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Title: Florida dairy news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00082035/00027
 Material Information
Title: Florida dairy news
Physical Description: 12 v. : illus. ; 30 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida Dairy Industry Association
Publisher: Cody Publications for Florida Dairy Industry Association.
Place of Publication: Kissimmee Fla
Publication Date: January-February 1955
Frequency: bimonthly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Dairying -- Periodicals   ( lcsh )
Cattle   ( lcsh )
Milk   ( lcsh )
Genre: periodical   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: v. 1-12, no. 1; Nov. 1950-Spring, 1962.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00082035
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 01386090
issn - 0426-5696

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover 1
        Front Cover 2
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Main
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Back Cover
        Page 37
        Page 38
Full Text

































DAIRY-GRAM



A MESSAGE TO FLORIDA MILK CONSUMERS

FLORIDA'S OVER 1200 DAIRY FARMS. WHICH PRODUCE FLORIDA'S 100 GRADE "A" MILK SUPPLY, AND
OUR MILK PLANTS, WHICH PROCESS, BOTTLE AND DISTRIBUTE YOUR MILK, ARE PROUD THAT OUR FLUID MILK
SUPPLY, NOW PRODUCED ENTIRELY WITHIN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, RANKS WITH THE NATION'S BEST IN
QUALITY AND COMPARES FAVORABLY WITH THE PRICE OF MILK OF EQUAL QUALITY IN OTHER AREAS.

A RECENT MONTHLY ISSUE OF "FLORIDA HEALTH NOTES", THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE FLORIDA
STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, WAS DEVOTED ENTIRELY TO A REVIEW OF FLORIDA'S GRADE "A" MILK SUPPLY.
FLORIDA DAIRYMEN ARE PROUD OF THE FOLLOWING ASSURANCE MADE TO MILK CONSUMERS BY THIS PUBLICA-
TION OF OUR STATE BOARD OF HEALTH, WHICH STATED:

"THERE ARE TWO THINGS A FLORIDA HOUSEWIFE CAN BE SURE OF WHEN SHE TAKES HER GRADE A MILK
OFF THE PORCH OR BUYS IT IN THE STORE. SHE IS GETTING A PRODUCT THAT IS:

"WHOLESOME: THE FLORIDA MILK LAW HAS REQUIREMENTS THAT ARE MORE RIGID THAN THOSE REC-
OMMENDED IN THE MODEL MILK CODE, SET UP BY THE UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.
t-
"SAFE AND CLEAN: THE MILK ITSELF HAS UNDERGONE THOROUGH LABORATORY TESTS. ALL EQUIP-
MENT AND UTENSILS USED IN PRODUCING AND DISTRIBUTING IT HAVE BEEN SUBJECTED TO STRICT SANI-
TARY INSPECTION. THE COW, TOO, GETS A GOING OVER, TO SEE THAT SHE IS HEALTHY AND FREE FROM
DISEASE."
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION


















tie,


SURGE VISIBILITY lets you

watch TUG & PULL work!


Visibility right at the end of
the teats...that's what you
get with Surge Siphon Break-
er cups and Surge Surcingle
Breaker cups. You can see
exactly what you're doing,
and that's good!
Releasers, Milk Pumps,
Milk Valves...Surge has
them all... anything you
need for every kind of pipe-
line milking.
Newest Surge labor-saver
is "Electrobrain," the push-
button, high-velocity, pipe-
line washer. Just push one
button and the rinsing, drain-
ing, washing and sanitizing
go right ahead automatically


with no further help from
you. "Electrobrain" won't
forget...won't skimp the
cleanup job.
On top of everything else
and more important than
anything else, any milking
machine bearing the Surge
name plate milks with gen-
uine Surge TUG & PULL...
protects your cows from
creeping teat cups. 0
That's the big reason why
hundreds of thousands of
men will use Surge TUG &
PULL to milk millions of
cows tonight.
Visibility plus TUG & PULL
spells satisfaction in milking.
Copyright 1955 Bobson Bros. Co.


BABSON BROS. CO.
2843 West Nineteenth Street, Chicago 23, III.
ATLANTA HOUSTON KANSAS CITY MINNEAPOLIS
SACRAMENTO SEATTLE SYRACUSE TORONTO


I J








CHOPS ANY FLORIDA CROP...


Here's a new, fast and thrifty way to handle any
Florida forage crop-all kinds of grasses and leg-
umes for hay or green feed-to produce cheaper
feed for making meat or milk.
Green feeding especially is gaining in favor
with dairymen. You simply cut and deliver the
green stuff right to the cattle and let them eat
from wagon or feed rack. This gives you better
control of your pastures and saves waste from






America's I

Lightest-

Running

Forage

Chopper






ALmiL MNEW...


ALL NEW


CASE 4)00


trampling and droppings.
And in cutting the forage you'll appreciate the
added capacity and low power consumption you
get in a Case chopper with its light-draft features
-efficient, low-speed knife-wheel . oil-bath
gears ... few moving parts . and anti-friction
bearings. Case also offers the widest choice of
quick-on-and-off attachments to fit your precise
needs.


Soon you'll have a chance to see and drive the first all
new post-war tractor in its class. This is not just a tractor
with improvements and refinements . the Case "400"
is new from the ground up ... a new creation not to be
compared with any other tractor. As the wraps fall from
the "400," forget old standards of capacity, convenience,
comfort and appearance. You'll witness a revelation when
you first see the "400."


SEE YOUR CASE DEAL. ... ASK FOR ADE


BELLE GLADE
Coastal Motors & Equipment
COCOA
Hibbs Tractor Co.
DADE CITY
Moss Tractor Co.
FORT MYERS
Ray Moore Implement Co.
FORT PIERCE
Taylor & Munnell Inc.
HIGH SPRINGS
Thomas Equipment Co.
HOMESTEAD
Dade Tractor Co.


LAKELAND
Pounds Tractor Co.
LIVE OAK
Granlham Chevrolet
MARIANNA
Andreasen Tractor & Equip.
MILTON
Gerlach Motor Co.
ORLANDO
Medlock Tractor Co.
PALATKA
Beasley Tractor Co.
POMPANO BEACH
Farm Machinery Sales


SEBRING
Pounds-Zeiss Motor Co.
TAMPA
Thompson Tractor & Equip.
WAUCHULA
Cosey Motor Co.
WEST PALM BEACH
Buckner Tractor & Equip.
WINTER GARDEN
Pounds Molor Co.
WINTER HAVEN
Pounds Tractor Co.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 0 1


































START 'EM FAST AND KEEP DOWN SCOURS


We have completely quit feeding milk
at the Purina Farm because we get
bigger calves on Nursing Chow milk
replacer. Since changing over two
years ago, we have raised 91 calves
with almost no scours and have lost
only 4 calves for any reason. It takes


only one 25-pound bag of Nursing
Chow per calf... and you can get a
Purina Feeding Pail with screw-on
bracket for only 850 with each bag.
Cuts out spilling. Snaps out for easy
cleaning. One of these pails is shown
in the picture.
-W -


Feed Through "Windows"
into Stomachs of Animals
You've been reading a lot lately about
the mysterious bacteria in the cow's
rumen... tiny "bugs" that help her
digest her feed.
Always alert to the new things that
might make you more money, Purina
Scientists cut permanent "windows"
in the sides of two steers and one
heifer... so they could study the"bugs"
at work in the rumen.
Plugs are removed and feed samples
tested at various stages of digestion.
Purpose of the studies has been to
learn more about ways to improve
Purina Chows by making them step
up bacteria growth in the rumen. And
Purina Dairy Chows are properly
balanced to do this job.
Fast growth of the rumen bacteria
means that they will do a thorough
job of breaking down feed the cow
eats-helping her get more milk-mak-
ing value from it.
This is but a small part of the dairy
research work going on at the Purina
Farm and Laboratories. And this work
has been so successful in improving
results for dairymen that Purina Dairy
Chows have been the most popular in
America for almost 50 years.


VI


GROW 'EM BIG AND DEEP-BODIED


One of the good points of the Purina
Plan is that you get off liquid feed so
fast. This saves work and reduces the
danger of scours.
You put dry Purina Calf Startena in a
trough when calf is only 3 days old
-continue it through 4th month.
Calves eat Startena so quickly you can
quit liquid Nursing Chow when calf


is only one month old! On dry Calf
Startena you raise a bigger calf with
more depth of body and less calf fat.
You've started a better cow... at just
slightly over half the cost of milk and
grain feeding. Try the Purina Plan on
just two calves, and you'll see the
results. See your Purina Dealer with
the Checkerboard Sign.


This cow at the Purina Farm has a "window"
in her side. She has had two calves and
gives over 10,000 Ibs. milk a year.


2 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


RALSTON PURINA COMPANY
Miami Tampa









EDITORIALS

Governor Collins Names Citizens' Committee
To Investigate the Florida Milk Commission
Governor Collins has appointed a Citizens' Advisory Committee to study the
operation of the Florida Milk Commission which supervises Florida milk prices and
fair trade practices within the Florida dairy industry.
The Florida Dairy Association has offered to Governor Collins and his Commit-
tee the cooperation of the officials and members of the Association in furnishing or
in helping them to obtain any information they desire about the production, proc-
essing, distribution and prices of Florida's milk supply.
The Florida Dairy Association's Board of thirty-two Directors-half producers
and half distributors-have recently voted unanimously their belief that the Florida
Milk Commission has rendered the dairy industry, the milk consumers, and the State
of Florida a valuable and necessary service and is still needed to prevent the return
of unsound and demoralizing conditions within the dairy industry resulting in the
loss of the State's high quality home milk supply.
Both the Governor and his Advisory Committee on the Milk Commission have
been advised that the Florida Dairy Association "has confidence in the ability and
integrity of the dairy members of the Milk Commission and in the Administrator"
who has served continuously through the administrations of four governors since his
original appointment by Governor Holland.
Since 1933 the Florida dairy industry, under the stabilizing influence of the
Milk Commission, has greatly increased both the quality and the quantity of the
State's home milk supply.
Milk production and processing conditions have been improved to the point that
today the entire milk supply of the State is Grade "A" and the State's requirements
for fluid milk are now entirely locally produced.
Contrast this with the lower grade milk produced in Florida 20 years ago and the
then approximately 500/. shortage of home produced milk which had to be shipped
into Florida from northern milk supply areas.
Dorothy Thompson, one of the nation's highly respected news-columnists, re-
cently made the following observations regarding criticisms of milk prices in New
York State. Mrs. Thompson said:
"And what is wrong with the price of milk? It is still the cheapest food value
on the market and yet people who buy loin chops and T-bone steaks kick about the
price of milk and pay 15 cents a pound for poor bread without protest.
"Consumers are also producers. Their only protection is constant industrial (pro-
duction) and marketing progress. As a 'producer' the working man wants even
higher wages and these are a leading element in cost. As a 'consumer' he wants low
prices. We can't have it both ways."
Milk prices are based on the costs of the better than average efficient farmer
and dairy plant. Milk production costs involve capital, land, buildings, equipment,
supplies, dairy cattle, labor and high-priced dairy feeds. Milk plants must have the
finest of machinery and sanitary equipment to meet high standards of quality and
sanitation.
Because milk is an extremely perishable product, its production and handling is
regulated, controlled, supervised and inspected by experts of the government all the
way along the line from the health of the cow to the refrigeration and delivery of
the bottle of milk. We are at a loss to know at what point along the line the would-
be price experts propose to cut the dairy farmer and milk plant costs.
It is hardly likely that anyone familiar with dairy farm costs and operations
would propose any worsening of the present circumstances of Florida Dairy Farmers
by reducing the prices they receive for their milk.
If they expect to eliminate dairy plant profits to reduce milk prices, they would
find upon investigation that a 1953 national survey made by the University of In-
diana of 385 milk plants in 280 cities and 44 states disclosed that these plants made
a net profit of only 2/5 of one cent per quart on milk. 19 Florida milk plants were
included in their survey.
While the value and importance of the dairy industry's greatly increased payroll
and investment to the economic welfare of the State generally is recognized, the milk
consumer has been the greatest beneficiary of the industry's sound development under
supervision of the Milk Commission because it has made possible the production
within the State of an adequate supply of the highest quality fresh Grade "A" milk
at a price which compares most favorably with other foods and with the price of
the same quality milk in other states.
U. S. Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Benson is quoted as saying in a recent address
that "Milk is a bargain because research studies show it would cost 42 cents for the
same nutrients . from other food sources, that a quart of milk provides."


JANUARY &


VOL. 5 NO. 1
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 1955
BI-MONTHLY

THE
FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
E. T. LAY, Editor & Business Manager


Official Publication of
Florida Dairy Association
C. D. WAYNE, President
Miami

Florida Guernsey Cattle Club
W. A. BOUTWELL, SR., President
Lake Worth

Florida Jersey Cattle Club
A. T. ALVAREZ, SR., President
Jacksonville

Florida Holstein Cattle Club
W. HERMAN BOYD, SR., President
Miami

Fla. Assn. of Milk Sanitarians
C. 0. STOY, President
Miami

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
E. T. LAY, Executive Director
C. D. WAYNE, President
Southern Dairies, Inc., Miami
GEO. F. JOHNSON, 1st V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Producers' Division, West Palm Beach
T. G. LEE, 2nd V. Pres. & Chrmn.
Distributors' Division, Orlando

Other Pioducers
BILL GRAHAM, Miami
JOHN SERGEANT, Lakeland
L. B. HULL, Gainesville

Other Dil.tributors
W. J. BARRITT, JR., Tampa
GORDON NIELSEN, 1 nest Palm Beach
J. N. MCARTHUR, Miami

THE FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS is
published bi-monthly by the Florida Dairy
Association. 220 Newnan St., Jackson-
ville, Florida. Subscription price of $1.00
a year. Entered as second class mail at
the Post Office at Jacksonville, Fla., under
Act of March 3, 1879, as amended.
Business and Editorial office, 220 New-
nan Street, Jacksonville.
NATIONAL EDITORIAL
| AS OCS ATIdN


Member Florida Press Association

FEBRUARY, 1955 3




























Officers and directors of the Florida Dairy Association for 1955 who were installed at
a meeting of the Board of Directors in Jacksonville, January 14th. Shaking hands are C. D.
Wayne (left), being installed as president by W. H. Boyd, retiring president. Others in the
picture are (left to right) E. T. Lay, Executive Director; George Johnson, 1st Vice-Presi-
dent; IV. J. Barritt, Jr., Treasurer, and T. G. Lee, 2nd Vice-President.

1955 ASSOCIATION PROGRAM IS ADOPTED
AT JANUARY F.D.A. DIRECTORS' MEETING
Wayne Installed As President
Directors of the Florida Dairy Association, 32 strong, set a fast pace for 1955
action with an all day meeting in Jacksonville, January 14th.
The meeting started with the induction of incoming president, C. D. Wayne,
and the new Board of Directors by outgoing president Herman Boyd.
Reports of the past year's activities of the Association were made by the retiring
president, the treasurer, the auditing committee and the executive secretary. President
Boyd said he felt that the Association had an excellent year and expressed his apprecia-
tion to the directors, officers and staff of the Association who had served with him
and whose cooperative efforts had made possible the accomplishments of the year.


The treasurer reported that the Asso-
ciation's income for the year showed a
substantial increase which had improved
the financial position very satisfactory
during the year. The auditor's annual re-
port was carefully scrutinized and ap-
proved.
Executive Director E. T. Lay submit-
ted a comprehensive summary of the As-
sociation's activities during 1954 and
emphasized this with an exhibit reaching
across the entire end of the hotel banquet
hall, showing the extent of the various
parts of the year's program.
A resolution was adopted commend-
ing the Executive Director and his staff
for the outstanding showing that was
made during 1954.
Adopt 1955 Program
Turning to 1955, the Board of Direc-
tors adopted certain basic policies and an
ambitious program for improvement of
the position of the Association and the
Florida dairy industry during the year
1955.
The plans adopted for the year in-
cluded (a) the adoption of an activities
and objectives program, (b) the naming
of the members and chairmen of stand-
ing committees for the year, and (c)
adoptions of recommendations to the
Florida Milk Commission regarding the
policies and procedures of that body.


Directors' Recommendations
To Milk Commission

That cooperative procedures be de-
veloped with other state agencies for
compiling and maintaining more accurate
and up-to-date records on the Florida
dairy industry.
That close cooperation and efforts be
maintained by the Commission with the
State Dairy Supervisor in checking and
regulating the shipment of milk into
Florida from outside sources.
That a standard practice be established
in connection with bidding on milk sales
to military and other uncontrolled pur-
chasers in which the distributor, before
submitting his bid, will secure an agree-
ment with his producers as to the mini-
mum price which they are willing to
furnish milk for such contract.
That the Milk Commission use such
authority as it may have to enforce laws
and regulations pertaining to standardiz-
ing, reconstituting or otherwise using sub-
stitutes for fresh fluid milk.
That the Milk Commission consider
improvement of present procedures in the
earning and determining of bases so as
to secure the leveling of milk production


SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION
FOR 1955
REGULAR QUARTERLY DIRECTORS'
MEETINGS
(Dates to be announced)

AREA MEMBERSHIP MEETINGS
SProducer Meetings
Distributor Meetings
(To be announced)

BRANCH OFFICE IN TALLAHASSEE
During the Legislature, April & May

ANNUAL MEETING & CONVENTION
June 22-24-Ft. Harrison Hotel
Clearwater, Fla.

DAIRY HERDSMEN'S
SHORT COURSE
University of Florida
September 6-8

DAIRY PLANT SHORT COURSE
University of Florida
October 13-15

ANNUAL DAIRY FIELD DAY
University of Florida
November 2-3


as nearly as is practicable to the ability
of distributors to use in Class I channels.
That a system, procedures and necessary
personnel be provided by the Florida
Milk Commission for keeping current and
up-to-date information on Florida milk
surplus and milk needs of distributors,
for securing the use by distributors of
all Florida milk at the best possible usage
level before milk is purchased outside the
State for use in the State.
That the Commission adopt a more ag-
gressive and effective enforcement pro-
gram and take more prompt and definite
action for the detection of violations and
hold to strict accountability all those
found guilty of violations.











STEWART HAMMOND

1955 officers of the F.D.A. Allied
Trades Members Division, known as the
"Alligator Club," are President, Jim
Stewart of Miami, representative of River-
side Mfg. Co.; Vice President, Joe Ham-
mons of Tampa, representative of Robert
A. Johnston Co., and Secretary, John
Manning, Dairy & Food Equipment, Inc.,
Orlando.


4 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS
























Directors of the Florida Dairy Association present at the first quarterly meeting for 1955 held January 14th in Jacksonville. SEATED,
left to right, are: Gordon Nielsen, A. T. Alvarez, John Sargeant, George Boutwell, I. Fred Zirkelbach; George F. Johnson, C. D. Wayne,
W. J. Barritt, Jr., B. W. Judge, L. B. (Red) Hull, Al Wells, Ira Barrow. STANDING, left to right, are: J. N. McArthur, Earl Lovelace,
George Schaufele (of McArthur Dairy, not a director); Walter Burton, Bill Graham, R. L. Lunsford (producer alternate), Herman Boyd,
E. T. Lay, John Adkinson, Dr. E. L. Fouts (Univ. of Fla.), John Tripson, Cody Skinner, J. D. Fuqua, D. E. Perret, John Hentz.
Directors not present: Julian Lane, J. T. Stewart, J. H. Adams, Herman Burnett, John McMullen, John Hood and Claude Kelly.


F.D.A. POLICIES, OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES FOR 1955


Policies and objectives adopted were:
Encourage within the members of the
Florida dairy industry a greater realiza-
tion of an adequate supply of the highest
possible quality products at the lowest
reasonable prices consistent with sound
business practices.
Endorse and support the continued
and more effective operation and program
of the Florida Milk Commission.
Promotion of increased effort to con-
trol and prevent disease among Florida
dairy herds and secure all possible aid
to dairymen toward this end, including
the establishing of a state animal disease
diagnostic laboratory.
Promotion of increased effort on the
part of all dairymen to produce more
feed and better pastures and strive for
more efficiency and economy in feeding
practices and more adequate control of
milk production to the end that demoral-
izing surpluses may be avoided.
Endeavor to arouse the entire dairy
industry of Florida to greater interest and
action in both individual and industry-
wide advertising "Public Information"
and educational activities regarding
"milk."


Conduct an aggressive membership ex-
tension program throughout the year to
secure the interest and active participa-
tion in both local and statewide dairy
association programs by all dairymen and
dairy plants.
Encourage active individual interest
and participation of all those interested
in the future welfare of the dairy indus-
try in the affairs of government.
Activities planned for the year were:
Publication bi-monthly of the "Florida
Dairy News" as the official publication
of the Association; assembling and dis-
tributing special "Florida Dairy and Milk
Facts" information for use by all dairies
in Florida and for possible distribution
to consumers.
Sponsor an active June Dairy Month
Program; sponsor a statewide "Dairy Pas-
ture Development and Improvement"
contest; hold regular Association Annual
Meeting and Convention.
Sponsorship in cooperation with the
University of Florida Dairy Department
of Annual Dairy Field Day, 2-day pro-
gram; Annual Dairy Herdsmen's Short
Course, and Annual Dairy Plant Opera-
tions Short Course.


F.D.A. COMMITTEES AND
CHAIRMEN FOR 1955
ADVISORY MEMBERS COMMITTEE:
Dr. E. L. Fouts, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Chairman.
ALLIED TRADES "Alligator Club"
COMMITTEE:
Jim Stewart, Riverside Mfg. Co., Coral
Gables, Chairman.
ANNUAL FIELD DAY COMMITTEE:
L. B. (Red) Hull, Hull Dairy Farm,
Gainesville, Chairman.
ANNUAL MEETING PROGRAM
COMMITTEE:
Cliff Wayne, Southern Dairies, Inc.,
Miami, and George Johnson, Johnson's
Dairy, West Palm Beach, Co-Chairmen.
DAIRY HUSBANDRY COMMITTEE:
John G. DuPuis, Jr., White Belt Dairy
Farms, Miami, Chairman.
DAIRY LAWS, STANDARDS &
REGULATIONS COMMITTEE:
George H. Boutwell, Boutwell's Dairy,
Lake Worth, and Theo Datson, Datson
Dairy Farms, Orlando, Co-Chairmen.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE:
Cliff Wayne, Southern Dairies, Inc.,
"FLA. DAIRY NEWS" COMMITTEE:
Board of Directors.


Below, E. T. Lay, Executive Director, is seen reviewing the numerous activities of the Flor-
ida Dairy Association during the year 1954 at the January, 1955 Directors' Meeting.


(Continued on Page 34)


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 0 5

















MEMBERS OF STATE CABINET


GOV. LeROY COLLINS........ ........Chairman
ROBT. A. GRAY......................Sec'y of State
NATHAN MAYO................Comm. of Agri.
J. EDWIN LARSON...................Treasurer
CLARENCE M. GAY....................Comptroller
RICHARD ERVIN............ ........Att'y. General
THOS. D. BAILEY..............Supt. Pub. Instr.


GOVERNOR COLLINS


REP. TED DAVID SEN. W. T. DAVIS
Broward County Dist. 10-Madison
Speaker President
Of The House Of The Senate


Busy Legislature Expected With Possible Extra Session


The successful functioning of the legislature depends largely
upon the leadership and teamwork of the Governor, the Presi-
dent of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House.
The Governor . addresses a joint session of the House and
Senate upon the convening of the Legislature, reporting on the
affairs of the State and submitting a recommended legislative
program . He has veto power over any legislation passed
unless both Houses vote a two-thirds majority to over-ride the
veto.
The President of the Senate . presides over the Senate ...
appoints all Senate Committees. The Speaker of the House
presides over the House of Representatives and appoints all
Committees of the House.
Senator W. T. Davis, veteran member of the Senate from
Madison, will serve as President of the 1955 Senate and Senator
George Tapper of Port St. Joe will serve as President Pro Tern.
Representative Thomas E. (Ted) David of Hollywood will
serve as Speaker of the House. Representative Sam Saunders
of Clay County will be Speaker Pro Tem.
Governor Collins, having but two years to serve, will find it
necessary to press for action on his legislative program in this
one session. Many believe a special session may prove to be
necessary.

MEMBERS OF THE SENATE
District Senator Counties Included Addrees
1 Woodrow W. Mclvin ...Santa Rosa & Okaloosa.. .................... Crestview
2 Philip D. Ball Escamhia ...... ...................... ... Pensacola
3 H. B. Douglas .............. W alton & Holmes ............................................ Bonifay
4 John Rawls........ Jackson .... ............ Marianna
5 C. H. Bourke Floyd ..Liberty, Franklin & Wakulla. .......Apalachicola
6 Dewey M. Johnson ........Gadsden ... .... ........... .. Quincy
7 H arry E. K ing............ ........Polk ............ .............. .................................. W inter H aven
8 W ilson Carraway .... ... Leon .... ..... .... ....... ..... ... Tallahassee
9 James E. (Nick) Connor.Hernando & Citrus ............................. Inverness
10 W T. Davis..... ......M adison & Taylor ....................... M adison
11 J. Frank Houghton. .Pincllas ..... .......... St. Petersburg
12 Merrill P. Barber ......Martin, St. Lucie & Indian River...Vcro Beach
13 R. B. (Bunn) Gautier D ade .... ...... ................................ ......... M iam i
14 J. 0. (Jack) Phillips...... Columbia .......... ............ ..... .. ... Lake City
15 Charley E. Johns .. ......Bradford & Union ...................... ........... Starke
16 Harry O. Stratton .... Nassau ............ .................. Callahan
17 J. Graham Black.......... Suwannee, Hamilton & Lafayette ........ Jasper
18 Fletcher M organ.... Duval .......... ................................ Jacksonville
19 J. B. Rodgcrs, Jr... Orange ............. ........ Winter Garden
20 L. K. Edwards, Jr. Marion .......... ................ Irvine
21 W. Randolph Hodges. ..Levy, Gilchrist & Dixie...................Cedar Key
22 S. D. Clarke ... Jefferson .............. ... ... ....... ... M onticello
23 J. Ed Baker .. Lake ..................... .................. .. .......... Um atilla
24 William R. Neblett Monroe, Lee, Collier & Hendry Key West
25 George G. Tapper.... Washington, Bay, Calhoun & Gulf....Port St. Joe
26 B. C. Pcarce.................. .. Putnam ...... ............................ ... .. Palatka
27 Doyle E. Carlton, Jr..... Hardee, DeSoto, Glades & Highlands Wauchula
28 E. William Gautier ...... Volusia ..................................... New Smyrna Beach
29 Edwin G. Fraser ......... Clay & Baker ........................................ .. M acclenny
30 Ted Cabot ......... ............Broward .. .................................... Ft. Lauderdale
31 Verle A. Pope....................St. Johns & Flagler ...................... St. Augustine
32 W A. Shands .... .. Alachua ........................ Gainesville
33 Irlo Bronson........................... Osceola & Okeechobee ............... ...... .. Kissimmee
34 Paul Kicklighter.................. H illsborough ........................................... ... .. Tam pa
35 Russell 0. Morrow........ Palm Beach ............ Lake Worth
36 Joe Bill Rood..... ............. Manatee, Sarasota & Charlotte.................Bradenton
37 Douglas Stenstrom..............Seminole & Brevard ........ ........................... Sanford
38 J. C. Getzen, Jr.............. Pasco & Sum ter ................................................. Bushnell


MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE
County Representative Address County Representailre Addrenr
Alachua Ralph D. Turlington Lee..............Walter O. Sheppard
Gaincsville Ft. Myers
Alachua..... J. Emory Cross.Gainesvill Leon............. Mallory E. Horne
Baker.........John J. Crews, Jr. Tallahassee
Macclenny Leon ............Kenneth Ballinger
Bay...... Frank M. Allen Tallahassee
Panama City Levy Frank Marshburn. Bronson
Bay .......... J. C. Bodiford Liberty. J. S. Alexander .... .Bristol
Panama City
Bradford .Doyle E. Conner......Starke Madison E. B. Jones...Greenville
Brevard ...A. Max Brewer Titusville Manatee William C. Grimes
Brevard 0. L. Burton .....Eau Gallic Palmetto
Broward Andrew J. Musselman, Jr. Manatee ..J. E. Pratt... Bradenton
Pompano Beach Marion ......C. Farris Bryant .....Ocala
Broward Thomas E. David Marion William V. Chappcll, Jr.
Hollywood Ocala
H o M o B. K Martin Marvin H. Rowell. Stuart
Calhoun Marion B. Knight Monroe Bernie C. Papy.Key West
Blountstown Nassau...... James P. Page, Jr.
Charlotttc John M. Hathaway o Fernandina Beach
Punta Gorda Okaloosa. .. Charles D. Stewart
Citrus Harry H. Glcaton Ft. Walton Beach
yI S D Snd nverness Ok'chobee. Nathan Zelmenovitz
Clay................Sam D. Saundcrs Okeechobec
Middleburg W Land .kApopka
Collier David C. Jones, Jr..Naples Orange Wim Land.Apopka
Columbia W. E. Bishop...Lake City Orange ... illiam C. Coleman, Jr.
Orlando
Dade ..............George S. Okell .. Miami Osceola .......J. Griffin, Jr..St. Cloud
Dade ........John B. Orr, Jr. P'm B'ch. Fred 0. Dickinson, Jr.
Coconut Grove West Palm Beach
Dade ..........W. Cliff Hcrrell P'm B'ch Emmett S. Roberts
Miami Springs Belle Glade
DcSoto........... S. C. Smith ... Arcadia Pasco... J. R. A. Williams
Dixie ..............Hal Chaircs ......... Oldtown Dade City
Duval ........Lacy Mahon, Jr. Pinellas..Fred C. Peterson
Jacksonville St. Petersburg
Duval ..............Harry W. Westberry Pinellas.... Charles R. Johnson, Jr.
Jacksonville St. Petersburg
Dunal ............ William H. Maness Pinellas.. B. E. Shaffer....Clearwater
Jacksonville Polk ...............Roy Surles ....... ...Lakeland
Polk.......... Boone D. Tillett, Jr.
Escambia .. B. Hopkins ....Pensacola Lake Wales
Escambia..Webb C. Jernigan Polk.. Perry E. Murray
Pensacola Frostproof
Flagler .....H. T. Cook ......Bunncll Putnam.. James N. Beck ....... Palatka
Franklin.. Mrs. Bryant Patton
Apalachicola St. Johns .F. Charles Usina
Gadsden.....W. M. Inman.... ...Quincy St. Augustine
Gadsden .C. Fred Arrington Havana St. Johns Nathan I. Weinstein
Gilchrist Hlowell Lancaster Trenton St. Augustine
Glades. J. H. Peeples, Jr. ..Venus St. Lucie..Lawrence L. King
Gulf....... Cecil C. Costin, Jr. Ft. Pierce
Port St. Joe S'ta Rosa..John S. Pittman..............Jay
Hamilton.....Joe W. McAlpin Sarasota. ...George E. Youngberg, Sr.
White Springs Venice
Hardee........... G. W. Williams.Wauchula Sarasota....Henry S. Bartholomew
Hendry .Elbert L. Stewart Sarasota
Clewiston Scminole .Mack N. Cleveland
Hernando....Jacob V. Varn Brooksville Sanford
Highlands Howard Livingston..Sebring Seminole .Volie A. Williams, Jr.
Hillsbr'gh... James S. Moody Sanford
Plant City Sumter... Evan A. Merritt, Jr.
Hillsbr'gh Tom Johns ................. Tampa Sumterville
Hillsbr'gh.. Sam M. Gibbons..... Tampa Suwannee...Houston W. Roberts
Holmes ..........arvie J. Belser....Bonifay Live Oak
Ind'nR'vr Sherman N. Smith, Jr. Taylor...........O. W. Jones ..................Perry
Vero Beach Union .......G. Fred Andrews
Jackson.... Hugh Dukes..... Cottondale Lake Butler
Jackson.....John S. Shipp, Jr. Volusia......... Thomas T. Cobb
Marianna Daytona Beach
Jefferson .Prentice P. Pruitt Volusia.........James H. Sweeny, Jr.
Monticello DeLand
Lafayette.....Homer T. Putnal .....Mayo Wakulla.... Z. Wallenstein Revelle
Lake ............... A. Boyd ... Leesburg Panacea
Lake............... Carl E. Duncan ..Tavares Walton ......Thos. D. Beasley
Lee. ............. W. H. Carmine, Jr. DeFuniak Springs
Ft. Myers Wash'gt'n..Jeff Webb................ .Chipley


6 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS











FREE


to Dairy


Executives!


This factual report
on the "home use" of
paper milk cartons!


.iUoo


(Al


Read... study... and
profit from this
authentic new
survey based on an
actual use test in
328 New Orleans homes


This handy, very readable new "]
report summarizes the results of a survey
made recently in New Orleans, a
market where the Canco container is comparatively
unknown. \Ve chose this market to get unbiased
opinion. This was not a "what-do-you-think?" t\ pe of
survey. It was an actual kitchen comparison
test in which families participating were provided
with a four-day supply of the same brand
of milk. One half was delivered in Canco Snap Cap
cartons. The other half in another type of paper carton.
The results are all yours in this clear, concise report.
Available free in single copy or bulk for distribution
to wholesale, retail and plant personnel.


C01j,00
I.,


Mr. Edward Evans
Fibre Milk Container Dept., American Can Company
100 Park Avenue, New York, New York


We request ( ) copy(s) of your new "Kitchen Comparison" report.


Your Name


Title


Company Name


Address


Zone State


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 0 7


/7


City.


fI -A
<^..^dl


0 R TODAY HANDY
rODAY 1"








1955 FLORIDA DAIR Y CONVENTION

AT FT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEAR WATER
Finest Hotel and Recreation Facilities
Will Feature June 22-24 Meeting
The 1955 Annual Meeting and Convention Program Committee of the Florida
Dairy Association are bubbling over with enthusiasm about the opportunities offered
at Clearwater, Clearwater Beach and the surrounding Gulf Coast are for an outstand-
ing state convention.
In the first place, Florida's marvellous outdoor climate and attraction with which
the Clearwater Gulf area is abundantly blessed are at their best in this late June
period.
The Ft. Harrison Hotel, near the attractive Clearwater business district, is a lovely
12-story, completely air-conditioned hotel with especially attractive coffee shop, din-
ing and lounge facilities. An ultra modern swimming pool and surrounding tropical
garden area with coffee shop facilities are unusually inviting.
The roof garden ball room with star-
light patio all overlooking the beach area 1955 DATES TO REMEMBER
and the Gulf, provide a choice spot for New Year's Day ......... ....Sat., Jan. 1
the convention programs. Lincoln's Birthday.............................Sat., Feb. 12
For those who enjoy the sand beaches Washington's Birthday ......Tues., Feb. 22
Ash Wednesday ...... ...... .......Wed., Feb. 23
and swimming in the Gulf, the Ft. Har- St. Patrick's Day .........Thurs., Mar. 17
rison's private beach and facilities will Good Friday .......... .......................Fri., Apr. 8
be available. Transportation, which re- Easter Sunday .... ..............Sun., Apr. 10
quires but a few minutes from the hotel, Memorial Day ... Mon., May 30
Independence Day ...........Mon., July 4
is provided to and from the beach. Labor Day ............... ........Mon., Sept 5
Transportation to Clearwater is by train, World's Series............................ 1st Week of Oct.
airline or by car. Arrangements will be Columbus Day ....Wed., Oct. 12
made for official courtesy transportation Election Day ..............................Tues., Nov. 8
convention guests arriving at Veteran's Day .............. ............ ...Fri., Nov. 11
to meet convention guests arriving at Thanksgiving Day ...... hours Nov. 24
both Tampa and St. Petersburg by air Christmas Day .............................Sun., Dec. 25
and train.
Recreation features including golf, fish- the Ft. Harrison only $5.00 single;
ing, boating, swimming, shuffle-board, $8.00 double . a single occupied room
tours should provide a favorite for every- is only $5.00, regardless of the facilities;
Sh. i Lb 1


one.
Ladies and children are especially in-
vited. The late date after schools are out
was selected for this reason.
The big surprise about the convention
will be the low hotel rates for the fine
new, air-conditioned all-outside rooms af


OUlie WII LwIn e room uan par ol,l
$15.00; Suite with 2 twin bedrooms and
parlor, $22.00.
Mail your reservation now for Florida's
finest state convention to Bill Harper,
Manager, Ft. Harrison Hotel, Clearwater,
Florida.


THE FORT HARRISON HOTEL, CLEARWATER where the 1955 Annual Meeting
and Convention of the Florida Dairy Association is scheduled for June 22-24.


NEW 1955 PROGRAM
FOR JUNE DAIRY MONTH


" ii


WE ARE COOPERATING

A preview of plans for the traditional
June is "Dairy Month" program of the
American Dairy Industry for 1955 in-
dicates that the program will have both
"new life" and a "new look".
The various National and State Dairy
Associations which sponsor the Dairy
Month program decided to give it new
emphasis with well-planned advertising
and glamorizing of dairy products while
keeping up the emphasis on "public re-
lations".
To make possible this expanded pro-
gram, the National Dairy Month head-
quarters has been changed from the "Na-
tional Dairy Council" to "The American
Dairy Association".
Plans for Florida Dairy Month pro-
grams are now being developed through
the Florida Dairy Association's State
Dairy Month Committee and various local
committees.

"Nogo" Alcoholic Milk
New Dairy Product
An English dairy lady recently an-
nounced the production of a new "dairy
product" made of honey, milk and whisky,
which she claims is a good formula for
a "hangover".
With Florida's abundance of milk,
honey, whisky and hangovers, possibly
some alert dairy will develop the hang-
over formula, Florida style-and "up"
the lagging Florida milk consumption.

Consumers who complain of the high
cost of living these days often fail to con-
sider that they are buying many services
today that were performed in the home a
few years ago. A recent study by the
U.S.D.A. showed that a family meal of
ready-to-serve food costs one-third more
than a meal requiring a maximum of
home preparation. Indications are that the
trend toward more commercial prepara-
tion is likely to continue.


8 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Annual Meeting Speaker
June 22-24 At Clearwater
Dr. Bruce Baldwin,
Jr., President of the
Milk Industry Foun-
dation, has accepted
0511 the program commit-
tee's invitation to
Speak at the Florida
Dairy Association's
1955 Annual Conven-
tion, which is sched-
BALDWIN ruled for June 22-24
at the Fort Harrison
Hotel, Clearwater.
Dr. Baldwin is Vice President of Ab-
bott's Dairies, Inc., Philadelphia.


cs..V1E




9,


Swimming and sunbathing at Clearwater
Beach will be one of the attractions of the
Florida Dairy Association convention, June
22-24, Clearwater.

Know Your State Senator
And Representative?
Mr. Dairyman! Do you personally
know the Representative and Senator who
will represent your county and you at
the coming 1955 session of the Florida
Legislature?
And even if you do know him, have
you told him about the problems of your
dairy and of the Florida dairy industry?
Having known and talked with hun-
dreds of members of the legislature dur-
ing the past 12 sessions, I can assure you
that your Representative or Representa-
tives and your Senator would be pleased
to have you come to see him and tell
him about your problems and problems
and policies of the dairy industry.
If you should be asked for information
you do not have, no doubt the Florida
Dairy Association could help you.

) "The only sound, satisfactory and per-
manent solution to the major problem of
the daily industry is to get the product
consumed."-The Dairy Record


1955 Florida Dairy Convention Hotel


Jack Tar's


FORT HARRISON HOTEL

Clearwater, Florida


Plan now to attend ...

THE 1955 CONVENTION


FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

JUNE 22, 23 & 24


Write for Reservations:
To Reservation Manager
FORT HARRISON HOTEL
Clearwater, Florida


JANUARY & FEBRUARY,


1955 9








DAIRY SCIENCE MARCHES ON 1954
By DR. R. B. BECKER
Past President, American Dairy Science Association
Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Part III of a special summary of the proceedings of the 49th annual meeting of American
Dairy Science Association which was held at Pennsylvania State University, June 22-24.
THE 49th annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association at Pennsylvania
State University in June, 1954 was a busy session. Besides the general session, Exten-
sion, and Dairy Manufacturing sessions, 97 papers were given before the Production
Section. Two sessions met simultaneously with full programs.
Nine of 15 reports on artificial breeding dealt with frozen
semen as affected by various proportions of diluters; one each
dealt with bacteriacidal agents in semen, sperm livability and
f^ activation. Fertility studies were concerned with phosphorus in-
takes and with thyroidal activity:
Ten papers dealt with dairy calves. At the Iowa, Kentucky,
SLouisiana and Vermont stations, dairy calves made slightly in-
creased growth when aureomycin, terramycin or bacitracin were
fed up until 88 to 120 days of age. Except for slightly increased
DR. BECKER weight gains, no other significant differences were observed. The
Minnesota station and USDA Agricultural Research Center at
Beltsville reported on fundamental studies of nutrients in growth of young calves,
but these had not reached a point that affects commercial feeding practices.
There is no need to waste valuable
colostrum milk. The Connecticut and and 19.9% of total digestible nutrients.
Montana stations showed that colostrum He raised the question-"why ensile so
could be stored frozen until needed, or much water?", implying desirability of
could be substituted intermittently for wilting the forage in some instances be-
whole milk in equal amounts for feed- fore ensiling it. Mixed alfalfa and brome
ing to calves. One part of dried whey grass was chopped and ensiled in two
to seven parts of soybean flour were stacks at the Iowa station, with ground
used successfully as part of a milk re- corn added to one of them. Cows
placement formula for young calves in showed some preference for the corn-
Pennsylvania. At Raleigh, North Caro- added silage, which analyzed higher in
lina the shelter of an open shed was as acetic acid and lower in butyric acid than
satisfactory as a closed barn for housing the plain silage. Scattering concentrates
young calves, over the less palatable silage overcame
In a basal ration containing 12% of the difference in palatability.
crude protein for growing heifers, cot- At the Florida station, dried citrus pulp
tonseed meal was withdrawn and re- was added at 0, 150 and 250-lb. levels
placed successfully by urea and ammon- per ton of green forage as a preservative
iated molasses to provide up to 30% of and absorbant, to green oats, Pangola
the nitrogen intake. Pennsylvania workers grass, and mixed White Dutch clover-
found that a new compound-dicyanodia- Dallis grass at ensiling. Loss of soluble
mide (containing 66% nitrogen) nutrients through seepage was reduced
could be fed safely to heifers. when DuD was added. Cows ate more


No advantage in milk or butterfat pro-
duction resulted from supplementing the
rations of first calf heifers with aureo-
mycin at the Iowa station. With limited
observations at the Montana station, cows
produced more milk from alfalfa silage
than from alfalfa hay. Cows at the North
Carolina station receiving corn silage as
the only roughage, plus 1 Ib. of mixed
concentrates per 4 pounds of milk test-
ing 4.01% fat, yielded only slightly less
milk than did cows receiving hay in place
of part of the silage. Lima bean silage
was slightly lower in total digestible nu-
trient value than corn silage with milking
cows at the Delaware station. No state-
ment was made of maturity at harvest,
nor amount of beans in the silage.
Dr. J. A. Newlander analyzed 154
samples of various grass silages submit-
ted by Vermont dairy farmers. He esti-
mated that these ranged between 9.4


of the silages containing citrus pulp. Con-
sumption of the Pangola silage was 35,
38,' and 42 lbs. daily with the increasing
amounts of citrus pulp, up to 60 lbs.
for mixed clover-Dallis grass with pulp.
Three reports were from Pennsylvania
and Beltsville using sodium bi-sulfite as
a silage preservative at 8 Ibs. per ton of
freshly cut forage. Such silages from 50
Pennsylvania farms were free from ob-
noxious odor (butyric acid, mainly),
quite palatable, easy to preserve, and not
expensive.
Milk from cows on a severely re-
stricted hay intake at the Wisconsin sta-
tion dropped from 4.6% to 2.14% fat,
accompanied by certain changes in blood
composition. Adding a large intake of
sodium acetate to the feed gradually re-
stored the fat test, whereas other salts
were ineffective.


Dr. J. C. Shaw et al continued studies
on cause and treatment of acetonemia
ketosiss) in cows, using ACTH, one of
the adrenal gland hormones, and glucose
in various combinations, observing ef-
fects on blood composition.
L. R. Arrington et al of the Florida
station found with samples of irradiated
defluorinated rock phosphate fed to
calves, that the phosphorus in this pro-
duct was readily available, based on tis-
sue analyses and rates of excretion from
the body.
Bovine hyperkeratosis (X-disease) is
associated with contamination of feeds
with machine grease or other substances
containing a highly chlorinated naphtha-
lene as confirmed by workers in the Vet-
erinary College at Cornell University.
Six reports were on rumen bacteria.
Two emphasized especially that aureomy-
cin reduced bacterial digestion of cellu-
lose (from 83 to 72%), and of several
other carbohydrates.
Eight papers from six stations dealt
with pastures. At Blacksburg, Virginia,
cows consumed more irrigated herbage
and it was 5% more digestible than non-
irrigated pastures. Four Holstein cows
grazed 9 hours, loafed 6 hours, and
ruminated 8 hours and 38 minutes. Fif-
teen hours of the day were spent in
standing or walking, and 9 hours lying
down. Fifty one percent of the grazing
was during the night.
S. P. Marshall (Florida) reported that
cows grazing rotationally on heavily fer-
tilized Pangola-white Dutch clover pas-
ture obtained 60.2% of their total diges-
tible nutrients from pasture, and averaged
33.3 Ibs. of 4.0% fat milk daily during
a 234-day grazing season. They received
some mixed concentrates. Over 5,400 lbs.
of total digestible nutrients were obtained
per acre from this pasture. At the Ken-
tucky station, cows maintained milk pro-
duction best on brome grass pastures,
less on orchard grass and bluegrass, and
least on fescue grass.
A number of reports dealt with sta-
tistical estimates of heritability, including
the fact that fat percentage and milk
yield are controlled by separate heredi-
tary factors.
USDA workers at Beltsville investi-
gated further the use of plant color pig-
ments as indicators in measuring digesti-
bility of forage crops. This modified
measure is of use to investigators study-
ing digestibility of fresh forages particu-
larly.
The average calving interval of the Ne-
braska station Holstein herd over 1897-
1948 averaged 14.79 months for all nor-
mal calvings. This affects replacement
rates and maintaining constant milk de-
liveries from a dairy herd.


10 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS















I


The above pictures show three steps in the preparations for sending Florida milk together with milk from 47 other states to the
Premier of France, December 26th. (1) Governor Johns is seen with his personal secretary in his Starke insurance office, Mrs. Hazel
Ritch, and Jack Dew who are assisting him in drawing from the hat the name that determined what Florida milk would be sent.
(2) Members of the F.D.A. Committee who delivered the milk to the Eastern Airlines plane at the Jacksonville airport. These, left to
right, are: V. C. Johnson, Earl Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Welkener, Stewardess Pat Donohue, Howard Brown (Chief Dairy Super-
visor), A. T. Alvarez, Mrs. Alvarez, Charles Johnson and Mrs. Charles Johnson and their two boys. (3) Miss Eleanor Maley, Minnesota
dairy farm girl and Minnesota State "Dairy Queen" of the year, who was selected representative of the American Dairy Industry to ac-
company and present the American Milk Salute to the French Premier, Mendes-France.

Florida Milk To Paris In Salute To Premier Of France


The Florida Dairy Association for-
warded a quart of Florida's finest milk
by Eastern Airlines, December 26th to
Premier Mendes-France in Paris as a
token of the appreciation of Florida Dairy
Farmers and Milk Distributors for his
internationally publicized "Drink Milk
Campaign".
The Florida milk was flown from New
York to Paris along with a quart of milk
from each of the other forty-seven states
and was accompanied by Miss Eleanor
Maley, Minnesota dairy farm girl who
was selected by the American Dairy Asso-
ciation and the Milk Industry Foundation
as Princess of the American Dairy In-
dustry, to personally present the milk to
Premier Mendes-France in Paris and as-
sist in serving it to his special guests for
the occasion.
American Dairymen carried out the
gesture of international amity and good
wishes in recognition of Premier Mendes-
France for his one-man campaign to con-
vert the French people to milk drinking,
as well as for the fine job he did during
his recent official visit to the United
States in awakening American adults to
the importance of drinking milk.
While in the United States, Mendes-
France championed milk drinking at
every opportunity in his personal activi-
ties and in many public places. Since his
visit to the United States, Mendes-France
has been carrying out a "Drink Milk
Campaign" in his own country in an ef-
fort to "improve the health and vitality
of the French people and particularly
French school children."


The bottle of Florida milk sent on
behalf of Florida's Dairy Farmers was
sponsored by the Florida Dairy Associa-
tion. Governor Charley Johns selected the
dairy from which the milk would be sent
by drawing from names of the state's
purebred dairies furnished by the Asso-
ciation.
The milk was turned over to the East-
ern Airlines for shipment to New York
and Paris by a special committee which


included E. T. Lay, Executive Secretary
of Florida Dairy Association; A. T.
Alvarez, President, and Walter Welkener,
representing the Florida Jersey Breeders
Association; V. C. Johnson and his sons,
Charles and Earl, of the Dinsmore Dairy
who represented the Florida Guernsey
Breeders Association; and W. Howard
Brown, Chief Dairy Inspector of the
City of Jacksonville Health Department
who supervised the selection and pack-
aging of the milk.


Bert Sweeting of Medosweet Dairies, Tacoma, Washington, is shown surrendering the
gavel as president of the International Association of Ice Cream Manufacturers after serving
two years, to Hugh F. Hutchinson of Greenbrier Dairy Products Company, Lewisburg, West
Virginia, incoming president, at the Association's 50th annual Convention in Atlantic City,
October 29th. In the photograph, left to right, are: Hugh Hutchinson; I. N. Hagan, I. N.
Hagan Ice Cream Co., Uniontown, Pa., Treasurer; Bert Sweeting; Robert H. Reeves, Carlson-
Frink Co., Denver, Colorado, Vice-President; Robert C. Hibben, Executive Secretary; and
Robert H. North, Assistant Executive Secretary.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 11









4-H DISTRICT DAIRY SHOWS REVIEW
By: C. W. Reaves, University of Florida State Extension Dairyman


Inspired Youth, Parents & Extension Agents
Finish Greatest Season of 4-H Dairy Shows
Participation in this season's 4-H Dairy Shows has again shown a considerable
gain over previous years. 4-H members will appreciate that only the main events and
winners of the various shows can be given in this brief summary.
4-H Clubs are one of the organizations in Florida playing a very important role
in the development of good citizenship. Conducted by county agricultural and home
demonstration agents, they antedate the Agricultural Extension Service, of which they
are now a part. 4-H boys' clubs were started in Florida in 1909, and 4-H girls' clubs
two years later.
From very small enrollments in those early days the membership has been grow-
ing every year. Florida now has nearly 30 thousand 4-H club girls and boys, the
Nation has over two million. As a matter of fact, the 4-H Clubs are the largest organ-
ization of rural boys and girls in the world.
Through their 4-H Club work the members develop their abilities to be good
farmers and good homemakers. They learn how to do the things required of them
on the farm and in the home, and in many, many instances have set the pace for their
elders.


ORANGE COUNTY IS LARGEST
LOCAL 4-H DAIRY SHOW
The Orange County 4-H Dairy Show
was considered the largest and one of the
best of the numerous district shows of
1954.
Those winning top honors and a place
on the County Dairy Team which will
compete with other Central Florida coun-
ties in the area 4-H Dairy Show were:
Ernest Fischer, Olin Fischer, Tommy
Edge, Brenda Dennison, Alfred Ham-
mond, Ruth Black.
Individual winners were: Ernest Fisch-
er, Registered calf, grand prize; Tommy
Edge, Grand Champion Guernsey; Olin
Fischer, Grand Champion Jersey; Tommy
Woodruff, Grand Champion Holstein;
Sandra Dennison, 1st in Showmanship,
and Robert Morris, 1st in Fitting.
Sponsors of prizes for the show were:
Winter Park Kiwanis Club, Pinecastle
Farmers Coop. Exchange, The Sears-Roe-
buck Foundation, Orlando Citizens Bank,
The Orlando Sentinel-Star, and the Flor-
ida Guernsey and Jersey Breeders Asso-
ciation.
LAKE COUNTY 4-H SHOW
Ellen C. Jost, a member of the Grove-
land 4-H Club, took top honors in the
sixth annual Lake County Dairy Show
held at Eustis.
In addition to her first place award,
Miss Jost took third place with a second
entry. Her animals were Ayrshires.
Sam Ebersole, Eustis, won the show-
manship trophy awarded by the Eustis
Kiwanis Club.
Other club members qualifying for the
area show were Marnell LaRoe, Eustis,
second; Lewis Hughes, Jr., Leesburg,
fourth; Bobby Blair, Howey-in-the-Hills,
fifth, and Sam Ebersole, sixth.


FLORIDA'S 4-H DAIRY TEAM
IN INTERNATIONAL CONTEST
As a result of winning the 4-H Dairy
Judging Contest at the International Dairy
Show in Chicago in October, Florida is
to represent the United States in the
Caribbean International 4-H Dairy Con-
test in Jamaica on February 22. The two
members to represent Florida and the
United States are Howard Renner of
Largo and Erny Sellers of Tallahassee,
who were the top individuals of the
winning Florida team at Chicago. The
other two members were Perry Smith of
Hastings and Beverly Simmons of St.
Augustine. All the team members have
had successful 4-H dairy projects for a
number of years. They won the state con-
test last June and brought distinction to
the state in winning at the International
Dairy Show. In this contest they were
followed in order by New York, Ne-
braska, Michigan, and Ohio for the top
five places.
The Caribbean Contest is open to
Canada, the United States, and the Carib-
bean Countries. The invitation to repre-
sent the United States was extended by
the USDA Extension Service Office. C.
W. Reaves, Extension Dairyman with
the University of Florida who coached the
team will accompany Renner and Sellers
to Jamaica. Three or four days will be
spent in Jamaica prior to the contest
studying its cattle and dairy industry and
in seeing points of interest.
The contest will be held at the time
of the All Island Achievement Day when
the New Youth Agricultural Training
Center will be dedicated, said to be the
first in the West Indies. It will be during
Jamaica's Tercentenary Celebration.


North Florida 4-H Show
Climaxes Five County Shows
The five top ranking members from
each of the county 4-H dairy shows and
contests in Madison, Jefferson, Leon,
Gadsden, and Jackson counties competed
for district honors at the show held on
October 14 in connection with the Gads-
den County Tobacco Festival and Fair.
Participants in the county and district
events were scored on the dairy animal
exhibited, its fitting and conditioning,
showmanship, and record book in a spe-
cial 4-H dairy project sponsored by the
Sears Roebuck Foundation and directed
by the county agents.
Jackson County led with a total score
of 442.8 out of a maximum of 500, fol-
lowed by Gadsden with 438 in second
place, and Leon in third with 434.6
points.
Jackson County's representatives were
William and Martin Schack, Earl Crutch-
field, Robert Olive, and Eugene Evans all
showing Jerseys. County Agent W. W.
Glenn and Assistant County Agent L. D.
Taylor had trained the members. Jackson
County took home the revolving trophy
which was won last year by Madison
County. Madison County members under
County Agent O. R. Hamrick, Jr. and the
new Assistant Agent Hilton Cook ran a
close second this year. Madison County
was represented by Lonnie J. Davis, Jr.
and Archie Davis, Russell C. Smith, Jr.,
Pat Cantey, and Barbara Walton. They
showed a number of good animals pur-
chased in Duval County by club mem-
bers.
High scoring individual members in
the project were William Schack (Jack-
son) first, Ernest Sellers (Leon) second,
Martin Schack (Jackson) third, Archie
Davis (Madison) fourth, Earl Crutch-
field (Jackson) fifth, Russell Smith, Pat
Cantey, and Lonnie Davis( all of Madi-
son) sixth, seventh, and eighth.
The judging contest was also won by
Jackson County followed by Leon Coun-
ty's team. Martin Schack of Greenwood
(Jackson County) was high scorer.
The Gadsden County 4-H Clubs were
represented by a float in the Parade.
Gadsden County Agent A. G. Driggers
and Assistant Agent Bernard Clark were
superintendents of the show.
W. L. Ford of Greensboro showed the
grand champion in the Open Show Class
while Frank L. DeBord of Quincy showed
the junior champion. The Lambert Dairy
also showed some top animals.


12 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








4-H Club Dairy Show I
At Northeast Florida Fair 4-H DAIRY HEiFER AREA SHOW
The Northeast Florida Fair at Calla- SEARROEBUCk PLY cUS10W
han had the largest livestock exhibit FOU. AT i f Sl
ever. The dairy show was much improved P ,l.f A iR1
both in numbers and quality of animals.
There were over fifty dairy animals repre-
senting the Guernsey and Jersey breeds.
In the 4-H Club division, Bob Bowie
of Dinsmore showed the Grand Cham-
pion Registered Guernsey, Bowie May
Royalty Francine. Al Bowie showed the e-
Reserve Champion. Both were registered
junior yearling heifers. Russell Lloyd
showed the top grade Guernsey.
Robin Alvarez of Jacksonville had the
Grand Champion Jersey, Dandy's De-
lightful Dot, a two year old heifer.
Sharon Ellis of Callahan had the reserve
Champion Jersey, a Junior yearling heifer.
In the 4-H Club Judging Contest the
Duval Dinsmore Club was first, Calla-
han boys second, Yulee boys third, the
Dinsmore girls fourth and the Callahan
girls fifth. High individuals were Clif-
ford Flood of Yulee, first, Sharon Ellis of
Callahan, second, and Russell Lloyd of .
Dinsmore, third.
The showmanship contest trophy was HP
won by Robin Alvarez of Jacksonville;
second place, by Tommy Prater of Calla-
han, and third place by Nancy Buchholtz
of Dinsmore.
The fitting contest trophy was won by
Nancy Buchholtz, second place to Tommy
Prater, and third place to Robin Alvarez.
The official judge for the Dairy Show
was Wilson Sparks, Assistant Extension
Dairyman from the University of Florida.
Showmanship was judged by Mr. Earl
Johnson of Dinsmore, and the fitting
contest was judged by Mr. James N. Wat-
son, Duval County Agent.



4-H Show pictures at right are: (1) Seen
above is the Orange County 4-H Dairy team
which was the winning County Group at the
District VII 4-H Dairy Show at Orlando,
November 20. Left to right: Olin Fischer,
Gotha; Ernest Fischer, Windermere; Tommy
Edge, Goldenrod; Ruth Block, Orlando;
Brenda Dennison, Lockhart, and Alfred
Hammond, Conway. (2) The 4-H Club
Float in the Gadsden County Fair and To-
bacco Festival Parade in Quincy. (3) Repre-
sentatives of each of the counties participat-
ing in the North Florida 4-H dairy project
at the District Show in Quincy, left to right,
Adrian Durden (Gadsden County), Archie
Davis (Madison County), Erny Sellers (Leon r-
County), William Schack (Jackson County)
and Ned Faglie (Jefferson County). (4)
Jackson County's winning team in 4-H Dis-
trict III Dairy Cattle Judging Contest at
Quincy. Howard Gregory, president of the 0" u I
Gadsden County Fair presents a check in
the name of the Fair and the Sears Roebuck-
Foundation, sponsor of the 4-H event, to
team members, (L to R) Earl Crutchfield, (.ll I
William Schack, Robert Olive, and Martin
Schack (high scorer in contest). L. D. IWe
Taylor, Jackson County Assistant Agent
smiles his pleasure at the team's award.


& FEBRUARY, 1955 13


0.4k


JANUARY

























Twenty Counties Entered in Orlando

Eighth Annual State 4-H Dairy Show
The Eighth Annual State 4-H Dairy Show will be held in connection with the
Central Florida Fair in Orlando February 21-26. Dairy Show Day is Monday Febru-
ary 21. Over 150 4-H dairy animals have been entered from 20 counties representing
all sections of the state. Several new counties are participating this year including
Union, Columbia, Lafayette, and Madison, indicating increased dairy interest in these


counties.
Nine district or area 4-H dairy shows
preceded the State 4-H Show in Pensa-
cola, Chipley, Quincy, Live Oak, Jack-
sonville, Ocala, Orlando, Tampa, and
Miami. The state show brings together
the best 4-H cattle from all over the state
with the individuals and counties viewing
for the top places in the cattle show. It
also brings together the best talent in
judging, showmanship and fitting of
dairy animals. Competition is held in
each of these on the 4-H Dairy Day. It
is the preliminary to the Final State Judg-
ing Contest at which the State Team is
selected to represent Florida in the na-
tional event.
The Central Florida Fair provides a
liberal premium list supplemented by the
State Department of Agriculture. Troph-
ies provided by different breed associa-
tions, business firms, breeders, and news-
papers are presented the winners at the
State 4-H Dairy Banquet provided by the
Central Florida Fair for the club mem-
bers, their county agents, and state dairy
representatives.
All dairymen and others interested in
young folks' agricultural activities are in-
vited to attend the State 4-H Dairy Show
and observe a full day of enthusiastic
effort by the top 4-H dairy club members
of the state.
The new 4-H Dairy Building, dedi-
cated at last year's show, will be a bee
hive of activity with some 150 young
Americans showing their animals with
pride of ownership and in a job well
done.
VOLUSIA COUNTY 4-H SHOW
Sandra Stoudemire of DeLand won
highest individual honors at the Volusia
County Dairy Show with 88 points.
Ronald Hunt won 1st in showmanship.


Jackie Hunt, Johnny Wilson, Ronald
Hunt, Sandra Stoudemire and Sharon
Stoudemire, all of DeLand, showed "blue
ribbon" animals which entitled them to
show at the Central Florida Area 4-H
Show.
RECEIVES STATEWIDE RECOGNITION
IN 4-H DAIRY PROGRAM
William Schack of Greenwood, Flori-
da (Jackson County) received outstand-
ing recognition by 4-H leaders in his
selection from all those in Florida's 4-H
Dairy program to represent the State at
the National 4-H Club Congress held in
Chicago.
Young Schack has been an active mem-
ber of 4-H Club since he was 10 years
old. In 1953 William won the State Dairy
Efficiency Contest. He has shown the
Grand Champion every year at the West
Florida Dairy Show from 1947 to 1952.
In 1950 William had the Grand Cham-
pion registered Jersey and the Grand
Champion grade Jersey at the State Dairy
Show in Orlando.

Pensacola 4-H Dairy Show
Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Walton
counties participated in the 4-H District
I Dairy Show and judging contest held
in conjunction with the Pensacola Inter-
state Fair on October 19.
Ray Gibbs of Pensacola and Carvel
Brown of Walnut Hill showed the cham-
pion Guernseys respectively.
In the Jersey Show, Clyde Creighton's
yearling heifer was Junior and Reserve
grand champion and Norman Foster's
cow was grand champion, both from Es-
cambia County. Pete Lunsford of Santa
Rosa county showed first and second place
heifer calves under one year old.
(Continued on Next Page)


Above are winners in the Jacksonville 4-H
District V Dairy Show held in the 4-H Club
Park Livestock Pavillion: Left, Merriam Sim-
ions of St. Johns County, who is Florida's
reigning State Dairy Industry Queen, shows
her Grand Champion (left) and reserve
champion Jerseys. Center, Laura Cameron
of Duval County with her Grand Champion
Guernsey. Laura also won 1st in "Groom-
ing". At right is Harry Stratton, Jr. of
Nassau County with his blue ribbon Jersey.
Harry placed 4th in the "fitting" contest.
DUVAL BOYS TEAM WINS
4-H DAIRY SHOW HONORS
While a Duval County boys team won
the Jacksonville District 4-H dairy cattle
judging contest, two attractive dairy farm
girls took top honors in showmanship
and fitting and the grand championship
awards in the Jersey and Guernsey Cattle
Show.
Members of the winning Duval County
judging team were David Findley, Charles
Magill, Russell Lloyd and Bob Bowie.
Runner-up in the team judging contest
was the Nassau County boys team.
Miss Merriam Simmons, veteran 4-H
dairy program girl from Orangedale, St.
Johns County, carried away the individual
honors of the show by winning first in
showmanship and both the Grand Cham-
pion and Reserve Champion in the Jersey
division of the show.
Merriam, with many previous honors
to her credit, was a member of the State
Champion 4-H Dairy Judging Team for
1953 and was selected State Dairy In-
dustry Queen for the year 1954-55.
Laura Cameron of Duval County won
2nd place in the "Fitting Contest", 3rd
in "Showmanship" and showed the Grand
Champion Guernsey of the show. Her
younger sister, Kay, showed the Reserve
Champion Guernsey. Tommy Prator of
Nassau County won 2nd in "Showman-
ship".
Participating in the show were young-
sters from eight counties in Northeast
Florida.


National 4-H Club Motto
"To Make The Best Better"


14 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







-^ CHIPLEY 4-H DAIRY SHOW


Ai 1


Merriam Simmons, seen above (left), as
she received the award for "showmanship"
at the North Florida District 4-H Dairy
Show. 2nd place award went to Laura Cam-
eron (right) and 3rd place to Tommy Prator
(center). Laura placed 1st in "animal groom-
ing".

4-H Dairy Show at Live Oak
An enthusiastic group of 4-H club
members, parents, and Extension agents
made a live-wire event of the District IV
4-H Dairy Show held in Live Oak.
Premiums were provided through the
Suwannee County Fair Association and
the State Department of Agriculture.
The heifers shown were good animals,
had been well cared for, and were well-
fitted for youngsters who were mostly
new at showing.
The champion Jersey was shown by
Morris Jackson of Mayo (Lafayette
County). Champion Guernsey was shown
by Adele Crawford of Columbia County
and Champion Holstein was shown by
Edna Fay Jackson of Lafayette County.
Winners in each class were:
Jerseys Under 1 Year of Age: 1st,
Morris Jackson, 2nd, Kenneth Jackson,
both of Lafayette County.
Jerseys Over 1 Year of Age: 1st Keith
Mayfield, Columbia County.
Guernseys Under 1 Year of Age: 1st,
Pasco Jackson, Lafayette County; 2nd,
Shands Howard, Union County.
Guernseys Over 1 Year of Age: 1st,
Adele Crawford, and 2nd, Paul Barcia,
both of Columbia County.
Holsteins Under 1 Year of Age: 1st,
Edna Fay Jackson, Lafayette County, and
2nd, Jerry Lascola, Union County.
Showmanship: 1st, Edna Jackson, La-
fayette County; 2nd, Jerry Lascola, Union
County, and 3rd, Shands Howard, Union
County.
Paul Crews, Suwannee County Agent
and secretary of the Fair, served as super-
intendent of the Dairy Show. T. J. Flet-
cher, president of the Suwannee County
Fair was very helpful. C. W. Reaves,
State Extension Dairyman, judged the
animals and W. J. Platt, District Agricul-
tural Agent, judged showmanship.
County agents from other participating
counties who assisted with the show were
S. L. Brothers, Lafayette County, W. J.
Cowen, Union County, and Neal Dukes
and Rance Andrews, agent and assistant
agent respectively of Columbia County.


In spite of a very dry year, cattle were
in excellent condition for the District II
Dairy Show held in connection with the
West Florida Dairy Show, Chipley. Forty
4-H animals were exhibited from five
counties.
The show was held in the new agricul-
ture building. Dedication of this new
building was one of the highlights of
the program. Mr. L. H. Lewis, State
Marketing Specialist, representing the
Honorable Nathan Mayo, Commissioner
of Agriculture, dedicated the building to
"Everything in the category of agriculture
so that with its help, rural boys and girls
may become more useful as citizens of
Florida." Following the dedication serv-
ices a barbeque was served by the county
officials.
C. C. Sellers, Jr. of Leon County al-
most stole the show. His 4-H Jersey cow
was selected Grand Champion of the en-
tire Jersey show. Young Sellers also won
the showmanship contest and was on the
winning 4-H judging team.
Milton Pillman, Jackson County, did
an excellent job of showing his fine
Guernsey. His efforts paid off in the end
when his animal was selected the top
Guernsey.
Martin Schack, 12 year old son of Mr.
and Mrs. M. A. Schack of Greenwood,
Florida (Jackson County), won the Times
Union trophy for the best groomed ani-
mal.
Eight counties entered the 4-H judging
contest. Leon County won the contest.
(Leon team: C. C. Sellers, Jr., Bill
Roberts, John Lauder, and Don Hanson).
Holmes County second, Washington third,
and Jackson fourth.

Pensacola 4-H Dairy Show
(Continued from Page 14)
The team ratings in the 4-H dairy
judging contest were: 1st Barrineau Park,
2nd and 3rd Molina, 4th and 5th Wal-
ton County. The top three individuals in
order were Blake Lamb of Molina, Billy
Gindl of Barrineau Park, and Floyd
Reamer of Molina.
The Showmanship Contest was close
with placings in order as follows: 1. Ray
Gibbs of Pensacola, 2. Norman Foster
of Molina, 3. Pete Lunsford of Allen-
town (Santa Rosa), 4. Carvel Brown of
Walnut Hill and 5. Clyde Creighton of
Cottage Hill.
The Best Fitted Animal winners were
Ray Gibbs and Carvel Brown.
Ben Floyd, Escambia Assistant County
Agent and H. P. Davis, Taylor County
Agent and former Escambia Assistant
County Agent were in charge of the
show and contest.


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JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 15






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRY REVIEW


Extension Service Dairy Products Laboratory
Dairy Farm Research Unit Agricultural Experiment Station

SDepartment Of Dairy Science
Announces Plans For 1955
By: DR. E. L. FOUTS, Head, Department of Dairy Science
University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Gainesville, Florida
The Department of Dairy Science begins 1955 with a full schedule of important
activities and events which will be of interest to people in all segments of the dairy
business in Florida.
The dairy staff is comprised of the following men who hold staff rank: P. T.
Dix Arnold, M. S., Associate Dairy Husbandman; R. B. Becker, Ph. D., Dairy Hus-
bandman; E. L. Fouts, Ph. D., Head of Department; W. A. Krienke, M. S., Associ-
ate Dairy Technologist; S. P. Marshall, Ph. D., Associate Dairy Husbandman; L. E.
Mull, Ph. D., Associate Dairy Technologist; H. H. Wilkowske, Ph. D., Associate
Dairy Technologist; J. M. Wing, Ph. D., Assistant Dairy Husbandman.
Extension Dairymen are: C. W. Reaves
Extension Dairymen are: C. W. Reaves Milk: Its Production, Correction, and
and Wilson Sparks. Utilization. From the projects, solutions
The following non-academic key per- to problems in Dairy Husbandry relating
sonnel assist with the over-all program to breeding, feeding and management of
of the Department: Tom Bruce, Labora- dairy cattle and milk production are
tory Assistant; DeWitt Crepps, Labora- found. Also problems relating to process-
tory Assistant; Herman Somers, Herds- of market milk, ice cream, cot-
man; Johnie Boggs, Barn Foreman; Joel stage cheese, butter milk, dairy bacteriology
Truluck, Field Foreman; Orin Teuton, and dairy chemistry are studied.
Refrigeration Engineer. Results of work on some of these same
The major interests and activities of projects have been very useful to dairy-
the staff are: (1) Research; (2) Teach- men in the State of Florida and through-
ing, (a) Resident, and (b) Short Courses out the South generally.
and Conferences; (3) Work with Dairy The Teaching Program
Industry Groups, (a) State, and (b) Na- RESIDENT: There is a gradually in-
tional and International. creasing interest among students at the
The over-all research program consists University of Florida to enroll in dairy-
of nine state supported projects and three ing as a major subject of study. The
projects from which some federal sup- numbers of students in the two major
port is available. The general research fields (Dairy Husbandry and Dairy Man-
project subjects are as follows: Ensilabil- ufacturing) are about equally divided
ity of Florida Forage Crops; Factors Af- and the job opportunities are good in
fecting Breeding Efficiency, its Possible both fields. The curriculum in Dairy
Inheritance, and Depreciation in Dairy Manufacturing has been modified some-
Herds; Effect of Certain Feeds on Milk what to provide training in several fields,
Flavor; Cooling and Aging of Ice Cream depending on each individual student's
Mixes; Post Partum Development of Bo- interest and ability. The fields that are
vine Stomach Compartments and Obser- available for specialization are: (1) Mer-
vations on Some Characteristics of their chandizing Dairy Products, Supplies and
Contents; Effects of Antibiotics and Equipment; (2) Dairy Plant Manage-
Chemotherapeutic Agents on Microorgan- ment; (3) Dairy Plant Operation; (4)
isms in Milk and Dairy Products; Study Dairy Technology; (5) Dairy Engineer-
of Production, Reproduction and Confor- ing; (6) Graduate Work, Research and
nation of the Florida Agricultural Exper- Teaching.
iment Station Dairy Herd; Effect of The curriculum in Dairy Husbandry
Aureomycin Feeding upon the Perform- embraces the following specializations to
ance of Dairy Calves; Irrigation of Per- meet the needs of students of varied in-
manent Pasture for Lactating Dairy Cows; terests: (1) Dairy Farm Operator, Farm
Utilization of Temporary Pastures by Manager or Herdsman; (2) Fieldman
Dairy Cattle; Influence of Dietary Pyri- for Dairy Company, Feed or Dairy Equip-
midine Ribose Nucleic Acid and Some ment Sales; (3) Dairy Worker in State
of its Probable Precursors on Dairy or Government Service; (4) Graduate
Calves; Improved Permanent Pastures for Work, Research and Teaching.
Growing Dairy Heifers; Sub-Normal (Continued on Page 30)


The University of Florida
DEPARTMENT OF DAIRY SCIENCE
Schedule of 1955 Special Events
THE FLORIDA DAIRY INDUSTRY
April 5-8
6th Annual
LABORATORIANS SHORT COURSE
For laboratory personnel, from State, county,
city and commercial laboratories, who test
dairy products, and milk sanitarians.
April 6-8
11th Annual
MILK SANITARIANS CONFERENCE
For milk sanitarians, food inspectors, lab-
oratorians, technicians, public health work-
ers, veterinarians, dairy plant operators,
producers, distributors, quality control per-
sonnel, and equipment and supply dealers.
September 6-8
24th Annual
DAIRY HERDSMEN'S SHORT COURSE
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, producer-
distributors and milk producers.
October 13-15
18th Annual
DAIRY PLANT OPERATORS
SHORT COURSE
For dairy plant superintendents and assist-
ants, managers, owners, dairy plant em-
ployees, producer-distributors, equipment
and supply dealers.
November 2-3
20th Annual
DAIRY FIELD DAY AND CONFERENCE
For Milk Producer-distributors, Milk Pro-
ducers, dairy processors, herdsmen, county
agents, vocational agriculture teachers, vet-
erinarians, DHIA workers and equipment
and supply dealers.

U. of F. Dairy Dept. Head
Serves In Many Places
Dr. Everett L. Fouts, head of the De-
partment of Dairy Science at the Univer-
sity of Florida, finds he is called upon
to engage in many activities beyond the
University of Florida campus where he
directs an extensive educational, research
and extension program in Dairy Science.
Such outside duties in recent weeks
have taken him to Atlantic City, where
he participated in the National Conven-
tions of the Milk Industry and the Ice
Cream Industry and examined the new
dairy equipment exhibited in the biennial
Dairy Equipment Exposition.
In Lexington, Kentucky he was a guest
speaker at the University of Kentucky,
Dairy Science Department "Short Course"
and in Lubrock, Texas, he was a guest
speaker at a Texas Technical College
Dairy Short Course.
Dr. Fouts regularly attends the direc-
tors meetings of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation of which he is an Advisory Mem-
ber. He also participates in the various
membership meetings and conferences of
the Florida Association and of the South-
ern Association of Ice Cream Manufac-
turers.
A chip on the shoulder indicates that
there is wood higher up.
From Fla. School Lunch News


16 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS










'Outline of Dairy Research Unit Pasture
Projects Seen on U. of F. Annual Field Day
By: DR. SIDNEY P. MARSHALL
Dept. of Dairy Science, University of Florida
One of the interesting features of the 19th Annual Dairy Field Day meeting
held at the University of Florida in September was the tour of the Dairy Research
Unit during which the group inspected some of the research in progress and were
given preliminary reports of the results. Following the tour an excellent lunch was
enjoyed at the dairy barn, after which some of the dairy cattle were inspected.
Intensive Permanent Pastures
The first tour stop was at the irrigated In the adjacent pictures are shown some of
and non-irrigated pangola-white clover the experimental pastures and herds seen on
pastures which were subdivided into the Dairy Field Day tour of the U. of F.
small plots for rotational grazing. In Dairy Farm, Gainesville: (1) Heifers graz-
S ing well-fertilized pangola pasture at a ten-
1953, the irrigated pastures furnished der stage when the forage is most nutritious.
666 cow days of grazing and 6,686 (2) Heifers grazing an excellent coastal
pounds of total digestible nutrients per bermuda pasture. (3) Some of the foundation
acre during the grazing season of March Guernrev female .acquired hA the Dep.rt-
1 t of Danr1 S''/C, Ifrom) lo d.i hr-j.-
3 through November 23, while the non- -,,. (4 1, l .,'i al ,.wC uIinIcnt.i ,r,,a-
irrigated plots supplied 551 cow days of ion dajin. diri tiod. is ,/oun hi .,bi,nd.
grazing and 5,628 pounds of total diges- In-, ol tno, .*anI p.igl.i /i,. i ni.i; d
tible nutrients per acre during the forag- pl/it (rblt. Litth t~,rtat.io,, i p "ltct
*b, 1on OI gated I.1 1 l t ( i1. I I pI 0A 1 o
ing period of March 27 through Novem- ',, ,(i,,, h,,,.i Q .,.,,. p.Cl mi/tt. iti,,
ber 23. Rainfall during the year totaled ,, on ol til b thI .Inuii. nInInuui ,.,,i.
61.3 inches. The irrigated plots were sup-
plemented with 14.9 inches of water. .4 .
Supplemental irrigation of pasture has '. .
increased the yield of total digestible
nutrients by 19 percent, maintained a
more uniform carrying capacity, length-
ened the grazing season, and sustained
high nutritive quality in the forage dur-
ing dry periods.
The system of rotational strip grazing
by subdividing a plot into 6 to 8 areas
with portable sections of electric fence
was seen on pangola-clover and coastal
bermuda-clover pastures being grazed by
dairy heifers. This method of grazing a
large number of animals on small areas .
for short periods has resulted in an im-
provement in quality and yield of feed
from the pastures.
Annual Summer Pasture
Pearl millet pastures were being grazed
by cows and by heifers. When spring
plantings of millet were grazed rotation-
ally and fertilized liberally they have pro-
vided excellent quality pasture from May
through the middle of September. Later
plantings have been grazed until early
October. During 3 years of experiments,
lactating cows obtained an average of
2,113 pounds of total digestible nutrients
per acre from millet. Well-developed
heifers above 10 months of age gained at
rates above normal for their age without
supplemental feed while grazing millet
pasture. Productions costs for millet
ranged between $37 and $47 per acre,
while the feed replacement value of
these pastures ranged between $77 and
$147 per acre.
Silage
Six pilot silos were passed that are
being used in ensiling studies. Such crops
(Continued on Page 26)


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 17







Flighlights Of Annual Field Day Talks
On Dairy Pastures, Feeds And Forage
PART II
Succeeding issues of the Dairy News will carry Parts III and IV of this series.
--DAIRY HERD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES
By: J. F. THOMPSON, Manager, Livestock Research Department
Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo.
"Dairying is still a sound profitable business provided efficiency is kept uppermost
in our minds. There is little that dairymen can do individually or collectively in
regulating prices of the products they sell. Therefore, milk pro-
ducers must be exceptionally conscious of efficient operation
during times of lowered incomes. Some dairymen will endeavor
S to bolster their income by adding more cows to make an equiva-
S lent total dollar return which usually adds to surpluses and does
not increase efficiency. A dairy herd, to be efficiently managed,
must be bred right and fed right as well as be handled properly.
If anyone of the three is neglected, efficiency lags and costs rise.
(A) Efficiency in breeding: (1) Inherited physical endurance
and longevity. (2) Ability to transmit desirable inheritance factors.
THOMPSON (3) Desirable body conformation.
(B) Efficiency in feeding-A dairy
feeding program naturally falls into the LEPTOSPIROSIS AND VIBRIOSIS
various groups of animals that are or N DAIRY HERDS
should be included in any efficient dairy
operation. Each group requires different By: KARL R. OWENS, D.V.M.
amounts and kinds of rations, and each Gainesville, Fla.
will be discussed briefly. The groups are: "Leptospirosis is a systematic disease
(1) calves; (2) growing heifers; (3) that affects cattle of all ages. It is
dairy cows; and (4) the milking herd. not a new disease, but has received wide-
(C) Efficiency in management: (1) condition onl in recent ears.
Animal comfort; (2) sanitation meas- spread recognition only in recent years.
ures; (3) time and labor saving de- ianisms using tois
vices; and (4) common sense. gaisase a ain en-
SUMMARY: Milk consumption na- disrae ito th ebody
tionally is at an all time high and indi- trance into the body
cations point toward still more people by almost any route
drinking more milk. This is good for except the stomach.
The acidity of the
the industry. However, dairymen must stomach adversely af
pay more attention to producing milk on fects these organisms
a quality basis, and we must also be Premises are contami-
more conscious of lowering the cost of nated by arn cam-
production. Dairymen should be interest- DR. OWENS riers which may have
ed in better cows and not just more cows.
Good cows properly fed and cared for recovered from the disease, from wild
will continue to be profitable." life and vermin.



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in STERILTY and INDUCING HEAT in COWS



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"The complexity of symptoms renders
a clinical diagnosis difficult and a lab-
oratory confirmation of the diagnosis is
always desirable. There is no specific
treatment for the diseases, but antibiotics
and supportive treatments are used. An
effective control program has not been
worked out yet for the disease.

VIBRIOSIS
"Vibriosis is a venereal disease af-
fecting the reproductive tract and is not
a systemic disease. It was first reported
in this country in cattle in 1918. Trans-
mission is thought to be made princi-
pally by the breeding act.
"Hard-to-settle heifers or cows bred
repeatedly to bulls of known fertility
should make one suspicious of this dis-
ease; however, a laboratory test is neces-
sary for accurate diagnosis.
"Treatment consists of holding ani-
mals of known infection (i.e., those
which have aborted) out of service for
120 days, and, depending upon the se-
verity of inflammation of the reproduc-
tive tract, one or more treatments made
with antibiotics. Streptomycin appears to
be specific against the vibriosis organism
and any combination of antibiotics used
for treatment should contain streptomy-
cin."

THE PRODUCTION AND USE OF
PASTURES, FORAGE CROPS AND
SILAGE IN SOUTH FLORIDA
By: R. K. PRICE
Asst. County Agent, Dade County
"Pasture and forage crop production
in South Florida is basically the same as
any other section. The things that make
their production somewhat different in
this area are the differences in soils, sea-
sons, crops and management practices.
"Pasture and forage are selected to
meet the soil type and seasons. Para and
Carib do very well on low lands. Pangola
and legumes such as alfalfa, white clover
and California Burr make good combina-
tions on higher soils. Millet and alyce
clover are the two main summer, tempo-
rary forage crops.
"The pastures are fertilized very lib-
erally during the year. Pasture rotation
is practiced and most of the dairies chop
the forage with a harvester and feed it
from wagons.
"Most of the pasture is used as a
soiling crop. Excess forage, both legumes
and grasses, is being preserved as silage
with some being saved as hay.
"The cost of producing and harvesting
forage for feeding is about $5.00 per
ton and for preserving as silage about
$6.00 per ton.


18 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Florida Milk Sanitarians
Announce Annual Meeting

An invitation is extended to Sani-
tarians, Laboratorians and Dairy Industry
personnel to attend the eleventh annual
Conference to be held at the University
of Florida April 5-8. This meeting is
sponsored by the Florida Association of
Milk Sanitarians and conducted by the
Department of Dairy Science staff with
the assistance of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation. The first day and a half will be
devoted to the Milk Laboratorians meet-
ing featuring all aspects of the Antibiot-
ics in Milk problems. Special demonstra-
tions and laboratory practice will be in-
cluded as well as a discussion of the
various microorganisms common in milk
of interest to milk laboratorians, sani-
tarians and quality control supervisors.
The Sanitarians program will begin
the afternoon of April 6 and will feature
outstanding national and local speakers.
"Red" Thomasson will be on hand to
represent IAMFS. Highlights of topics to
be discussed include information of value
to Sanitarians as well as Dairymen, such
as Nutrition, CIP Automatically, Clean
Milk Production, Instrumentation, Stain-
less Steel Care, Iodine Compounds in
Sanitation. Bulk Milk Sanitation, Price
Control, Sanitation and Public Health,
Sanitary Plant Operations, Public Rela-
tions, Milk Secretion, Cattle Feeding and
Milk Composition. This array of subjects,
presented by qualified speakers, will pro-
vide all who attend with a great deal of
useful information.
At the annual business meeting of the
Florida Association of Milk Sanitarians
a proposal will be under consideration
to rename the Association to include both
Milk and Food in conformance with
IAMFS with which the Florida Associa-
tion is affiliated. A special invitation is
thus extended to all general and food
sanitarians, especially those doing some
milk work, who wish to join and par-
ticipate in an active and growing asso-
ciation which can contribute much to their
desires and needs for valuable informa-
tion.
Additional pleasures will be provided
in the form of a Picnic Supper, Movies,
Yellow-Dog Initiation, Social Hour, En-
tertainment and Annual Banquet at which
time 10-year awards will be presented to
seven outstanding Sanitarians of Florida.


Milk is available to consumers in more
outlets than any other food commodity.


The self-important people are import-
ant only to themselves.
-Jacksonville American


Milk Price Increase Compared to Other Foods
The January 14 issue of the U. S. News & World Report magazine gives some
interesting comparisons of food price increases.


Here are the prices quoted with substitution of
price for the average used by the magazine:

Foods 1939 Price
Can of Tomatoes ................... ............$ 0.086
Round Steak ........... ..... ..... ........ 0.36
W ork Shirt ..................................... 1.25
Dining Room Set .................... ............. 100.00
FLA. MILK .............................. 0.16


the Jacksonville, Florida milk

Per cent of
1954 Price Increase
$ 0.175 103.0%
0.925 173.6%
2.50 100.0%
197.00 97.0%
0.27 68.7%


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tank perfectly air-tiglt to hold vacuum so you know it's dust- and vermin-proof.
Even if you're not yet ready for fully automatic milking, you run improve
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y 9 your T-20 as a vacuum refrigerated tank with Zeio's Vatcuttu Ttank Filler. With
this method (shown at left), a pail of milk is easily ldawn int tIhe tank in
alt tt 30 seconds, then quickly vacuum refrigeiatcle. The short milk line used
ill ludcs Ilur in-line strainer and valve. Thiis metllodt lets yot take greater
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DIRECT COW-TO-TANK MILKING WITH ZERO'S T-20 is the ideal
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JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 0 19







ACTIVITIES REVIEW OF:


Florida's Dairy Councils
Current News of Dairy Council Work in Tampa-St. Petersburg, Miami & Jacksonville
This section of the Dairy News is intended to bring timely information of the
activities of Florida Dairy Council work. The material will be supplied by the
three Council directors in turn.

Dairy Council Material In This Issue Sponsored by
Miami Dairy Council
Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director

Homogenized Vitamin D Milk And Health
From National Dairy Council
Nutrition Research Digest
Homogenization of milk and its fortification with vitamin D are separate proc-
esses. They are considered together in this Digest because of the extent to which
both processes are combined in fresh fluid and evaporated milks available throughout
the United States. All evaporated milk is homogenized and virtually all is fortified
with vitamin D; nearly all fresh homogenized milk is so fortified. There is good
logic in commercial combination of homogenization and vitamin D fortification.
Since this vitamin is fat-soluble, even distribution of fat means even distribution of
the vitamin throughout all portions of homogenized vitamin D milk.


HOMOGENIZATION OF MILK
Normal cow's milk contains fat glob-
ules which vary in size from 0.1 to 15
microns, averaging 3.5 microns. On
standing, these globules first cluster, then
rise to the top to form a cream layer.
This creaming process is aided by a
"membrane" or layer of phospholipid-
protein complex adhering to the surface
of the fat globules. In homogenization
(usually achieved by forcing milk through
small holes under 2500 or more pounds
of pressure), the fat globules are reduced
to an average of one micron. The sur-
face adherents on the new and smaller
globules are different, the phospholipid-
protein complex being largely absent and
replaced by other substances in the non-
fat fraction of the milk. Thus, creaming
off of the milk fat is prevented and
homogenized milk and cream are stable
emulsions. Less than 50 percent of the
fat of such products can be recovered by
centrifugal separation, as in commercial
separators. Removal of the milk fat can-
not be achieved by churning. Viscosity is
increased, and the product has a richer
taste, characteristic of a higher solids con-
tent.
PASTEURIZATION AND FLAVOR
Milk must be pasteurized before or
immediately after homogenization to in-
sure good flavor. Raw cow's milk is not
suitable as an infant food. That heat-
treated, or pasteurized, cow's milk has
been successfully adapted for infant feed-
ing is evidenced by the estimate that 75
percent of all infants born in the United
States are fed cow's milk formulas rather
than mother's milk.
DIGESTION OF "SOFT-CURD" MILK
From a nutritional standpoint, the in-
fluence of homogenization on milk casein
is particularly interesting. This process


appears to render milk casein more sus-
ceptible to coagulating agents of all types.
The curd which is formed in the stomach
by acid and the enzyme pepsin is smaller,
softer, and more friable than the curd of
normal untreated cow's milk.
Although older children and healthy
adults have no difficulty in digesting un-
processed "hard-curd" milk, infants re-
quire "soft-curd" milk. Heat treatment,
dilution with water, acidification, and
adequate homogenization are such effec-
tive means ot causing milk to form
softer smaller curds in the stomach. The
successful adaptation of cow's milk for
infant feeding is dependent upon: the
eradication of bacteria which might be
harmful to the infant; and elimination of
large curds of tough texture which would
form in the stomach if unmodified milk
were given an infant. Feeding experi-
ments with more than 800 babies have
shown that homogenized and boiled milks
having curd numbers of 200 or higher
are equally well tolerated.
(Continued on Next Page)


DIRECTORY OF
FLORIDA'S
DAIRY COUNCILS
DAIRY COUNCIL OF JACKSONVILLE
16 East Church Street
Mrs. Maxine Carter, Exec. Director

DAIRY COUNCIL OF TAMPA AND
ST. PETERSBURG
102 N. Dale Mabry Tampa
Mrs. America Escuder, Exec. Director
Mrs. Betty Hornbuckle, Asst. Director
Mrs. Harriet L. Hastings, Asst. Director
DAIRY COUNCIL OF MIAMI Includ-
ing DADE, BROWARD & MONROE
COUNTIES
769 N. W. 18th Terrace Miami
Miss Marian Cudworth, Exec. Director
Miss Nancy Hinckley, Asst. Director


National Dairy Council
Observes 40th Anniversary
The National Dairy Council celebrated
its 40th Anniversary at the time of the
1955 Annual Convention in Chicago,
January 24-26.
Among the featured speakers was U. S.
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra Benson,
who spoke on "The Challenge We Face
In 1955".
An outstanding feature of the program
was a dramatization showing the pro-
gress of the dairy industry during the 40
years during which the Dairy Council
has been in operation.
Florida's Jacksonville, Tampa and Mi-
ami Dairy Council directors attended the
meeting.

Burdine's Department Store sponsors
GLAMORAMA, a course for teenagers who
are interested in learning about good groom-
ing and personality. The Miami Dairy Coun-
cil was invited to participate in the first
program. Miss Nancy Hinckley, Assistant
Director of the Council showed two films
and gave a talk on "Good Health- A Foun-
dation for Better Personality and Personal
Happiness". Above she is shown serving
"Pink Cow" (equal parts buttermilk and
tomato juice) at the close of the program.


20 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS








Hult Describes Council Program
As Finding, Minding, Reminding
In addressing a Jacksonville dairy group on his recent visit to Florida, Mr. Milton
Hult, president of the National Dairy Council, described the three keys to Dairy Coun-
cil work as "Finding, Minding and Reminding" in connection with dairy foods.
Finding, he said, represents the Council's extensive research program which is
continually searching out the mysteries of the food elements in milk and their nutri-
tional values. The dairy industry experi-
enced its greatest progress during the
1920's and 1930's because of discoveries
of the values of milk.
Minding is the Council's program of %
preparing and making available to con-
sumers and nutrition leaders the infor-
mation about milk and dairy foods which
is learned through research. This is done
through printed matter, exhibits, films
and T-V materials.
Reminding is the Council's educational
program through its numerous local coun- Mrs. Maxine Carter, Director of the lack-
cil units whose nutritionist-directors carry sonville Dairy Council, is seen as she in-
the story of dairy foods through schools produced Mr. Milton Hult, President of the
National Dairy Council to a Jacksonville
and other groups to millions. dairy group at a special luncheon held in
The value of Dairy Council work is honor of Mr. Hult during his recent Florida
demonstrated in the fact that surveys have visit.
disclosed that per capital milk consump-
tion is always higher in cities having a Milk Is Best Source For
dairy council unit. Daily Calcium Requirements


HOMOGENIZED MILK
(Continued from Page 20)
A recent study has demonstrated that
raw, pasteurized, and homogenized milks
have comparable nutritive value.
It has long been established that addi-
tion of vitamin D to either homogenized
or cream line milk is a sound public
health measure. Such milks have been a
factor in the virtual elimination of rickets
in the United States.
SUMMARY
Homogenized vitamin D milk repre-
sents a major share of the market milk in
the United States.
Homogenized milk is a "soft-curd"
milk suitable for infant feeding.
Pasteurization and homogenization can
only be considered as beneficial to human
health, increasing the sanitary quality and
palatability of milk under modern distri-
bution methods and not adversely affect-
ing its nutritive value.
Vitamin D fortification of milk is a
public health measure which has aided in
eliminating rickets in the United States.
Most vitamin D milk is fortified by
the direct addition of the vitamin in the
form of a sterile canned concentrate dis-
solved in a milk carrier.

A quart of milk is two pounds as com-
pared to other foods and is recognized
the world over as "Nature's most nearly
perfect food."
It is little realized that while milk and
milk products take only 15 per cent of
the average family food dollar, they pro-
vide about 30 per cent of the nutritional
value of these foods.


Experiments show that calcium is nec-
essary from the prenatal period through
old age. Approximately 1.0 gram of cal-
cium is needed daily by the growing
child; this amount is increased to about
1.4 grams during adolescence, the period
of most rapid growth.
Normal adults require about 1.0 gram
of calcium daily. During pregnancy and
lactation, the calcium requirement is
greatly increased. The National Research
Council recommends allowances of 1.g
and 2.0 grams a day respectively for those
two conditions. During pregnancy and lac-
tation, the diet of the mother must pro-
vide an extra supply of calcium upon
which the child depends for the develop-
ment of his skeleton.
Milk is superior to any other food or
combination of foods as a source of cal-
cium.
One quart of milk (4 glasses) supplies
1.15 grams of calcium, and can be relied
upon as the sole source of this mineral
for children and adults under ordinary
circumstances. Adolescents and pregnant
and lactating women need a quart or
more.
Milk is the only food which can be
depended upon as a regular source of
calcium in the diet. It would be imprac-
ticable to obtain the amount of calcium
needed every day from other foods, be-
cause of the large quantities which would
have to be eaten.
Milk stands alone as an essential, regu-
lar source of calcium for people of all
ages.


JANUARY &


MILK FACTS
For the Milkman

Mr. Milkman, can you give Mrs. James
the right answers to these questions?


1. Q.

A.


What about milk and weight con-
trols?
Milk is ideal for those who wish
to gain weight. Served with high
calorie foods, milk will help you
put on weight.
Drinking milk regularly will al-
so aid in losing weight. Consumed
before meals, it provides needed
nourishment but somewhat dulls
the appetite.


2. Q. There are those who say that milk
doesn't mix with acid fruits or sea
foods. What about it?
A. Even though the acid in lemons
helps curdle milk, remember that
this is the first step in the digestion
of milk. As for fish, think of the
many creamed-fish and seafood
dishes-all made from milk and
cream. Milk and fish are very
perishable foods, but with modern
refrigeration spoilage can be pre-
vented. Therefore, fresh milk
blends well with fresh acid foods
and fish.


3. Q.

A.


Does the color of milk determine
how much cream is in it?
In the spring milk appears to have
more cream than at any other time.
This is because the cows go to pas-
ture after being indoors all winter
and eat an abundance of fresh
grass which naturally effects the
color of the milk, making it more
yellow. The color of milk or the
cream line on the bottle does not
necessarily tell how much cream
is in the milk. As a result of sea-
sonal variations in color, homo-
genization, and other processing
factors, milk can easily have more
or less cream than appearance
would seem to indicate.


HAVE YOU JOINED

the .. .


f DRINK
GLASSES
OF MILK
EVERY DAY


CLUB?


FEBRUARY, 1955 21







Florida Lags Behind Other States in

U.S.D.A. Speci I School Milk Program
By: MRS THELMA FLANAGAN
School Lunch Supelisor, State Department of Education
The Agricultural Act of 1954 provided $50,000,000 annually of federal funds
to assist in increasing milk consumption by school children. Florida schools received
an allotment from this fund at the beginning of the current school year of slightly
over one million dollars. Non profit schools of high school grade and under are
being reimbursed from this fund for milk consumption. A milk consumption base,
established for each participating school, represents normal consumption of milk by
children in the school. Reimbursement is made for all milk served to children in


excess of this base. The school agrees to
operate its milk service on a non profit
basis, and to serve only fluid milk meet-
ing applicable state and local standards
for butterfat content and sanitation.
The final success of the special School
Milk Program depends upon the coopera-
tion of the schools and of the dairy in-
dustry. Florida is somewhat handicapped
in the program by the fact that consump-
tion of milk in the schools was already
high, making increased consumption
more difficult.
Florida at the present time is lagging
considerably behind the other southern
states in participating in this special milk
program. As of January 1955, there are
462 schools on the program in 44 coun-
ties, out of a total of 1391 school centers
in the state, in 67 counties. The figure is
not impressive. Approximately 900 more
schools are eligible than are participating.
However, news has just reached me
that Dade County has voted to come in
the program and this will bring the total
counties to 45 and will add a consider-
able number of schools to the present
number participating. This leaves Hills-
borough and Polk Counties as the only
largely populated counties not under the
program.
At the current rate of participation in
the program, Florida will probably not
use up more than half of the one million
dollars allotted for the current school
year.
The dairymen can work on rectifying
this situation. If the milk sales have not
gone up appreciably, contact the schools
and do some sales promotion work.
Many school people are asking wheth-
er they should choose the citrus program
or the milk program. The answer is
choose both. Orange juice cannot replace
milk nor can milk replace orange juice,
in the diet. Studies have established the
need of milk primarily to furnish protein,
calcium and B vitamins and of orange
juice to furnish Vitamin C and Carbo-
hydrates. It is known that Vitamin C is
not stored in the body, therefore Vitamin
C rich food should be included in the
diet each day.


These youngsters are seen drinking a toast
to "Smokey Bear", a new movie character
who will help promote milk consumption in
a film just produced by the U. S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture with the cooperation
of the National Dairy Council. The film will
be distributed by U.S.D.A. to 425 television
stations, and color prints will be made
available to 71 local units of the Dairy
Council for showing in communities through-
out the United States. The picture is a scene
from the film.

Recent studies have indicated that teen-
age boys and girls will profit from added
amounts of calcium in their diets during
periods of rapid growth. Diet record
studies made by the Nutrition Division
of the State Board of Health have shown
these two types of food are not consumed
in adequate amount by many Florida peo-
ple. It is, therefore, desirable to make
both available to school children to en-
courage increased consumption.
At the present rate of use, four cents
reimbursement per half pint of milk con-
sumed in excess of the base figure, is
available for many more school children.
Schools which did not serve milk last
year are eligible for three cents per half
pint.
48 States Adopt Program
Every state in the country is now in
the Special School Milk Program the U.
S. Department of Agriculture announced
November 10. Arrangements with the
last of the states have been completed and
approved.


22 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


SCOTT SHAW

John M. Scott Retires
As Chief Dairy Supervisor
The retirement of John M. Scott on
January 1st as Chief Dairy Supervisor
of the Florida State Department of Agri-
culture brought to a close 48 years of
active service to the state. For twenty-
three years he was with the Florida Agri-
cultural Experiment Station and he cele-
brated his twenty-fifth anniversary as
Chief Dairy Supervisor last fall, having
held that position since it was established
in 1929.
Alex G. Shaw, dairy supervisor of the
north central Florida district, was named
by the Commissioner of Agriculture to
succeed Mr. Scott. Mr. Shaw has been a
dairy supervisor for twenty-five years; he
will now be in charge of the Dairy Di-
vision's office in the Seagle Building in
Gainesville.
Shaw also succeeds Scott to member-
ship on the Florida Milk Commission as
representative of the Commissioner of
Agriculture. Scott has served on the Com-
mission since 1933.
Commissioner Nathan Mayo, in com-
menting on Mr. Scott's retirement, stated
that "Scott and his co-workers deserve
the highest praise for bringing the Flori-
da dairy industry up to its present high
standard. He has set a standard that will
do much for the continuing progress of
the industry and I believe that such a
program will be effective under Shaw's
leadership. The members of the Dairy
Division regret Scott's decision to retire,
and have pledged their support to Shaw
in his new position."
Two years ago Mr. Scott was honored
by the Florida Dairy Association by his
election to life membership in that organ-
ization's distinguished service and leader-
ship group known as the "Bell Cows".

U.S.D.A. Secretary Benson said he is
"highly pleased" that all of the states are
now in this new program to increase milk
consumption by school children. "The
speed with which the arrangements were
completed with all states is a notable
achievement," he said. "It has been made
possible only by the fine work of of-
ficials in state educational agencies and
in local schools, and by the close coopera-
tion between dairy industry leaders and
educational officials."







Guernseys Purchased
By Florida Breeders
The American Guernsey Cattle Club has
announced recent purchases of outstanding
Guernseys by Florida Guernsey breeders.
Purchases reported are:
SVELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC.,
TALLAHASSEE, have purchased the
young Guernsey sire, Wilburn High
Duke from W. S. Dickinson, Fredericks-
burg, Va. This young bull is out of the
cow, Wilburn Imperial Princess and is
sired by McDonald Farms High Laird.
SBEN S. WARING, MADISON, has
purchased the young Guernsey sire, Ben-
Bow Gc. President Ike from Paul H.
Bennet, Quitman, Georgia. This young
bull is out of the cow, Ben-Bow C. Lea
and is sired by Green Meads Proclama-
tion.
SDR. C. W. BAKER, SANFORD, has
purchased two young Guernsey sires from
T. Stin Haselton, Eustis. Both are sired
by Woodacres Bright Meteor. LaViDa
Bright Martin is out of the cow, Mc-
Naughton's Noble Martha, that has once
been classified Desirable for type. La-
ViDa Bright Beau is out of the cow,
LaViDa Jeweller's Beauty, that has once
been classified Desirable for type.
) VELDA DAIRY FARMS, INC., TAL-
LAHASSEE, have purchased the proved
Guernsey sire, Caumsett Promoter, from
LeRoy A. Buck, Groton, N. Y. This
richly bred proved bull is out of the
high-producing cow. Caumsett Ocean
Bracelot, that has once been classified
Desirable for type, and has two produc-
tion records of 15,496 pounds of milk
and 811 pounds of fat, made on three
times daily milking for 365 days, as a
five year-old and met calving require-
ments, and 16,757 pounds of milk and
829 pounds of fat, made on three times
daily milking for 365 days, as a seven
year-old and met calving requirements.
He is sired by Caumsett High Strung.
, MRS. P. L. GARDON, SEBRING, has
purchased the young Guernsey sire,
Shantz's Florida Prince from Harold C.
Harris, Lake Placid. This young bull is
out of the cow, Shantz's Florida Lee and
is sired by Ludlo's Dreaming Prince.
) CECIL A. RADNEY, PANAMA
CITY, has purchased the young Guernsey
sire, Lucky Warrior's King, from John
G. Hentz, Jr., Panama City. This young
bull is out of the cow, Beauty of St.
Andrews Bay, and is sired by Mo-La-Jac
Lucky Warrior.
GLADES STATE PRISON FARM,
BELLE GLADE, have purchased the
young Guernsey sire, Brays Island La
Leader, from Brays Island Plantation,
Inc., Yemassee, S. C. This richly bred
young bull is out of the well-bred cow,
Brays Island Lucky Mary, that has once
been classified Very Good for type, and
has a production record of 9,241 pounds
of milk and 427 pounds of fat, made on
two times daily milking for 305 days.


P. D. Q.


BRINGS

RESULTS!


* Experienced dairymen report excellent results from the feeding of
P. D. Q. Mineral Supplements.

* Milk Production has been stepped up, Lactation Period prolonged
and the general all-round health of the cows maintained.

* Today, stronger, more vigorous calves, with a minimum of calf mor-
tality are the rule, rather than the exception and cows calve with
greater regularity and greater ease.

* You, too, can profit from this experience by feeding P. D. Q. Mineral
Supplements.



The P.D.Q. Company, Inc.


BOX 439


- LAKELAND, FLA.


DISTRIBUTORS


HOWARD FEED MILLS, INC.
Jacksonville


IRWIN GRAIN COMPANY
Kendall


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 0 23






-A LOOK INTO THE DAIRY INDUSTRY-
Phenomenal Growth, High Quality Product,
Importance To Health And Economy Are Noted
By: DICK STARK
Livestock and Dairy Specialist Florida State Marketing Bureau
The Dairy Industry in Florida is at this time suffering not only with the usual
problems of the Milk Industry but with a variety of growing pains as well.
Ten years ago Florida imported approximately fifty per cent of the fluid milk
consumed in the State. Today, with a forty per cent increase in population, Florida
dairymen are producing not only all the fluid milk needed but a
slight surplus most of the year besides. Such an increase in the
volume of milk produced is indeed an amazing thing; when you
consider that all the milk produced for market in Florida at this
time is of Grade "A" quality, it is little less than phenomenal.
It is hard to believe that such a growth in the Dairy Industry
would have been possible without the stabilizing effect of the
Florida Milk Commission, the aid of the Dairy Inspection Division
of the State Department of Agriculture and various Health De-
partments of the State, the Florida Livestock Board, the splendid
work of the Florida Dairy Association and the complete coopera-
STARK tion of the various instructional, research and extension services
of the University of Florida and the U. S. Department of Agriculture.


The advantages of this improved milk
supply to the consuming public should
be rather obvious. The consumer is as-
sured of a superior quality milk pro-
duced under his own state's supervision
and the surplus affords a cushion which
assures plenty of milk during the winter
months when the supply drops off and
the demand increases, due to the influx
of tourists.
The Dairy Industry's contribution to
the State's economy is more important
than most of us realize until we look at
the record. In a recent summary report
of the Florida Dairy Industry, Mr. John
M. Scott, Chief Dairy Supervisor, had the
following to say:
"The cash farm income to Florida
dairy farmers (third largest of Florida's
agricultural products) is about 50 mil-
lion dollars for the 85 million gallons
of Florida-produced milk.
"The retail sale value of this milk
after processing is about 85 million dol-
lars.
"It takes over 1,200 dairy farms with
165,000 to 180,000 dairy cows to pro-
duce this milk.
"The total employment of the dairy
industry of Florida is estimated to be
from 12 to 15 thousand persons.
"The investment in the property of
Florida dairy farms and plants is very
great. Some authorities estimate dairy
farm investment alone to be $1,000.00
per cow including all land, improve-
ments, equipment, cattle, etc.
"The industry's annual payroll is esti-
mated at 25 to 30 million dollars. Its
expenditures for supplies (other than
milk), -equipment, containers, insur-
ance, etc.-are estimated at over 15 mil-
lion dollars."
It should also be noted that soil im-
provement and conservation have always
gone hand in hand with dairying in con-


trast to the soil depletion and erosion
which too often follows many row crop
practices.
These changes, however, have brought


with them some problems which are new
to Florida dairymen. Pressure is applied
from various sources for a reduction in
price. Milk sold as surplus brings lower
returns. Relations become strained be-
tween producer and distributor and be-
tween distributor and consumer.
In regard to the present price of milk
it should be pointed out that while pro-
duction cost of milk is higher in Florida
than in most parts of the United States,
that average workers' hourly earnings to-
day will still buy almost twice as much
milk as twenty years ago and that milk,
on a nutritive basis, is still one of the
cheaper foods.
However we must not lose sight of the
fact that milk must compete with other
highly-advertised foods for its share of
the family food dollar. Too rigid price
control could result in pricing milk out
of the market. It happened to butter and
a market lost is mighty hard to get back.
It is always easier to blame someone
else for one's troubles. Too many in the
Dairy Industry have wasted too much
time hoping someone else would settle
(Continued on Page 26)


24 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


GOOD NEWS!






Jersey Classification and
Registry Test Records
IFAIRGLADE JERSEY DAIRY, OR-
LANDO-The herd of registered Jerseys
owned by the Fairglade Jersey Dairy, Or-
lando, was classified for breed type by an
official classifier of The American Jersey
Cattle Club. The animals in the herd
were given individual ratings based on a
comparison with the Jersey breed's of-
ficial score card, which allots 100 points
for the ideal Jersey animal. The above
herd now has an average score of 84.08%
on 60 animals. The breed's average is
83.15%. One animal is rated Excellent,
28 Very Good, 20 Good Plus, and 11
Good.
The following results of recent official
Jersey registry tests in the State of Flor-
ida have been announced:
) A. T. ALVAREZ, JACKSONVILLE,
has a registered Jersey cow that recently
completed a 299-day Herd Improvement
Registry production record of 12,169 Ibs.
milk containing 593 lbs. butterfat at the
age of 10 years and 11 months. The of-
ficial record was made by Wonderful
Aim Queen.
OW. J. NOLAN, SOUTH DAYTONA,
FLA., has a registered Jersey bull, Xenia
Design Sovereign, which has qualified as
a Tested Sire. Ten tested daughters of
Zenia Design Soverign produced an aver-
age of 8,824 lbs. milk containing 454
Ibs. butterfat on a twice-daily-milking,
305-day mature equivalent basis, which
is more than two times the butterfat pro-
duction of the "average" daily cow in the
U. S. Fifteen of his daughters have been
classified for type; they attained an aver-
age score of 84.8% as compared to the
breed average of 83.15%. Xenia Design
Sovereign has been officially classified
for type by the Club and given a rating
of Very Good.
OWALTER WELKENER, H LLY
HILL DAIRY, JACKSONVILLE, has a
Jersey cow which has been rated a Tested
Dam by the A.J.C.C. The distinction was
awarded Sybil Pompey Elsie for having
three offspring with official production
records. The cow's progeny averaged
9,426 lbs. milk containing 526 Ibs. butter-
fat on a twice-daily-milking, 305-day ma-
ture equivalent basis.
Five registered Jersey cows owned by
Walter Welkener have been awarded Ton
of Gold Certificates by the A.J.C.C. The
Ton of Gold Award is made to Jersey
cows that produce at least a ton of but-
terfat during a four-year period on Herd
Improvement Registry test. During the
past four years the production of the five
cows in the Welkener herd average over
500 lbs. butterfat per cow per year, which
is over twice the production of the "aver-
age" dairy cow in the United States.


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JANUARY & FEBRUARY,


SPARTAN GRAIN & MILL CO.
GRAND CROSSING, FLORIDA
.o .ri .,. i- I -77


~iil


1955 0 25




























In the above pictures (1) the officers and directors of the Tri- County Dairy Association, which includes dairies of Escambia, Santa
Rosa and Okaloosa Counties. Officers of the Association are John Adkinson, R. L. Lunsford and Ed McCall, seated 2nd, 3rd and 4th, from
left in the front row. (2) A meeting of the Tri-County Association in January, 1955 at Milton. L. K. Nicholas, Administrator of the
Florida Milk Commission, is the speaker.


their problems. If a producer is having
trouble meeting his costs his first in-
stinct is to blame the plant because he
is being paid surplus price for part of
his milk. The plant, in turn, faced with
the problem of too much milk, blames
the producer for producing his biggest
supply of milk in the summer rather
than in the fall and winter and criticizes
the public for its low consumption.
The time is past when a man can hope
to milk just any kind of cows, give them
mediocre feed and care and hope to
make a living. Distributors can no longer
remain aloof to the production problems
ot their producers. No one in the Dairy
Industry can any longer afford to ignore
the fact that milk must be SOLD to
the public rather than taking its con-
sumption for granted. As for the pro-
ducer, he has almost unlimited oppor-
tunity to lower production cost, first by
improving his herd and second by raising
and storing more roughage either as hay
or silage. Since artificial insemination is
available to all dairymen, there is no
longer any excuse for raising scrub heif-
ers. The dairyman must never let up on
culling low producers. His motto might
well be: "Cull, Cull, Cull!"
With improved grasses and fertilizers
now available, good grazing and ample
hay and silage should be musts for every
man milking cows. Feed costs per gal-
lon of milk on dairy farms using these
and other good practices often run as
much as fifty per cent lower than those


on poorly operated farms. Also closer
attention to having cows freshen in the
fall will do much to eliminate summer
surplus. Closer cooperation between milk
plants and their producers is becoming
essential. The plants having the least
trouble with surplus and the least dis-
sension among their producers are those
which maintain closest contacts and best
understanding with the men who milk
the cows.
More attention should be given in the
future to public relations in order to ac-
quaint the consuming public of the su-
perior quality of milk produced in this
State. Not only are the sanitary require-
ments unusually high, the butterfat con-
tent is correspondingly so. As an ex-
ample, the average butterfat content of
milk sold in Chicago, Illinois is 3.5 per
cent. In Jacksonville, Florida it is 4.1
per cent.
Some means might well be found to
finance and direct an even more aggress-
ive educational and advertising campaign
than is now in effect. Such a campaign
if carried on intelligently and consistent-
ly would unquestionably pay big divi-
dends. There is certainly no lack of ma-
terial for such an effort. As an example,
more and more emphasis is being placed
by doctors and nutritionists on the im-
portance of milk in the diets of all age
groups, particularly teenagers and older
people. This should indeed be a fertile
field for an expanding market in Florida
as more and more people of a retirement
age move here. Every effort should be


University Of Florida
Dairy Pasture Unit
(Continued from Page 17)
as oats, white clover and grass, pangola
grass, cowpeas, and hairy indigo have
been preserved as plain silages, wilted
forages, by additions of citrus molasses
and of citrus pulp, and with sodium
metabisulfite.
Fields of Dixie 18 hybrid corn were
seen that produced 10 tons of ensilage
per acre, or 45 bushels per acre of grain.
Inspection of Cattle
The program was concluded by show-
ing the foundation Guernsey females ac-
quired by the Department of Dairy Sci-
ence in 1952 and 1953 from Florida
breeders. These cattle and their progeny
are serving important roles in the re-
search and teaching programs of the de-
partment.

made to continually remind everyone liv-
ing here and everyone considering com-
ing to Florida that there is available an
ample supply of milk which is not only
safe but of exceptionally high food value.
Milk consumption in Florida is far be-
low the national average. This should be
a direct challenge to everyone connected
with the milk industry. If everyone in
Florida were drinking the proper amount
of milk for his health requirements we
would certainly at this time have no
surplus.
These are not overnight cure-alls. They
take time, money, work and patience,
but do point the way for a profitable
future for dairying, which will in turn
add much to the stability and prosperity
of the entire State.


26 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


A Look Into The Dairy Industry
(Continued from Page 24)



















Lilydale Chess 24th, Grand Champion
bull at the International Dairy Show, Chi-
cago. This is the sire of one of the milking
shorthorn hulls advertised on another page
of this issue.

MILKING SHORTHORNS
COME TO FLORIDA
Florida's dairy herds, although still
predominately Jersey and Guernsey, are
gradually becoming supplemented with
other well-known dairy breeds. Chief
among the newcomers are the Holsteins
which now have a place at most local
and state-wide dairy shows. The past year
saw a Florida Holstein Breeders Associa-
tion formed.
The Brown Swiss has found a place in
quite a number of herds through pur-
chases by Florida dairymen from mid-
western dairy centers and are seen more
and more in various dairy shows. A
Brown Swiss Class has been shown at the
Florida State Fair by out of state breeders
for the past two or three years.
Now comes the "Milking Shorthorn"
with one well established breeder in Cen-
tral Florida and another small herd at
Live Oak. Milking Shorthorn cattle orig-
inated in Northeastern England over a
hundred years ago. During the early days
of importing Shorthorns to America they
were often referred to as "Durham Cat-
tle", but "Shorthorn" is the correct name
of the breed. Shorthorns are either red,
red and white, white or roan, the last
named color being a very close mixture
of the red and white, and is found in no
other breed of cattle.
Shorthorns are the most numerous cat-
tle in the British Isles, and are widely
distributed over America and Australia.
The breed was developed to its present
high standard of perfection by selecting
animals that were best suited to meet the
demands of practical farmers.
Most of the earlier importations of
Shorthorns to America came from Eng-
lish herds and were of the Bates and
Booth types; those that came direct from
the Bates herd or descendants of that
herd had good milking qualities.
Milking Shorthorns in the United
States are either decended from these
cattle and other importations from Eng-
land, where Milking Shorthorns consti-
tute 61 per cent of all cows tested in the
Milk Recording Societies of England.


C BUULK COOLERS


WITH CONFIDENCE


Built-in quality insures complete
satisfaction over the years. 18-8
all stainless steel construction,
including internal bracing mem-
bers. Cools milk quickly to 34-
36F. with lowest possible power
cost. Simple refrigeration system
guarantees service-free opera-
tion. Low pouring height and
rounded bottom makes cleaning
easy. Every Mojonnier Bulk
Cooler has same cold-wall sur-
face for use interchangeably on
skip-day or every-day pick-up.
Write for Bulletin 290.


MOJONNIER BROS. CO.
4601 W. Ohio St., Chicago 44, Illinois


SFlorido Representative
Lee P. Bickenbach
P.O. BOX 2205
LAKELAND, FLA.


TH= TfUE STDCY


or CITRUS PULP

Why is Florida Citrus Pulp causing so much talk among dairy ymen
today? The answer is simple. Mlore dairymen are feeding Citrus IPulp,
and finding out the true facts about it. Florida Citrus Pulp is a carbo-
hydrate concentrate, high in T.I).N and low in fiber content. It has
proven milk stimulating factors and will not affect milk flavor. It can
be fed wet or dry, stores well and is available all year round. Facts
prove you get better milk production at lower cost by feeding Florida
Citrus Pulp.


*Total Digestible Nutrients


I ou r cnruplcte information,
write I r our free booklet
"lluow to Feeti (itrus lill".
Please include your feed deal-
er, onia anltd addre"


NAME
ADDRESS


DEALER
ADDRESS


P. 0. BOX 403 DEPT. D
TAMPA, FLORIDA


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 27










DAIRY NEWS DIGEST


Members of the Dairy Industry throughout the State are invited to please
send to the "Florida Dairy News" all news about dairies, dairying and the
good people who devote their time, talents and money to this great industry.
-The Editor.


Ted Lewis of Aren Dairy Farms, Los
Angeles and president of the Milk Industry
Foundation, is seen speaking at the 1954
Annual Convention of M.I.F. at Atlantic
City. His subject was "The Price of Milk."
The signs indicate the percentage of mark-
up in various agricultural commodities be-
tween the producer and the consumer price.
These he compared with the approximate
mark-up of 100% for fluid milk. The milk
price mark-up of 100% seems most reason-
able indeed as compared to the others shown
which ranged from 254% on cotton to 637%
on cereals.
N. C. JERSEY DAIRY
MOVES TO FLORIDA
Announcement was recently made in
Bradenton, Florida that C. W. Snyder,
operator of a Jersey dairy farm for the
past 40 years in North Carolina, has
moved a herd of 46 producing Jerseys to
Bradenton where he is establishing a
dairy in connection with the new Cream
Crop Dairy of Manatee, which will use
the farm's milk supply.
The farm will comprise 125 acres with
about 70 acres of improved pasture and
Snyder said he plans to convert the re-
maining acreage to improved pasture
grasses.


Florida Ranks Sixteenth
In Ice Cream Production
While Florida ranked 16th in ice cream
production and 33rd in milk production
for 1953, by comparison with other
states, first place was maintained in the
percentage of increase in both milk and
ice cream production.


Borden's Announces
Manager Appointments

A recent announcement of the Borden
Dairy state headquarters in Tampa, lists
the following changes in manager assign-
ments:
A. R. Allison, formerly manager of the
Tampa branch, has been appointed divi-
sion manager for the following plants:
Orlando, Leesburg, Ocala, Gainesville,
Jacksonville, Daytona Beach and Cocoa.
He will maintain his office in Orlando.
T. E. Barrett has been appointed a di-
vision manager of Borden's Dairy plants
in St. Petersburg, Clearwater, Lakeland,
Bradenton, Sarasota, Ft. Myers and Se-
bring with his office in Clearwater.
George Harlan, who has been sales
manager of the Tampa branch, succeeded
A. R. Allison as manager.
Forrest I. Green, sales manager for
the Miami branch, has moved to Tampa
as sales manager.
John M. O'Brien, who has served nine
years in the Miami sales department, has
replaced Forrest Greene as sales manager
of the Miami branch.


FOREMOST BELLE GLADE FARM
ACQUIRED BY SHAWANO CORP.
A recent announcement in the Belle
Glade Herald reports that Glades pro-
duced milk in increasing quantities-up
to 50,000,000 pounds annually-is an-
nounced aim of new owners of the
Foremost Dairy on the former Hillsboro
Plantation land east of Belle Glade.
The Shawano Development Corpora-
tion, owners of more than 11,000 acres
of deep muck, are ramie growers and pro-
cessors, and have purchased the 1700-
odd acres of the Foremost organization,
together with its herd, milk barn and
facilities. The new owners have already
embarked on a plan to bring the output
to more than 2200 gallons daily, with an
ultimate plan for 10,000 dairy cattle.
Plans provide for winter grasses to be
mowed and "toted" to the milkers, field
corn to round out the daily nutrients for
milk production, hay for slim winter
grazing and silage for a "rainy day" are
now being provided at Shawano's opera-
tion.
Marketing and distribution of this milk
will be made through Foremost Dairies,
Inc. or subsidiary companies.


GEORGE B. NICKLES


The many friends of George B. Nickles
will regret to learn of his death on No-
vember 23rd, 1954 in Tallahassee. For
eighteen years George was in charge of
the Dairy Equipment
Exchange in Miami
and through this and
his attendance at state
and national dair y
Association convene
tions was well known
among dairymen in
SFlorida. With his
h wife, Grace Sudduth
Nickles, he had man-
NICKLES aged the Capitol City
Motor Court in Tallahassee for the past
two years.
For many years George was an ardent
golfer and managed the golf tournaments
at the Florida Dairy Association conven-
tions. He was active in civic and fraternal
organizations in Miami. In addition to
his wife, he is survived by three brothers
and six sisters.


Florida Members
In U. S. Congress
Florida has three new Congressmen in
the 84th Congress which convened early
in January. One of these is Representa-
tive Win. C. Cramer of St. Petersburg,
first Republican Congressman from Flori-
da since reconstruction days in the State.
Another is Representative Paul Rogers of
West Palm Beach who was elected to
succeed his father, Dwight L. Rogers,
who served several terms and died in late
1954 after his re-election without oppo-
sition. The third is Representative Dante
B. Fascell of Miami succeeding Repre-
sentative Bill Lantaff, who was not a
candidate for re-election.
All of the new members are young
attorneys. Cramer and Fascell have seerv-
ed as Representatives in the State Legis-
lature.
Other Florida Congressmen beginning
new, two-year terms in the 84th Con-
gress are: Rep. Bob Sikes, Crestview;
Rep. Syd Herlong, Leesburg; Rep. Charles
E. Bennett, Jacksonville; Rep. D. R.
Matthews, Gainesville; Rep. James A.
Haley, Sarasota.
Florida Senators
Florida's members of the U. S. Senate
are the well-known Senator Spessard Hol-
land and Senator George Smathers.


Until pride and stubbornness are killed
in me, I will kill the best in other people.
-Jacksonville American


28 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


I






Tierney is Elected President
Southern Ice Cream Group
The Southern Association of Ice Cream
Manufacturers closed its 40th Annual
Convention December 2nd in St. Peters-
burg, Florida with
the election of one
of Florida's leading
D a i r y Executives,
Jack Tierney, as pres-
ident and the selec-
tion of Boca Raton,
Florida, as the 1955
Convention site.
Mr. Tierney, Ex-
ecutive of Foremost
Dairies at Orlando,
Florida, succeeded Howard C. Williams
of Cleveland, Mississippi, to the South-
ern Association presidency. He served as
Vice President during the past year and
was chairman of the convention program
committee.
C. D. Wayne, Florida Zone Manager
of Southern Dairies, was elected Florida
director in the Association.
The convention entertainment and ar-
rangements were handled by a local com-
mittee consisting of Russell Bevan of
Borden's, Albert Schendel of Southern
Dairies, and Charles Ankerberg of Fore-
most Dairies, all of St. Petersburg.



U. of Fla. Ag Fair
Set For March 11-12
The annual Ag Fair at the University
of Florida will be held on March 11 and
12 with a dance on Saturday night cli-
maxing the two days of the exhibition.
This Fair is a project of Alpha Zeta,
honorary agricultural fraternity in the
College of Agriculture. The public is in-
vited and there is no admission charge.
High school students with an interest in
dairying or other phases of agriculture
are especially invited to attend.
Exhibitions depict phases of agricul-
ture and are entered by the various de-
partmental clubs consisting of students
majoring in particular divisions of agri-
culture. The Dairy Science Club with Dr.
H. H. Wilkowske as faculty adviser
placed second with their exhibit last year
and their beauty candidate was crowned
Queen of the Ag. Fair Dance. They will
be competing again this year and results
will be reported in our next issue.
Prof. W. A. Krienke of the Dairy
Science Department has been faculty ad-
visor of Alpha Zeta for the past four
years and dairy students Courtney Steph-
ens, George Hindery and Sidney P. Mar-
shall have been Chancellor of the Florida
Chapter during recent years.


Making Hay



This Year?





Considerable interest is being displayed among Florida
dairymen in haymaking. Because of the difficulty of curing
hay during the rainy summer and fall we would like to suggest
a spring hay crop.
Applications of complete IDEAL BRAND pasture fertilizers
during February and March and an IDEAL BRAND nitrogen
top-dressing in April will give a good yield of high quality hay to
be cut in May when the weather is usually ideal for hay-making.
Consult your Wilson & Toomer representative for full co-
operation in advice and service.


Working hand in hand with
Florida Agriculturefor 62 Years




, WILSON & TOOMER
FERTILIZER COMPANY
Plants in Jacksonville, Tampa, Cottondale, Port Everglades
GENERAL OFFICES JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 29


.


, 16


r~- ;.

a,
*L ~~; hiXII























Above, left, Mrs. Lula Dalton, 88, prepares to milk her 24 year old family cow, "Pet",
and at right, demonstrates how the world's best butter and buttermilk is made.

78 Year Old Milk Maid Still Milking 24 Year Old Havana, Florida Cow


The Florida Dairy Association was
told that a cow at Havana, Florida was
still producing over a gallon of milk a
day at over 24 years of age, and Secretary
Andy Lay decided to go and see.
Mrs. Lula Dalton, owner of the cow
which she named "Pet" when it became
a pet around the farm 24 years ago, now
lives alone on the small farm about seven
miles from Havana and has personally
milked the cow for twenty-two years.
"Pet" still gives about a gallon of
milk a day which provides both milk
and butter for Mrs. Dalton and some


extra for her son's family nearby. She
last calved about seven years ago.
In checking on the significance of
"Pet's" record, we learn from Dr. R. B.
Becker, University of Florida Dairy Hus-
bandman, that "it is extremely unusual
for a cow to live to be 24 years of age
and especially to be still producing milk
at that age."
According to Dr. Becker, there is an
official record of a Jersey cow which
calved when past 24 years of age.
Possibly Mrs. Dalton's milking and
caring for "Pet" for 22 years is the record
some one will have to try to beat.


1954 EFFICIENCY AWARDS District VII 4-H Dairy Show


IN 4-H DAIRY PRODUCTION
This contest is directed by the Agricul-
tural Extension Service through County
Farm Agents.
Awards are provided by the National
Dairy Products Corporation thro ugh
Southern Dairies of Florida.
The State Winner was Al Bowie, Du-
val County, who received a plaque.
The 10 District Winners were: Bobby
Wilkerson, Walton County; Earl Crutch-
field, Jackson County; Erny Sellers, Leon
County; Bobby Mills, Suwannee County;
Al Bowie, Duval County; John Green-
man, Alachua County; Bobby Blair, Lake
County; Michael Williamson, Pinellas
County; Tony Collins, Manatee County,
and Wm. Herman Boyd, Jr., Dade Coun-
ty. All district winners won cash awards
of $15.00 each.
The Orange County 4-H group won a
plaque as top county in county competi-
tion "Best Overall 4-H Dairy Program".
All awards will be presented at the
4-H Dairy Banquet at the State 4-H
Dairy Show in Orlando the evening of
Monday, February 21, 1955.


The District VII 4-H Dairy Show was
held in Orlando November 20 before an
enthusiastic crowd of people. The cattle
were in good condition and the 4-H'ers
were in high spirits.
The six counties in this project (Orange,
Lake, Volusia, Brevard, Osceola, and
Polk) had each held a county contest.
The six members with the highest com-
bined score on animal, showmanship,
fitting and conditioning, and record book
represented their county in the Area Con-
test. Every one of the 36 eligible mem-
bers and their animals were on hand for
the Area Contest. This 100 percent record
is an excellent accomplishment. Orange
won the trophy for highest total score
for its six members, followed closely by
Polk. The Orange County Judging Team
won the judging contest.
Sears-Roebuck provided $1400 for the
six county contests prior to this show.
This event was sponsored by Sears-Roe-
buck Foundation, Co-Sponsored by Ply-
mouth Citrus Growers, State Department
of Agriculture and directed by the Flori-
da Agricultural Extension Service.


Dairy Science Department
Announces Plans
(Continued from Page 16)

SHORT COURSES AND CONFER-
ENCES: The following special meetings,
conferences and short courses will be held
during 1955:
Labrororians Short Course Date:
April 5-8. In Charge: W. A. Krienke,
Associate Professor, and Ben J. Northrup,
City Health Dept. of St. Petersburg, Fla.
Description: This annual training course
includes lectures, demonstrations and lab-
oratory practice on the chemical and bac-
teriological quality control tests currently
used by public and commercial labora-
tories for analysis of various dairy pro-
ducts. Latest methods, proper techniques,
new developments, theory, and the funda-
mentals of analysis are considered. Who
for: For laboratory personnel, from State,
county, city and commercial laboratories,
who test dairy products, and milk sani-
tarians.
Ailk Sanitarians Conference Dale:
April 6-8. In Charge: H. H. Wilkowske,
Associate Professor. Description: The
purpose of this annual conference is to
improve public health through better san-
itation, especially in regard to milk pro-
ducing, processing and distribution. Staff
members discuss current research prob-
lems and results. Special guest speakers
are invited to present various milk sanita-
tion topics along the lines in which they
are specialists. The Florida Association
of Milk Sanitarians and the Laboratorians
conduct their annual business meetings
and banquet in conjunction with this con-
ference. Who for: For milk sanitarians,
food inspectors, laboratorians, technicians,
public health workers, veterinarians, dairy
plant operators, producers, distributors,
quality control personnel, and equipment
and supply dealers.
Dairy Herdsmen's Short Course-Date:
September 6-8. In Charge: R. B. Becker,
Dairy Husbandman; C. W. Reaves, Ex-
tension Dairyman; T. G. Lee, Lee Dairy,
Orlando. Description: This annual short
course offers training classes, demonstra-
tions and farm practice in various practi-
cal phases of dairy cattle breeding, herd
management, record keeping, milking,
milk production and care of milk. Train-
ing in Dairy Herd Improvement Associa-
tion supervisors sometimes is held in con-
junction with this short course. Who for:
For dairy herdsmen, herd owners, dairy
farm helpers, DHIA supervisors, pro-
ducer-distributors and milk producers.
Dairy Plant Operators Short Course -
Date: October 13-15. In Charge: L. E.
Mull, Associate Dairy Technologist;
Charles Williams, Borden Southern Co.,

(Continued on Page 35)


30 0 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS





Reports Show Florida Jersey Herds
Compare Well With National Records
The December issue of the Jersey Journal, the national breed publication, lists all
herds in the nation with Herd Improvement Registry production test averages of over
30 pounds butterfat per cow in October. Two Florida herds were in the 10 herds
of above 100 cows in this high production group. They were ALVAREZ JERSEY
FARM, Jacksonville, with a per cow average of 719 pounds milk and 36.5 pounds
butterfat for each of its 157 cows (including 23 dry cows) for the month. MEAD-
OWBROOK FARM, Jacksonville, made 544 pounds milk, and 32.3 pounds butter-
fat per cow for its 104 registered Jerseys (19 dry).
Other Florida herds listed were in the
groups of less than 100 cows and includ- C T YOUR M
ed WALTER WELKENER, Jacksonville, CUT YOUR M
with an average of 706 pounds milk and CON
38.7 pounds butterfat on 92 cows (16 CONTROL
dry); J. K. STUART, Bartow, with 637
pounds milk and 36.2 pounds butterfat Gilbert, Allen's New
on 79 cows (10 dry); POLK COUNTY Condition Cleared And
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS, Bar-
tow, with 712 pounds milk and 41.8
pounds butterfat on 45 cows (2 dry); M A S TITIS
and B. W. JUDGE, Orlando, with 581 MAS T I I S
pounds milk and 30.6 pounds butterfat
on his 8 registered Jerseys (1 dry). 3000,000 UNITS PENICILLIN G AN
1 to 12 tubes ...................................
Type Classification Ratings 1 to 1236 tubes .- .
Listed in the same issue were Type 13 to 36 tubes
Classification reports of six Florida Jer- 37 to 72 tubes
sey herds which were recently classified
for type. Those with average scores of
over 84 percent on type conformation of
their herds included WALTER WELK-
ENER, Jacksonville, with the very high
average of 86.65 percent on a total of


100 animals including 21 rated Excellent,
46 Very Good, 28 Good Plus, and five
Good.
A. V. BROWN, Chattahoochee, aver-
aged 85.23 percent on his 22 classified
animals. DAVID PAGE, a former 4-H
Club member from Fernandina Beach,
had five classified with an average score
of 84.5 percent.

MEDICINE COSTS

MASTITIS
therapy And Treatment
Milking Within 48 Hours

OINTMENT
ID 300 MG DIHYDROSTREPTOMYCIN
- -................ ...................... ............. $ .5 5 E A .
.... ... ..... ....... .. 5 0 EA .
...... .. ... ... .4 5 EA .
Write For Complete Information
2380 PALM AVE. HIALEAH, FLA.
Phone 88-6496


SEVEN DEHORNED REGISTERED

MILKING SHORTHORN BULLS
OUT OF CHAMPIONSHIP STOCK

Aged 19-27 Months

BORN IN MISSOURI MORE THAN A YEAR IN FLORIDA


FOR SALE, Reasonably, or


FOR LEASE, by contract to

responsible parties


W. J. ROGERS


FAIRVIEW FARM


LIVE OAK, FLA.


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 31



















ADAMS PACKING ASSN., INC.
Citrus Pulp, Citrus Meal, Citrus Molasses
Jim Coates, Sales Mgr., By-Products Division

Auburndale, Fla. Phone 8-4301






0 INC. DariRich
Chocolate Products Fruits and Flavors
Ed Salvatore
205 Come Street, Tampa Ph. 85-6902


DAIRY & FOOD EQUIPMENT, INC.
General Office: 1034 N.W. 22nd St.
Miami, Fla. Telephone 9-3679
Branches
Tanmp Jacksonville Orlando



DAIRYPAK INCORPORATED
PURE-PAK MILK CONTAINERS
J. H. STRACK PHONE: 3-422::
3064 Liberty St. (At Van), Daytona Beach, Fla.
J. H. Strack Plone: ;;-422=


CHARLES DENNERY, INC.
New Orleans
Ice Cream Coating, Fruits and Flavors
Ira Stone 1026 E. Walnut St.
Ph. Mutual 5-3284
LAKELAND, FLA.


JAMES V. DEMAREST
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Fine Chemicals, Vitamins and Minerals
Chemo Pure Mfg. Corp.
Hanovia Chemical & Mfg. Co.
P. 0. Box 787 Deland, Fla.


VETERINARY MEDICINES
S Sold direct to the dairyman
D. W. Parfitt Ben Zirin, Ph.G.


GULF PAPER COMPANY, INC.
Ice Cream (Linerless) Cartons,
Butter Cartons
J. H. McVoy
50 E. Magnolia St. Pensacola, Fla.


w


DOUGLAS J. HEADFORD
FLA. REPRESENTATIVE
Green Spot Orangeade Concentrate
Krim-Ko Chocolate Flavorings
616 Jessamine Ave. Phone 2-0148
Daytona Beach, Fla.


HELM SANITATION CHEMICALS
HANS B. AHLEFELDT
Phone: ELgin 3-3721
Union Terminal Warehouse
Jacksonville, Fla.


JIM JENNINGS
MFRS. REPRESENTATIVE
Land O' Lakes Non-fat Milk Solids
Bireley's Dairy Orange Base
Welch Mfg. Co. Ice Cream Spoons
Route 9, Box 356 Jacksonville, Fla.


CHOCOLATE AND
OCOCOA DIVISION

"Chocolate for Ice Cream and Milk
JOE L. HAMMONS
Rte. 1, Box 304 T'I'LEPHONE
Odessa, Florida Tampa 90-2396


KELCO COMPANY
Darilold Dricoid and Sherbelizer

W. E. TARVIN, Phone Evergreen 9722
2370 Capri Drive Decatur, Georgia


KIECKHEFER CONTAINER CO.
Pure-Pak Paper Milk Bottles
R. J. Evans M. A. Knowles
Phone ELgin 6-13:14
4700 Pearl St. Jacksonville, Fla.



S. H. MAHONEY EXTRACT CO.
Vanilla Products
D. C. Mulligan, Florida Representative

221 E. Cullerton Rd. Chicago 16, Ill.



KELVINATOR
Division of American Motors Corporation
WM. C. MAYFIELD


Howell House Suite 202


Atlanta, Ga.


NATIONAL PECTIN PRODUCTS CO.
Ice Cream Stabilizers & Emulsifiers
Pectin Stabilizers for Ices, Sherbets & Fruits
J. C. Head
Phone Norfolk, Va., LOwell 3-3939
RFD No. 1, Box 48, Bayside, Va.


NEWTH-MORRIS BOX CORP.
Ice Cream, Popsicle, and
Miscellaneous Folding Boxes

Jacksonville, Fla., Phone: ELgin 3-9779
Miami, Fla., Phone: MUrray 8-8431


OWENS-ILLINOIS GLASS CO.
Douglas Milk Bottles
C W. Parmalee V. H. Adams
1102 Barnett Bldg. Jax. 2, Fla.
Phone ELgin 3-6134-5




PAUL-LEWIS LABORATORIES, INC.
Lactivase-For the Prevention of oxidized flavor
in bottled milk, ice cream, storage cream
FLAVOR-PAK FOODS, INC., Miami, Fla.


PENN SALT CHEMICALS
BK Powder Cleaners Acids
Bottle Washing Alkalies
ROY WILSON
2505 Bethaway Ave., Orlando, Fla.


RIVERSIDE MANUFACTURING
COMPANY
MOULTRIE, GEORGIA
Masterbilt Uniforms
James M. Stewart Dave Freeman


SCHAEFER ICE CREAM CABINETS
Tampa
2209 E. Broadway, Phone 4-3362
Jacksonville
2320 Edwards Ave., EV 7-7011
Orlando
1215 W. Central Ave., 5-5179
MAIN OFFICE:
Miami-1034 N.W. 22nd St., Ph. 82-1671
Distributor
DUDLEY CAWTHON, INC.
Representative
E. G. "Don" Graham


STANDARD PACKAGING CORPN.
Tamper Proof Seals Flexible Vacuum
Packages Liner Materials
Larry Hodge
1121 duPont Bldg. Miami, Fla.



THATCHER GLASS MFG. CO., INC.
Glass Milk Containers
W. T. LOVE, Florida Representative

3221 Pinehurst PI. Charlotte 7, N.C.


UNIVERSAL MILKING MACHINE
DIVISION
Pail-less (Pipe line) Milking Machines
L. H. Hall Factory Representative

5240 N.W. 7th Avenue Miami, Fla.


32 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS


ALLIED TRADES MEMBERS

FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION

Special Card Ad Directory


i


II m


!




















Members of the Chipola Dairy Association
as pictured by the Dairy News Editor at
their last meeting in Chipley. The meeting
followed a splendid barbecue lunch on the
grounds of the State Agricultural Exhibit
Building at Chipley.


J. D. Fuqua (left), president of the Chip-
ola Dairy Association at Chipley, greets
Andy Lay, Secretary of the Florida Dairy
Association, at a recent meeting of the
Chipola group.

The Right to Work!
When a man joins a union, it should
be because he wants to join and not be-
cause he is forced to do so.
This is one fundamental principle that
should never be lost sight of in all con-
siderations of labor legislation, or in dis-
cussions between labor and management,
or by the people of a free nation gen-
erally.
That is why seventeen of our states
have passed "right to work" laws, for-
bidding compulsory unionism in any form
-closed shop, union shop, or otherwise
-and that is why passage of a similar
measure is now being considered by a
number of other state legislatures. The
states recognize that if the rights of the
individual worker are not protected at
the national level, they must be protected
at the state level.
National labor legislation should be
strengthened to forbid compulsory union-
ism in any form. State labor legislation
should be retained, and passed, to the
same effect. This is something that con-
cerns all the people, because whether or
not we have compulsory unionism in this
country will be one of the deciding fac-
tors in whether or not we remain a free
nation.
-By Thurman Sensing


U. of F. Dairy Science Club
Holds Annual Meeting Bar-B-Q
By: George Milicevic, Jr.
It was amid the aroma of freshly bar-
bequed beef and baked beans that more
friendships were made and a more closely
knit Dairy Science Department was insti-
gated at the University of Florida on
December 11th.
Annually the Dairy Science Club spon-
sors some form of assembly for the Dairy
Science Department's staff, workers,
dairy extension men, and their families.
This year the assembly materialized in the
form of a barbeque which was held at the
Dairy Research Unit just outside of
Gainesville.
A planned program held in the dairy
barn added to the nutritious thrill that
must have been experienced in digesting
the 300 pounds of barbeque, slaw, baked
beans, milk, coffee, ice cream, and
"there's no telling what all." Indeed,
Bessie the heifer would have been quite
astonished if she had, had to give her
daily contribution to the tune of "This
Old House" or "Down Yonder," played
by Jack Dodd on the piano. Or maybe
she would have taken a more nonchalant
attitude as expressed in the tune "It Don't
Hurt Anymore," sung by Dog King. Ross
Longmire provided entertainment with
his harmonicas (using a different har-
monica for each tune.)
Fullness, diversity, and success were
added to the program by the participa-
tion of Mrs. C. W. Reaves and her three
daughters in playing light symphonic mu-
sic for the more than one hundred peo-
ple present. It was only through the me-
dia of luck that we were fortunate
enough to have T. W. Sparks as master of
ceremonies as well as Dr. E. W. Cake
as a song leader for the Christmas carols
and popular songs that were sung. The
special guests of the evening were Dean
C. V. Noble, J. M. Scott, and W. M.
Fifield.
The atmosphere of enjoyment and the
number of people present were enough
to make the Club and staff more appre-
hensive toward the "get-together" for
next year.


JANUARY &


RUMELK










THE NEW DEVELOPMENT IN SCIENTIFIC
AND PRACTICAL CALF FEEDING
RUMELK, a new and different milk re-
placement feed that features rumen cul-
tures in a viable state and enzymes has
been found to grow healthier and larger
calves than those fed on whole milk.
RUMELK was developed by George A.
Jeffreys, one of the country's outstanding
enzymologists, and president of the
George A. Jeffreys Research & Develop-
ment Co.
RUMELK is a natural feed that makes calf
feeding easy, safe and economical. This
amazing product is the long sought after
ideal calf replacement feed. After years
of research it has finally been produced
and is now available to herdsmen and
dairymen. No longer do calves have to
die from nutritional scours or food de-
ficiencies. No longer need the farmer
waste hundreds of pounds of milk to
raise a calf. RUMELK guarantees that
a calf can be raised on 20-80 pounds of
milk, depending on size and breed. Ex-
haustive field tests have proven that
calves raised on RUMELK will do bet-
ter than those fed whole milk.
The principle of RUMELK is this: The
micro-organisms and enzymes of the ma-
ture cow is transferred through a special
patented culture contained in RUMELK.
This seeds the stomach and intestines
with beneficial organisms that promote
a healthy tone. The rumen of the calf
developed earlier, making it possible for
hay and grains to be utilized more effici-
ently.
RUMELK contains all the proteins of milk.
It is high in vitamin content. It con-
tains vitamin B12, terramycin and un-
identified growth factors. In addition
RUMELK contains a special bulking
enzyme that reduces nutritional scours
to an absolute minimum. This amazing
new product will do a great service to
the dairy industry, for it has definitely
been proven to save milk for market and
grow healthier and larger calves and
replacement stock.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL FEED DEAL-
ER OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DE-
TAILS AND INTERESTING LEAFLET

Manufactured by:

W. A. DAVIS MILLING CO.
P. O. Box 1552, High Point, N. C.
or
P. O. Box 787, DeLand, Fla.



FEBRUARY, 1955 33










, we, .


The 1955 CONVENTION HOTEL OF THE FLORIDA DAIRY ASSOCIATION, the
famed "Fort Harrison" at Clearwater, Florida, is seen in the above background near the
beautiful waterfront and a few minutes from Clearwater Beach over the beautiful causeway,
seen in the foreground. The Convention dates are June 22- 23-24.


DAIRYMAN WRITES PRAISES
OF MILK COMMISSION
The following letter was recently re-
ceived by the Florida Dairy Association
from a dairy farm member in answer to
an inquiry concerning his views about the
Florida Milk Commission:
"Dear Sir:
"I am sending your reply card but I
would like to make my expressions a little
stronger. Keep the Milk Commission by
all means. I don't think the average
housewife realizes what kind of milk she
might get if we did not have the Milk
Commission.
"I made a trip up through Illinois,
Wisconsin and several other states and I
stopped and visited with dairymen and
they had no Commission and were the
worst dissatisfied bunch of people I ever
saw-the big companies were taking their
milk for what they were a mind to pay.
The dairy farmers could not get labor be-
cause they were not getting enough for
their milk to pay a man a living wage.
"I could write a history about what I
think of the Milk Commission and I
don't think I am selfish but I do like to
think every dairy in Florida is putting
out good milk and our milk is not being
shipped front dairies out of the North."
Yours very truly,
Edgar Melvin
Melvin Dairy, Winter Haven


IDEAS That
Make Democracy Work
It ought to be the happiness and glory
of a representative to live in the strictest
union, the closest correspondence, and the
most unreserved communication with his
constituents. Their wishes ought to have
great weight with him; their opinion
high respect; their business unremitted
attention. It is his duty to sacrifice his
repose, his pleasures, his satisfaction, to
theirs; and above all, ever, and in all
cases, to prefer their interests to his own.
-EDMUND BURKE:
Speech to the Electors of Bristol


Legislative Information
Office In Tallahassee
Directors of the Florida Dairy Asso-
ciation have announced plans to main-
tain a legislation information office in
Tallahassee during the 1955 session of
the State Legislature. Secretary E. T.
(Andy) Lay will be in charge and plans
to be in Tallahassee each legislative day
during the 60-day session.
Any proposed legislation (affecting the
dairy industry) that may be introduced
in the legislature will be promptly re-
ported to the dairymen of the state.
The Association's Legislative Committee,
headed by T. G. Lee of Orlando and
John Sargeant of Lakeland as co-chair-
men, will head up any legislative action
which may be taken on behalf of the
Association.

LADIES' AUXILIARY COMMITTEE:
Mrs. Leon Sellers, Sellers Guernsey
Dairy, St. Petersburg, Chairman.
VETERINARIAN MEMBERS
COMMITTEE:
Dr. Karl Owens, D. V. M., Gaines-
ville, Chairman.



Classified Advertising
RATE FOR ALL CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING IS 10c PER WORD


FOR SALE

RANCH EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES-CATTLE
WATERING TANKS. Ten-foot steel rein-
forced Concrete, 2 feet wide. $60.00, delivered,
$50.00 your truck. Four foot wide tanks, $80.00
and $70.00. Orlando Concrete Specialties. Box
6122, Station 6, Orlando, Florida. Phone 3-4111.
LEAFY, PROTEIN RICH ALFALFA HAY.
Fescue, Pangola and Pensacola grass hay.
SQUARE G RANCH, phone 989, Leesburg,
Florida.
NEW DEMONSTRATOR INTERNATIONAL
Milk Truck. Complete with automatic trans-
mission and 62 case body. List $3324.00, sacri-
fice $2498.00. QUINN R. BARTON CO., P. O.
Box 2730, Jacksonville, Fla. Phone EL 4-8411.


1955 Committees
Florida Dairy Association
(Continued from Page 5)

FINANCE COMMITTEE:
W. J. Barritt, Jr., Borden's Dairy,
Tampa, and John Adkinson, Adkinson
& Mayne Dairy, Pensacola, Co-Chair-
men.
FLA. FARM BUREAU COMMITTEE:
T. G. Lee, Lee's Dairy, Orlando, and
J. D. Fuqua, Fuqua's Dairy, Altha,
Co-Chairmen.
LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE:
T. G. Lee, Lee's Dairy, Orlando, and
John Sargeant, Sargeant's Dairy Farms,
Lakeland, Co-Chairmen.
MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE:
John Tripson, Tripson's Dairy, Vero
Beach, and L. B. (Red) Hull, Hull's
Dairy, Gainesville, Co-Chairmen.
MILK & ICE CREAM PLANT COM-
MITTEE:
Gordon Nielsen, Alfar Creamery Co.
West Palm Beach, Chairman.
DAIRY PROCESSING-SHORT
COURSE COMMITTEE:
Charles Williams, Borden Southern
Co., Jacksonville, Chairman.
MILK PRODUCTION COMMITTEE:
M. A. Schack, Schack's Dairy, Green-
wood, Chairman.
PAST PRESIDENTS' ADVISORY
COMMITTEE:
Herman Boyd, Hall & Boyd Dairy,
Miami, Chairman.
PASTURE DEVELOPMENT COM-
MITTEE:
Herman Boyd, Hall & Boyd Dairy,
Miami, Chairman.
PLANT & PRODUCER COST &
ACCOUNTING COMMITTEE:
Bill Hale, T. G. Lee Dairy, Orlando,
Chairman.
PUBLIC HEALTH COMMITTEE:
Brady Johnston, Dinsmore Dairy Co.,
Jacksonville, and J. H. Adams, J. H.
Adams Dairy, Jacksonville, Co-Chair-
men.
PUBLIC RELATIONS & DAIRY
MONTH COMMITTEE:
Bill Graham, Graham's Dairy, Hialeah,
and Dolph Allison, Borden's Dairy,
Orlando, Co-Chairman.
STATE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
DAIRY SUB-COMMITTEE:
J. N. McArthur, McArthur Jersey
Farms Dairy, Miami, Chairman.
STATE DEFENSE COUNCIL
COMMITTEE:
Cotton Paul, Foremost Dairies, Inc.,
Jacksonville, Chairman.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
COMMITTEE:
Wilmer Bassett, Bassett's Dairy, Mon-
ticello, Chairman.


34 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS






Dairy Science Department
Announces Plans
(Continued from Page 30)
Jacksonville. Description: Special guest
speakers and experienced dairy plant op-
erators are invited to discuss current prob-
lems related to dairy products processing
and distribution at this meeting. Emphasis
is placed on the latest developments im-
portant to the dairy industry along the
lines of research, plant production, equip-
ment and associated commercial develop-
ments. The Annual Ice Cream Clinic is
held in conjunction with this meeting, in
which samples of vanilla ice cream from
throughout the State are submitted for
critical analysis by expert judges. Who
for: For dairy plant superintendents and
assistants, managers, owners, dairy plant
employees, producer-distributors, equip-
ment and supply dealers.
Dairy Field Day Date: November
2-3. In Charge: S. P. Marshall, Associate
Dairy Husbandman; C. W. Reaves, Ex-
tension Dairyman; L. B. Hull, Hull
Dairy, Gainesville; John Sargeant, Sar-
geant's Dairy, Lakeland. Description:
This annual program is designed to bring
results of current research and latest de-
velopments in dairying to people inter-
ested in dairy production, dairy process-
ing and dairy extension. A part of the
program will be a tour of the dairy re-
search unit, to observe cows, pastures,
feed crops and dairy farming facilities.
National Herd Honor Roll Diplomas,
Dairy Production Efficiency Awards and
State Pasture Contest Awards will be pre-
sented at the annual banquet. Who for:
Milk producer-distributors, Milk produc-
ers, dairy processors, herdsmen, county
agents, vocational agriculture teachers,
veterinarians, DHIA workers and equip-
ment and supply dealers.
Work with Dairy Industry
The entire group of staff members
plan their work in such a way as to
enable them to work with, for and in the
complete interest of the dairy people of
the State and Nation, collectively and in-
dividually. Each member of the staff is
encouraged to take part in programs and
meetings of community, state and na-
tional level. To that end several staff
members hold important committee as-
signments and offices in state, national
and dairy organizations.
Every effort is made to assist individual
dairymen with problems that arise from
time to time, by letter, phone or by per-
sonal visit.
Such a broad program provides an
avenue of activity for every Department
employee, academic and non-academic,
and each problem presented is attacked
with vigor until a solution is found, if
possible.


Dairymen May Still Enter 1954-55

State Dairy Pasture and Forage Contest
By: C. W. REAVES, Extension Dairyman
and Director of Pasture Contest
THE OBJECT of the State Dairy Pasture Contest is to encourage and assist
farmers in developing the best pasture and forage crops possible and to utilize them
for maximum production of milk at lower cost.
THE GOAL for each farmer should be to produce 35 to 50 percent of the total
feed nutrients for his dairy herd. (The average is only about 24 percent home pro-
duced feed for all dairymen and 30 to 32 percent for all DHIA members, the re-
mainder being purchased.)

1953 Winners Show Lowest Production Costs
RESULTS SHOWN by dairymen who received Pasture Certificates in the
1953-54 Contest whose herds were on DHIA test showed higher milk production and
lower cost:


Yearly milk
per cow
DHIA herds winning pasture certificates................................................ 8013 Ibs.
All DHIA herds in state ................................... ...................... ...... 6886 Ibs.
+ 1127


Feed Cost
Per 100 Ibs. Per Gallon
Milk Milk
$2.67 23/2
3.05 26%/2
-$0.38 3 g


1954-55 CONTEST. The contest includes pastures grazed, pastures field
chopped and hauled to cows, and forage crops grown and stored as silage or hay.
The County Agent is chairman of the County Dairy Pasture Committee along
with two dairymen appointed by the Florida Dairy Association. The General Outline
of the Contest and the Report to be filled out by the dairymen were mailed every
dairyman in the state but dairymen desiring a copy may get them from their County
Agent. Reports must be submitted to the County Agent by April 15, 1955.

Dairymen May Still Enter Contest
Interested Dairy Farmers may fill out enrollment cards with their County Agent
up to April 1, 1955.

Contest In Two Divisions
County and State winners will be selected in two divisions:
1. On the basis of the top pasture and forage program.
2. On the basis of the most progress over the previous year in providing pas-
ture and forage to meet the needs of the herd, on a per cow basis.

Awards to be Made
An Annual Certificate of Recognition will be issued to each herd owner submit-
ting a report and making a creditable record of pasture production, scoring at least
75 percent on the score card.
Suitable Trophies will be provided for State winners in each division. Awards
for the 1954-55 contest will be made at the Annual Dairy Field Day in 1955 at the
University of Florida.
County Dairy Pasture Committees will award prizes for the "Top County Win-
ners" in counties having suitable competition.

4-H and FFA Pasture Essay Contests
There is a "Better Dairy Pasture Essay Contest" for 4-H and FFA members with
prizes for the best three in each division in the State on "The Production and Use of
Better Dairy Pastures". The County Dairy Pasture Committee or judges selected by
them will choose the best 4-H and best FFA essay for the County and submit to the
State Judging Committee for selection of State Winners, who will receive appropriate
1st, 2nd and 3rd prize awards.
Essays must be certified by club leader and submitted to the County Farm Agent
not later than May 1st, 1955.

PASTURE CONTEST-SCORE CARD-
Points
A. Amount and Quality of Pasture and Forage (according to number livestock)....... ........... 60
B. Management
1. Efficient Pasture Production M ethods...................... .............................. ............ 15
2. Efficient Utilization of Pastures.. ............ ... ......... ...... 10
3. Efficient Handling of Cows on Pasture. ...... ... .. .. .............. 5
4 Efficiency of Feed ing ... ................... ......... ... .. ............... .. .. ...... .. ...... .. ... ........ 10
TO TA L ................... .......... ................ ..100


JANUARY & FEBRUARY, 1955 35








NEWS AND VIEWS


Milk Commission Is Strongly Supported By The Florida

Dairy Association Before Governors' Citizens' Committee

National Dairy Leader said Florida is to be congratulated on the outstanding
record of the Florida Dairy Industry in its sound and rapid development.

Five spokesmen of the Florida Dairy Association told members of the Citi-
ens' Advisory Committee on "Milk Price Controls" in Florida at their Miami public
hearing, February 4th, that great deal of the credit for the development in Flor-
ida during the past 21 years of an adequate supply of high quality Grade "A"
milk, is due to the stabilizing effects of the supervision of the industry and of
minimum milk prices by the Florida Milk Commission.
They expressed the further conviction that the continuation of the Milk Com-
mission and its functions are necessary to insure the continuation of the State's
milk production on the present sound basis.
The five Dairy Association spokesmen were: E. T. Lay, Executive Director;
Bill Graham, Miami producer; J. N. McArthur, Miami Producer-distributor; Cotton
Paul, for Distributors, and Richard Werner, Executive Director of the U. S. Milk
Industry Foundation of Washington, D. C.
The Dairy Association spokesmen expressed the conviction that Florida's
Milk Commission Law is one of the best of many such State laws and that it was
far superior, more desirable and more effective than the Federal plan for super-
vision and control of the dairy industry, which is in operation in many areas of
the country and would undoubtedly be placed into effect in Florida if the State
supervision were not in effect.
F. D. A. spokesmen expressed their praise of the Milk Commission for the
unselfish public and uncompensated service which they render and their con-
fidence in the ability and integrity of the Administrator who has served con-
tinuously and competently since the Governor Holland administration.
Complete information briefs were filed with the Committee and cooperation
was offered for the furnishing or attempting to secure any other information
which might be desired.






Florida's Low Milk Consumption Is

A Challenge To Dairy Industry

The potential demand for fluid milk in Florida is more than double the present
per capital consumption which is only half the national average. This means that the
Florida dairy industry would have to double present milk production in the State to
supply a demand equal to the national average.
This can only mean that the dairy industry needs a far better program of selling
milk consumers and potential consumers on the unusual nutritional value of milk as
a food and the desirability of milk as a beverage.
The industry's educational program on milk and milk products through its Dairy
Council programs in the schools and community groups, should be greatly enlarged.
These programs should be supplemented by a new and aggressive industry-wide spon-
sored milk advertising program.
Florida's potential in increased milk consumption before reaching the national
average can be any amount up to 100%/ of the State's present consumption.
Such possibilities certainly present a tremendous challenge and opportunity to the
Florida dairy industry.


Time Magazine Statements
On Milk Prices Questioned
The Time magazine issue of December
13, 1954 carried an unsigned attack on
"Milk Price Controls" with which the
Dairy Industry justly takes serious issue.
The first questionable charge made was
that "the big reason U. S. milk consump-
tion is no higher is that milk markets
all over the nation have been saddled
with monopolistic controls that create
artificially high prices, thus cut consump-
tion."
The dairy industry denies that milk
price regulation creates a "monopoly".
There are many ways of competing for
business besides on price.
Dairies also deny that milk prices are
"artificially high" which would seem to
mean "without sound reason". The super-
vised prices of milk are based on costs
of production and not on something "arti-
ficial"-at least that is the case in Florida.
The dairy industry denies also that
the "price of milk" is high, if considered
comparatively. To say that milk is "high
priced" while ignoring the fact that milk
prices today show a much less increase
than other major foods, is unfair, to say
the least.
The TIME article states that "State
Milk Controls are a Patchwork of Poli-
tics and protection for local producers".
As to this claim, we would say, so far
as Florida is concerned, the politics
patchwork, if any, is that of politicians
trying to raise false issues on which to
get votes. It should be noted that such
tactics apparently have failed to get votes.
It is freely admitted that the Florida
Milk Commission is a protection to local
producers, as charged. Does the TIME
magazine not realize that in aiding the
milk producer, this law is likewise help-
ing milk consumers by insuring their sup-
ply of wholesome milk? We suggest that
TIME magazine secure a few facts con-
cerning local conditions in various milk
price supervision areas before they draw
their conclusions.
If TIME magazine is serious in its
monopoly hunting," we'd suggest they
consider the monopoly which they them-
selves enjoy in their privilege of printing
and broadcasting to their tens of thou-
sands of readers such misleading state-
ments as these "referred to" about the
dairy industry, creating their erroneous
impressions which can never be corrected.


"Mama, can Jimmie stay for lunch?"


36 FLORIDA DAIRY NEWS







Prepare For


1956


Base -


Now


We, as many other breeders, get orders particularly in the fall and winter for a "bull of serviceable age," or
like this-"I could use 6 bulls ready for service."


Dairymen often get panicky to get their cows settled during these months so that they will calve at the right
time when milk is most needed. Few breeders can fill such orders for top bulls one to two years old, so we sug-
gest that the time to buy a herd sire is a year or so before you need him.


Listed below are our four oldest bulls that are for sale and that should be purchased by progressive dairy-
men now. Also, pictured are two expectant mothers that have classified EXCELLENT and have made very credit-
able production records. Both of these may have bulls, too.


1. Dinsmore Inspector
Born: March 18, 1954
Sire: Foremost Royal Milton
Dam: Dinsmore Faymost Irene
13995-668-6 Yr.-3656


2. Dinsmore Lawyer
Born: August 1, 1954
Sire: Quail Roost Master Mac
Dam: Dinsmore Mayroyal Laura
On test in 150 days: 5507-233-5 Yrs.


DINSMORE MAYROYAL JEDETTA
15070-619-Jr. 4-365C
Grand Champion & Best Udder
at 1952 Fla. State Fair


3. Dinsmore Dean
Born: August 1, 1954
Sire: Foremost Royal Milton
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Debbie
On test in 150 days: 5245-251-Jr. 4


4. (Bull calf not yet named)
Born: October 20, 1954
Sire: Foremost Royal Milton
Dam: Dinsmore Royal Justine
13837-624-5 Yr.-3655


MAPLETON'S MAXIM CONNIE
14063-654-5 Yr.-365C
A line bred Maxim
Dam of 1 AR Daughter-VERY GOOD


Dinsmore Guernseys
FEDERAL ACCREDITED 57790 J. B. LANOUX, Herdsman NEGATIVE TO BANG'S


Dinsmore Farms
V. C. JOHNSON


10 miles north of Jacksonville
Near U. S. 1


EARL A. JOHNSON CHARLES F. JOHNSON


Dinsmore, Florida
BRADY S. JOHNSTON






















)ECURITY
DAIRY

0I
FEEDS
SW!~c


- -


every minute of your cows' lives
requires Specific Feeds

From the first week of calf hood ... through the budding to calf, there is a specific Security Daily Feed to help you
obtain better results. Whatever the stage in the life
stage as heifers until the day they are bred . as they
cycle and for maximum utilization of pasture and rough-
blossom into full-grown, long lived milk producers . .
age, Security Feeds are built to help you produce more
and through the dry and freshening periods-from calf milk from fewer cows.


/r




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