prof. El-
don Smith, Department of Agricultural
-*, Economics; Dr. Leon Mull, Department
of Dairy Manufacture; and C. W. Reaves,
-. State Extension Dairyman.
Other Florida dairy authorities on the
program were: Raymond Lee, Chairman
and L. K. Nicholas, administrator of the
Florida Milk Commission; Alex Shaw,
TChief Dairy Supervisor and Maxine Car-
ter, director of the Jacksonville Dairy
Council.
Allied Trades Attendance
A. The Florida Dairy Association is proud
of its Allied Trades membership. Their
fine attendance and contribution to the
success of the 1955 Convention was right
up to past performance. A list of mem-
ber companies represented and those at-
tending appears separately. Much credit
is due this group for assistance on ad-
... vance Convention arrangements and regi-
stration, as doorkeeper during business
sessions, their supervision and sponsor-
ship of the golf tournament and the
sponsorship of one evening's fellowship
party and after dinner program and dance.
O. L. Bobo, a past president of the
group, not only served as Alligator Club
Chairman of Arrangements, but acted as
official convention photographer. Most of
the pictures in the Convention review are
from Bo's camera.
.-President Jimn Stewart deserves extra
credit for performing the many duties of
his office while suffering with a broken
toe.
(Continued
I Next Page)


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























CONVENTION REPORT Convention Groups: TOP PANEL, (1) Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Pownall, Velda Corpor-


(Continued)

The Fort Harrison Hotel
At least half the suggestions in the
1956 Convention "Suggestion Box" rec-
ommended a return to the Fort Harrison
Hotel at Clearwater as soon as possible.
The facilities of the Fort Harrison were
certainly tops with 100% air-condition-
ing, good food and dining room service,
one of the finest pools and surrounding
gardens in Florida, a private gulf-beach
area, and most of all to be appreciated
were the management personnel.
The Clearwater Convention Bureau
staff also provided the finest assistance
and cooperation.
The 1956 Convention location will be
decided by the F.D.A. Board of Directors
sometime during the next few weeks.
ANNUAL DINNER GUESTS
The Annual Dinner of the Florida
Dairy Association, as the industry's top
event of the year, is not only enjoyable
because of its dignity and its customary
enjoyable program but because it is a time
when members and Association officials
choose to honor their friends as guests.
Among those who honored the Asso-
ciation with their presence on this occa-
sion, many of whom were seated at the
long speakers table, were:
Dr. Ouida Abbott, Wilson Sparks, Dix
Arnold, Dr. Howard Wilkowske, Dr. L.
E. Mull and C. W. Reaves, all of the Uni-
versity of Florida.
J. B. Starkey, Chairman of the Florida
Livestock Board, and Mrs. Starkev; Ray-
mond Lee, Chairman of the Florida Milk
Commission, and Mrs. Lee; L. K. Nichol-
as, Jr., Administrator, Florida Milk Com-
mission; R. L. Dressel, Member, Florida
Livestock Board; Sam Noles, Milk Con-
sultant, State Board of Health; Fred Rag-
land, Mrs. Bertha Elliott and Henry
Schneider, members, Florida Milk Com-
mission.
Alex Shaw, Chief Dairy Supervisor,
State Department of Agriculture, and
R. R. Hood, area supervisor of this De-
(Continued
Next Page)


action, Uleta; (2) Mr. and Mrs. George B.'.'a., ,i and daughters, Boutwell's Dairy,
Lake Worth; (3) Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stovall and daughters, Superior Ice Cream Co.,
Douglas, Georgia. BOTTOM PANEL, (1) Group of winners in the Western Party
costume contest; (2) Enjoying the Western Party, L to R, Alex Shaw, Florida's Chief
Dairy Supervisor and members of his staff, Mrs. Ora Stanley, office manager, right,
Miss Mary Goodbred, secretary, left, and John D. Robinson, area dairy supervisor,
and Mrs. Robinson.


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 33





















Convention Groups: TOP PANEL, (1) Jack Dew introducing a brother and sister
group who delightfully entertained with singing and dancing; (2) Beverly Collins,
11-year old Jacksonville protege of Jack Dew, who charmed the convention banquet
group with her unusual singing ability; (3) Henry McClanahan, golf chairman, pre-
senting the golf tournament prizes to Stan Brumley, left, Gordon Nielsen and J. K.
Bradford.


LEFT PANEL, (1) Pre-convention plan-
ning by L to R, Miss Angie Barker,
executive of the Fort Harrison Hotel,
Jim Stewart, president of the Alli-
gator Club; Secretary Andy Lay and
Clearwater Convention Bureau manager,
Bob Hendershott; (2) Mr. and Mrs. John
Lowry, socializing; (3) The 3 horsemen
of Alfar Creamery, West Palm Beach:
Bill Gooding, Alf Nielsen and Gordon
Nielsen; (4) Producers attending a busi-
ness session, L to R, VWm. Schack, Green-
wood, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Fuqua, Altha,
and Mrs. Bob Lunsford, Milton.

RIGHT PANEL, (1) Mr. and Mrs. Wal-
ler Burton and John Lowry (center); (2)
W. J. Barritt, J. Atwood Taylor and
Claude Kelly; (3) Gene Fulton and
Dolph Allison and friend.



CONVENTION REPORT
(Continued)

apartment; Miss Jo Forrester, Associate
Editor, Southern Dairy Products Journal;
Mrs. Sue Lay Mathis of Illinois, sister of
F.D.A. Secretary Andy Lay, and her
daughter, Nancy Mathis; Bill Gunter,
President, Future Farmers of America;
Harry Wood, State Director of Vocational
Agriculture Education.
Tom Douglas, Milk Industry Founda-
tion; Del Cook, Ice Cream Merchandis-
ing Institute; Neal Kelley, National Dairy
Council; Rex Paxton, Kalamazoo, Michi-
gan, and W. R. Hancock, Chairman,
Florida Agricultural Council.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS



















Convention Groups: TOP PANELS, (1) Alligator Club leaders in charge of Allied Trades convention registration, L to R, Bill Decklar,
immediate past-president; Jim Stewart, president, and Joe Hammons, president-elect; (2) Alligator Club meeting in session at the conven-
tion; (3) Ladies enjoy the Clearwater sunshine. RIGHT PANEL, Below (1) Larry Hodge, Stan Brumley and Dolph Allison; (2) George
Johnson West Palm Beach, left, and J. D. Fuqua, Altha, discuss producer problems of North and South Florida; (3) L to R, Producers
O. W. Goolsby, Ft. Lauderdale; Herman Boyd, Miami; and Russell Riley, Ft. Lauderdale, compare dairy farm experiences; (4) Convention
group enjoy lounging in the Fort Harrison garden and pool area.
LEFT PANEL, Below (1) Raymond Lee, left, chairman of the Florida Milk Commission, and Fred Ragland, member of the Commission
for the State Board of Health, relax at the Dairy Bar between convention business sessions; (2) Jack McMullen, prominent Clearwater
dariymen, shows local Dairy Month Queen about "milking" as F.D.A.President Cliff Wayne officiates.


CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS STATE POLICIES
AND OBJECTIVES OF DAIRY ASSOCIATION ,
The following policies and objectives of the Florida Dairy Association were de- '
dared by resolutions adopted at the 1955 Annual Meeting in Clearwater, June 24:
Prices and Quality
The Florida Dairy Association hereby reaffirm its previously stated and adopted
policy of favoring and desiring that the industry's products be sold to the public at
the lowest price consistent with high quality and sound business policy.

Milk Commission Law
The Florida Dairy Asociation, feeling
that through its membership it represents
the views of a high percentage of the
dairy industry of the State in all its
branches, hereby reaffirms its position of
many years standing that we firmly be-
lieve in the Milk Commission Law, in
the soundness of the purposes and objec-
tives of this law as stated in its preamble
as being enacted in the interest of a
wholesome and adequate Florida milk
supply and in the interest of the public
health and welfare of the citizens of the
State of Florida.
Milk Commission Administration
We, the members of the Florida 4'-
Dairy Association, reaffirm our confidence
and belief in the present administration of
the Florida Milk Commission and re-
pledge our cooperation with the Commis-
sion and offer our assistance to them in
their efforts to bring about strict enforce-
ment and compliance with the orders and
/5 regulations of the Commission.
Industry and Public Relations
The membership of the Florida Dairy
Association recognizes the importance and
S need of a well considered and appropriate
program of relations within the Florida
dairy industry and a program of "public
relations" and authorizes the Board of
SDirectors of the Association to give im-
p* mediate attention to this program and to
plan, adopt and carry out such industry
and public relations program; and further
authorizes the Board of Directors to call
upon the membership for all necessary
(Continued on Page 40)


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 35








ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.


Nutritionists of World Study Milk and Growth
EDITOR'S NOTE: Mrs. America Escuder, Director-Nutritionist for the Dairy Council of
Hillsborough-Pinellas Counties has just returned from Cornell University where she did
advanced work in nutrition. This article discusses recent research on milk and its relation
to growth.
Countries in the far corners of the earth which are not blessed with the abun-
dance of food and dairy products which we enjoy in the United States are striving
to find sources of nutritious foods which will take the place of meat, milk and cheese.
In some areas a "fish meal" made from fish and bones has been created to supply
the population with the protein and calcium found in meat and milk. In others, new
plants that yield better sources of food are being introduced by scientists, and home
economists and nutritionists are teaching the people how to use these plants for better
health. The problem in the less developed parts of the world is then, how to get
enough protein and calcium, which means, how to get enough meat and milk to
assure good bone development and healthy growth.
Studies carried on in various countries
of Europe, Ceylon, South Africa, and
India all show that children from poor ment in animals as well as in humans.
families are less tall than children from In a study made at Harvard the con-
well-to-do families. The obvious reason delusion was reached that ". . nutrition is
is that poor people get smaller amounts the most plausible explanation we have
of food and less of the high quality foods for the mean increase in stature of ap-
such as meat, milk and eggs. In general, proximately three inches that has taken
researchers believe that calcium (best place over the hundred year interval be-
source of milk) is the nutrient that makes tween 1830 and 1930. And Dr. Elveh-
the greatest difference in growth. jem of the University of Wisconsin writes
In Kenya, 40 African boys 10 to 17 Each new experiment . gives further
years old, working on farms, were divided proof that . protein . must be sup
into 4 groups and given 4 different diets plied in a ratio similar to that found in
Group No. 1 was given the native diet high quality proteins . such as meat,
which consisted of corn, beans, potatoes, milk, eggs, fish and poultry." He further
ghee and salt. Ghee is a form of rancid states that . all basic studies give
butter Group No. 2 was given the same scientific evidence for the importance of
butter. Group No. 2 was given the same three balanced meals each day for all peo-
food but an extra 3/4 of a pound of corn ee lne ma a day f al o
was added. Group No. 3 was given the ple." And, we may add, a meal is not
native diet plus an extra quarter pound balanced unless it includes one glass of
native diet plus an extra quarter pound milk to drink or its equivalent in cooked
of corn and 2 grams of bone flour to in- milk to drink or its equivalent in cooked
crease the calcium. Group No. 4 received foods
the native diet with one pint of skimmed
milk. Even though the experiment lasted NDC Diet Advertising
only 6 months there was a startling in- The National Dairy Council has been
crease in growth in the more abundantly advertising in nineteen national profes-
fed groups. The biggest difference was sional journals during 1955 on the speci-
between Groups No. 1, who ate the native fic subject of weight control diets. More
diet containing 560 mg. of calcium, and than five million messages on dairy foods
Group No. 4, who ate the same diet with are thus being directed toward profession-
the single addition of one pint of skim- al leaders in medicine, education, public
med milk; the total calcium of this en- health and nutrition.
riched diet amounting to 1,250 mg. of Included in the ads is a coupon offer
calcium per day. The native diet group, for doctors to order "Diet Prescription
without milk, grew .71 inches in 6 Pads" from the NDC. Thousands have
months; the native diet plus skim milk been shipped -enough for more than
group grew .99 inches in 6 months. 450,000 overweight patients and all
Whether the increase in growth can be these menus are generous in milk, butter,
ascribed to the calcium alone or to the cheese and ice cream.
additional high quality protein and vita- The potential increase in consumption
mins provided by the skim milk needs of dairy foods because of these diets
further research. In either case the results would mean much to the dairy industry
show that milk, when added to a diet, and improve the health status of the peo-
produces the best growth and develop- pie at the same time.


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Maxine Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Betty Hornbuckle, Asst. Director
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director
DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director

NDC FILM WINS AWARD
A National Dairy Council film recently
won a Golden Reel Certificate of Accep-
tance awarded by the Film Council of
America. The color film entitled "It's All
In Knowing How" is aimed at correcting
food habits in teen-age young people and
an estimated 20 million persons have
viewed it in less than a year.
Diets of teen-agers and young adults
have been one of the most important
phases of the National Dairy Council
program for the past several years.
Studies indicate that this is the time when
food habits are most apt to break away
from even the most carefully supervised
diets of childhood.

BOTH ORANGE JUICE AND
MILK PROGRAMS NEEDED
A committee of nutritionists including
the directors of Florida's three Dairy
Council units recently prepared a state-
ment endorsed by the State Department
of Education, State Board of Health, the
Florida Citrus Commission, the Florida
Dairy Association and the School Lunch
Advisory Committee. This statement de-
clared that one important food cannot re-
place another when each contributes a
superior amount of different essential
nutrients.
All surveys of food habits show that
neither children nor adults are consuming
as much of these two foods as are recom-
mended by the Bureau of Human Nutri-
tion of the U.S. Department of Agricul-
ture. Only 51% receive adequate
amounts of citrus and only 45 % sufficient
milk in their regular diets.
Cooperative efforts can very well prod-
uce a schedule in which both orange juice
and milk are supplied to school children
with the particular contribution which
each makes to the diet taken into con-
sideration. For the health's sake of the
children, the two programs should be
compatible.


36 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






SCHOOL MILK PROGRAM
SIMPLIFIES REQUIREMENTS
The Federal Aid Program for making
more milk available to school children
will operate during the coming school
year under new simplified regulations
which school authorities feel will make
possible a much greater participation by
Florida schools than was the case during
the past school year.
Florida used only $445,000.00 of our
allowed $1,000,000.00 for last year. The
unused balance was required to be return-
ed to the National Fund in Washington.
Approximately the same amount has been
allotted to Florida for the 1955-1956
school year.
The revised plans have dropped the
"base" system used last year under which
schools were reimbursed only for milk
consumed over the base or previous year's
consumption. Under the new plan schools
under the National School Lunch Pro-
gram may receive reimbursement from the
special school milk fund of 4f per half
pint for all milk served a la carte.
Schools not under the School Lunch
Program may receive not to exceed 30
per half pint reimbursement on all milk
served with school lunches or a la carte.
School reports required to be made
have been simplified and combined with
regular school lunch program reports,
making it easier for school authorities to
carry out the program. No additional
school reports will be necessary as was
the case last year.
F.D.A. Committee Meets
On School Milk Program
A special school milk committee of the
Florida Dairy Assoication met August 10
in Jacksonville with the State School
Lunch Lunch Supervisor, Mrs. Thelma
Flanagan, to work out plans for cooper-
ation between the dairies and school au-
thorities of Florida in an effort to secure
the greatest possible benefits for Florida
school children under this program.
One of the chief objectives of the
committee is to endeavor to extend the
benefits of the program to the twenty-four
counties and approximately 400 schools
of the State which did not qualify for the
program last year.
Members of the committee attending
the meeting August 10 were: Dolph
Allison, Chairman, Borden's Dairy, Or-
lando; Bill Seeburger, T. G. Lee Dairy,
Orlando; George Heine, Southern Dair-
ies, Tampa; Claude Kelly, Foremost
Dairies, Jacksonville; Cody Skinner, Skin-
ner's Dairy, Jacksonville; Maurice Sherk,
Southern Dairies, Jacksonville; Mrs.
Maxine Carter, Director Dairy Council of
Jacksonville; E. T. Lay, Executive Direc-
tor F. D. A.; and Mrs. Thelma Flanagan,
State School Lunch Supervisor, Tallahas-
see. Members of the committee not pres-
ent were: Charles Coble, Tallahassee;
Gordon Nielsen, West Palm Beach; and
Brady Johnston, Jacksonville.


Florida Ranks 21st
For School Lunch Funds
,Florida has been allocated $1,475,-
969.00 of the Federal appropriation of
$83,236,197.00 for the National School
Lunch Program during the 1955-56
school year.
Twenty States receive more funds than
Florida under a formula based on the
number of children between the ages of
5 and 17 inclusive and the relation of the
per capital income in the United States to
the per capital income within each State.
States are required to match Federal
funds also by a plan based on the rela-
tionship of the State per capital income to
the national average per capital income.
Last year approximately 1.8 billion
meals were served to 11 million children
in 60,000 schools under the National-
State School Lunch Program.

Your child is beginning to learn the
real value of a dollar when he starts ask-
ing for two.


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 37


"Milk Breaks"
vs. "Coffee Breaks"
One of the findings of discussion
groups meeting at a recent regional con-
ference of Dairy Council directors was
that, with proper education, business and
industrial workers might learn the advan-
tages of drinking milk instead of coffee
during their morning and afternoon
breaks. Further discussion on milk in the
diet brought out the fact that proper
nourishment might reduce accident rates
in factories and contribute to greater
alertness of business workers.
Marian Cudworth, director of the Dairy
Council in Miami, participated in the
discussion reaching the above conclusions
while America Escuder, director of the
Dairy Council in Tampa, took part in a
discussion relating to the use of milk by
older people. The latter group advised
that education on diet and the use of milk
can be directed toward welfare and re-
creation groups of older people as well as
both men's and women's clubs.


...

IT VENV LIKE '


And there's a good reason too! Florida Citrus '
Pulp is made from the best tree-ripened oranges
and grapefruit. Cows like it and what's more
important, Florida Citrus Pulp is a carbohydrate
concentrate that is high in T.D.N.*, low in fiber
content, and contains definite milk stimulating
factors. Successful dairymen are getting better
milk production at lower cost by
feeding Florida Citrus Pulp. It is
easy to feed and store and will not
affect milk flavor. The Citrus In-
dustry has prepared a complete
booklet on Citrus Pulp. It explains
clearly what Florida Citrus Pulp is
and how to feed it to dairy cows. You can obtain W.a. f o,'e
a free copy by filling in the coupon below. wToFeedCtruPu|p
*Total Digestible Nutrients '.s t'


2- Name_
Address
City State
dealer's name




R 0. BOX 403 TAMPA, FLORIDA DEPT. D
02'




















FLORIDA JERSEYS PROVE POPULAR

WITH COSTA RICAN DAIRYMAN
By DR. D. A. SANDERS, Head, Department of Veterinary Science
University of Florida
, EDITOR'S NOTE: This interesting article was furnished the Dairy News at our request
S by Dr. Sanders who recently returned from several weeks duty in Costa Rica where he was
engaged in a joint research contract assignment with the Costa Rican Ministry of Agricul-
ture, the U. S. Foreign Operation Administration and the University of Florida.
Mariano Guardia's modern dairy, Hacienda Queberi, a 2500 acre farm, is located
30 miles from the quaint city of San Jose and 15 miles from Cartago in the scenic
S Central Mesata area of Costa Rica. Queberi is an Indian name with no translation to
English or Spanish. The Queberi River crosses the plantation in a beautiful valley
which is part of the farm as yet unexplored.
Elevation of Hacienda Queberi varies
from 5,000 to 8,000 feet, providing a de- senior four-year old, was secured as herd
lightful climate and excellent weather sire. This bull produced around 100
conditions for forage production. The daughters at the farm with a very credit-
famous Kukuyo grass intermixed with able production record.
Louisiana White Dutch clover forms the Bulls are being brought in from the
basis for the verdant pastures and soilage finest herds in the United States. Walter
crops used as dairy forage. Here one Welkener of Holly Hill Farm, Jackson-
finds a herd of 400 purebred registered ville, consigned a shipment of two Jersey
Jerseys which the owner has carefully bulls and several heifers to the farm.
bred by selection of foundation stock Later he and Mrs. Welkener flew to Costa
from the best herds in many parts of the Rica to visit the Guardias and observed
world. The farm has been under develop- the animals in their new environment.
ment since 1937. The first three years Another bull was purchased from the
were devoted by its owner to clearing the Spann herd. Its dam was recently import-
Sland of a very profitable lumber crop. In ed into the United States from the Island
This corporation 10,000 logs of fine lum- of Jersey. Female offspring of this bull
ber were taken out for the local markets, have shown excellent udder conforma-
In 1939 nearby Irazu Volcano had its tion. Last Spring, his daughters won sev-
largest eruption covering with ashes all eral prizes in the Exposition held at El
of the rich dairy farms surrounding the Campo Auana in Cartoga, Costa Rica.
area. One of the dairy farms consisting Characteristics of several individuals
of the finest Jerseys in the country became are shown in the accompanying photo-
depressed following the volcanic eruption graphs.
and Mr. Guardia purchased fifty of the
choicest animals for an initial herd build- In addition to raising fine Jersey's and
ing and breeding project. The aim was to producing top quality milk and milk
bred for the highest production and the products, Mariano Guardia operates a
best type. large coffee fincha which supplies the
A son of Siegfried Military Secret, popular medium for use of much of the
a class leader in the United States as a cream he produces.


The accompanying pictures supplied by Dr. Sanders show: (1) Lush green pastures,
purebred cattle, fertile soil and beautiful scenery typical of Costa Rica. Dr. Sanders is seen
inspecting the verdant pasture and contented Jerseys on Mariano Guardia's farm, Hacienda
Queberi, overlooking the historic Orosi Valley in Costa Rica's Central Meseta. (2) Oscar
Guardia, son of Mariano, right, owner of Hacienda Queberi, showing SAMARES DAY
DREAM PRINCE, purchased from Morrocroft Farm, Charlottee, N. C. Prince's dam,
Robinette Valiant Princess, classified excellent, has never been defeated as a show cow.
(3) ROSE OF OREGON, a cow imported in dam from A. W. Sweet, Sixes, Oregon. (4)
OBSERVER SULTAN POMPEYO, a Walter Welkener bull, son of excellent sire and dam.
(5) SYBIL GREY BEAUTY, half-sister to U.S. champion "Siegfried Military Secret," still
a great producer on the farm. (6) SYBIL LARK BARONET SULTAN, a Welkener bull,
junior champion in Costa Rica show, 1955. (7) BOUTILLIERE'S DORIS, bred and raised
at Hacienda Queberi, a heavy producer with a perfect udder. (8) A typical scene in
Costa Rica.


38 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


*-e
E;;~7L~*i









JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



OFFICIAL JERSEY CLUB Medals, Ratings
HERD IMPROVEMENT TESTS And Classification
Recent Herd Improvement Registry The herd of 58 registered Jerseys
Tests supervised by the University of owned by Fairglade Jersey Dairy, Or-
Florida in cooperation with the American land, recently scored an average of
Jersey Cattle Club reveal the following 84.40% compared to the Breed's average
records: of 83.15%. One animal was rated Ex-
Six registered Jersey cows in the Holly cellent, 29 Very Good, 19 Good Plus and
Hill herd, Jacksonville, owned by Walter 9 Good.
Welkener exceeded 9,500 lbs. of milk Gold and Silver Medal Certificates
and 550 lbs .of butterfat each in the 305- have been awarded to X. Standard Ivy
day test period. The highest producing Bambi belonging to Walter Welkener,
animal, X. Standard Ivy Bambi, had an Jacksonville, for her production record
actual record of 11,646 lbs. of milk with cited above. Two other cows in this herd
674 lbs. of butterfat, qualified for Silver medal certificates.
J. K. Stuart, Bartow, has a registered They are Observer Onyx Erna with a
Jersey cow which in 305 days produced record of 10,042 lbs. milk containing
9,782 lbs. of milk containing 568 lbs. of 535 Ibs. butterfat at 3 years and 3
butterfat. This record was made by Lilac months and Treva Sybil Eula with a
Lad's Pansy Princess. record of 7,167 Ibs. of milk with 457
The highest producing cow of the four lbs. butterfat at the age of 2 years and
belonging to the Meadowbrook Farms, 6 months.
Jacksonville, was Magnolia Pinnacle Stan Favorite Doreen, belonging to
Linda with an actual record of 8,825 lbs. Meadowbrook Farms, Jacksonville, has
of milk containing 549 lbs. of butterfat. been rated a Tested Dam by the Ameri-
The record of other cows exceeded 8,000 can Jersey Cattle Club for having three
Ibs. milk and 525 lbs. butterfat each. offspring with official production records.
A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville, has two The cow's progeny averaged 8,653 lbs. of
cows which recently completed the HIR milk and 500 lbs. butterfat on a twice-
tests. Valor Favorite Harriet produced daily-milking, 305-day mature equivalent
10,659 lbs. of milk with 606 lbs. butter- basis.
fat at the age of 6 yrs. and 2 months, and
P. R. S. Advancer Bell produced 8,476
lbs. milk containing 487 lbs. butterfat PUBLIC RELATIONS: Public Rela-
at the age of 2 years, 1 month, tions begins at home.


Hood's Bradenton Dairy
Expands To Sarasota Area
An extensive expansion of its dairy
products deliveries in the Sarasota area
is planned by Hood's Dairy following its
purchase recently of the Bayside Farms
Dairy, on U.S. 41 six miles south of
Sarasota.
John Hood, one of four brothers oper-
ating the Hood's dairy interests, said the
owners of the Bayside Farms will con-
tinue to maintain their herd, ranging up-
ward to 3,000 cows, while Hood's will
bottle and distribute the milk products.
Hood's, originally established more
than 50 years ago in Pinellas County,
about a year ago took over the Burnett
Dairy, Bradenton, establishing a distribu-
tion point from that city. In addition to
John, the other brother owners are Paul,
Emmett, Jr., and Lester Hood.
Bayside Farms has been conducted for
the past 32 years by J. F., Cy and Jack
Bispham, who will continue to maintain
their herd under the Hood management
plan.


Cottage Cheese Plant
Opens In Graceville
Paul Taylor, who some years ago had
much to do with establishing milk pro-
duction in West Florida around Chipley,
has gone back to the area after operating
a wholesale milk business in Miami for
several years, to help the dairymen dis-
pose of their milk.
Taylor, together with Chris Boget as
superintendent and Earlston Williams as
secretary, has formed the Pioneer Milk
Association at Graceville for the Manu-
facture of cheese.
An announcement in the Washington
County News at Chipley on August 11,
reported that 800 pounds of cottage
cheese was made in the first test run of
the new plant during the first week of
August. About 800 gallons of milk was
used. Full time operation of the plant
was expected to get under way late in
August.

It's better to have loved a short guy
than never to have loved a tall!


Two baby mocking birds, barely dis-
tinguishable in the litter of their nest,
are being fed milk from a medicine
dropper by the hand of Dr. Wilkowske in
an unused crate behind the University of
Florida's Dairy Products Lab.
Baby Birds On Milk Diet
In Novel UF Experiment
Everyone knows that milk is good for
babies-why not baby birds? That was
the idea of Dr. Howard Wilkowske of
the Dairy Science Department of the
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
when he saw a mocking bird's nest on the
back platform of the Dairy Products Lay.
The fact that at the time it was "Dairy
Month" (June) might have influenced
him somewhat.
Between semesters the lab doesn't use
all its cases. The extras are stored behind
the lab. These strong metal cases looked
like a safe place, so mocking birds (State
bird of Florida) have built two nests in
them. One pair of mocking birds has
already hatched baby birds, and is strug-
gling to keep their hungry mouths fed.
That was what gave Dr. Wilkowske the
idea of trying milk. After all, milk is
our most nearly perfect food-loaded
with proteins, minerals, vitamins and
everything people need for good health.
Who knows? It might grow super mock-
ing birds, too!

NEW REGULATION ADOPTED
ON DIETETIC ICE CREAM
State Commissioner of Agriculture, Na-
than Mayo, as administrator of the Flor-
ida Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts Law
has amended a previously adopted regu-
lation which prohibited the storing of
"dietetic" ice cream in the same cabinet
with regular ice cream.
The new regulation is an amendment
to official regulation #9 of the Commis-
sioner of Agriculture under the Florida
Ice Cream and Frozen Desserts Law,
Chapter 500, Florida Statutes.
The amendment to the previous order
provides that:
"Dietetic Ice Cream may be stored in
the same cabinet with other ice cream,
provided they are partitioned so as not to
become mixed with each other and a sign
with letters at least one inch in height is
prominently displayed."


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 39









ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS REPRESENTED

AT THE 1955 FLORIDA CONVENTION


-


Model "10" Utility Loader
Designed for fast hook-up and easy
operation, the new Case Model "10"
Utility Loader is priced low; especially
for small operators. It will handle up to
one-quarter ton per bucketload and fits
Case "VAC" Series Tractors. Being an
Eagle Hitch Loader, it can be attached or
removed from the tractor by one man in
one minute or less.
Ideal for manure handling operations,
the Model "10" Loader is also capable of
handling small earth moving and scraping
jobs. Many small miscellaneous farm
jobs can now be power-handled econom-
ically.
The hydraulic power of the tractor's
Eagle Hitch lifts the load. A built-in
safety valve protects the hydraulic system
from overload. Maximum operating
height and depth can be varied by relo-
cating the hitch pins in any one of three
locations.
The Eagle Hitch Loader, being rear-
mounted, operates better in slippery barn-
yards due to the weight shift from front
to back wheels.
Featuring simplicity and unusually low
cost, the Model "10" Loader provides
farmers an extremely handy loader with-
out having to buy hydraulic pistons and
other superstructure framing.


CONVENTION RESOLUTIONS
(Continued from Page 35)
cooperation including such reasonable
financial support as the Board deems
essential for the conduct of such program.
Milk Standards Enforcement
The membership of the Florida Dairy
Association is firm in the conviction that
it is the duty of the dairy industry to
provide the public with products of the
highest possible quality and to accomplish
this objective favors the strict enforce-
ment of all State and local laws and
regulations having to do with the pro-
ducts of the dairy industry and likewise
favors the exercising of special diligence
by all appropriate authorities enforcing
the laws and regulations which are in-
tended to insure the public that only
dairy products which meet Florida's high
standards of quality can be imported into
the State.


ADAMS PACKING ASSOCIATION, INC.
J. L. Coates, Winter Haven
BOWEY'S
Ed Salvatore, Tampa
CAWTHON, INC.
E. G. Graham, Miami
CREAMERY PKG. MANUFACTURING CO.
F. S. Brumley, Atlanta
DARI-TECH PRODUCTS CORPORATION
C. O. Morgan, Columbia, S. C.
DAIRY & FOOD EQUIPMENT CO.
Wilton Adams, Coral Gables
DAIRYPAK, INC.
Hugh Macaulay, Waynesboro, Ga.
F. K. Dickson, Athens, Ga.
Jack Strack, Daytona Beach, Fla.
DENNERY, CHARLES, INC.
Ira Stone, Lakeland
DIVERSE CORPORATION
J. K. Bradford, Atlanta, Ga.
E. E. Fulton, Jacksonville
DOUGHNUT CORPN. OF AMERICA
Paul Kellenberger, Jacksonville
ESKIMO PIE CORPORATION
.0. R. Pickett, Smyrna, Ga.
EX-CELL-O CORPORATION
J. W. Radke, Atlanta, Ga.
FLA. CITRUS CANNERS COOPERATIVE
R. W. Bennett, Lake Wales
FLORIDA FEED MILLS
Grady R. Swope, St. Petersburg
FISCHMAN COMPANY, THE
Leo Fischman, Philadelphia, Pa.
GERMANTOWN MANUFACTURING CO.
A. H. Decker, Philadelphia, Pa.
HACKNEY BROS. BODY COMPANY
J. H. Brunt, Jr., Atlanta, Ga.
James R. McLendon, Wilson, N. C.
HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
Hans Ahlefeldt, Jacksonville
INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY
W. M. Scott, Atlanta, Ga.
JACKSON GRAIN COMPANY
R. L. Peeples, Tampa
JOHNSTON'S, ROBT. A.
Joe Hammons, Odessa
KELCO COMPANY
Joe E. Anderson, Gainesville
KIECKHEFER CORPORATION
R. J. Evans, Jacksonville
M. A. Knowles, Jacksonville
KLENZADE PRODUCTS, INC.
W. H. Haskell, Jacksonville
A. E. Bock, Sarasota
KOLD-HOLD COMPANY
.M. H. Gwynn, Nashville, Tenn.
KRIM-KO CORPORATION
Herbert E. Henry, Charlotte, N. C.
Douglas Headford, Daytona Beach
LIBERTY GLASS COMPANY
Harold O. Rogers, Atlanta
LILY-TULIP CUP CORPORATION
Hank Tull, Atlanta, Ga.
S. T. Tygart, Jacksonville


When someone stops buying
Someone stops selling;
When someone stops selling,
Someone stops making;
When someone stops making,
Someone stops working;
When someone stops working,
Someone stops earning;
When someone stops earning,
Someone stops buying.


F. W. Decklar, Tampa
LIQUID CARBONIC CORPORATION
C. B. Palmer, Atlanta, Ga.
H. S. Hiatt, Atlanta, Ga.
O. L. Bobo, Jacksonville
LOWE, JOE, CORPORATION
Jack Hartman, Cleveland, Fla.
Arthur Goodrich, Hollywood, Fla.
MARATHON CORPORATION
Robert J. Walters, Jacksonville
MARYLAND BAKING COMPANY
James Mott, Jacksonville
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.,
JACKSONVILLE
D. R. Haller, Jacksonville
MILLER MACHINERY & SUPPLY CO.,
MIAMI
Ray Arkley, Miami
MILLER-LENFESTEY SUPPLY COMPANY
,W. R. Waldeck, Tampa
J. Ralph Kirkland, Tampa
Syd Lenfestey, Tampa
MOJONNIER BROS. COMPANY
Lee P. Bickenbach, Lakeland
Kenneth D. Pylant, Ocala
MORRIS PAPER MILLS
Richard P. Slye, Avondale Estates, Ga.
MURPHY BODY WORKS
Walter P. Roberson, Wilson, N. C.
OLIN-MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORPN.
Hugh Attaway, Atlanta
OWEN-ILLINOIS GLASS COMPANY
C. W. Parmalee, Jacksonville
W. H. Adams, Jacksonville
PENNSYLVANIA SALT MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
Joe M. Foss, Memphis, Tenn.
Roy H. Wilson, Orlando
REDDI-WIP COMPANY OF FLORIDA
Aaron Block, Jacksonville
RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
Dave Freeman, Moultrie, Ga.
Jim Stewart, Orlando
SAVAGE ARMS CORPORATION
John T. Lowry, Atlanta, Ga.
SCHAFFER, INC.
Jess Kaiser, East Point, Ga.
SEALRIGHT CO., INC.
J. K. Osborn, N. Miami
Bob Meagher, Neptune Beach, Fla.
STANDARD PACKAGING CORPORATION
Larry Hodge, Miami
SUTHERLAND PAPER CO.
Rex Paxton, Kalamazoo, Mich.
THATCHER GLASS MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
W. T. Love, Charlotte, N. C.
J. L. Stanley, Philadelphia, Pa.
IVARNER-JENKINSON MANUFACTUR-
ING COMPANY
Jim Reardon, Valdosta, Ga.
WILSON-TOOMER FERTILIZER CO., OF
TAMPA
Harvey A. Page, Tampa
WYANDOTTE CHEMICALS CORPN.
Henry H. McClanahan, Miami
Tom Jones, Atlanta, Ga.


By the time a woman can pay a fancy
figure for her clothes, usually she doesn't
have one.

Pessimist: "What have I to be thankful
for? I can't even pay my bills."
Optimist: "In that case, be thankful
you're not one of your creditors."

Don't underestimate the power of the
"editor"!


40 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






































Sandra Dennison and her prize 4-H Cow.

First Prize Dairy Pasture Essay

In State 4-H Members Contest
EDITOR'S NOTE: Sandra Dennison of Orlando, author of this first prize essay, has won
many honors in dairy shows and other 4-H activities. She is now president of the State
4-H Girl's Council. The American Institute of Cooperation recently awarded her a scholar-
ship for a summer Farm Youth Conference at Purdue University for her outstanding 4-H
Club farming program activities.
THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF BETTER DAIRY PASTURES
By Sandra Dennison
Today, more and more dairy farmers are finding out how profitable temporary
and permanent improved pastures can be. They are wanting knowledge on how they
can produce and maintain these pastures. Here are some suggestions.
First, it is important to begin with the best land available. In selecting this land
consider the financial standpoint as well as management conveniences, such as, loca-
tion of water, shade and fences.
After the land is selected it should be Fr f r s s m c-
cleared. When clearing land, a good Fou e zr sustancs most co
number of shade trees should remain only needed in Florida soils are nitro-
standing. However, all stump should gen, phosphorus, potassium and minor
standing Hower al s s s d elements. Nitrogen is the most important
be cleared. These can be sold to help pay elements. Nitrogen is the most important
eeein good pastures because it increases
In order planting, disk growth and improves feed quality. Nitro-
In order to prepare for planting, disk I
or chop about three times, being careful gen is costly. Perhaps the cheapest means
not to disk deeper than four to six inches of supplying nitrogen is through planting
so as not to turn up the infertile subsoil. legumeous crops which add nitrogen to
Land preparation should begin six to the soil. It may be necessary to add more
twelve months before seeding. Palmettos through fertilizing. Phosphorus builds
will probably be the number one menace. plant cells and is important in animal
Perhaps the most practical way to elimin- growth. Potassium is necessary for growth
ate them is by the use of surup blades. and makes up an important part of the
After disking, the land should be leveled. plant structure. The minor elements aid
The proper amount of lime in the soil rapid establishment and larger production.
is necessary for good pasture establish- Fertilizer and lime may be spread by
ment. The amount varies by the section the drop-type spreader or the centrifugal
of the country, but usually one ton of type. Fertilize at seeding time and either
limestone per acre can be applied for plow under or leave on the soil surface.
grasses and two tons for legumes. Care After land preparation, seed must be
should be taken in applying too lightly selected. Seed should be of good quality
because it will create more expense in and high germination. Some grasses are
having to relime sooner, planted by runners or rhizomes. These


Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD


FOR SALE

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IAIRY CATTLE: We offer any number Ayr-
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you. Write or call: Bill Carpenter's ,ivestock
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REGISTERED SERVICE AGE MILKING -
SHORTHORN BULLS. Championship stock,
priced right. J. C. Taylor, 1022 Park St.,
Jacksonville.

GRADE GUERNSEY HEIFER CALVES from
day-old to six weeks. These calves sired by
hulls out of high record danis that classify
Very Grood and Excellent. Write for prices or
come to tlie l'ar. I)ONEGAN FARMS,
Largo, Florida.

POSITION WANTEI: As pIroduction mtanag-er
in milk or ice cream. 28 years in dairy in-
dustry; iu a lity control and low butter-fat loss;
;lso cut labor cost in any pIlant. Write FDN-3,
220 Newnan St., Jacksonville 2, Florida.


runners should not be too long, but
should be sturdy rather than tender.
What grass to plant? That depends
on the soil condition and location. Per-
manent pastures are probably the most
economical, but temporary pastures can
be an emergency supply during a drought
or while permanent pastures are growing.
Two of the best temporary crops are oats
for winter grazing and pearl millet for
summer. Different kinds of grasses
should be planted in order to reduce dis-
ease.
Seed may be planted by hand, a hand-
crank, or by machine. Runners may be
scattered by hand. Cover the seed lightly
and pack after planting. Planting should
be done when the soil is moist and well
prepared.
Pastures may be maintained in several
ways. A good pasture should not be over-
grazed. A good way to prevent this is by
pasture rotation. Mowing or chopping
whenever necessary helps maintain a lush
and palatable growth. Legumes should be
fertilized in October of every year, and
grasses in either February or August.
Relime legumes every four or five years
and grasses every five or seven years.
Every day Florida is increasing as a
dairy state. Thus, dairymen must have
more and better pastures to carry more
cattle.


THIRD QUARTER, 1955 0 41




















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division

Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-4301





SINC. Dariickh

Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Como Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902



DAIRY & FOOD EQUIPMENT, INC.
General Office: 1034 N.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Fla. Telephone 9-3679
Branches
Tampa Jacksonm ille Orlando



DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
J. H. STRAClK PHONE: 3-422:
3064 Liberty St. (At Van), Daytona Beach, Fla.
J. H. Strack Phone: 3-4223


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Pit. Mutual 5-3284
LAEIAND, FLA.


JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Pure Mfg. Corp.
Ilanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.


VETERINARY MEDICINES

S Sold direct to the dairyman
= D. W. Parfitt Ben Zirin, Ph.G.


-.- U~T a ~ U U W-~ EI


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.



DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Snot Orangeade Concentrate
irrim-Kuo Chocolate Flavorings
16il Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-01-18
Daytona Beach, Fla.


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone: ELgin 3-3721

Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land O' Lakes Non-fatt Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons

Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
for COCOA DIVISION

Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
JOE L. HAMMONS
Rte. 1, Box 304 TELEPHONEE
Odessa, Florida Tampa 90-2396


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer

JOE E. AN)ERSON

89)1 Ponce de Leon Avenue, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia



KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Ihone ELgin 6-1334

4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.



S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative

221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.



KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


Howell louse Suite 202


Atlanta, (;a.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head
Phone Norfolk, Va., LOwell 3-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

J:aksoniille, Fla., Phone: El.gin 3-9779
Miaumi, Fla.. P'lone: MUrray 8-8431


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee W. H. Adams
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone ELgin 3-6134-5




PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream

FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, iFa.


PENN SALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY

MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
Tampa
2209 E. Broadway, Phone 4-3362
Jacksonville
2320 Edwards Ave., EV 7-7011
Orlando
1215 W. Central Ave., 5-5179
MAIN OFFICE:
Miami-1034 N.W. 22nd St., Ph. 82-1671
Distributor
DUDLEY CAWTHON, INC.
Representative
E. G. "Don" Graham


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE. Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N.C.



UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative

5240 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami, Fla.


42 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


m


l/ I









FEATURING THE BLOOD OF THESE TWO

at the Florida Guernsey Sale, Largo, Fla., Sept. 16, 1955

Pictured below are two of the most valuable
Guernseys that have ever been at Dinsmore


Sire:
Dinsmore Prince Royal
38 AR Daughters
Jr. & Res. Champ.
Fla. 1942

0

Dam:
Butler Island Janice
13803-603-Jr. 4
EXCELLENT
6 AR Daughters, 1 AR Son


Dinsmore Royal May
12378-524-Sr. 2-
15261-643-5 yrs. 305C
EXCELLENT '49 '50 '51
Sold for $10,000 to
Quail Roost Farm


Foremost Royal Valor
8 Daughters over 900 Fat
11 Daughters over 800 Fat
81 AR Daughters
42 PR Sons



Dam:
Foremost Loyalty
18229-856-CC
2 AR Daughters
3 AR Sons

CONSIGNED:
1. Dinsmore Mayroyal Alene
Born Sept. 18, 1949
11304-475-in 344 days on test
as Sr. 3 yr. old
Due Sept. 26, 1955 to Dinsmore Juryman,
a brother of "Royal May" (above).
Sire: Foremost May Royalty (above)
Dam: Dinsmore Mistress Arlene


Foremost May Royalty
65 AR Daughters,
Over 100 to be tested
3 EXCELLENT,
24 VERY GOOD
Sire of Grand Champions
in Florida, Tennessee,
and Maryland





2. Dinsmore Jury Justina
Born Sept. 23, 1950
13680-650-Sr. 3-365C
Due Sept. 28, 1955 to a son of
Foremost May Royalty (above)
Sire: Dinsmore Juryman
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Justine (VG)


Dinsmore Guernseys

FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1
EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON




Return Postage Guaranteed


SIt's time for me to pay my bill...


A 4 0


It's taken two lactations for me to pay the
boss back for all the fine care I've had.
Now I'm out to return a profit. I came
from high producing ancestors and I've
been on Security's Program all the way.
Security Dairy Feeds help me produce
the maximum milk fed along with available
roughage. As a calf I got all the benefits
of Security Calf Starter and Security
Calf Grower. When I'm dry I'm fed Security
Conditioner. How can I lose! Pardon me,
I'm next on the milking machine.


Security Mills, Inc.
TAMPA KNOXVILLE JACKSONVILLE

Security Feed & Seed Co.
MIAMI PALATKA ORLANDO OCALA, FLA. THOMASVILLE, GA.


,


. *


"for
the
BEST
years
of
her
life"




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