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 Back Cover














Title: Florida dairy news
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00028
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: 2d quarter 1955
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00028
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
    Back Cover
        Page 33
        Page 34
Full Text



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I Young Holstein Herd of the University of Florida Dairy Research Unit Gainesville, Story Page 6


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Surge Milker Units Parlor Stalls h anks
Breaker Cup Units Stainless Steel hs
VMacu uhe Surge ELECTROBRAH"
Vacuum Pumps Automatic Pipe Line washers
Milk Pumps IRANDELS
Releasers Water Heaters
Milk Line Valves Line Wasters
Stainless Steel or MLnifolds
Glass Pipe Manifolds
Washing Racks Sanitary Fittings
Washing Rocks e e t of conditions
...all that you need to meet any set of conditions
is offered you on terms that you can handle.

Any milking machine that bears the Surge
Nameplate milks with Genuine Surge TUG &
PULL, which is the best possible guarantee that
you will get good cow milking.
Any milking machine that bears the Surge
Nameplate is protected by Organized Surge
Service, which is the best guarantee there is
that you won't be left in a mess.
Any milking machine that bears the Surge
Nameplate is now sold on EASY TERMS... a
down payment that you can swing, and up to
twenty-four months to clean up the balance.
It is hard to think of a machine that will
save you so much time and labor as a Surge ...
any kind of a Surge.
NOW... is a good time to let a Surge start
working for you....


NO

E Z


SStanchion Pipe
Line Milkers










* Bucket Milkers


.4wA


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2843 W. 19th Street Chicago 23, Illinois
ATLANTA KANSAS CITY SACRAMENTO SYRACUSE HOUSTON
MINNEAPOLIS SEATTLE TORONTO


k Parlor Milkers

A "
Stanchio Pipe.


o U ng 7e


q










The most important SO5

a dairyman can save today


SureRaise
Pre-starter with aureomycin and
pectin for controlling scours.
Here's why...
Larro research has developed a great
new calf-feeding program that grows
calves 26% faster than accepted stand-
ards, helps control scouring troubles
and gets heifers to breeding size by 14
months.
Now this great new program is ready
for you ... at our store.
The plan includes two brand new
feeds: Larro SureRaise pre-starter and


SureCalf
Improved starter with coarse,
tasty texture that calves really
go for.
SureCalf starter. During the announce-
ment period we are offering an intro-
ductory coupon with each 25 lb. bag
of SureRaise. It's worth 500 toward the
purchase of SureCalf.
That's a worthwhile saving in itself.
But far more important are the benefits
to calves offered by this revolutionary
new calf-feeding program. It's the sure
way to raise better calves.


Get all the facts at our store now!


YOU'RE MONEY AHE,


GENERAL


2 Riverside Avenue
Jacksonville, Florida

77 W. Livingston Street
Orlando, Florida


MILLS, INC.


7275 N.W. 7th Avenue
Miami, Florida

711 West Cass Street
Tampa, Florida


SECOND QUARTER,


1955 1








































A recent, highly penetrating survey made of
fibre carton acceptance proves that the
CANCO SNAP CAP CARTON IS BETTER FOR POURING


After having used Canco Snap Cap
and Carton "X" side by side in their
homes for four days, 328 housewives
in New Orleans told specifically what
they liked best about the way the
Canco Snap Cap carton poured.
Read the statements below. See why


"Easier for children to pour" -"pours
so easily"-"doesn't gush out"-
"doesn't spill"-"can regulate flow"


Canco Snap Cap-with "controlled
pouring"-is clearly the milk container
women really prefer! Then see if you
don't agree-like so many thoughtful
dairy operators: There are extra sales
for your brand when you change to
Canco Snap Cap cartons!


-"doesn't drip"-"just lift cap and
ready to pour"-"don't have to be
as careful."


GET THIS FULL SURVEY FREEI It's accurate, interesting.
Points the way to more sales and more satisfied customers
S for your brand. Just write: Fibre Milk Container Dept.,
100 Park Avenue, New York 17, N. Y.

AMERICAN CAN COMPANY
4 The easy-to-open container
women really prefer!


2 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


This controlled pouring gives you a selling
edge with women in your market-particularly
mothers with children! Read what they say:


j7i72


,rNA



AD
CL 0S Ei
E^Zi








EDITORIALS


Florida Dairymen Rally In Defense
Against Misleading Press Attacks
Dairymen in record-breaking numbers from almost every section and corner
of Florida hurried to Tallahassee during the recent sixty-day session of the State
Legislature for committee hearings on proposed dairy legislation-possibly more
in defense of the truth and fair play than out of immediate concern over threat-
ened changes in dairy laws.
Florida dairymen succeeded in preventing the passage of unfavorable legis-
lation only by presenting facts and information to their members of the legisla-
ture and not through any powerful lobby as was claimed over and over again by
biased newspapers.
The truth is, as members of the legislature well knew, that the Florida Dairy
Association, which represented the industry at Tallahassee, has but one regular
representative at the legislature who might have been classed as a lobbyist and
this was the year-round Secretary of the Association since 1942, E. T. "Andy"
Lay.
The sincere pleas of dairymen back home to their own Representatives
constituted the so-called dairy lobby. Officials of the Florida Dairy Association
have expressed the highest praise to the hundreds of dairymen who assisted in
their own counties and especially to all County Chairmen and those who left
their farms and dairies to go to Tallahassee.
The people of Florida should be proud of the fact that so far as the milk
question is concerned a majority of the members of the legislature chose to base
their decisions on facts rather than on pressure from newspaper writers and self-
seeking politicians.

4th Birthday Tribute To The Dairy News
"The Florida Dairy News has now completed four very successful years.
After four years college students are awarded a degree. If such were possible I
am sure the Florida Dairy News would be graduated 'with high honors', for it
is outstanding as a valuable educational medium. Although the publication of
this Journal is but one of many important activities of the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion, the publication of Florida Dairy News, in itself is sufficient reason for all
people who earn part or all of their livelihood from dairying, either directly or
indirectly, to give their wholehearted moral, financial and active support to the
continued success of the Florida Dairy Association and publication of the in-
formative Florida Dairy News." -Dr. H. H. Wilkowske, Associate Professor of
Dairy Manufacturers, University of Florida.

Letters From Our Readers
To The Florida Dairy News and Florida Dairy Association:
"I have just read the special tribute to me which appears in the current
issue of the Dairy News. I felt very proud to receive the honorary membership
at the meeting on our campus last fall. To have this reported in such a wonderful
fashion in the "Florida Dairy News" was an added honor which I had not ex-
pected. Thanks so much for the honor and for sending me extra copies."
Sincerely yours,
John S. Allen Acting President,
University of Florida
To The Editor,
Florida Dairy News:
"Just a note to thank you very much for continuing to send me the Florida
Dairy News. I enjoyed the last issue very much, as I do all of them."
Sincerely,
Rex K. Smith, Foremost Dairies,
San Francisco, California


-1111-


VOL. 5


NO. 2


SECOND QUARTER 1955


THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
C. D. WAYNE, President
Miami

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
W. A. BOUTWELL, SR., President
Lake Worth

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
A. T. ALVAREZ, SR., President
Jacksonville

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, SR., President
Miami

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
DR. H. H. ROTHE, President
Gainesville

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
Officers and Executive Committee
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
C. D. WAYNE, President
Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami
GEO. F. JOHNSON, 1st V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Producers' Division, West Palm Beach
T. G. LEE, 2nd V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Distributors' Division, Orlando

Additional Producers
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Gainesville

Additional Distributors
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
GORDON NIELSEN, West Palm Beach
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published quarterly by the Florida Dairy
Association, 220 Newnan St., Jacksonville,
Florida. Subscription price is $1.00 a year.
Entered as second class mail at the Post
Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under Act of
March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.

NATIONAL EDITORIAL

m ber Floria Pres Asocio

Member Florida Press Association


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 0 3









GUERNSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS



Guernseys Win State Production Records
Two purebred Guernsey cows have recently completed state championship produc-
tion records.
Lakemont Steadfast Belle, owned by CARROLL L. WARD, SR., Winter Park,
produced 13,650 pounds of milk and 681 pounds of fat, which is the highest Ad-
vanced Registry record in the state of Florida, made by a senior two year-old, milked
three times daily for 365 days, and met calving requirements. The sire of this cow,
Lakemont Anthony's steadfast, owned by Carroll L. Ward, Jr., Goldenrod, has six
tested daughters in the Performance Register of the AGCC.
Valkyrie Lucky Ellen, owned by CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod, pro-
duced 13,271 pounds of milk and 751 pounds of fat, which is the highest Advance
Registry record in the state of Florida, made by a senior four year-old, milked three
times daily for 365 days, and met calving requirements. The sire of this cow, Shoal
Falls Lucky Maxim, owned by Southern Dairies, Inc., Chandler, N. C., has one son
and 13 tested daughters in the Performance Register of the AGCC.


HIGH RECORDS SHOWN IN
GUERNSEY REGISTRY TESTS
The average cow in the United States
produces only about half as much milk
and butterfat as the average purebred
Guernsey cow on official test. Guernsey
cows on official registry tests have stead-
ily increased their production records over
the years.


The University of Florida supervises
the records for Florida and sends them to
the American Guernsey Cattle Club for
approval and publication. The most re-
cent announcements from the AGCC in-
clude the following:
C. E. DONEGAN, Largo-Ring-Win
King's Lass produced 10,675 pounds of
milk and 520 pounds of fat as a five


OUR FAVORITE FOR FORTY YEARS


The economical, quick-acting bactericide
S. for sanitizing dairy utensils.


^ um


B-K Dept., Pennsalt Chemicals
EAST: 904 Widener Bldg., Philadelphia 7, Pa.
WEST: Woolsey Bldg., 2168 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley 4, Calif.

4 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


year old, representing approximately 5117
quarts of high-quality milk.
DINSMORE DAIRY CO., Dinsmore-
On two times daily milking for 305 days,
Dinsmore Mayroyal Winnie, a six-year-
old, produced 13,702 pounds of milk and
542 pounds of fat, representing approxi-
mately 6279 quarts of high-quality milk,
and met calving requirements. She is the
daughter of the famous Guernsey sire,
Foremost May Royalty.
Dinsmore Majestic Honeymoon, also
owned by Dinsmore Dairy Co., produced
11,874 pounds of milk and 667 pounds
of fat, milked three times daily for 365
days, as a six year-old. This production
represents approximately 5581 quarts of
high quality milk. "Honeymoon" is the
daughter of the famous Guernsey sire,
Dinsmore Majestic Rose King.
Dinsmore Noble Blossom, also owned
by Dinsmore Dairy Co., produced 10,930
pounds of milk and 507 pounds of fat
on three times daily milking for 305 days,
as a junior three year-old. This produc-
tion represents approximately 5117 quarts
of high-quality milk.
CARROLL L. WARD, JR., Goldenrod
-A registered Guernsey cow, Valkyrie
Lucky Ellen, put 13,271 pounds of milk
and 751 pounds of fat into the country's
breadbasket, representing approximately
6279 quarts of high-quality milk. "Ellen"
was a senior four year-old.
Nejasca Phil's Paula, owned by Carroll
L. Ward, Jr., produced 18,608 pounds
of milk and 611 pounds of fat (repre-
senting approximately 5117 quarts of
high-quality milk) as a junior two year-
old.
Indian River Emory's Judy, also owned
by Carroll L. Ward, Jr., produced 12,402
pounds of milk and 670 pounds of fat,
representing 5814 quarts of high-quality
milk as a eight year-old.
CARROLL L. WARD, SR., Winter
Park A registered Guernsey cow,
Lakemont Victor's Charlotte, produced
8,545 pounds of milk and 408 pounds of
fat, as a junior two year-old. This pro-
duction represents approximately 4140
quarts of high-quality milk.
Lakemont Steadfast Belle, also owned
by Carroll L. Ward, Sr., produced 13,650
pounds of milk and 681 pounds of fat
(representing approximately 6513 quarts
of high-quality milk) as a senior two
year-old.
Lakemont King's Nancy, also owned
by Carroll L. Ward, Sr., produced 10,604
pounds of milk and 509 pounds of fat
for 305 days, as a senior two year-old.
This production represents approximately
5117 quarts of high-quality milk.

A mistake is proof that something has
been done.

Why be disagreeable when, with a
little effort, you can be a real stinker!


PenWsalt
Chemicals







Florida dairymen are talking about. ..


PURINA BULKY-LAS...A GOOD


CITRUS PULP SUPPLEMENT!


Good roughage is often the key to
dairy profits. That's one reason why
Purina developed Bulky-Las-to help
turn lower-quality roughage into good.
Hundreds of dairymen mix Bulky-Las
with poor roughage. The reasons are
not hard to find.
BULKY-LAS is a BIG bag of highly
palatable, nutritious dairy feed. It has
proteins, minerals, and vitamins that
are usually lacking in citrus pulp and
other poor or average roughages. For
building condition and whetting the
appetite, Bulky-Las has plenty of mo-
lasses mixed into it. And finally, it's
high in carbohydrates, making it a
good, substantial feed that cows really
go for and clean up.
That's why so many Florida dairymen
are using Purina Bulky-Las to supple-
ment citrus pulp. They've found the
roughage mixture of one-third Bulky-
Las and two-thirds citrus pulp is a real
butterfat booster. Bulky-Las is a cow
conditioner, too, and extra cow con-
dition always means extra milk.

Ask your Purina Dealer about Bulky-Las
today. It comes in big 5-bushel bags that
cost a lot less than you might think.


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
Tampa Miami


Look How. ,JR "WA

BULKY-LAS B Mi

Out Citrus P:api :

** 0 0 ,

I I


FEEDING VALUES


BULKY-LAS


CITRUS
PULP


Digestible Nutrients High Low
Palatability
and Relish Very High Low
Lime and Phosphorus High Low
Variety High None
Bulk High High
Protein Medium Low
Conditioning Value Very High Good
Laxative Value Very High High
Cud-Making
Character Excellent Good
Heating Qualities Low Low


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 5


*
*
*
* *


PURINA
BUIKMASA
Eliaw







First Experimental Holstein Herd
Received By University Of Florida

By: P. T. DIX ARNOLD
Associate Dairy Husbandman
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station

The dairy herd at the Dairy Research Unit was founded in 1901 with the pur-
chase of two pure-bred Jerseys cows. From time to time, additional animals have
been added to the herd. On three occasions pure-bred Guernseys were brought in and
a considerable number of them now are milking.
In February 1954, at the State Fair in Tampa, Glenn Householder, then Ex-
tension Director for the Holstein Friesian Association of America, called together
a group of Holstein enthusiasts composed of a few local people and some tourist
breeders from other states. The outcome of this meeting was the formation of the
Florida Holstein Friesian Club and Her-
man Boyd, of Miami, was chosen presi-
dent. All good livestock clubs are or- It was the opinion of the staff at the
ganized to accomplish the advancement Dairy Science Department that very good
of the breed in question and the first individuals should be selected for the
project that the newly formed club under- foundation. This was heartily endorsed
took was the establishment of a small by everyone concerned, since the herd
foundation of pure-bred heifers at the would be much in the public eye. From a
University of Florida Agricultural Experi- type standpoint they needed to be pleas-
ment Station. Through the activity of the ing in dairy conformation to attract favor-
Florida Holstein Club, the Florida Dairy able comment from both Florida visitors
Association, and many friends through- and from the many persons from other
out Florida and as far away as Minnesota states and other countries who are literal-
and Pennsylvania, financial interest was ly daily visitors. Likewise, these Holsteins
generated to the extent that Holstein must produce liberal amounts of milk to
heifers became a reality at the Dairy Re- live up to the breed reputation gained
search Unit on February 15, 1955. over the years in other sections of the





nmE P SAVE EFFORT

with the




LOW DESIGN

BU.L K O COOLER

Mojonnler Low Design Bulk Coolers save labor and effort In
the milk house. The actual floor-to-tank top dimension of the
300 gallon unit (illustrated above) is only 34 Inches, re- Only
during pouring effort. On the 100, 150 and 200 gallon Bulk tr
Coolers, this height is only 321/4 Inches from the floor. 4 ,
Mojonnier Bulk Coolers are of rounded bottom construction From
for easy cleaning, inside and out, and the all stainless steel Fro
construction helps too. the
Milk is quickly cooled to 34 360F, at lowest possible power Floor0
cost.
Decide to enjoy the advantages of the convenient, efficient
Mojonnier Low Bulk Cooler. Bulletin 290 gladly sent upon
request.
MOJONNIER BROS. CO. Florida Representative
4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Illinois Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
SLAKELAND, FLA.


HOLSTEINS AT STATE FAIR
The Holstein show at the Florida State
Fair was small but very good for the first
year at Tampa.
Lan O'Sun Dairy Farms of Miami, ex-
hibited the Grand Champion Holstein.
Donna and Phyllis Boyd of Miami, ex-
hibited the Reserve Grand Champion
Holstein.
Herman Boyd exhibited the best three
females owned by one exhibitor.
J. C. Marlow of Manko, Minnesota,
and 1954 Vice-president of the Florida
Holstein-Friesian Club, presented a beau-
tiful trophy for the best three females
and a True Type Holstein to each of the
Grand Champion and the Reserve Grand
Champion.


country. In fact, a great many people
will be watching the development of this
group of Holstein heifers because it has
been said that Holsteins don't do well in
hot weather, that they go to pieces under
Florida conditions, and that they are not
adapted to our pastures and feed supplies.
Then, too, others say that Holstein milk
doesn't sell well in the South. With these
points in mind and realizing that the
pure-bred Holstein development program
in Florida will be under close scrutiny,
the heifers were quite carefully selected
with the help and co-operation of J.
Homer Remsberg, President of the Hol-
stein Friesian Association of America. Mr.
Remsberg is a very rare combination of
farmer, dairyman, administrator of na-
tional repute, and an International Hol-
stein judge.
In all, fifteen heifers were selected
from nine different farms in Maryland.
All trace to Dunloggin breeding, in some
degree and are quite uniform in type. An
assembly date was made for February 14,
and Herman L. Somers, Herdsman
for the Station herd, made the trip down
with the heifers by truck in approximate-
ly 26 hours' driving time.
After several days' rest, the heifers
were put on some excellent clover pasture
at the Dairy Research Unit. One of the
heifers told Dr. Fouts that she never had
it so nice in Maryland.
The Dairy Science staff at the Uni-
versity of Florida extends a cordial invi-
tation to all interested persons to visit the
Dairy Research Unit and see the new
Holsteins.
*

"Florida is to be congratulated on the
outstanding record of the Florida Dairy
Industry in its sound and rapid develop-
ment during the past twenty years."
(Statement of Richard J. Werner. Execu-
tive Director, Milk Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C., in a recent Florida
address.)


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS












Just scatter this bait as you walk


and KILL flies


New, easiest way ever to control

house flies in and around dairy

barns, livestock barns, poultry

sheds, out-buildings, stables,

garbage disposal areas.

A dry granule bait-kills both resistant and
non-resistant house flies.


Simple as shaking salt-Open the shaker
can and scatter lightly around fly breed-
ing areas.

Fast! You can bait several hundred square
feet in 2 or 3 minutes.

Effective! This attractive-type bait lures
flies, they feed and die.

Low cost, too! One pound covers 2,000
square feet of fly feeding areas.


On all chemicals, read directions and cautions before use.


Where to Buy ORTHO Fly Killer Dry Bait:


ALACHUA, Farmers Hardware Co.
BELLE GLADE, The Kilgore Seed Company
BLOUNTSTOWN, Coxwell Seed and Plant Store
BOYNTON BEACH, Broward Grain & Supply Co., Inc.
BRADENTON, Check-R-Board
CHIEFLAND, Farm Service Store, Inc.
CHIPLEY, F-R-M Feed & Seed Store
CLEWISTON, Parkinson's, Inc.
COCOA, Farmers Supply Store
COCOA, Mathew's Feed Store
CRESTVIEW, Crestview Trading Company
DANIA, Broward Grain & Supply
DAYTONA BEACH, Dunn Brothers Hardware
DAYTONA BEACH, Volusia Garden Supply
DAYTONA BEACH, Daytona Feed & Supply Co.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, Thompson-Hilliard Milling Co.
DEFUNIAK SPRINGS, West Florida Farmers Co-op., Inc.
DELRAY BEACH, Delray Beach Farm Supply, Inc.
DUNNELLON, Rush's Department Store
FT. LAUDERDALE, Broward Grain & Supply Co.
FT. LAUDERDALE, Sunnyland Supply Co.
FT. MYERS, Corbin Farm Supply
FT. MYERS, Kilgore Seed Company
GAINESVILLE, Brownlee Feed & Seed
GAINESVILLE, B & G Farm Supply
GAINESVILLE, Johnson Brothers, Inc.
GAINESVILLE, Kilgore Seed Company
HIGH SPRINGS, High Springs Seed Store
HIGH SPRINGS, Farm Supply Store
CLEARWATER, Red Comb Feed Store
CLEARWATER, Clearwater Farm Store
BUNNELL, Dunn Brothers Hdwr.
DADE CITY, L & L Farmer Feed & Supply
DeLAND, Smith Feed & Seed Store
EUSTIS. Igou Farm Store
BROOKSVILLE, Williams Feed & Hardware
FT. PIERCE, Hawkins Supply Co.


APOPKA, Tuxedo Feed Store
HOMESTEAD, Kilgore Seed Company
JACKSONVILLE, E. A. Martin Seed Co.
JASPER, Farmers Hardware & Supply
JAY, Morgan Seed Store
KISSIMMEE, Kissimmee Feed Store
KISSIMMEE, Tarcai Feed & Farm Supply
KISSIMMEE, Tuxedo Feed & Seed Store
LAKE BUTLER, Rivers Hardware & Furniture
LAKE CITY, Farmers Mutual Exchange
LAKE CITY, Wade-Persons
LAKE CITY, Seminole Pharmacy
LEESBURG, Simon Seed Co., Inc.
LEESBURG, Leesburg Fertilizer Co.
LAKELAND, Harrel Feed Store
LIVE OAK, Farmers Mutual Exchange
LIVE OAK, Mizell Produce Co.
LAKE WALES, Yeoman's Feed & Farm Supply
MACCLENNY, Baker County Farmers Supply
MADISON, Farmers Mutual Exchange
MADISON, Ivey's Farm Feed Store
MARIANNA, Powledge Seed & Supply Co.
MALONE, Williams Seed & Feed Co.
MAYO, Garden's Farm Supply
MAYO, E. B. Williams
MELBOURNE, Farm Supply Store
MIAMI, General Mills, Inc.
MIAMI, Hughes Seed Store
MIAMI, Security Feed & Seed Co.
MILTON, Griffin Supply Co.
OCALA, Kilgore Seed Company
OCALA, Security Feed & Seed Co.
OCALA, Seminole Stores, Inc.
ORLANDO, Palmer Tuxedo Feed Store
ORLANDO, General Mills, Inc.
ORLANDO, Sanderson Tuxedo Feed Co.


ORLANDO, X-Cel Feed Store
ORLANDO, Haile-Dean Seed Co.
ORLANDO, Joseph Bumby Hardware Co.
WINTER PARK, Poole & Fuller
OKEECHOBEE, Robinson Seed Store
PAHOKEE, The Kilgore Seed Co.
PALATKA, Security Feed & Seed Co.,
PALMETTO, Kilgore Seed Co.
PENSACOLA, Escambia Farmers Supply Co.
PENSACOLA, F. S. Mellen Company
PERRY, Bryant's Feed Store
PLANT CITY, The Kilgore Seed Co.
POMPANO BEACH, Broward Grain & Supply Co.
QUINCY, Southern Chemical Sales & Service
ST. CLOUD, Tuxedo Feed Store
SANFORD, Kilgore Seed Store
STUART, Stuart Feed Store
SARASOTA, Farm & Garden Supply
ST. PETERSBURG, Spaulding's, Inc.
TALLAHASSEE, Ott's Feed Store
TALLAHASSEE, River's Seed Company
TAMPA, Amco Feed Stores, Inc.
TAMPA, Crenshaw-McMichael Seed Co.
TAMPA, General Mills, Inc.
POMPANO BEACH, Kilgore Seed Co.
TAMPA, Jackson Grain Company
TAMPA, The Quaker Oats Co.
TAMPA, Tuxedo Feed Store
TRENTON, Tri-County Farmers Co-op., Inc.
VERO BEACH, Law's Feed & Supply
WAUCHULA, Kilgore Seed Co.
WEST PALM BEACH, Knox Feed & Supply
WEST PALM BEACH, Kilgore Seed Co.
WILDWOOD, Deuel Seed & Feed Co.
WINTER HAVEN, Winter Haven X-Cel Store
WINTER GARDEN, Arnold Feed & Seed


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 7


! KillerORTHOIry Bait








County Dairy Pasture Winners

Announced In State Contest
County winners in the 1954-55 State Dairy Pasture Contest have just been an-
nounced by C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairyman and Chairman of the Contest,
which is sponsored jointly by the Florida Agricultural Extension Service and the
Florida Dairy Association.
Awards are given by the Florida Dairy Association for County and State Winners
for (a) The Best Dairy Pasture and Forage Program and (b) The Most Improvement
Made In Dairy Pasture and Forage Development Program.
Awards are also made in a 4-H Club and Future Farmer members "Essay Contest"
on "The Value of Dairy Pasture and Forage."
The State Winners will be selected from the County Winners listed below and
will be announced at the 1955 Annual Dairy Field Day Meeting at the University of
Florida, November 2 and 3. Judges in the State Contest are C. W. Reaves and J. R.
Henderson for the Agricultural Experiment Station; Herman Boyd, last year's "Best
Pasture" State Winner, and V. C. Johnson of Jacksonville for the Florida Dairy
Association.
State Winner of the 1953-54 Contest for "Pasture Improvement" was Floyd B.
Crawford Dairy of Lake City. 4-H Club winners in the Essay Contest were: Robert
Parisian, Jacksonville, 1st, and Erny Sellers, Tallahassee, 2nd.
Dairies qualifying for the Pasture Contest "Honorable Mention Certificate" for a
pasture program grading 75% or better, are: Lay Laine Guernsey Farm and Fairglade
Jersey Farm, Orange County; Brightman Skinner Dairy, W. J. Simmons Dairy, and
F. B. Miller, all of Duval County.
The Contest Chairman, C. W. Reaves, and that certificates will be presented
to all those above at the Dairy Field Day at the University of Florida, November 2-3.
These awards will be made to the two state winners at that time. "A number of
excellent reports were submitted," said Mr. Reaves, director of the project.


COUNTY WINNERS of the "Best Pas-
ture" Division are:


County
Washington
Jackson
Columbia
Gilchrist
Duval
St. Johns
Volusia
Orange
Pinellas
Manatee
Polk
Highlands
Palm Beach


Winner
Lee Stanton Dairy
Schack's Dairy
Columbia Dairy Farms
Hill Top Dairy
Walter Welkener
Velda Corp. Dairy
Ira Barrow Dairy Farm
B. W. Judge & Son Dairy
Bayou Vista Farms Dairy
R. W. Edwards Dairy
Edgar Melvin Dairy
Ramer's Dairy
E. F. Froehlich's Dairy


COUNTY WINNERS of the "Most Im-
provement In Pasture Program" Contest


are:
County
Washington
Jackson
Columbia
Gilchrist
Duval
St. Johns
Volusia
Orange
Pinellas
Manatee
Polk
Highlands
Palm Beach


Winner
Lee Stanton Dairy
Schack's Dairy
Columbia Farm
Hill Top Dairy
A. T. Alvarez
Velda Corp. Dairy
Ira Barrow Dairy Farm
Hanson Collins Dairy
Donegan Farms
R. W. Edwards Dairy
Edgar Melvin Dairy
Ramer's Dairy
Froehlich's Dairy


How Floyd B. Crawford Earned

"1954 Pasture Improvement Award"
In State Pasture Contest
The pasture and forage program of Floyd B. Crawford of Lake City clearly reveals
how he was able to win the "most improvement" award in the state pasture contest
sponsored jointly by the extension department of the University of Florida and the
Florida Dairy Association in 1953-54.
His story begins with his purchase in 1951 of a dairy farm which had no improved
pasture and very low grade dairy cattle. He sold the low grade cattle and secured
better producers which made it necessary to plant pastures in 1952.
The Pangola pastures were planted
with cuttings from a two acre plot which with 400 pounds of 6-6-6 fertilizer in the
was established in 1951. The fields in Fall of the year. In the Spring of 1953
which this grass was established were well this pasture was grazed.
prepared, grass disked in, and fertilized The Bahia grasses established on this


farm were seeded in the Summer and fer-
tilized in the Fall with 400 pounds of
6-6-6 fertilizer. The following Summer
these grasses were grazed.
Sweet yellow lupine was produced and
grazed successfully in 1951-52 and 1952-
53. This crop has proven to be very suc-
cessful in increasing winter milk produc-
tion. In 1953 corn silage was harvested
and stored in a trench silo, which was
constructed according to instructions from
a circular, The Trench Silo. About 135
tons of silage was stored in this silo.
Total Cost for first year was as follows:
Silo .......................... $ 35.00
Harvester .................. 2600.00
Wagon .................... 300.00
Cloth ........................ 60.00
Fuel, oil and labor .... 141.00
Since the equipment was purchased in
1953, the expense of harvesting was much
less for 1954. Also to reduce the cost of
production Mr. Crawford planted a thick-
er stand of corn and used more fertilizer.
Fertilization recommendations from the
Agricultural Extension Service were fol-
lowed. Application of 400 pounds of 4-
12-12 fertilizer and side dressing of 200
pounds of Ammonium Nitrate was used.
About 350 tons of silage was cut off
of 50 acres in 1954 which is enough for
two years.
(Continued on Page 24)


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





















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Has hydraulic control. Mounts on Case
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COCOA
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DADE CITY
Moss Tractor Co.
FORT MYERS
Ray Moore Implement Co.
FORT PIERCE
Taylor & Munnell Inc.
HIGH SPRINGS
Thomas Equipment Co.


HOMESTEAD
Dade Tractor Co.
LAKELAND
Pounds Tractor Co.
LIVE OAK
Grantham Chevrolet
MARIANNA
Andreasen Tractor & Equip.
PALATKA
Beasley Tractor Co.
POMPANO BEACH
Farm Machinery Sales


SEBRING
Pounds-Zeiss Motor Co.
TAMPA
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WAUCHULA
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WEST PALM BEACH
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WINTER GARDEN
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WINTER HAVEN
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SECOND QUARTER, 1955 0 9


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DAIRY LEGISLATION FAILS TO PASS
AT 1955 FLORIDA LEGISLATURE
RESOLUTIONS FOR STUDIES PASSED
WITHOUT OBJECTIONS FROM DAIRIES
House and Senate Resolutions providing for separate House and Senate Commit-
tees to investigate the effect of the taxing power and practices of the Florida Milk
Commission as they effect milk producers and independent dairymen were passed
by the legislature during the last few days of the 1955 sessions without objection from
the dairy industry.
In fact, leaders of the industry were of the opinion that a factual study by mem-
bers of the legislature, of the services and benefits of the Milk Commission to Florida
dairymen should prove to be very helpful in getting the real facts about the functions
and results of the work of the Florida Milk Commission before members of the
legislature.


Bills Fail To Pass
Among the bills failing to pass which
proposed drastic changes in the Florida
Milk Commission Law were:
House Bill 87-which provided for
abolishing the Milk Commission.
House Bill 223-and a similar Senate
Bill which provided for repealing the re-
sale milk price authority of the Milk
Commission.
House Bill 647-and a similar Senate
Bill, the so-called 15% bill, which pro-
vided for freezing present minimum milk
prices established by the Milk Commis-
sion as "maximum" prices and setting
15% below these prices as "minimum
prices.
House Bill 698-a bill providing for
seasonal milk price changes.
House Bill 1159-a bill to amend the
State Milk & Milk Products Law requir-
ing individual permits and inspections for
each shipment of milk and milk products
was held up by the introducer when it
was opposed by the Commissioner of
Agriculture and the State Board of Health
as unenforceable and for other reasons.
Pinellas County Frozen Desserts
Bill Passed
House Bill 1955-A local frozen des-
serts bill applying to Pinellas County only,
providing for complete county health de-
partment standards and regulations of
frozen desserts and ice cream.

House & Senate Committees
To Study Milk Commission
The President of the Senate and Speak-
er of the House of the Florida Legislature
have announced appointment of Commit-
tees for independent studies of the opera-
tion of the Florida Milk Commission as
provided by a resolution adopted by each
during the recent session of the legisla-
ture.
While the House and Senate resolu-
tions providing for these Committees are
not identical, the purpose stated in each
for making the study is, "to inquire into
practices of the Milk Commission as they
affect milk producers and independent
dairymen. The house resolution also in-
cludes "effect on distributors" in the
purpose of the inquiry.


F.D.A. Directors' Meeting
May 11 In Tallahassee
The second quarterly directors meeting
of the Florida Dairy Association was held
May l1th in Tallahassee.
With action still pending on proposed
legislation affecting the dairy industry
and the Milk Commission, considerable
time and attention was devoted to this
subject.
Other actions included consideration of
a Public Relations Program, the Annual
Convention Program, the June Dairy
Month Program,, Improved Regulations
on Importing of Milk, Changing of the
publishing schedule of the Florida Dairy
News to quarterly, Code of Fair Trade
Practices, Inclusion of the office staff un-
der Social Security, a resolution of the
State Junior Chamber of Commerce and
Reports of Association Activities, Mem-
bership and Finances.

The Senate Committee
Senators named by President W. Tur-
ner Davis on the Senate Committee are:
Senator Harry Stratton, Callahan, chair-
man; Sen. Woodrow Melvin, Milton;
Sen. Dewey Johnson, Quincy; Sen. Philip
Beall, Pensacola, and Sen. Irlo Bronson,
Kissimmee.
The Senate resolution also named three
Advisory Members of the Committee
from the University of Florida Agricul-
tural Experiment Station. These are: Dr.
E. L. Fouts, Head, Department of Dairy
Science; C. W. Reaves, State Extension
Dairyman ,and Dr. H. G. Hamilton,
Head, Department of Agricultural Eco-
nomics.
The House Committee
Members of the House Committee
named by Speaker Ted David are: Rep.
Volie A. Williams of Sanford, chairman;
Rep. Tom Beasley, DeFuniak Springs;
Rep. John S. Pittman, Jay, Santa Rosa
County; Rep. J. A. Boyd, Leesburg; Rep.
J. R. A. Williams, Dade City; Rep. A.
Max Brewer, Titusville; Rep. F. Chas.
Usina, St. Augustine; and Rep. Thomas
T. Cobb, Daytona Beach.


CHANGES IN LABOR LAWS
MADE BY THE LEGISLATURE
The Florida Industrial Commission has
announced the following changes made
in Florida Unemployment Compensation
and W.orkmen's Compensation Laws by
the 1955 legislature:
1. Increased unemployment compen-
sation benefits from $20 to $26 weekly.
2. Decreased from three years to one
year the time wherein an employer may
obtain the benefit of a lower rate of un-
employment insurance tax based upon
employment experience in his business.
3. Provided for coverage of employ-
ers with four or more employees in line
with recently enacted federal laws. The
state law will save employers in Florida
from having to pay the full three per cent
unemployment insurance tax which would
have applied had not Florida adopted the
same federal provision.
4. Extended the time for filing ap-
peals in unemployment compensation mat-
ters with the commission from seven
to 10 days. It also extended from 10 to
20 days the time for initiating a proceed-
ing for judicial review.
5. Set up a second injury fund in the
workmen's compensation law. This law
is in effect in 42 other states and protects
employers against paying total disability
compensation for injury to an already dis-
abled worker.
6. Provided for payment during the
duration of disability for those perman-
ently and totally disabled.
7. Redefined an employee under the
workmen's compensation law so as to
permit officers of corporations to be em-
ployees and thus to be covered by the
law. This provision also was made to
protect officers of family corporations in
the light of a recent Supreme Court de-
cision excluding officers of such corpora-
tions from coverage.
8. Extended from two to three years
the time wherein claims may be filed un-
der the workmen's compensation law.
9. Changed the workmen's compen-
sation law with respect to lump sum set-
tlements so as to facilitate the power of
the industrial commission to permit such
settlements to be made in the case of
widows.
10. Made provisions for the commis-
sion to set up a rehabilitation program
for permanently injured workers along
physical and vocational lines.
11. Empowered the commission to re-
duce payments for workmen's compensa-
tion in accordance with rehabilitation
recovery.
12. Provided that the writing of a
workmen's compensation insurance pol-
icy by a carrier covering any exempt or
excluded employment and the acceptance
of such policy by the employer shall con-
stitute a waiver of such exemption or ex-
clusion.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Collier's Quotes Little From
Florida Dairyman's Letter
The following is an example of the fairness shown by
"Collier's" in quoting letters from readers.
The quotation is from a letter written to "Collier's" by
Brady Johnston, Dinsmore Dairy, Jacksonville. The CAPI-
TALIZED portion are those quoted by "Collier's."
Jacksonville, Fla., April 18, 1955
"Mr. Bill Davidson, Contributing Editor,
"Collier's Magazine,
"New York, N. Y.
"Dear Mr. Davidson:
"We hold no brief for anyone who does wrong and we
concede that everyone makes mistakes. We can appreciate
that you want to sell magazines and you must feel that you
have to make your articles spectacular.
"YOUR ARTICLE ON MILK, however. IS NOT IN
KEEPING WITH THE DIGNITY OF COLLIER'S. YOU
MENTIONED MILK AT 12 A QUART. POSSIBLY YOU
COULD FIND, DURING THE SURPLUS SEASON, some
kind of milk in some places at 120 a quart but you convey
the impression that it ought to be sold every place throughout
the year at 12~ per quart.
"THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IN
THEIR AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE, FLUID
MILK AND CREAM REPORT FOR MARCH 1955,
FAILED TO DISCLOSE ANY PRICES BELOW 19 AND
The 19 PLACES WERE VERY LIMITED. Now for the
QUALITY MILK, refer to page 10 and you will find that
milk RANGES IN PRICE FROM 21 PER QUART TO
351/2 PER QUART while the Market milks starting on page
2, range 19 to 28.
"You claim that you are interested in helping to get peo-
ple to consume more milk. The proper way to do that is to
tell the whole truth not just part of it. For instances, milk
has gone up less than other things and milk is the best buy
on the food market. Further information from the Bureau of
Labor Statistics shows that prices of 'all foods' are up over
the 1935-1939 average 130% plus while fresh milk is up
84.1%. Incidentally, in Jacksonville it is up 62.5%.
"INSTEAD OF INTIMATING TO PEOPLE THAT
MILKMEN ARE GOUGING THEM as you did in your
article, YOU SHOULD TELL THE COMPLETE FACTS as
brought out by surveys of the University of Indiana and oth-
ers on the PROFITS OF THE MILK COMPANIES WHICH
RUN approximately 20 of the sale dollar or ABOUT 1/2 PER
QUART.
"Prior to 1940 your magazine was 5f, then it advanced to
10. About 1949 it advanced to 15. In July 1953 you sus-
pended weekly publication and now publish each two weeks.
I predict fewer publications of Collier's if you continue to be
as unfair as you have in the case of the milk. 200% increase
in the cost of your magazine as compared to 621/2% increase
in the price of milk. Maybe that's unfair as you would say
you have expenses that we don't know about. I dare say, you
know little of our expenses.
"THE DAIRY INDUSTRY IS DOING A REMARK-
ABLE JOB WITH A HIGHLY PERISHABLE PRODUCT
AT LOW PRICES AND WE BELIEVE MOST PEOPLE
APPRECIATE IT."
Sincerely,
Brady S. Johnston


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SERGEANT LEE


1. Plant improved grasses on the best land available.

2. Establish only as much pasture as is needed and can be
properly maintained.

3. Destroy native growth and prepare land thoroughly, starting
6 to 12 months before planting. Tree and stump removal is
usually desirable but expensive.

4. Plant productive and adapted grasses such as Pangola and
Pensacola Bahia. Use more than one variety, each in a pure
stand, when large areas are planted.

5. Plant when land is moist and use a packer to save moisture
and smooth the field.

6. Apply lime, fertilizer and minor elements as needed. Most
flatwoods soils require treatment at planting time.

7. Fence new pastures and protect from grazing for 60 to 90
days after planting or until grass is established.

8. Refertilize high producing pastures yearly with not less than
500 pounds per acre of 6-6-6 or a similar mixture.

9. Apply additional nitrogen when very heavy grazing or several
cuttings of hay or planting material are desired.

10. Plan pasture grazing and fertilization to supply feed when
the need is greatest. More improved pasture should be fall-
fertilized and reserved for winter grazing.

11. Maximum production can be obtained only if over-stocking
is avoided.

12. High cost pastures must be used efficiently if they are to
yield a profit.


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GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


Florida Dairy Association
Lists Legislative Committee
The Florida Dairy Association has re-
quested announcement in the Dairy News
that in addition to the Board of Directors
and the General Chairman, the following
members served as County Committee
Chairmen for the Association's General
Legislative Committee: T. G. Lee, Orlan-
do, Distributor, and John Sargeant, Lake-
land, Producer, served as State Chairmen
of their respective groups.
Alachua County: L. B. (Red) Hull,
John Townsend; Baker County: W. L.
Brown; Bay County: John Hentz, Ray
Bassett; Bradford County: R. D. Red-
dish; Brevard County: John Tripson,
Lowell B. Fenner; Broward County: E.
G. Williams, Julian T. Stewart; Calhoun
County: J. D. Fukua; Charlotte County:
Charlie O. Pettitt, Dave Locks; Citrus
County: M. A. Smith; Clay County: Ed
Gustafson, I. J. Pemberton; Collier Coun-
ty: Wm. Lamar Rose; Columbia County:
Dewey Bullard, Warren G. Tyre; Dade
County: C. D. Wayne, Bill Graham ,J.
N. McArthur; DeSoto County: R. H.
Morgan; Dixie County: Wilmer Bassett;
Dural County: J. H. Adams, V. C. John-
son, Don Perret, Escambia County: R. E.
McCurdy; Flagler County: Louis S. Shef-
field; Gadsden County: W. L. Ford; Gil-
christ County: L. E. Grant; Glades Coun-
ty: Frank D. Yaun; Gulf County: E. C.
Harden, Sr.; Hamilton County: I. S.
Johnson; Hardee County: Jesse Maxwell;
Hendry County: W. K. Bixby; Highlands
County: Demos Mandis, J. R. Ramer;
Hillsborough County: Julian Lane, John
Cone, W. J. Barritt, Jr.; Holmes County:
W. J. Sapp; Indian River County: John
Tripson; Jackson County: Jess D. Hoy,
M. A. Schack; Jefferson County: Wilmer
Bassett; Lafayette County: Marshall
O'Steen, Bishop Jackson; Lake County:
Stin Haselton, W. K. Galbreath; Lee
County: Norman Clemons, Hilton Hart;
Leon County: Curry Bassett, Charles C.
Coble; Levy County: R. S. Robinson, Jr.;
Madison County: Ben S. Waring; Mana-
tee County: Herman Burnett, John Hood;
Marion County: Bill Pickens, S. R. Mc-
Ateer; Martin County: Bill Matheson;
Monroe County: Gerald H. Adams; Nas-
sau County: W. J. Gaines, J. D. Carter;
Okaloosa County: Lamar Garrett, Gordon
C. Johnson; Okeechobee County: Clifton


12 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
















ONE DEFINITION OF A COW
The cow is a mobile harvesting ma-
chine designed by nature to handle large
quantities of grassland crops. She has a
mower and a grinder on one end and a
spreader on the other. In between these
extremes, supported by a back-bone ex-
tended by ribs and covered by rawhide
to shed rain and make it more difficult
for flies to eat her up, is a complex plant
of large capacity, dedicated to the con-
version of large quantities of crude plant
material into nature's most nearly perfect
food.
This product called milk is manufac-
tured and stored in a flexible container,
suspended between the hind legs and
forward and drained two or three times
a day from four faucets.
The middle section of a cow contains
a digestive system consisting of four
stomachs with a capacity of 250 quarts
and an intestinal tract holding 70 quarts.
The capacity of this digestive system of
a cow equals eight 40 quart milk cans
or 80 gallons.
A good cow can manufacture 10 times
her body weight in milk each year if she
is furnished 121/2 tons of good pastures,
4 tons of grass silage, 11/2 tons of excel-
lent hay, 11/2 tons of grain, and 36 tons
of water. In addition to producing milk,
she will produce 20 tons of organic matter
for fertilizer.
From Journal of Kentucky Artificial
Breeders Assn.

Ellis; Orange County: Theo Datson, B.
W. Judge, T. G. Lee; Osceola County:
Earl Jocelyn; Palm Beach County: George
F. Johnson, Gordon Nielsen, George H.
Boutwell; Pasco County: B. E. Dean, B.
L. Gore; Pinellas County: Russell Bevan,
Jack McMullen; Polk County: John Sar-
geant, Norlee Thornhill; Putnam County:
Tom McLean; St. Johns County: W. Paul
Simmons, Bob McCarter; St. Lucie Coun-
ty: W. J. Falardeau, Turner Coats; Santa
Rosa County: R. L. Lunsford; Sarasota
County: John O. Binns, Charles J.
Schmid; Seminole County: George Har-
din; Sumter County: Mrs. Stella Eaddy,
Vernis E. Bishop; Suwiannee County: O.
P. Hatch, Delmar Sapp; Taylor County:
I. A. Landry, Wilmer Bassett; Union
County:.. Angus S. Bielling; Volusia
County: Ira C. Barrow, Carroll B. Green,
Raymond Beville; Wakulla County: Curry
Bassett; Walton County: B. C. McCall;
Washington County: Willard Enfinger.


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Seen above are the 1955-56 Officers and Directors of the Florida Association of Milk
and Food Sanitarians. Left to right, seated: Vice President-S. O. Noles, Milk Consultant,
State Board of Health, Jacksonville; President-H. H. Rothe, State Dairy Supervsor, Dairy
Division, State Dept. of Agriculture; Secretary-Treasurer-H. H. Wilkowske, Associate Pro-
fessor, University of Florida. Directors, standing: J. D. Robinson, State Dairy Supervisor,
Plant City; J. S; Massey, Milk Sanitarian, Escambia County Health Dept., Pensacola; Imme-
diate Past President-C. O. Stoy, Dairy Supervisor, Dade County Health Unit, Miami; J. H.
Baker, City Sanitarian, Ft. Pierce; W. A. Krienke, Associate Professor, University of Florida;
and L. A. Scribner, Dairy Inspector, City Health Department, Orlando. Not shown, Labora-
tory Section Chairman-Mary F. Schmoker, Laboratory Technician, Borden's Dairy, Orlando.



FLORIDA MILK & FOOD SANITARIANS
By: DR. H. H. WILKOWSKE
Secretary-Treasurer, Fla. Assn. of Milk & Food Sanitarians
The Florida Association of Milk and Food Sanitarians held its eleventh annual
meeting April 5-8 at the University of Florida in Gainesville. A day and a half
meeting of the Laboratorians Section, which is affiliated with the Florida Association,
featured all aspects of the antibiotics in milk problems, including special lectures,
demonstrations and laboratory practice. It was reported that the data of one State
laboratory showed the standard plate counts on pasteurized milk to be below 500 (5
colonies on the one to one hundred dilution) approximately 15 per cent of the time.
This percentage of samples might be reported as having "growth inhibitors" present
as outlined in Standard Methods.


The Sanitarians program featured sev-
eral outstanding national and local speak-
ers. Miss Rita Dubois, Extension Con-
sumer Marketing Specialist, USDA,
Washington, D. C., listed the main rea-
sons given by housewives for not using
more milk was their belief that it was
fattening, too high priced and that adults
don't need milk as children do. "They
are mistaken ideas, especially in that milk
is not a high calorie food as compared to
some others and the price has not risen
as much as many other foods," she stated,
adding "Adults must be made to realize
they need milk nutrients, such as calcium,
to help muscular work. Housewives com-
plain of being tired all the time, but if
they would drink more milk maybe they
would have more energy for their house-
work." This goes for Sanitarians, too.
H. L. "Red" Thomasson was present
to meet his many friends in Florida. He
aptly pointed out that many sanitarians
in the Southeastern area, as well as other
parts of the country, do both milk and


food work. Following this fundamental
approach the Association decided to in-
clude "and Food" in the name of the
Association and open the meetings to
those in the state who do both milk and
food sanitation work.
Dr. J. J. Sheuring of Georgia told of
plans for the forthcoming IAMFS annual
meeting to be held in Augusta, Georgia,
October 4-6. The plans for an outstand-
ing program are well advanced, with
plenty of good entertainment, fellowship
and a special ladies program. After hear-
ing his report one realizes that this is a
program that should be attended.
Dr. T. W. Workman, Borden's, New
York, pointed out that both present forms
of pasteurization, holding and HTST,
were found to be sufficient for the com-
plete destruction of polio viruses isolated
from natural sources. Space does not per-
mit review of all papers presented, but
copies of the program are being sent to
all affiliate secretaries for their informa-


FLORIDA MILK SANITARIANS
ON NATIONAL COMMITTEES
The following Florida Milk sanitarians
have recently been appointed to important
committees of the International Associa-
tion of Milk and Food Sanitarians with
which the Florida Association of Milk
Sanitarians is affiliated:
W. Howard Brown of the Jacksonville
Health Department has been reappointed
to the Committee on Education and Pro-
fessional Development which is currently
concerned with student scholarships for
prospective sanitarians and with legisla-
tion dealing with registration of sani-
tarians.
Alex G. Shaw, Chief State Dairy Su-
pervisor, has been appointed to the Com-
mittee on Dairy Farm Methods which is
currently studying methods of improving
the sanitary handling of milk on farms.
Dr. H. H. Rothe, Deputy State Dairy
Supervisor, has been reappointed to the
Committee on Communicable Diseases
affecting man which is currently complet-
ing a Manual for Sanitarians to use in the
event of disease outbreaks in milk and
food.
Sam Noles, Milk Consultant of the
State Board of Health, has been appoint-
ed to the important Committee on Sani-
tary Procedure which develops the 3-A
sanitary standards.
Dr. H. H. Wilkowske of the Univer-
sity of Florida, Department of Dairy Sci-
ence, was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer
at the annual meeting held in Atlantic
City and serves on the Membership Com-
mittee and the Publications Committee,
as well as a member of the Executive
Board.

tion. Others interested may write for a
copy. Briefly, other topics discussed in-
cluded CIP automatically, clean milk pro-
duction, instrumentation, stainless steel
care, iodine compounds in sanitation, bulk
milk sanitation, sanitary plant operations,
public relations, milk secretion and milk
composition.
At the annual business meeting the As-
sociation went on record as favoring in
principle the idea of establishing scholar-
ships by IAMFS as proposed by the Com-
mittee on Education and Professional
Development. Ten Year Service Citation
Certificates were presented to seven out-
standing Florida men, shown in the pic-
ture.
Dr. H. H. Rothe, State Dairy Super-
visor, Dairy Division, State Department
of Agriculture, who was advanced to the
Presidency, pledged an aggressive and
cooperative program. He is well known
throughout Florida as an outstanding
spokesman for uniformity in regulation,
believing that the best way to improve
sanitation is through education.
The other officers and directors elected
are shown in the accompanying picture.


14 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS























.- -.-I I d"M Ih
Above are recipients of 10-year Service Citation Certificates for 1955 from the Florida
Association of Milk & Food Sanitarians. LEFT TO RIGHT: Brady S. Johnston, Vice-
President, Dinsmore Dairy Co., Jacksonville; V. C. Johnson, President, Dinsmore Dairy Co.,
Jacksonville; J. French Koger, Chief Dairy Sanitarians, Dade County, Miami; and extreme
right, H. B. Martin, Dairy Engineer, Miller Machinery & Supply Co., Miami. Other re-
cipients not shown were Dr. H. W. Bolser, Sanitarian, Indian Rocks; H. M. Champion, Bay
County Sanitarian, Panama City; and W. R. Thompson, Milk Sanitarian, City Board of
Health, Jacksonville.
This is a joint award by the International Association, the Florida Association and the
University of Florida, represented, respectively, fourth fifth and sixth from left by H. L.
"Red" Thomasson, C. O. Stoy, retiring President of the Florida Association, and Dr. E. L.
Fouts, Head, Department of Dairy Science, University of Florida, Gainesville.


Traylor Offers Pamphlet
On Ensilage Addatives
Traylor Chemical & Supply Co., Or-
lando, state distributor for Sta-Fresh so-
dium bisulfite, has available for free
distribution to dairymen, an informative
pamphlet on a simple method of applying
chemical addatives to ensilage. The
pamphlet includes sketches of a mechani-
cal applicator which may be built at home
at a minimum cost by the dairyman him-
self. Three types of applicators are de-
scribed in the pamphlet and all are de-
signed to feed the silage sodium bisulfite
uniformly in desired quantities.
LeRoy Traylor of the Traylor Company
pointed out that Sta-Fresh sodium bisul-
fite is an easy-to-use powder that keeps
grass silage fresh, green and sweet-smell-
ing. Traylor said use of the home made
applicator eliminates waste and cuts labor
time to a minimum. To receive the free
pamphlet on silage treatment and sketches
of the applicator, write Traylor Chemical
& Supply Co., 912 Metcalf Bldg., Or-
lando, Florida.
Milk is the outstanding food buy to-
day. Milk prices have risen much less
than the average for all foods.


THIS MENU~j^~ IS 0 DATE!


Grasses Alone


6W NO T /


Use P. D. Q. Supplements for that balanced profein-
mineral-vitamin feed intake . PLUS Extra Rumen
Stimulation.


/ou'(/ flid it doest vo...It
BECAUSE
* It increases the assimilation of the
nutrients in grass
It guards against "starving" in the
midst of plenty
'e It insures better health-better
weight!


P. D. Q. contains the recom-
mended levels of VIT-A-WAY'S
Patented Process Mineral-Vitamin
base and has been tested and
approved by the Dept. of Re-
search and Control of VIT-A-WAY,
Inc.


DEALERS THROUGHOUT FLORIDA


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 15








DAIRY ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES


State Dairy Convention Program June 22nd

Features National Speakers & Dairy Problems

Milk Producers and Distributors
To Discuss Common Problems
Advance registrations indicate one of the largest delegations to attend a Florida
Dairy Convention can be expected at the Fort Harrison, June 22nd, for the three days
of business and recreational program of the Florida Dairy Association.
Featured on the program will be speakers from two national dairy groups-the
Milk Industry Foundation and the Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers-and
members of the staff of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station.
Other principal speakers will be Rex Paxton, a Public Relations Authority
of Kalamazoo, Michigan, and Bryan Blalock, Texas official of The Borden Company.
Other portions of the program include officials of the State Department of
Agriculture and the Florida Milk Commission.

Recreational Program
The Ladies' Auxiliary Committee, the Alligator Club Entertainment Committee
and the Golf Committee have all made plans for these features of the program which
will provide plenty of pleasant diversion from work schedules and even from the
convention business sessions.
Swimming and sun-bathing will be popular in both the beautiful Fort Harrison
Hotel pool and at the beaches.
A "Western Party" planned for the first evening of the convention offers costume
prizes and an opportunity for the six-shooter, loud shirt and big shot boys and gals
to really carry on.
Dancing will brighten up the late hours following the dinner programs both
Wednesday and Thursday evenings.


Parade of Officials and Speakers of
the Florida Dairy Association Conven-
tion to be held June 22-24 in Clear-
water.


LAY WAYNE


STEWART


MRS. SELLERS


Annual Meeting To Elect New
F.D.A. Officers & Directors
The Florida Dairy Association by-laws
provide for election of Officers and one-
third of the thirty active directors at each
Annual Meeting. Those elected, however,
do not take office until January 1st.
Officers to be elected at the June 24th
Annual Business Meeting in Clearwater
are President, Producer Vice President,
Distributor Vice President, Treasurer, and
Assistant Treasurer. One-third of the
thirty directors-5 producers and 5 dis-
tributors-are to be elected for three-year
terms and one vacancy each for producers
and distributors will be filled.
Producer directors whose terms expire
at the end of 1955 are: John Adkinson,
Pensacola; John McMullen, Clearwater;
J. H. Adams and A. T. Alvarez, Jackson-
ville, and John Hentz, Panama City.
Distributor directors whose terms are
to expire are: T. G. Lee, Orlando; W. J.
Barritt, Tampa; John Hood, Bradenton,
and D. E. Perret, Jacksonville.


F.D.A. CONVENTION
PROGRAM
AND FEATURED SPEAKERS
The Executive Committee of the
Florida Dairy Association states that con-
vention subjects and speakers were se-
lected with the thought that each would
contribute something definite to the con-
sideration of the most pressing problems
of the industry at this time.
The principal speakers and subjects for
discussions are: Dr. Ouida Abbott, Uni-
versity of Florida; T. W. Douglas, Milk
Industry Foundation; Neal Kelly, Nation-
al Dairy Council; Raymond Lee and L.
K. Nicholas, Florida Milk Commission;
Rex Paxton, Sutherland Paper Co.; C. W.
Reaves, Leon Mull and Dix Arnold, Flor-
ida Agricultural Experiment station; Bob
North and D. J. Cook, National Ice
Cream Association and Bryan Blalock,
Borden Company.
Convention subjects include: Milk and
Ice Cream Sales Promotion, Public Re-
lations, Dairy Legislation, Producer and
Distributor Fair Trade Practices, Milk
Nutrition Education, Milk Price Enforce-
ment, Milk Surplus and Milk Importation
Controls. Reducing Dairy Feed Costs.


NORTH


COOK


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


PAXTON


DR. DOUGLAS


MULL





























Those attending the June 22-24 Annual Convention of the Florida Dairy Association
will find this swimming pool and garden of the Fort Harrison Hotel at Clearwater, a most
delightful place for relaxation.


FOR MASTITIS CONTROL
Ster-Bac quaternary ammonium compound
is a powerful germicide, yet safe and non-
irritating to human or animal tissue. Ideal
for daily washing of teats and udders. Helps
curb mastitis, disinfects bruises, cuts, sores.
Completely safe for use on cows, milking
utensils, and milkers' hands. Exceptionally
good for cold weather use: not harsh on
skin. Used on dairy farms the nation over.
Write for Helpful Free Folder
KLNZD PRODUTIC


GOOD NEWS!




"100,000" COPIES ORDERED *e AR
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copies. ,or:. hIu Nt Yi S '5 "'

Opinions from a number of national ,, .t* 0 .
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milk powder and butterfat shipped down """ .aSidu cAAA
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their raw or pasteurized milk produced in .........
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Haiti.________________________________
SECOND QUARTER, 1955 17
Consumers andmkee recombineId mil ,' ..... ...
city, P rt- au thnis p h arni elar ,,,. .... ,dr .,' .
materials salary axese i





SEC- OND U ARTERME 1955O 1










SECOND OUARTER, 1955 0 17





























STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW SETS RECORD


By: WILSON SPARKS, Assistant Extension Dairyman
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Record crowds of people saw the finest group of 4-H dairy animals ever exhibited
at the 1955 Central Florida Fair which included the Eighth Annual Florida State 4-H
Dairy Show, held during the week of February 21. A total of $2500 was provided
for premiums for this show, $2000 coming from the Central Florida Fair and $500
from the State Department of Agriculture. The Honorable Nathan Mayo, Commis-
sioner of Agriculture, visited the 4-H show barn and stated that this was one of the
finest groups of junior dairy cattle he had ever seen.


Five Dairy Breeds Are Exhibited
The five major dairy breeds were rep-
resented with Jerseys and Guernseys pre-
dominating. Forty-six percent of the ani-
mals shown were placed in the blue
ribbon groups, thirty-nine percent red
ribbon animals, and fifteen percent in the
white ribbon group. Judges were L. A.
Higgins, recently retired Extension Dairy-
man of Mississippi and approved AJCC
judge, placing Jerseys and Brown Swiss
and J. T. Christian, approved AGCC
judge, making the placings on Guernseys,
Holsteins, and Ayrshires. Lloyd Warren
and C. J. Jacobs, Fieldman for the Amer-
ican Jersey and Guernsey Cattle Clubs
respectively, were on hand and judged
showmanship. Fitting judges were M. O.
Watkins, Assistant Director, and Bill
Platt, District Agent, Agricultural Exten-
sion Service. The official judges of the
show placed the cattle in the judging con-
test and Paul Thornhill, University of
Florida student, and member of the 1951
National champion 4-H Judging Team,
graded the reasons. T. W. Sparks, As-
sistant Extension Dairyman, served as
Superintendent of the Show. Other per-
sonnel handling the show were members
of the State Agricultural Extension Staff.
Good cold milk was served free on
show day by the Florida Jersey Cattle
Club. They also made milk available in
the barn the remainder of the week. It
was sold by the 4-H boys who were caring
for the cattle.


4-H Girls Win High Honors
Honors were shared by several 4-H'ers.
The champions in each breed are as fol-
lows: Merriam Simmons, St. Johns Co.,
showed the Senior and Grand Champion
Jersey, Observer Sultan Karen. A close
runner-up was Ginger Stuart with her
Junior and Reserve Grand Champion
Heifer, Sparkling Mac Golden. The Sen-
ior and Grand Champion Grade Jersey
was won by Earl Crutchfield, Jackson, on
an age cow. The Reserve Grand went to
Lee Rhoden, Duval, and the Junior
Champion to Jeanette Foote, Orange. Top
honors in the Reg. Guernsey division was
swept away by Pinellas County. Senior
and Grand Champion went to Howard
Renner, Pinellas, on Sultan's Fay Royal
(Age Cow). Reserve Grand Champion
was placed on the Reserve Senior Cham-
pion, 2 years old, Bayou Vista Noble Su-
san, owned by George Casey, Pinellas.
Kenneth Renner, also of Pinellas, won
the Junior Championship. In the grade
division of the Guernsey classes Max
Beebe of Palm Beach showed the Junior
and Grand Champion and Bob Knuckles
of Sarasota showed the Reserve Grand
Champion.
12 Year Old Wins Showmanship Award
On Aryshires, Charles Addison, Polk,
took Junior and Grand Championship on
Thunder Mae's Betty Ann, and Ellen
Jost, Lake, was awarded Senior and Re-
serve Grand Championship on her two
year old cow, Angel Wing of Old Bank.


Donna Boyd, Dade, captured the Reg-
istered Holstein Junior and Grand Cham-
pionship on her heifer, Armisley lane Bel-
mont, while Sam Ebersole, Lake, took the
Reserve honors on Floriland Burke Baby
Ann. Johnny Wilson, Volusia, received
top honors in the Grade Holstein division
taking Junior and Grand Champion on
his heifer. Jimmy Dowdy, Brevard,
showed the Reserve Grand Champion.
The coveted Showmanship Plaque
(Awarded by American Savings Building
and Loan Association) was won by a
veteran showman, Martin Schack, 12 year
old son of M. A. Schack, Jackson County.
Susan Wing, Citrus, Second and Caroline
Stuart, Polk, Third.

Simmons Wins Fitting Trophy
The Dinsmore Revolving Trophy for
the best fitted animal was awarded per-
manently to Steve Simmons, St. Johns.
Steve had won the trophy two times and
had been in second place two times. This
year and in the future, Dinsmore Dairy
Farms will provide a trophy annually.
Alfred Hammond, Orange, captured this
fitting trophy this year. Milton Pittman,
Jackson, and Ginger Stuart, Polk, second
and third, respectively.
Jackson County placed at the head of
the Best County Group class with three
fine Jersey cows. A close second was
Pinellas with their three lovely Guern-
seys, St. Johns stood third, Polk fourth,
Dade fifth.
Leon County won the judging contest
and the Florida Times-Union Trophy
with a score of 685 points followed close-
ly by Marion, Jackson, and Orange. The
second place team won the Florida Chain
Store Council Plaque and the third team

(Continued on Page 20)


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





















UP.,












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These pictures of events at the State 4-H Dairy Show in Orlando show, Top Panel,
L to R, (1) W. A. Boutwell, President Florida Guernsey Cattle Club, presenting that organi-
zation's trophy to the winner of the Grand Champion Guernsey; (2) Mr. John Norfleet,
Orlando, presenting for Southern Dairies and National Dairy Products Corporation the
1954 Dairy efficiency award to Bob Bowie for his brother, Al Bowie, winner of the trophy,
who is now in the armed services; (3) Orange County Agent, Fred Baetzman, is presented
the 4-H Dairy Efficiency Award for the winning County by John Norfleet on behalf of
Southern Dairies and National Dairy Products Corporation.
In the panel to the left, Top to Bottom are: (1) The Leon County Judging Team re-
ceives Florida Times-Union Trophy as Top Judging Team presented by Steve Willis;
(2) The Jackson County group which won the "Best County Group" award, L to R, Martin
Schack, Earl Crutchfield, William Schack; (3) Guernsey champions of the show are, L to R,
grand champion Sultans Fay Royal owned by Howard Renner, Pinellas County; Reserve
Grand Champion Bayou Vista Noble Susan owned by George Casey, Pinellas County, and
the junior champion owned by Kenneth Renner, also of Pinellas County; (4) The Jackson
County Delegation who received top honors of the show as the "Best County Group."

1955 STATE 4-H DAIRY SHOW


(Continued
a plaque by Hall & Boyd Dairy, Miami.
Twenty-one teams competed in the con-
test. High individual honors went to
Ronald Hunt of Volusia County with a
score of 262. C. C. Sellers, Jr., of Leon
was close on his heels with a score of 261.
Earl Crutchfield, Jackson, 240, came in
third.
The next seventeen individuals are as
follows: Nell Whittington, Marion, 238;
Susan Wing, Citrus, 236; Robert Thorn-
hill, Polk, 231; Russell Lloyd, Duval,
224; Jack Sellards, Orange, 223; Milton
Pittman, Jackson, 220; Jay Pelot, Marion,
218; Mickey McGee, Marion, 218; Lucy
Parker, Hillsborough, 218; Michael Wil-
liamson, Pinellas, 217; Mildred Frieson,
Hardee, 217; Nancy Buchholtz, Duval,
215; Pleas Strickland, Leon, 214; Sharon
Ellis, Nassau, 212; Clifford Flood, Nas-
sau, 211; Billy Boyd, Dade, 210; Frank-
lin A. Davis, Madison, 210. W. W.
Brown, State Boys' 4-H Club Agent, and
Grant Godwin, Assistant State Boys' 4-H
Club Agent, were in charge of the con-
test.
The team to represent Florida at the
National Contest will be selected at a later
contest involving the eligible members
from the above group.
Sandra Dennison, Orange, was selected
as Sweetheart of the Show and was
awarded a bouquet of red rose buds by
O. P. Swope, President of the Fair. This
award was made to the girl whom the
judges considered showed more charm,
grace, poise and friendliness.
Awards Banquet Honors Exhibitors
At the Awards Banquet the Jackson
County group in their green 4-H jackets


on page 18)

held their heads high. It was under the
able leadership of W. W. Glenn, County
Agent, and L. D. Taylor, Assistant Coun-
ty Agent, and the backing of breeders
from Jackson County that many awards
were made to members from that county.
The Jersey Awards, Loving Cup,
plaques, and medals were presented to the
winners by M. A. Schack, Vice-President
of the Florida Jersey Cattle Club and
Lloyd Warren, Field Representative for
the American Jersey Cattle Club.
The Guernsey awards were likewise
presented by the Guernsey officials, W. A.
Boutwell, President of the Florida Club,
and C. J. Jacobs, Fieldman for the Ameri-
can Guernsey Cattle Club.
Herman Boyd, President of the Florida
Holstein Club and Floyd Marlow, made
the Holstein awards.
The Ayrshire awards were made by T.
W. Sparks.
Dairy Association Trophy
Won by Jackson County
Tom D. Lee of Orlando, Vice-Presi-
dent of the Florida Dairy Association,
presented the Florida Dairy Association
Trophy to Jackson County as the best
county group in the show. The second
place winner, Pinellas County, was award-
ed a trophy presented by Boutwell Dairy,
Inc. St. Johns received a trophy for third
place presented by Lay-Laine Guernsey
Farms, Goldenrod.
4-H Dairy Efficiency Awards
In addition to the awards mentioned in
the foregoing paragraphs, the district and
state winners of the Dairy efficiency pro-
(Continued on Next Page)


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







DADE COUNTY YOUTH FAIR
AND DISTRICT DAIRY SHOW
The Dade County Youth Fair and the
10th District Dairy Show was very suc-
cessful this year with 80 entries. Dade
County youths exhibited about 65 and
Palm Beach, the only other county in Dis-
trict 10 that entered animals, had about
15.
The champions were selected in each
breed, both registered and grade. Earl
Jensen of Boutwell's dairy was the of-
ficial judge and C. W. Reaves was
the showmanship and grooming judge.
There were two sets of premiums. Each
animal got a premium on the ribbon
group they were placed in and each boy
could make $15.00, $10.00 or $5.00 on
grooming and showmanship. By setting
up the premiums this way it gave a boy
who had a white ribbon animal, well
shown and groomed, a chance to make
more money than the lazy youngster
whose father bought him a blue ribbon
animal and he never made any effort to
get it ready for showing.
The champions were: Registered Hol-
stein, Donna & Phyllis Boyd; Grade Hol-
stein, Ben Franklin, Jr.; Registered Jersey,
Teddy Kretzschmar; Grade Guernsey,
Stanley Bradshaw; Registered Guernsey.
Teddy Kretzschmar; Registered Ayrshire.
Billy Boyd; Grade Ayrshire, Judy Boyd;
Grade Brown Swiss, Ben Franklin, Jr.

1955 STATE 4-H
DAIRY SHOW
(Continued from page 20)
gram were awarded. Al Bowie, Duval
County, was presented with a plaque
awarded by Southern Dairies and National
Dairy Products Corp. They also presented
checks of $15.00 each to the following as
district winners: Bobby Wilkerson (Wal-
ton), Earl Crutchfield (Jackson), Erny
Sellers (Leon), Bobby Mills (Suwanee),
Al Bowie (Duval), John Greenman
(Alachua), Bobby Blair (Lake), Michael
Williamson (Pinellas), Tony Collins
(Manatee), Wm. Herman Boyd (Dade).
William Schack of Jackson County,
winner of the 1954 Dairy Achievement
Contest, won the Production Records
Contest on the record of "Ena Sensation
Ann, HIR 4-11 305 9,591 5.5%/ 523
2X" and was awarded the Florida Feed
Dealers Association Trophy.
All exhibitors were congratulated for
one of the best 4-H Dairy Shows ever
held in Florida.
"Florida is to be congratulated on the
outstanding record of the Florida Dairy
Industry in holding the milk price line to
the lowest percentage of increase since
1940 of any major milk market in the
nation."
(Statement of Richard J. Werner, Execu-
tibe Director, Milk Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C., in a recent Florida
address.)


W. H. Boyd Represents Florida
At National Holstein Meeting
Herman Boyd of the Hall and Boyd
Dairy, Miami, represented the Florida
Holstein Breeders Association at the 1955
Annual Convention of the American Hol-
stein-Friesian Association held May 29-31
in Philadelphia.
Mr. Boyd is president of the Florida
Holstein Breeders Association and imme-
diate past president of the Florida Dairy
Association.
One quart of milk weighs 2.15 lbs. To
make a pound of butter 9.77 qts. of milk
are required, 4.65 qts. for a pound of
cheese. One quart of milk is required for
a pound of evaporated milk, 3.72 qts. for
a pound of whole milk powder.











Ideal's May Royal's Petunia-Outstand-
ing Guernsey National Record Cow. Her
record reads 17050-894-Sr. 3, 365
C-2X. Owned by North Farm, Bristol, R.I.
whose manager. Wilfred Jordan, insists
that his championship production is also
championship quality by using only Rapid-
Flo Fibre-Bonded Filter Disks in the
Blue Box.


IMPROVE MILK QUALITY-CUT COSTS WITH
THE RAPID-FLO CHECK-UP FOR MASTITIS
AND SEDIMENT
A simple daily procedure endorsed by sani-
tarians and health authorities that can help
prevent loss of milk and cows.


Test Your 1-0
READ this sentence aloud:


"FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE-
SULTS OF YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC
STUDY COMBINED WITH THE
EXPERIENCE OF YEARS"

Now count aloud the F's in that square.
Count them ONLY ONCE; do not go
back nor count them again.
One of average intelligence finds three
of them. If you spotted four, you're
above the average. If you hit five, you
can turn up your nose at most anybody.
If you caught six, you're a genius and
most too good to be wasting your time
on foolishness like this.









ARE CHAMPIONS*

IN

PERFORMANCE


GET CHAMPION FILTER DISK
PERFORMANCE-GET RAPID-FLO
Even though your herd may not in-
clude a champion, the quality of milk
or cream you produce is as vital to
your income and the industry as to
the owners of blue ribbon winners. To
get the utmost in protection of milk
quality, use Rapid-Flo Fibre-Bonded
Filter Disks, engineered by Johnson
& Johnson for safe filtration and a


1. After filtering each can reliable check-up for mastit
of milk (10 gallons or less)
the used filter disk is care- causes of sediment. As a maji
fully removed from the producers know, Rapid-Flo p
staie cardboard to dry day-in day-out protection in
milk production.
S ' 2. Examination of the used
filter will indicate precau- Buy the world-famous brand
ionary steps necessary that stands for known quality an
to secure clean milk.

Filter Products Division


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is and
ority of
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quality


d value


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 0 21







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

The Rancid Milk Flavor Problem
By: W. A. KRIENKE
Department of Dairy Science, University of Florida
Development of the rancid flavor in whole milk is not new, but to many dairy-
men it is a new experience to find that the milk of an entire milking or perhaps a
pooled batch of two to four milkings has "gone rancid" and cannot be used at the
milk plant.
Several articles in dairy publications of recent date and over a period of about
three years emphasize the increase in the number of cases of rancid milk and that
many of these are associated with installations of pipeline milking and bulk tank
systems on dairy farms. This is not to
be taken as a statement of condemnation physical arrangement of the butterfat
of this newer way of handling milk on coating material sufficiently to let the
the farm and most certainly should not enzyme lypase through this "first line of
be taken by anyone as being discriminat- defense" against development of rancid-
ing or derogatory. As in past experiences ityA recently published finding indicates
with certain problems, generally solutions A recently published finding indicates
to problems when they arise are not al- that foaming of milk and mixing of the
ways easy. If carefully controlled ex- foam into the milk is likely to result in
periments can not be set up to study great damage to the "defense mechanism"
and evaluate the different aspects it be- on butterfat. Even though the air is in-
comes necessary to use some trial and corporate in a very gentle manner to
error methods based on fundamentals as produce the foam the report indicates that
they are known asd on da certain amount this is a definite cause of rancid milk.
they are known and on a certain amount ezing of milk contributes to the
of practical application. Then, too, there Freezing of milk contributes to the
is the matter of slight to major differences disruption of the fat globule coating
in installations that from a practical or material. This is evident by the fact that
workable standpoint appear necessary for frozen milk and frozen cream frequently
workable standpoint appear necessary for _oil-off" to some degree when thawed,
one reason or another. It is likely, there- "oil-off to some degree when thawed,
fore, that when making an analysis of one especially when thawed slowly as would
or more of these installations that the be the case involving frozen milk in a
specific point that yields to a corrective milk storage tank.
measure in one case may not do so in an- Consistent with fundamentals and
other or that a major correction is essen- based on reported research results, it
tial in one of two systems, that from the appears that mistreatment of raw milk,
standpoint of equipment appear identical involving unnecessary agitation, freezing,
tnoint of ui nt intic and air incorporation, must be avoided,
in so far as is practical, regardless of sys-
Individuality of the cow is known to tem of milking and milk handling if the
be a contributing factor to development rancid milk problem is to be kept under
of the rancid flavor of milk. Some cows control.
are habitual offenders in this respect while
others never or infrequently produce milk
susceptible to the action of lypase, the U. F. Dairy Science Club
constituent of milk that acts on butterfat Sponsors AG Fair Exhibit
to produce the rancid flavor. By: GEORGE MILICEVIC, JR., President
Some fundamental knowledge has been Every year near the turn of spring, the
acquired and is useful in attempting an College of Agriculture blossoms out with
appraisal of the rancid milk problem. its Agricultural Fair. The Fair is spon-
It is very desirable in this connection to scored by the honorary agriculture frater-
be prepared to understand that the physi- nity, Alpha Zeta, and is participated in
cal treatment raw milk receives functions by all the agricultural clubs on the cam-
in an accumulating way. There may be pus and by several commercial organiza-
one point of extremely vigorous agitation tions. The clubs compete for two tro-
of raw milk in one case preceded or fol- phies; one offered for the best exhibit
lowed by very gentle treatment, while in and the other for the most attractive coed
another case slight to moderate agitation entered in the Ag Fair Queen Contest.
may exist throughout the milk handling The Dairy Science Club bashfully
operation from the cow to the point of boasts its success for the past two years
heat treatment in the plant. Possibly one,
both or neither system will damage the (Continued on page 24)


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1955 Special Events
for
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
September 6-8
24th Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.
October 13-15
18th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
and supply dealers.
November 2-3
20th Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY AND CONFERENCE
For Milk Producer-distributors, Milk Pro-
ducers, dairy processors, herdsmen, county
agents, vocational agriculture teachers, vet-
erinarians, DHIA workers and equipment
and supply dealers.


Artificial Breeding Program
Shows Substantial Progress
By: C. W. REAVES
Extension Dairyman
A total of 29,774 dairy cows were bred
in Florida during 1954 by artificial in-
semination. This number included only
those bred with semen from bulls in reg-
ular bull studs and does not include cows
bred artificially from bulls owned by the
same man. The majority or 27,439 were
bred with semen from the American
Breeders' Service bull stud at Carmel, In-
diana, which keeps only bulls of proven
production transmitting ability.
The artificial breeding program was
started in Florida in the fall of 1948 and
has had a steady growth each year. The
29,774 cows bred in 1954 compares with
24,691 bred in 1953.
Offspring born as a result of artificial
breeding are helping raise the average
production of many Florida dairy herds.
DHIA records give a measure of the pro-
duction of those cows in herds in which
production records are being kept. The
records of all artificially-sired cows for
which DHIA lactation records were re-
ported up to December 31, 1954 show
an average annual production of 7,282
pounds milk and 348 pounds butterfat
on a mature equivalent basis. This is
850 pounds milk (99 gallons) higher
than the average production of all cows
on DHIA test and indicates that the
objective of the program to raise higher
producing cows is being accomplished in
the state. The artificial breeding program
makes the use of outstanding bulls avail-
able to large or small dairymen and to
family cow owners.


22 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


































In the top picture above, Dr. C. V. Noble, Dean of the College of Agriculture, Uni-
versity of Florida, is seen presenting the "Borden Award" for 1954 to Paul M. Thornhill,
senior dairy husbandry student, from Dundee, who will graduate from the University of
Florida in June, 1955. This award is made each year by the Borden Company to the out-
standing student in agriculture who has taken two courses in dairying prior to his senior
year. This is the 10th annual award at the University of Florida, six of which have been
won by dairy students.
In the lower picture Dr. Leon Mull of the University of Florida Department of Dairy
Science is seen presenting the "Virginia Dare Award" to Charles Dunnigan, senior dairy
products student from Brooklyn, New York. This award is given annually to the dairy
student who has shown the most outstanding achievement in the ice cream manufacturing
field. This is the fourth annual award presented here. Virginia Dare Company has indicated
that the award will be continued.


Raising Dairy Herd Replacements
By: DR. JAMES M. WING
Asst. Dairy Husbandman, University of Florida
Use of purebred bulls on grade cows has increased milk production by as much
as 130 per cent in two successive generations. These results, together with the fact
that home-raised replacements stay in Florida herds 20 per cent longer than purchased
heifers, emphasize the economic importance of raising calves.
The first essential for raising a healthy calf is proper feeding of the cow. Heavy
milking removes nutrients from the cow's body, and thus a dry period of six to eight
weeks with good feed is necessary to the health of the cow and her calf.
A clean, well bedded maternity stall is
desirable but usually is not available. A
small pasture, away from other livestock, usually in much larger volume than can
is a suitable place for calves to be born. be used by one calf. The rest may be fed
If maternity stalls are used, calves can be to older calves and takes the place of
left with the cows for three to four days. whole milk-if properly diluted. Uusual
Otherwise they should be removed to in- mixtures are: One part water to two parts
dividual pens as soon as they have been colostrum; or one part skim milk, or com-
dried. mercial calf starter, to one part colostrum.
In either event, the calf should be al- If necessary, colostrum can be kept for
lowed to consume some of the colostrum, several days at 40 degrees fahrenheit or
or first milk, because it contains anti- for months if frozen.
bodies which protect the calf from bac- As soon after birth as possible, the
trial infections; it is high in nutrients naval cord should be disinfected with
which are especially needed by new-born iodine. If weather is cold and the cow
animals and it helps to activate digestion does not lick the calf, it should be rubbed
in the young calf. Colostrum is produced with a clean cloth, or sack, to hasten dry-
for three or four days following calving, ing and to increase blood circulation.


Housing Is Important
Calves should be housed in clean, dry,
well ventilated quarters. Open sheds pro-
duce better results than conventional
barns in tests at the Washington and
North Carolina Stations. Individual port-
able calf brooders are satisfactory if lo-
cated so that the calf is protected from
wind and rain and if kept clean. Calf
quarters always must be disinfected be-
tween occupancy. This can be done with
a hot lye solution or commercial disin-
fectants.
Hay and concentrate feeds should be
provided from the start. Very little will
be consumed by calves under two weeks
of age but consumption of solid feed is
encouraged by keeping it before them.
Calf-hay should be early cut, green in
color, and should be made in part from
legumes. The concentrate feed for young
calves should contain at least 20 per cent
protein and not over six per cent of crude
fiber. Whole or cracked grain, or pellet-
ed meals are eaten more readily than
finely-ground feeds.
Colostrum should be fed for the first
three to four days, followed by whole
milk or diluted colostrum until the calf
is at least one week of age. (Two to
three weeks is preferable.)
This may be followed by skim milk
supplemented with fish liver oil, or by
commercial calf starters. One pound of
dried milk is mixed with nine pounds of
water. A fresh mixture should be pre-
pared for each feeding.

Precautions To Be Observed
Vigorous calves of normal size may be
weaned at 60 days of age. Limited use of
pasture may be begun at about three
months. Usually dairy animals grow at a
normal rate on lush pasture forage and
mineral supplements alone after reaching
the age of six months. Most difficulties
in calf raising can be avoided by observ-
ing a few precautions:
1. Avoid overfeeding milk: never
feed more than one pound per
day for each ten pounds the calf
weighs (and this must be given in
at least two feedings).
2. Feed warm milk, about 1000
Fahrenheit (every calf feeder
should have a hot plate and a
thermometer).
3. Feed fresh milk.
4. Observe regular feeding hours.
5. Keep utensils as clean as a milk-
ing machine (don't feed calves
with a pail from which you
wouldn't be willing to drink).
6. Reduce the feed intake if scouring
occurs.
7. Use a nipple pail for feeding
small calves.


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 23







4-H WINNERS ANNOUNCED D.H.I.A. RECORDS SHOW


IN PASTURE ESSAY CONTEST
Winners of the 1955 4-H Essay Con-
test, which is a part of the State Dairy
Pasture Contest, have just been announced
by C. W. Reaves, State Extension Dairy-
man, as follows:
First, Sandra Dennison, Orlando,
Second, Jay Boosinger, Bradenton; Third,
Edwin Stubbs, Sarasota.
Cash prizes of $25.00, $15.00 and
$10.00, furnished by the Florida Dairy
Association, will be presented the win-
ners at the Annual 4-H Assembly at the
University of Florida, June 16th.
The essays will be published in the
Florida Dairy News.


DAIKY PASbUKI: PAY
The seven dairy herds of the Orange
County D.H.I.A. secured an average of
35 per cent of their total feed nutrients
from pasture, whereas D.H.I.A. herds as
a whole secured only 30 per cent from
pasture. Herds in the association varied
in the per cent of total feed nutrients re-
ceived from pasture from 43 per cent
down to five per cent. The herd that
received the least from pasture had the
highest cost of production, with 84 cents
higher feed cost per 100 pounds 4%
fat corrected milk produced, than the
average for the association. This is 7c per
gallon difference in feed cost of produc-
tion.


Now, General Chemical, 50-year
leader in agricultural chemicals,
brings you another great new farm
aid. This time it's STA-FRESH-
the handy, low-cost sodium bisul-
fite powder that keeps silage fresh,
green and sweet-smelling.
STA-FRESH insures a superior
feed with less work at lower cost.
It is already highly recommended
by many county agents and agri-
cultural leaders. STA-FRESH has
been used with success on alfalfa,
orchard grass, brome grass, ladino,
sweet clover, timothy, vetch, oats,
and other forage crops.


912 Metcalf Bldg.


Cows prefer STA-FRESH-
treated silage. In a typical free-
choice test, cattle ate an average
of 63 pounds of bisulfite-treated
silage to 18 pounds of untreated
silage.
STA-FRESH keeps silage sweet-
smelling, too; rids it of that "silage
stink" that fouls your clothes,
smells up the barn, and may taint
milk.
Get the facts on STA-FRESH
right away with complete details
on how to use it. We have
STA-FRESH in stock now in
100-lb. bags. See us today.


Tel. 5-5501


ORLANDO, FLA.


St. Louis Is Selected
For National Conventions
The Milk Industry Foundation and the
International Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers have announced the selec-
tion of St. Louis for the 1955 Annual
Convention of these groups which have
an established plan of meeting in the
same city with one day devoted to a joint
session of the two organizations.
The dairy equipment and supplies ex-
position, which is held every other year
in conjunction with these Conventions,
is not scheduled this year.
The convention dates announced are
October 24-26 for the Ice Cream Session
and October 26-28 for the Milk Founda-
tion.
Announcements and reservation forms
for Convention hotels will be furnished
later.


U. F. Dairy Science Club
Sponsors AG Fair Exhibit
(Continued from page 22)
in these contests. Last year the Club won
second place with its exhibit and spon-
sored the Queen of Ag Fair. This year
heads are slightly bowed because the cur-
rent exhibit provided for only a third-
place win. The American Society of
Agronomy entered the winning exhibit.
Dairy's exhibit told the story of arti-
ficial breeding, giving, along with other
things, the advantages, the equipment
used, and the progress of this practice.
Probably the highlights of the exhibit
were live sperm shown under a micro-
scope, slides showing the procedure used,
and finally the end result represented by
two artificially sired calves.
The interest shown and the questions
asked by observers of the exhibit were
enough to indicate the success of it.


How Crawford Earned
Improvement Award
(Continued from page 8)
The following feed program has
proven to be very successful and will be
followed with better quality feeds.
Winter feeding program for milk herd
is as follows: Lupine pasture, 12 % Dairy
Mixture, Pensacola Bahia hay, Molasses,
and silage.
Summer feeding program for milk
herd is as follows: Rotate to new grass
pasture each week for three weeks. Hay
and molasses, 14%CDairy Mixture, and
Silage in late summer. The combination
if lupine pasture and corn silage brought
his milk production to better than a three
gallon average per cow in 1954. This
average was maintained for seven months.


24 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Amazing New Way to Keep Your


SILAGE

Fresh, Green, Sweet-Smelling!


STAmFRESH*
4Silage Grade Sodium Bisulfite
*Geoeral Chemical Trade-Mark
ORCHARD --------------

s- TRAYLOR

CHEMICAL & SUPPLY CO., INC.


II






Werner Elected Executive
Of Milk Industry Foundation
The Board of Directors of the Milk
Industry Foundation has announced the
recent election of Richard J. Werner as
chief executive officer of the organization
with the title of Executive Director.
Mr. Werner came with the Foundation
five years ago as Assistant Executive Di-
rector, later was
e ~ promoted to Asso-
ciate Executive Di-
rector, and now has
Ii been put in charge
of the many activi-
ties of the Founda-
tion which operates
in the United
States, Canada, and
ten foreign coun-
DR. WERNER tries.

Prior to coming with the Foundation,
Mr. Werner had held positions in several
phases of the milk business from pro-
ducer to field manager of a large dairy
company. Besides his wide knowledge of
the industry, he has been prominent in
education, having served as State Super-
visor of Agricultural Education and Com-
missioner of Secondary Education for
California. Later he was President of
Hartnell College, also in California.
Born in Minnesota and raised on a
dairy farm, he worked his way and was
graduated from Oregon State College
with a B.S. degree in 1917. After service
in the first World War, he was engaged
in dairy farming as a producer in Man-
teca, California. Later he became an em-
ployee of the Golden State Dairy Prod-
ucts Company and rose to the position of
field manager of the company. He was
later appointed manager of the California
Dairy Industry Advisory Board, a position
which he held from 1945 to 1951 when
he was selected for the position with the
Milk Industry Foundation, which he has
pursued with diligence and energy. With
his experience in the dairy industry as a
producer, processor, and trade association
executive, Mr. Werner is well qualified
to assume the responsibility placed in him
by the industry.
Mr. Werner, who has served his coun-
try during both wars as an infantryman,
is the holder of numerous military medals
and honors for his distinguished service.
Besides the degree of Bachelor of Sci-
ence, he has received the Master of Sci-
ence degree from the University of Cali-
fornia and the Doctor of Science degree
from the University of Naples, Italy.

FLORIDA 33rd IN DAIRY CATTLE
U. S. Department of Agriculture re-
ports for the past year show that Florida
has moved from 35th to 33rd place in
the nation with 303,000 dairy cows val-
ued at $16,032,000.00.


An enumeration of cows on DHIA
test January 1, 1955 showed a total of
10,023, with nine test supervisors with
DHIA herds in 25 counties. This is the
largest number cows on test to date and
marks a steady growth of DHIA work for
several years.
Association reports are showing im-
provement in most herds.
The following comparison of the first
and last years' operation of the West
Coast, Orange County, Manasota and


South Florida Associations reflect im-
provement in management, breeding, and
feeding of the herds. The West Coast
DHIA has had seven years, the Orange
County Association five years, and the
other two three years each. The combined
1953-54 yearly records of the group com-
pared to the first year's operation of the
respective associations showed an average
increase of 453 pounds milk and 27
pounds butterfat per cow and a decrease
of 45 cents in the feed cost of producing
100 pounds milk.


NOW! Vacuum Refrigerate Milk

with ewe T-20 Milk Tank








_. .






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Milking Methods
The beginning of Designed for use on any dairy, the T-20 Milk
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your fully automatic of its many advantages: stainless steel and steel
milking system throughout . cylindrical shape won't bulge,
Easy to cln i e gives accurate measurements ... so easy to clean
SEasy to lean de 3" insulation for rapid cooling . .10"x20"
and out, even for a lids easily cleaned in wash tanks. Entire tank
short man perfectly air-tight to hold vacuum so you know
it's dust-and-vermin-proof. And Zero's T-20 Milk
Tank will vacuum refrigerate milk direct from
cow to tank in your automatic milking system. Milk is drawn direct from cow to
tank and refrigerated by vacuum. No more lifting, carrying, pouring heavy milk
cans. No need for costly releases or pumps. And actual tests prove your T-20 will
cool better than 10% more milk per KW of electricity.
Use eac Labor Saving Super Strainer
"Like Sucking Milk Through A Straw"
If you're not ready for fully automatic milking,
you can greatly improve on the pour-in method
and add new ease to your milking operation by
using your T-20 as a vacuum refrigerated tank
with Zero's Super Strainer under Vacuum . .
"just like sucking milk through a straw." With
this method, a pail of milk is easily drawn into
the tank in about 30 seconds, then quickly
vacuum refrigerated. The short milk line used
includes our in-line strainer and valve. This lets
you take greater advantage of your T-20 . .
eliminates lifting and pouring from heavy milk
pails . saves cost of pour-in strainer . and
gives you vacuum refrigerated milk with animal
heat and odors removed!
Write TODAY for the Name of Your Nearest Zero 2eWZ SALES CORP.
Dealer or Tell Us Who Your Dairy Equipment 000 DUNCAN AVE.
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SECOND QUARTER, 1955 25


10,000 COW MARK PASSED BY D.H.I.A.







MILK PRICE INCREASE LESS THAN

/3 of OTHERS
The following price increase comparisons in Tallahassee, Florida, were made April 23rd,
1955, by the Florida Dairy Association and furnished members of the State Legislature in
answer to claims being made to the legislature that milk prices were unreasonably high:
Comparison of the price increase of milk with increases for other foods and other home
necessities in Tallahassee, Florida, (compiled April 23, 1955, by the Florida Dairy Association).
(Source: Grocery ads in Tallahassee DEMOCRAT, July 1940, and from
Tallahassee CHAIN STORES, April 23, 1955.)
Foods and Commodities Cost in 1940 Cost in 1955 % Increase
*MILK-HOMOGENIZED................. 17 QUART 27 QUART ................................. 58.8%
Hams, half or whole...................... 19 pound 59 pound ........ .... ..................210.5%
Steak, sirloin or round... ............. 35 pound 79 pound .. ............................125.7%
Hamburger.................................. 15 pound 390 pound ...................................... 160. %
Rindless Bacon....... .......... .... ... 15 pound 49 pound .......................................226.6%
W hite Bacon...................................... 7 pound 29 pound ............. .. ....................286. %
Maxwell House Coffee.....................21%2 pound 97 pound .... . ...... ................351.1%
Tomatoes--#21/2 can............. 5 can 11/2 can ...................................130. %
Sugar-5 lb...................... 21 45 5 lb. ....... .........................1.......... 14.2%
Irish potatoes, #1 size................. 19--10 lbs. 45--10 lbs. ..... ......................136.8%
Bread- 16 oz............. ..... ............... 8 loaf 190 loaf ... . ........................137.5%
Weiners............................ 23 pound 490 pound .................. .................... 113. %
Eggs......... ....................................21 dozen 55c dozen ............ .... ............... 161.9%
Bananas.... ......................... .......... 17 dozen 500 dozen ......... .............................194. %
Toilet Tissue.... ........ .......... ......... 25 --6 rolls 50 -- 6 rolls ................................... 100. %
Fancy Blue Rose Rice.................... 180- 5 lbs. 75 -- 5 lbs. .................................... 16.6%
Dress G ingham.............. ................. 19 yard 79 yard ...................... .................3.... 15.7%
Cannon Bath Towels.... ...................25 each 50 to $1.79 each ......................... 700. %
Bicycles................ ................$... 24.95 $49.95 ............................................. 100. %
Roller Skates.......... ................ ....... $ 1.95 $ 4.29 ............................................. 120. %
HOUSE RENT: 6 rm. unfurnished. $35.00 month $75.00 month .......... .....................114.2%
Roast Turkey, restaurant dinner.......25 60 ..................................................140. %
Ford V-8 (Factory Delivered Prices) $736.00 (1941) $1807.00 ...........................................145.5%

(Source, National Market Reports, 4/28/55)
*AVERAGE PER CENT INCREASE OF 22 ITEMS LISTED OTHER THAN MILK....199.9%
*PER CENT OF MILK PRICE INCREASE........................................... 58.8%


Fertilizer Company
Names Hancock Manager
Directors of Superior Fertilizer and
Chemical Company announce that W. R.
Hancock has been elected general man-
ager of the com-
pany, replacing G.
Dexter Sloan who
has held that posi-
tion since 1945.
Mr. Sloan becomes
President.
Mr. Hancock is a
native Floridan
S, having been born
in Madison Coun-
HANCOCK ty. He is a graduate
from the College of Agriculture, Univer-
sity of Florida. After graduation he
served with the U. S. Marines in the Pa-
cific Theatre as a bomber pilot captain.
Returning to civilian life he taught voca-
tional agriculture, and was county agent,
and later became field secretary of the
Florida Farm Bureau.
For the past two years Mr. Hancock
has served as Chairman of the Florida
Agricultural Council, which is a confer-
ence group of all agricultural and live-
stock organizations of Florida.


COWS HIT BY LIGHTNING
I. L. Decubellis of New Port Richey
suffered the loss of eight cows recently
when his milking barn was struck by
lightning. The shed was built with an
aluminum ceiling and steel stanchions.
The cows were waiting at the stanchions
to be milked when the bolt of lightning
struck.




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CATTLE DISPERSALS: 154 Ayrshires, 7( Hol-
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26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


The Right Fertilizer

Makes The Difference!

Higher production at lower cost often means
the difference between profit and loss. The
right fertilizer mixtures for specific crops
and soil types can be the answer to this prob-
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UNIVERSITY SUMMARIZES
NEW MILK COST SURVEY
The University of Florida Department
of Agricultural Economics has recently
announced the results of a partial survey
of Florida milk production costs for the
year 1953.
The survey made for and at the request
of the Florida Milk Commission included
105 dairy farms of the peninsular portion
of the State only.
The following information is quoted
from the authors' summary of the 41-
page report. Additional material from
the survey will be published in succeed-
ind issues of the Dairy News.
Summary of Survey
"This report is of a preliminary nature.
It is based on survey data primarily de-
signed for other purposes. The main pur-
pose was to analyze dairy farm organiza-
tion, particularly the economic possibili-
ties of improved pasture. As a result, the
writers urge that caution be exercised in
its use. However, it is felt to be reason-
ably indicative of actual conditions in the
period discussed.
"The dairy farms in the areas sur-
veyed are now predominantly very large
compared to most milk producing areas.
The average herd has about 150 cows.
Almost half of the milk produced in these
areas in 1953 was produced by herds with
more than 200 cows. In the metropolitan
milk sheds of southeast Florida the herd
of less than 50 cows is now almost a
thing of the past. Indications are that the
size of herds in the survey area was still
increasing at the rate of about 9.5 cows
per herd per year during 1953.
"The rate of turnover of dairy herds
was relatively high. In the survey area
the expected productive life of dairy
cows average a little less than five years.
Only about one-third of the total number
of herd replacements was provided by
home-raised heifers.
"Although there has been a trend to-
ward increasing use of pasture as a source
of dairy cattle feed, it appears that in
1953 only about 15 per cent of all feed
consumed by dairy herds was derived
from pasture. In the survey area there
was an average of about two acres of
pasture for each dairy cow, about half of
which was improved grass.
"The average annual production for
cows in commercial herds in the survey
area was estimated at about 624 gallons
during 1953.
"In the entire survey area cash costs
plus herd depreciation averaged 52.4
cents per gallon. These estimates did not
include an allowance for unpaid labor and
managerial services, interest in investment
or depreciation of buildings and equip-
ment. According to past surveys these
excluded items comprise one-fifth to one-
tenth of total costs.


VIKING BRAND
CALCIUM NITRATE GIVES PASTURES
NEW START AFTER GRAZING


Top dressing pastures with VIKING
BRAND CALCIUM NITRATE after
grazing brings quick response and
oftentimes a remarkable increase in
yield.
The use of VIKING BRAND CALCIUM
NITRATE will increase both the yield
and protein content of pasture grass-
es . provide more pasture feed ..
turn inexpensive nitrogen into high-
value protein.
Many dairymen and ranchers are
demonstrating to themselves the
profitability of increasing their pas-
ture feed by this method.
Results have shown greater beef or
milk production . .more profit per
acre . reduction in feeding costs
and a more even supply of pasture
throughout the year.
Grasses, because of the complete-
ness with which their roots occupy
the soil, are capable of using prac-
tically 100% of the nitrogen top-
dressing. When applied after grass
has been grazed down, VIKING
BRAND CALCIUM NITRATE gives the
grass a quick start and keeps it
growing rapidly. It corrects immedi-
ately the lack of available calcium
essential for grass root development.


MANUFACTURERS AND DISTRIBUTORS SINCE 1909







SECOND QUARTER, 1955 0 27


It prevents stubby, insufficient roots.
Two or more applications of VIKING
BRAND CALCIUM NITRATE of two
hundred pounds per acre are recom-
mended. The first application should
be applied early in the spring and
similar applications immediately aft-
er each cutting or grazing.
VIKING BRAND CALCIUM NITRATE
contains both water-soluble nitrogen
(15.3 % ) and water-soluble calcium
(20%) . is an ideal top-dresser
for pastures.
For more complete information, con-
tact your X-CEL DEALER.


P....

-CALCIUM NITRATE
NOn 0 l -
,' I3%TOTAL NmToiEl
f! ,..,,cii kll moim



NDRSK HYDiRO
-. 0os4- -
kw HAlHffalfY.









JERSEY CATTLE CLUB NEWS


Jersey Club Sale & Annual Meeting
Scheduled For Marianna On Aug. 18
Outstanding cooperation and devoted work on the part of West Florida dairy-
men has brought about a decision on the part of the directors of the Florida Jersey
Cattle Club to hold their annual sale in Marianna. Jackson County dairymen say that
they are looking forward to an unusually large attendance at the sale which will be
held August 18 at the Fairgrounds.
On the afternoon and evening preceding the sale, members of the Florida Jersey
Cattle Club will hold their Annual Meeting and enjoy a Barbecue Supper. The head-
quarters for the meeting will be the Chipola Hotel.
A. T. Alvarez, Jacksonville, president
of the club, is chairman of the Sale Com-
mittee. He will be assisted by B. w. Two New Florida Members
Judge of Orlando, Walter Welkener of In American Jersey Group
Jacksonville, C. C. Sellers of Tallahassee,
M. T. Crutchfield of Altha and County The American Jersey Cattle Club has
Agent W. W. Glenn of Marianna. announced B. W. Judge of Orlando and
For a catalogue of the fifty-seven fine Miss Betsy Pennington of DeLand, Flor-
Jerseys to be offered write to F. E. Baetz- ida Jersey breeders, as new members of
man, secretary of the Florida Jersey Cattle the organization.
Club, 122 Wall St., Orlando, Florida.




X-M&P v *pE" a


JERSEY REGISTRY TESTS
ANNOUNCED FOR FLORIDA
The American Jersey Cattle Club has
recently announced records for official
registry tests of Florida Jersey herds as
follows:
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXP.
STATION HERD, Gainesville-Florida
Onyx Daisy, a registered Jersey, has
earned the Silver Medal Award of The
American Jersey Cattle Club. She recently
completed a production record of 9,441
lbs. milk and 470 Ibs. butterfat in 305
days at the age of 2 years and 5 months.
HOLLY HILL DAIRY, Jacksonville-
Five registered Jersey cows completed rec-
ords on Herd Improvement Registry test
which entitles them to special recognition
from The American Jersey Cattle Club.
The high producing animal in the group
from the standpoint of age was Sybil
Pompey Mary with an actual record
14,494 lbs. milk containing 697 lbs. but-
terfat at the age of 6 years and 9 months.
The actual records of the other cows all
exceeded 9,500 lbs. milk.
J. K. STUART DAIRY, Bartow-A
registered Jersey cow, Boaster's Weeping
WIillow, completed a 305-day Herd Im-
provement Registry production record of
8,210 lbs. milk containing 534 Ibs. but-
terfat at the age of 2 years and 11
months.
MEADOWBROOK FARMS, Jackson-
ville-Four registered Jersey cows recent-
ly completed records on Herd Improve-
ment Registry test which entitles them to
special recognition from The American
Jersey Cattle Club. The high producing
animal in the group from the standpoint
of age was Alpine Carry on Sultana with
an actual record of 8,504 Ibs. milk con-
aaining 517 lbs. butterfat. The actual
records of the other cows equalled or ex-
ceeded 8,500 lbs. milk.
A. T. ALVAREZ DAIRY, Jackson-
ville-A registered Jersey cow, Sampson's
Diana, has been rated a Tested Dam for
having three offspring with official pro-
duction records. The cow's progeny aver-
aged 8,589 lbs. milk with 473 Ibs. butter-
fat on a twice-daily milking, 305-day ma-
ture equivalent basis. The three tested
progeny required to qualify a cow as a
Tested Dam may be either three tested
daughters or three tested sons, or any
combination thereof totaling three.


CENTER OF INDUSTRY CHANGING
Dr. Roy A. Bair, pasture consultant
of Miami, predicts that Okeechobee
County will become the center of the
dairy industry within the next 10 years.
Big dairies of the Miami area are being
crowded out of the expanding metropoli-
tan developments.


28 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


Florida Citrus Pulp is a bulky carbohydrate concen-
trate and should be fed as such. Citrus Pulp can be
fed wet, but dry feeding is recommended for ease,
economy and a more sanitary method. Normal daily
ration is one pound per 100 pounds of body weight.
As a new feed, the ration should start at one pound
and increase a pound a day until the full ration is met.

If you are interested in the full story on how and why
to feed Florida Citrus Pulp, mail the coupon and you
will receive an eight page booklet on "How to Feed
Florida Citrus Pulp"
ADDRESS


DEALER
P. O. BOX 403, DEPT. D, TAMPA, FLORIDA ADDRESS





























Seen above is Florida's 4-H dairy judging team with the championship trophy which
it won representing the United States in the Caribbean 4-H Dairy Cattle Judging Contest
in Jamaica, B. W. I.
Left to right: Erny Sellers, Tallahassee, high man in the contest, C. W. Reaves, Uni-
versity of Florida Extension Dairyman and team coach, and Howard Renner of Largo.

Florida's State 4-H Dairy Judging Team
Wins U. S. Honors In Caribbean Contest
Two of Florida's four-member 4-H Dairy Judging Team for 1954 won the 1955
Caribbean Dairy Cattle Judging Contest held in Jamaica, B. W. I., February 22nd.
The contest was held during the "All Island Achievement Day" at the celebration
of the 4-H Training Center at Maypen, Jamaica, and was attended by Princess Mar-


garet.
The team accompanied by their coach,
C. W. Reaves, Florida State Extension
Dairyman, represented the United States
in the Contest at the request of the U. S.
Department of Agriculture.
The two team members, Erny Sellers of
Tallahassee and Howard Renner of Largo,
were members of Florida's 1954 4-H
team along with Miss Beverly Simmons
of St. Augustine and Perry Smith of
Hastings, which won the 1954 Interna-
tional Dairy Show 4-H Dairy Judging
Contest in Chicago.
Prior to the Caribbean contest the Flor-
ida group visited the "Hope", "Boodles",
and "Grove Place" experiment stations in
Jamaica and some privately owned farms
to see their cattle and learn about their
agriculture. They learned the standards
of the Jamaican Hope breed of cattle
which is being developed in Jamaica and
which was included in the contest. It is
based largely on American Jersey breed-
ing with a small amount of blood of the
Montgomery strain of cattle from India.
Reaves served as one of the judging com-
mittee for making official placings and
grading reasons.
Enroute home, the group stopped at
Havana, Cuba, and attended the Cuban
National Livestock Show where they saw
excellent beef and dairy cattle and horses.
They were guests of honor at this event
and were shown many courtesies by the


show officials and breeders.
Sponsors of the team's trip to Jamaica
were the State Department of Agriculture,
the Pinellas County Dairymen's Associa-
tion, and the Foremost, Velda, and Bor-
den companies of Tallahassee.


New 4-H Dairy Project
In North Florida District
A new six-county 4-H district dairy
project was adopted on April 13 by the
county agents in Suwanee, Lafayette,
Dixie, Columbia, Hamilton, and Union
counties in a meeting at Lake City, ac-
cording to an announcement by C. W.
Reaves, State Extension Dairyman, and
W. W. Brown, State 4-H Club Agent.
The Sears Roebuck Foundation will spon-
sor the project on a plan agreed on by
W. C. Greenway, Assistant Southern Di-
rector of Public Relations of the Founda-
tion who attended the meeting. The pro-
gram will be patterned after that of the
Central Florida and North Florida district
4-H dairy projects which have worked so
successfully. These were started several
years ago with Sears' sponsorship. The
Orlando Sentinel newspaper assumed the
sponsorship of the Central Florida project
in 1955.
The distinctive feature of the project
is that it places the greatest emphasis up-
on the effort of the individual club mem-
ber. Participating club members must
secure and care for a dairy animal. In
the fall, each county will hold a county
show and contest at which the members
are graded on five items including their
record book, improvement, fitting, and
conditioning and showing of their ani-
mal and the animal itself. Thus 60 per-
cent of the total score is based on the
members' efforts and only 40 per cent on
the animal itself.
The five members with the highest
scores at each of the six county events
will represent their respective counties in
the district event, which will be held in
connection with the Suwanee Valley Fair
and Livestock Show on October 21 and
22.


ANNOUNCING...


THE 16th ANNUAL FLORIDA

JERSEY CATTLE CLUB STATE SALE

August 18, 12:30 P.M. Fairgrounds, Marianna

55 Females and 2 Bulls from the finest herds in Florida.

* Including heavy springing cows and heifers and yearling heifers,
all heavy producing animals of excellent blood lines.

AUCTIONEER: Tom McCord Pedigree Reader: Laurence Gardiner

Write for Catalogue: F. E. Baetzman, Secy., 122 Wall St., Orlando, Fla.


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 29






ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.

Dairy Council Material In This Issue Sponsored by
MRS. MAXINE CARTER, EXEC. DIRECTOR
Jacksonville Dairy Council


Success Of Special School Milk Program
"The Special Milk Program has been far more successful than we anticipated,"
reports Mrs. Alice Certain, Director of Duval County School Cafeterias," and many
more children in Duval County are drinking milk now that ever before because
this program has made possible a reduction in the selling price from eight to five cents
for whole, Grade A homogenized milk".
Teamwork accounts for the success of this year's operation of the new milk
program in Duval County schools. Hundreds of the school personnel have shared the
responsibility for promoting good health habits by increased milk drinking on the
part of the students.
The enthusiasm of cafeteria depart-
ments, the support of principals, and spe-
cial health projects in classrooms have
stimulated interest.
A Home Economics teacher in one of
the large junior high schools is conduct-
ing a rat-feeding demonstration to show
"Milk Made the Difference". Science
teachers in two high schools are finding
this demonstration effective in changing
the food habits of their students.


The Morning Milk Break
Mid-morning milk sales are handled by
a unique method in several elementary
schools. The teacher's name is printed in
big letters on bushel baskets. Each basket
has a plastic soap box in a different color
-this enables first graders to find their
milk-basket easily. The mid-morning
milk order is taken in the classroom each
morning. Two children collect the money,
print the order, and place money and
order in the soap box, place this in their
basket and take it to the school cafeteria.
At the time scheduled, they carry the
baskets of milk to the classroom or play-
ground. Good teaching!-whether it's
food habits, arithmetic, writing, responsi-
bility, or etiquette. Milk consumption has
increased, too.
Posters from the National Dairy Coun-
cil are displayed in the school cafeterias,
athletic departments, Home Economics
and science departments of the schools.
Principals in Duval County have re-
quested 29,000 leaflets to interpret the
Special School Milk program to parents
and children.
This challenge is a nutritionist's dream
-a concerted community effort to realize
our three-fold aim: More children drink-
ing milk, children drinking more milk,
and children establishing a lifelong habit
of milk drinking.


1 oe mta-mornmng miz oreas at ite raxton
High School, Jacksonville, is typical of the
popularity of this portion of the new School
Milk Program started in the 1954-56 school
year under joint federal, state and local
sponsorship.
Enlarging the Program
This special School milk program
should be greatly expanded for the next
school year. Almost half of the million
dollar Federal allotment of funds for
Florida school milk for the school year
just closed was unused. We are advised
that the funds will be available again
next year with easier qualifying require-
ments and simplified reports which should
encourage more schools to participate and
more children to drink milk.
During the summer, dairymen in areas
not already under this program should
either individually or in a group confer
with your County School Superintendent,
your School Board and your principals.
It is our understanding that a special
Statewide School Milk Committee of the
Florida Dairy Association is preparing to
communicate with all the dairies about
promoting this program for next fall, so
any who wish information may either in-
quire from your Dairy Council office or
from the Florida Dairy Association.


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Maxine Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Betty Hornbuckle, Asst. Director
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director


JUNE DAIRY MONTH
OBSERVED IN FLORIDA
Indications are that 1955 June Dairy
Month activities will exceed by far those
of any previous year. President Eisen-
hower, cooperating fully in the program,
is scheduled to make a Dairy Month
speech June 22nd on the program of a
huge dairy festival in Rutland,, Vermont.
U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Ezra T.
Benson has cooperated fully and the U. S.
Post Office Department will use "Dairy
Month" posters on thousands of post of-
fice mail trucks during the last half of
June.
In Florida local "Dairy Month" pro-
gram committees are conducting activities
in most every area of the State under the
leadership of State Dairy Month Chair-
man of the Florida Dairy Association,
Brady Johnston of Jacksonville.








IT COST ME ?


HOW MUCH MAY
I HAVE ?





WHEN CAN WE
HAVE THE MILK ?


30 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
























Miss Marian Cudsworth, Executive Di-
rector, Miami Dairy Council, left, and Miss
Barbara Stickley, Director of the Springfield,
Ohio Dairy Council, join Mr. Carl Dysenroth
of the Milk Industry Foundation in a toast
to National Dairy Council's 40th Annivers-
ary, during the Council's Anniversary Cele-
bration in Chicago.

11 FLORIDIANS GRADUATE
IN MILK SALES TRAINING
With eleven new graduates in 1954,
the Florida Dairy Industry now boasts 24
graduates of the Milk Sales Training In-
stitute of the Milk Industry Foundation,
Washington, D. C.
Florida ranks 10th among the 48
states in number of graduates in this train-
ing. The Borden Company ranks first in
the total number of graduates with 81
and Foremost Dairies 5th, with 17.
The 1954 Florida graduates were: Har-
old G. Anderson, The Borden Company,
Lakeland; Fred M. Castle, Land O'Sun
Dairies, Inc., Miami Beach; John F.
Cavan, Southern Dairies, Inc., St. Peters-
burg; Thomas J. Eubanks, The Borden
Co., Tampa; Raymond L. Garcia, South-
ern Dairies, Inc., Jacksonville; George
Harlan, The Borden Co., Tampa; Clair
W. Hill, The Borden Co., Tallahassee;
Randy Sexton, Vero Beach Dairy, Vero
Beach; Jay C. Struble, The Borden Co.,
Pensacola; Lloyd R. Terwilliger, Southern
Dairies, Inc., West Palm Beach; Raymond
R. Tracy, Alfar Creamery Co., West
Palm Beach, Florida.

NEW 4-H AWARD DONOR
The Larro Sure Feed Division of Gen-
eral Mills has recently joined a select
group of 45 public spirited organizations
and individuals as donors of the county,
state and national awards for the 4-H
Dairy Award program.
State winners in the dairy program
will receive a trip to the National 4-H
Club Congress in Chicago next fall and
six national winners will receive $300
scholarships. Medals will be awarded
county winners.


and IT IS GOOD!

Unmatched in its field!

Get your hands into a bag of Spartan Quality Dairy, and
you'll agree "MAN, WHAT FEED!" You'll see those big,
Crimped Oats...those Crunchy Pellets (contain fine
materials)... that tasty Beet Pulp and Wheat Bran ...
all "cow-flavored" with fine-spray Molasses. Cows love
iti And dairymen quickly get sold on its milk-making
and money-making power. This feed is built to produce!

If you're really serious about this dairy business...
most milk for least cost, long cow life, and sturdy
calves . .then YOU SHOULD BE AN "SQ" USER!

NOW IN SPARTAN'S -



BACK-SAVER BAGS

* "SQ" CALF STARTER PELLETS DAIRY
* "SQ" CALF FEED (Grower) l '
* "SQ" 16% DAIRY i
* "SQ" 20% DAIRY
* "SQ" LIVESTOCK MINERALS


SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
Phlone Jlck.mori.lle --2277


SECOND QUARTER, 1955 31


















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division

Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-4301






SINC. Variich
Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Come Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902



DAIRY & FOOD EQUIPMENT, INC.
General Office: 1034 N.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Fla. Telephone 9-3679
Branches
Tampa Jacksonville Orlando



DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
J. H. STRACK PHONE: 3-4223
3064 Liberty St. (At Van), Daytona Beach, Fla.
J. H. Strack Phone: 3-4223


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.


JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Puro Mfg. Corp.
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. O. Box 787 Deland, iFa.


VETERINARY MEDICINES

SSold direct to the dairyman
D. W. Parfitt Ben Zirin, Ph.G.


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone: ELgin 3-5721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land O' Lakes Non-fat Milk Solids
Blreley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons

Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
a COCOA DIVISION

Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
JOE L. HAMMONS
Rte. 1, Box 304 TELEPHONE
Odessa, Florida Tampa 90-2396


KELCO COMPANY
Dariloid Dricoid and Sherbelizer

W. E. TARVIN, Phone Evergreen 9722

2370 Capri Drive Decatur, Georgia



KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone ELgin 6-1334

4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.



S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative

221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.



KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


Howell House Suite 202


Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices. Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head
Phone Norfolk, Va., LOwell 3-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksonville, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami, Fla., Phone: MUrray 8-8431


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C. W. Parmalee W. H. Adams
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone ELgin 3-6134-5




PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream

FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.


PENN SALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2595 Betawany Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
Tampa
2209 E. Broadway, Phone 4-3362
Jacksonville
2320 Edwards Ave., EV 7-7011
Orlando
1215 W. Central Ave., 5-5179
MAIN OFFICE:
Miami-1034 N.W. 22nd St., Ph. 82-1671
Distributor
DUDLEY CAWTHON, INC.
Representative
E. G. "Don" Graham


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N.C.



UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative

5240 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami, Fla.


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory






All Breeds Have Good Points -

All Breeds Have Good Cows -

But Only Guernseys Produce -


GOLDEN GUERNSEY
America's Table Milk

The Big Difference to you is the Superiority of Guernsey Milk Which Al-
ways Sells for a Premium Price. The Public is not fooled and it is not a
Racket. Look at the Facts:
A resume of published data on the composition of milk
reveals that Guernsey milk, compared with regular mar-
ket milk, contains on the average:
12% to 16% More Protein
20% to 25% More Vitamin A
15% to 20% More Butterfat
6% to 8% More Solids not Fat
4% to 8% More Minerals
12% to 20% More Nutritive Energy
+ THE TASTE (Homogenized or Plain) that Usually Wins.
Write today for information on top Guernsey families.
Here is a living member of one of those families:











DINSMORE MAJESTIC GILDA

14206 lb. Milk, 708 lb. fat as a Jr. 3 yr. old
17237 lb. Milk, 830 lb. fat as a Jr. 4 yr. old
18343 lb. Milk, 787 lb. fat as a 5 yr. old
16877 lb. Milk, 716 lb. fat as a 7 yr. old
15923 lb. Milk, 591 lb. fat as an 8 yr. old
One Daughter sold to Quail Roost Farm for $4,000



Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S
10 miles north of Jacksonville
Dinsmore Farms Near U. S. 1 Dinsmore, Florida
V. C. JOHNSON EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON BRADY S. JOHNSTON







. ,e *


SIt's time for me to pay my bill...


Is e


It's taken two lactations for me to pay the
boss back for all the fine care I've had.
Now I'm out to return a profit. I came
from high producing ancestors and I've
been on Security's Program all the way.
Security Dairy Feeds help me produce
the maximum milk fed along with available
roughage. As a calf I got all the benefits
of Security Calf Starter and Security
Calf Grower. When I'm dry I'm fed Security
Conditioner. How can I lose! Pardon me,
I'm next on the milking machine.

Security Mills, Inc.
TAMPA KNOXVILLE JACKSONVILLE

Security Feed & Seed Co.
MIAMI PALATKA ORLANDO OCALA, FLA. THOMASVILLE, GA.


"for,
the
BEST
years
of
her
life"




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